Găsiți următorul dvs. carte audio preferat

Deveniți un membru astăzi și ascultați gratuit pentru 30 zile
State of Wonder: A Novel

State of Wonder: A Novel

Scris de Ann Patchett

Povestit de Hope Davis


State of Wonder: A Novel

Scris de Ann Patchett

Povestit de Hope Davis

evaluări:
4/5 (301 evaluări)
Lungime:
12 hours
Lansat:
Jun 7, 2011
ISBN:
9780062072498
Format:
Carte audio

De asemenea, disponibil ca...

De asemenea, disponibil ca carteCarte

De asemenea, disponibil ca...

De asemenea, disponibil ca carteCarte

Descriere

"Expect miracleswhen you read Ann Patchett's fiction."-New YorkTimes Book Review

Award-winning, New York Times bestsellingauthor Ann Patchett returns with a provocative andassured novel of morality and miracles, science and sacrifice set in the Amazonrainforest. Infusing the narrative with the same ingenuity and emotionalurgency that pervaded her acclaimed previous novels Bel Canto, Taft, Run, The Magician's Assistant, and ThePatron Saint of Liars, Patchett delivers anenthrallingly innovative tale of aspiration, exploration, and attachment in State of Wonder-a gripping adventurestory and a profound look at the difficult choices we make in the name ofdiscovery and love.

Lansat:
Jun 7, 2011
ISBN:
9780062072498
Format:
Carte audio

De asemenea, disponibil ca...

De asemenea, disponibil ca carteCarte


Despre autor

ANN PATCHETT is the author of seven novels, The Patron Saint of Liars, Taft, The Magician’s Assistant, Bel Canto, Run, State of Wonder, and Commonwealth. She was the editor of Best American Short Stories, 2006, and has written three books of nonfiction, Truth & Beauty, about her friendship with the writer, Lucy Grealy, What now? an expansion of her graduation address at Sarah Lawrence College, and, most recently, This is the Story of a Happy Marriage, a collection of essays.


Legat de State of Wonder

Articole conexe

Recenzii

Ce părere au oamenii despre State of Wonder

4.1
301 evaluări / 259 Recenzii
Ce părere aveți?
Evaluare: 0 din 5 stele

Recenziile cititorilor

  • (5/5)
    Many of the books I have read lately have been character driven. This book is both character (unforgettable characters) and plot driven. The plot unfolds slowly, and along with it we are faced with really thought provoking moral and ethical questions. The story s also very much an adventure/action tale. As the story progressed I found myself changing my views on many of the interesting issues the book raised. The author skillfully brings up the "issues", we are not hit over the head with them, which allows for the readers opinions to shift and grow. I found the ending rushed, and since I did not want the book to be over, this was a bit annoying. I would LOVE to see this made into a movie, but only by a skillful director who would not focus only on the "adventure" aspects of the novel.
  • (5/5)
    State of Wonder by Ann Patchett

    'State of Wonder' is the story of a woman, Marina Singh, on a journey to find a coworker, who was reported dead from malaria and his already body buried in the jungle according to his Christian beliefs. Marina, (age 42), is a doctor working as a pharmacologist in a lab for a pharmaceutical company named Vogel, in icy Minnesota. Her coworker, Anders had been sent months ago into the Brazilian jungle to check on a research project concerning the development of a fertility drug. His wife, Karen, is not satisfied that her husband is dead and already buried. She wants to know more in order to provide closure for her children. Karen and Marina's boss, Mr. Fox, (also Marina's secret lover), ask that she travel to Brazil to check both on the death of Karen's husband and on the research grant of Dr. Swenson, (age 72,) Marina, formerly a student of Swenson's, agrees but reluctantly, as she and Dr. Swenson have not spoken since a surgical accident. After the accident that occurred while Marina was in residency under Swenson, Marina abandoned her major in obstrectics.

    Once in the jungle, Marina finds that things are never as they appear. Swenson is working not only on a fertility drug that can reactivate a woman's menstruation and eggs after menopause, allowing them to have children late in life, but also on a drug made from the same compounds that can inoculate against malaria. She is using funding from Vogel to finance her drug, unbeknown to Vogel executives. Further, Marina struggles with the ethical and moral questions that arise from doing research on native cultures. Swenson has also made herself a test subject and is now pregnant in her advanced age. The other doctors at the facility have agreed to work on the project and Marina must choose between her employer/lover Mr. fox, and a drug that can save millions through an inoculation that prevents malaria.

