The New York Times

How to Give Your Therapist Feedback

WE OFTEN THINK OF PSYCHOTHERAPISTS AS “ALL-KNOWING,” WHICH CAN MAKE PATIENTS FEEL THAT COMPLAINING ABOUT THE THERAPY OR THE THERAPIST IS NOT ALLOWED.

As with any relationship, patient and therapist unions aren’t immune to misunderstandings. When conflict appears, addressing it early on can help patients determine if the therapist and the therapy are right for them.

We often think of psychotherapists as “all-knowing,” which can make patients feel that complaining about the therapy or the therapist is not allowed.

But numerous studies have found that providing feedback pays off. According to psychology researchers, patient feedback can bolster the “therapeutic alliance.”

Similar to relationship chemistry, a sturdy, it’s essential to meeting treatment goals. Regardless of the type of therapy one receives, it’s this connection — the bedrock from which hope springs — that matters most of all.

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