The Atlantic

Boris Johnson Is Not Britain’s Donald Trump. Jeremy Corbyn Is.

Corbyn and Trump are both populists and in a battle with ‘the swamp.’ Brexit aside, Johnson is not.
Source: Kirsty Wigglesworth / AP

Donald Trump has claimed Boris Johnson as his bumbling, blond-haired mini-me from across the water. The U.K. Labour Party is doing all it can to push the same message ahead of next month’s general election, claiming there is a Trump-Johnson alliance afoot. Even Hillary Clinton has criticized the British prime minister for his refusal to publish a report into Russia’s involvement in the Brexit referendum.

And yet, by any serious audit of the two men and what they represent, it is not Boris Johnson who is Britain’s Trump. It’s Jeremy Corbyn.

Take away Brexit, and Johnson is a run-of-the-mill conservative whose policy agenda, instincts, and world view, as opposed to his personality, verge on the dull; a member and defender of the establishment whose wish is to climb atop it, not rip it down. Corbyn is the opposite: a populist who believes in the inherent corruption of the established order, at home and abroad; a man who sees conspiracy and injustice everywhere. Only one of these descriptions comes close to the U.S. president.

The parallels are not immediately obvious. They are hidden beneath their contrasting personalities and values. Corbyn, the Labour Party leader, who is seeking to replace Johnson as prime minister in the December 12 election, is a jam-making vegetarian socialist and self-proclaimed anti-imperialist defender

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