    During her longer than planned stay, Marina meets a native young boy, (Easter), who is completely deaf, yet extremely resourceful. She has come to love Easter like a mother. Easter had been stolen from his own tribe several years ago, a tribe who are or had once been cannibals, by Dr. Swenson, and her presumed deceased coworker Anders. Marina begins to understand that morality and ethical consideration are often difficult and that no decision is ever without consequence. Her time with the Lakashi women teaches her that sometimes medical science should not try to improve on nature, and that simply because something can be done, doesn't mean it should be. Swenson is at about 27 weeks into her pregnancy when she tells Marina the baby has died. Marina does a crude surgical C section to remove Swenson's own dead child all the time knowing that nature holds a delicate balance and to damage that balance can be dangerous. By the end of the novel, Marina has learned that sometimes, to act in the best interest of nature, one should merely allow nature to function without intervention. 'State of Wonder' shows readers the delicate balance between ecosystems, ethics, morality, and self preservation and asks readers to evaluate their own beliefs.

    I would love a sequel and I feel like I have been to the jungle by reading this book.
  • (3/5)


    I very much enjoyed Bel Canto, and State of Wonder was good, too, but not great. Easter was the most lovable character. I wish the story had been about him. The ending was just awful, in my opinion, however the writing was descriptive, the plot kept my attention, and the pace was fast. It was just a bit too unbelievable for me to give any more than 3 stars.
  • (3/5)
    Sometimes I wonder what is the purpose of a book when I get done with it. I kind of feel that way with this book. Yet it drew me in and showed what it can be like for researchers out in the jungle for years. It seems like you can lose yourself out there and lose touch with reality. I felt for Marina who was sent into the jungle to find out what happened to Anders. And she almost forgets why she is even there and starts to adapt to the Lakashi tribal ways. Dr. Swenson is there to develop a new drug and over the years it's almost like she has either lost focus or has slowed down what she is doing because she has "become" part of the Amazon. This is a good book and well written. I didn't truly get emotional until the very last 2 paragraphs.
  • (5/5)
    This is my 4th novel by Ann Patchett. When I read Bell Canto, I thought it was one of the better written novels of that year. So I started to go backwards reading The Magician’s Assistant and Run and realized that there is something about her construction of characters that resonates. The same is true here. In State of Wonder we meet Marina, a 42 year old doctor who is working for a pharmaceutical company because her medical career took a bad turn. She has spent many years working side by side with a co-worker whose death is announced in the first page. Seeking answers only found in the Brazilian Amazon, Marina agrees to be persuaded by her boss and love, Mr. Fox, to visit the scene of the death and where the company's money has been spent researching a fertility drug based on a lost tribe whose women give birth in their 60's and even 70's. Dr. Swenson is the other character of note - a Kurtz-like seemingly rouge scientist in this female tribute to Heart of Darkness. Swenson is interestingly tied to Marina's career change and she is convinced that the end justifies the means. Her "for the good of science" attitude has some flaws and Marina is the perfect counterpart to question her. I have to say it all works. Marina is someone you want to read about, and the description of the Amazon - its insects, its snakes, its mushrooms and even its tree bark is very involving. Mixed with this is also the thread that is hallmark Patchett - the relationships of people in strange situations. Marina is intelligent and skeptical enough to question appropriately, yet she becomes a favorite of the lost tribe. She is also wrestling with her own confused feelings about Mr. Fox, Dr. Swenson and her former co-worker Anders Eckman. The combination of action and character relationships build to what I felt was a satisfying solution. I continue to look forward to and recommend Ann Patchett’s works.
  • (3/5)
    Beautifully written with a crazy, non-sensical story. Didn't like it.
  • (4/5)
    Loved this. Ann Patchett has a kind of genius for evoking the foreign in a way that seems at once realistic and yet incredible. I don't want to say too much about it because it's a story that unfolds organically, and knowing too much about its plot would destroy the joy of discovery. But I'll tell you this: I had literal chills reading the last page because it was so perfect. Not necessarily happy-ending perfect, but Yes, this is how it should be perfect.
  • (4/5)
    A beautifully written but ultimately unsatisfactory novel, this is in some ways a reworking of Heart of Darkness.A man travels to the Amazon to check up on medical research that’s been going on for years. The sponsoring company is getting impatient for some kind, any kind, of a report on the progress of the project.He’s reported dead. The company sends a pharmacologist down to see what’s happened, and what on earth is going on with the research.State of Wonder is peopled with unlikeable characters. Dr Swenson, the head of the project, is a monomaniac determined to get her way through sheer strength of will. Pharmacologist Marina, the main character...spends most of her life doing the bidding of others, without the will to say no. Other more minor characters, some of whom materialize in the pages like smoke, are mostly selfish or so minor that they don’t really matter. The single exception is Easter, a boy who lives in the research compound. The indigenous people are truly anonymous: they don’t even have names. I’m sure that the cavalier attitude is meant to reflect that of the researchers, but it’s hard to take.I’m not sure what Pratchett was trying to do here. Certainly the reader becomes completely immersed in the story, feeling the humidity and claustrophobia of the jungle. But the ending, I thought, was a bit facile. State of Wonder is worth reading, but it won’t make you happy.
  • (2/5)
    A book full of stereotypes and cultural inaccuracies. The author may have been going for a Heart of Darkness, post-colonial vibe, she succeeded, but it felt completely out of sync with the modern day setting. The characters were one-dimensional, and I was really irked that the Lakashi (a fictional Amazonian tribe) were completely nameless throughout the entire book.
  • (2/5)
    I have to give it two stars because I like the prose. The beginning pulled me in. I lost interest in the middle party because the main character became increasingly annoying and partly because the story began to drag in a way where I sometimes forgot the purpose of the main character's trip. The ending seemed rushed. At one point one of the characters says of the main character, "I keep hoping you are more than you show yourself to be..." and then goes on to talk about how she's continually disappointed. I felt the same while reading the book.
  • (3/5)
    A woman's journey out of her comfort zone in the search of truth and love. The storyline is very contained. It gives little tidbits about other things, such as relationship with her father, pharmacological research, anthropology, and side characters, but none of them pan out to anything and instead just focus on the main protagonist uncomfortability with the setting. The story itself is well-written and interesting, but it could have easily been a short story then. There was very little technical information in a book that deals with science, most side characters are unmemorable, and there is a unique culture that never gets explored. The ending got very exciting but got resolved way to easily. It is still a good book that I enjoyed, but it's not great.
  • (3/5)
    As inventive as improbable a story, as intriguing as annoying. An adventure novel that in its second chapter seems to become a psychological one but then forgets about the story of Marina and her father altogether. Well weitten apart from occasional leaps of thought that leave you wondering what happened. The end leaves too many threads lying loosely around. So 3.5 stars.
  • (4/5)
    Dr Marina Singh heads off to the Amazon jungle to discover what has happened to her colleague and friend Anders. He had been sent by their employer, a drug company who had formerly dispatched a researcher to investigate a tribe whose women continued having children into their old age. There are many twists and turns to the plot in this enjoyable and thought-provoking story.
  • (5/5)
    What a captivating story. Marinas work colleague is in the Brazilian Amazonas to see the right since the company never again hears something of the project that they finance. When the death message of her colleague came Marina went to Manaus. When she finally arrives at the camp, she quickly realizes that it is not just about researching fertility into old age, but also about permanent protection against malaria.What fascinates me is that the leader of the camp is so anxious not to disclose this native tribe to the public, so that they can continue to live according to their old traditions. This is and was one of the biggest problems of the Amazon inhabitants.
  • (3/5)
    I have mixed feelings about this one. I think the author tried to address too many themes. Because of that, the characters weren't well developed. For example, scientists are dealing with big moral issues yet no one struggles with aligning their behaviour and beliefs. The plot pushed me to suspend disbelief beyond what I could accept. I might have swallowed the fact that a profit-oriented drug company would let a researcher work for years with zero accountability. Maybe even accepted that said company would send two scientists to the jungle to assess the situation. But why on earth would women want to be pregnant in their 70s? I would have run as far as possible from those damn trees! And peeling off the bark to chew or brew tea is one thing, but to have the women stand and bite/caress the trees is a bit much.So why did I finish it? I liked Marina (the main character); I really wanted to know what happened to her. And the quality of the writing is good.
  • (5/5)
    Extraordinary, unforgettable
  • (4/5)
    "State of Wonder" by Ann Patchett was chosen as a book club selection for a local reading group in which I participate. I had difficulty getting involved in the book and at first did not like the characters very much, particularly Mr. Fox. I started the book in print form but finished it in audio. Listening to it made it more interesting as the reader did a good job portraying the characters. I think others might enjoy the book and there are many Ann Patchett followers who will like having another story which includes medical and science experiences in the jungle and touches on the issues of large drug companies and their experimentation. This was not a favorite for me but it will provide a topic for a rich conversation and perhaps debate. I would give it a 3.5 plus so rated it 4.
  • (3/5)
    Okay, so why do I keep picking up these books that have such great undertones related to undertaking research? It may be because I am now embarking on my dissertation research for my doctoral thesis that such undertones are coming forth. However, I prefer to think the great, good book gods have put these gems in my hands for a purpose. They are telling me to listen. If I were to teach research ethics, this book would be on the reading list accompanied by class discussions. In academia, Human Subjects through our Institutional Review Boards requires we do no harm in the research we undertake. The difficulty comes in determining what 'do no harm' means. In State of Wonder, readers become intwined with U.S. researchers in their arrogance determining what is right and wrong with questionable consequences. These consequences stick with you well past the last pages providing much food for thought.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this book! The characters were well-developed and likeable and believeable. The descriptions of the rainforest area were detailed enough to make me feel claustrophobic. In enjoyed the story, even the parts that are not realistic. I'm not sure how I feel about the ending but it makes sense for the characters. I would definitely recommend it.
  • (4/5)
    Summary: Scientists discover a drug in the Amazon, which appears to extend female fertility into old age. The research is lead by the mysterious and eccentric Dr. Swenson. When an employee of the drug company dies on a trip to the jungle research center in Brazil, the pharmacologist Marina is sent down there to to find out what happened - and to find out how Dr. Swensons research is going.It was a slow start, but once Dr. Swenson appears and we are in the jungle the book is hard to put down (or rather stop listening too). All in all an exiting and brainy adventure with some surprising twists and turns that kept me fascinated - actually I was reluctant to leave Marina and wanted to know more about her fate - Both Marina and Dr. Swenson was complexed, nuanced and well-drawned characters.Good narration by Hope Davis.
  • (5/5)
    When the jacket of the book said "In a narrative replete with poison arrows, devouring snakes scientific miracles, and spiritual transformations, State of Wonder presents a world of stunning surprise and danger, rich in emotional resonance and moral complexity" I was almost sorry I'd bought the book but I had bought it and it was by Ann Patchett and it got high praise on LT, so I read it. I'm ever so glad I did.Marina Singh is an M.D. who dropped out of obstetrics training and a Ph.D. working for a pharmaceutical company. The company is funding research in the Amazon jungle which is headed by a Dr. Annick Swenson who had been Marina's professor when she was in medical school. Dr. Swenson has been working for years, reporting back minimally and, so far, has nothing concrete to show for her work. Marina's lab mate and friend travels to Manaus to try to find out how the project is going and dies while there. Marina is asked by her boss to go down and see what she can learn and her lab mate's widow asks her to go and find out what happened to her husband and why no body was sent home. A superb adventure tale follows.
  • (4/5)
    There are many places I would like to travel and to experience. I would likely not last long in the middle of the rain forest on the border of the Amazon. So, instead, I content myself to visiting such places in books.

    Upon receiving word that her research partner has died of fever in a rain forest in Brazil, Marina sets off to find out more about his death at the request of her partner's wife, as well as to inquire about Dr. Swenson's drawn out work on a mysterious fertility drug at the behest of her employer and lover, Mr. Fox. Marina has mixed feelings about going, but go she does. She meets up with the eccentric Bovenders whose job it is to keep people away from Dr. Swenson, and Milton, the very resourceful chauffeur.

    Dr. Annick Swenson, 73 years old, has spent decades studying the Lakashi people and conducting her research alongside a team of doctors, each with their own purpose. She is not an easy person to get close to, much less like. She is gruff in manner and spends more time pontificating than she does listening. As you can guess, I am not her biggest fan. Even so, Marina, has always admired Dr. Swenson and even longed to follow in her footsteps at one time, having once studied under her.

    Marina is an interesting character. As smart and thoughtful as she appears, she sometimes makes rash decisions, not all of which make sense. The more I got to know her, the more I accepted this as her character flaw--and in some ways, I could understand her choices. There was also a distance about her, and yet it was obvious she really cares about people. Marina changed her medical focus early in her schooling after a tragic mishap that has haunted her ever since. Dr. Swenson and the Amazon force Marina to face her past. Her time in the rain forest is also a time of soul searching. She faces her fears and relies on strengths she did not know she had.

    There are secrets and lies, and several mysteries solved. Difficult choices are made. You really get a feel for the native people and how fragile their lifestyle and environment are, given the encroaching civilization. Not to mention the questions raised in how they are treated by the researchers. There are also other ethical questions involving the way pharmaceutical companies set their priorities. State of Wonder is both a heartbreaking and inspiring novel.

    When I first began reading State of Wonder it did not seem like a book I would love. Somewhere along the line, I realized how caught up in the story I was, how invested in the characters. I adore Easter, the deaf boy taken in my Annick Swenson and later by Marina. Ann Patchett had transported me to the rain forest just as she had Marina. I wanted to know more. I wanted to experience more.

    I do wish the author had provided more insight into Marina than she did, but that very well could be my lack of wanting to let go of the character and the world Ann Patchett has created. When I finished the book, tears in my eyes, I so much wanted more. The ending was perfect in so many ways, but I didn't want the book to end. I wanted to spend more time with the Lakashi and with Marina.

    I am grateful to Carrie of the Books and Movies and her "I've Always Meant to Read That Book!" Challenge for spurring me to read State of Wonder now. It has been on my shelf forever, and her challenge motivated me to pick it up and give it a try. This is my first Ann Patchett novel, but it definitely will not be my last.
  • (4/5)
    can't decide how i feel about this book. at first i thought it was going to be amazing, then i got bored in the middle, but toward the end i was really into it again. amazing writer, but the plot was a little dull to me.
  • (4/5)
    i really loved this book a lot. i think it would make a great discussion book for book groups as there are a lot of interesting subjects raised that would make for good debate. i became quite sad at one point during the reading and that is lingering with me as i try to imagine what happens after the story ends.so far, i am still processing my thoughts but i hope to post a longer review soon.
  • (5/5)
    As usual with Ann Patchett, I really enjoyed this book, though still not as much as Run, which is my favourite so far, even more than Bel Canto (but there are still one or two I haven't read). This reminded me of Barbara Kingsolver, for some reason, can't put my finger on it, perhaps just the removal of the characters from what they would normally consider to be civilisation. Others have commented that the ending was a little abrupt, and I suppose that's true, though I liked the way it ended, despite leaving the reader to fill in some of the blanks.
  • (5/5)
    This book made the top ten fiction list for 2011 in numerous book review publications, and it was well-deserved. The book takes place in Minnesota and the Amazon rain forest. Dr. Marina Singh is sent by her employer, Vogel Pharmaceuticals, to discover the circumstances of her co-worker's death. Dr. Anders Eckmann had been sent earlier to check on Vogel's researcher Dr. Annake Swenson, who was out-of-touch and behind schedule. What follows are twists and turns of plot that are as numerous as the the turns of the Amazon itself. Well, maybe not quite that numerous but almost! It's a delightful book that many have compared with Conrad's Heart of Darkness. I would say it's a much happier book than that one, however. It does give the reader a definite feel for how life goes in the rain forest. Patchett is to be commended for a literary accomplishment.
  • (5/5)
    State of Wonder, the magical new novel by Ann Patchett, begins with news of a death. Anders Eckman, a big blond Minnesotan, has died in the Amazon. He was sent there by the pharmaceutical company for which he worked to track down a research team led by a single-minded and eccentric doctor who is doing ground-breaking research but sending no results to her big pharma backer. The news comes in a businesslike, emotionless letter--written on old-fashioned Aerogram stationary--from the researcher Anders was sent to locate. The recipient of the news is Marina Singh, Anders's office mate and friend.Marina, fortyish and quiet, is asked by Mr. Fox, her boss, to help break the news to Anders's wife. Then she's asked to travel to the Amazon herself, to finish the work Anders began. She wants to do neither, but does both, because she's that kind of person, helpful and kind, and because she's been having a discreet affair with Mr. Fox, a gentle, if quietly demanding, widower twenty years older than Marina.She gets her inoculations and begins a course of the anti-malarial drug that she knows from experience will give her screaming nightmares, and sets off for Manaus, Brazil, where Dr. Annick Swensen keeps an apartment. She will be in the city for weeks, spending time with, trying to gain the trust of, the Bovenders, the young Australian couple who act as caretakers--and gatekeepers--for the elusive Dr. Swensen.Eventually Marina and Dr. Swensen meet in the city, and Marina follows the doctor to the secret research compound she maintains in a remote jungle outpost. Slowly, Marina begins to learn things about the research, and about the reasons for the secrecy. Dr. Swensen has been continuing the research of her mentor, begun many years earlier, on a tribe called the Lakashi, whose women bear children until their sixties and seventies. Swensen is secretive because she's protecting the Lakashi from the hordes of researchers and reporters she knows would flood their quiet existence if word ever got out. Marina is drawn into life in the compound, helping in the research and to hide the location, even participating in the grand experiment.Ann Patchett has a delicate touch with her characters, an ability to insinuate the reader one layer at time into the intricate depths of their psyches. Several characters by the end of the novel will come to behave in ways that, if one had only read the first few chapters, would appear out of keeping with their introductions. So subtle is Patchett's unfolding of the characters, however, that there is no dissonance at all for the reader who has followed along the whole way. Patchett's descriptions of the physical environment, from the bitter cold of a Minnesota winter to the smoggy heat of a Latin American city to the deep jewel colors and surreal flora and fauna of the deep Amazon jungle, are just as glorious as her characters. Each detail is rendered with such exquisitely rich precision as to make one long to experience it for oneself.State of Wonder is a novel which lives up to its name. It is beautiful and funny and sad, with an ending that could not be more perfect. It's a novel that can be savored just as well in delicious solitude or in the company of a book group.
  • (5/5)
    Adventure in the Amazon jungle. Characters rich in emotion and passionate values
  • (5/5)
    Felt like I was there because it all sounded so real. Loved that I felt the emotions the characters were experiencing.
  • (5/5)
    State of Wonder is another home-run from Ann Patchett. Now, granted, my favorite of her books is, and probably will always be, Bel Canto (but that's just because it spoke to the musician in me and I could HEAR a soundtrack while I was reading it) but this is a solid, well put together, fantastic story of the choices we have to make, of challenging ourselves and of finding out where that line is, you know.. the one between fanaticism and passion for ones work.I picked this book up yesterday after work and stayed up late finishing it. I read it when I got home from work, read it while I ate dinner, crashed on the couch with it and tried to put it down for sleep.. but ended up turning the lights back on and finishing it. That's what Ann Patchett does for me, she stirs up the curiosity and gets me so involved in the story I can't help but continue to read.And let me talk for a moment about Marina Singh as a character. She was so freaking brilliant. It's been a while since I truly connected with a character and could understand why they were doing and thinking what they were, and it happened with Marina. I could sympathize with her insecurities, her choices made for profession, her worries, her fears and I admired her all the more for standing up to them and pushing forward to find the answers. Even when things developed in a way that was unexpected toward the end of the book, I found myself so lost in wonder about Marina that everything else happening seemed to take a back seat. State of Wonder is well worth the hype - so if you are put off by big starred reviews and lots of press, please... don't let it put you off of reading this book. Talk about it, buy it, read it and loan it out, get it from the library - whatever you have to do, just experience it. Your time will not be wasted.