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Jacob Have I Loved

Jacob Have I Loved

Scris de Katherine Paterson

Povestit de Moira Kelly


Jacob Have I Loved

Scris de Katherine Paterson

Povestit de Moira Kelly

evaluări:
4/5 (48 evaluări)
Lungime:
2 hours
Lansat:
Aug 18, 2009
ISBN:
9780060887469
Format:
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Descriere

"Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated." With her grandmother's taunt, Louise knew that she, like the biblical Esau, was the despised elder twin. Caroline, her selfish younger sister, was the one everyone loved.

Growing up on a tiny Chesapeake Bay island in the early 1940s, angry Louise reveals how Caroline robbed her of everything: her hopes for schooling, her friends, her mother, even her name. While everyone pampered Caroline, Wheeze (her sister's name for her) began to learn the ways of the watermen and the secrets of the island, especially of old Captain Wallace, who had mysteriously returned after 50 years.

The war unexpectedly gave this independent girl a chance to fulfill her childish dream to work as a watermen alongside her father. But the dream did not satisfy the woman she was becoming. Alone and unsure, Louise began to fight her way to a place where Caroline could not reach.

Renowned author Katherine Paterson here chooses a little-known area off the Maryland shore as her setting for a fresh telling of the ancient story of an elder twin's lost birthright.

A HarperAudio production.

Lansat:
Aug 18, 2009
ISBN:
9780060887469
Format:
Carte audio

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Despre autor

Katherine Paterson is one of the world’s most celebrated and beloved authors. Among her many awards are two Newberys and two National Book Awards, and she was recently named a "Living Legend” by the Library of Congress. She has been published in more than 22 languages in a variety of formats, from picture books to historical novels.


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3.9
48 evaluări / 38 Recenzii
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  • (4/5)
    Not at all what I was expecting (not sure what I was expecting, but not this!) ... it reminded me in many ways of Little Women, believe-it-or-not. At one point it lurched in a horrifying plot direction, but veered back again, phew, and proceeded in ways I could get behind. Not funny enough, moving enough, suspenseful enough, etc., to warrant the rare 5 stars, but this really was a terrifically-written book.

    (Note: 5 stars = amazing, wonderful, 4 = very good book, 3 = decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. I'm fairly good at picking for myself so end up with a lot of 4s).
  • (5/5)
    I think that the plot in this book is fantastic. The main focus is the topic of sibling rivalry- which many individuals can relate to. I still find myself feeling sorry for the main character after reading it a few years ago. Some, however, say that there are many opportunities in the book that the main character had to go and make her life better. So another message I think this book conveyed to me is to not feel sorry for myself but to try and take up every opportunity that comes knocking at my door. I almost cried after reading this book. This is a truly amazing book and deserves the Newbery Award completely.
  • (4/5)
    Louise is determined that she will brake out of her sisters shadow. They live in Rass Chesapeake Bay were Louise is stuck in her twin sisters shadow. she keeps wonering will it take for me to brake free. I liked this book because it really put you in the book thought in the beginning it is a bit boring at first. I could feel Louise's pain because the book was so descriptive. I recommend this book to you if you like books you can not put down.
  • (2/5)
    I recognize the literary merits of this book, but personally, I didn't care much for it.The story is narrated by Louise, who is terribly jealous (with fair justification) of her twin sister Caroline. Caroline is talented, personable, and gets all the attention. Louise is plain, untalented, unladylike, and not as personable either. I sympathized with Louise for the way she was relegated to second place her whole life... but at the same time, even as the narrator, she didn't come off as greatly likable. I believe that was what I disliked most. There were two or three chapters that were about, (although discussed is YA appropriate language), Louise feeling a sexual attraction to a 70 year old man who was a friendly neighbor. Thankfully, the man neither noticed nor reciprocated her interest... but I found that subject matter a bit unsettling all the same.The last few chapters brought Louise all the way into adulthood. Somehow that didn't feel right. Having read the whole book as the thoughts of a 14 year old, it seemed strange to have her reach 30 something before the end. It's well written. It won the Newberry, and I may be deserving. But as a matter of taste, I didn't care much for it.
  • (3/5)
    Such a disappointment. As I read this book, I became involved in the story of a twin who feels as if she's not appreciated or loved as much as her younger sibling. However, the whining and paranoid rants by the teen-aged narrator start to get wearing, and eventually ruined the book for me. It's too bad, as life on the island was interesting, with descriptions of the daily routine of crabbing or fishing well done, and a nice touch. Not recommended unless you appreciate self-involved, pity-me, "it's all God's fault" type of narration.
  • (4/5)
    This took a while to get into. I am not sure juvenile readers have the ability to stick with it long enough to enjoy it. Once it got going it was a good story.
  • (4/5)
    I think I read this as a kid, but I don't really remember my reaction to it then. Upon reading it as an adult, I liked the story and thought it did a good job depicting jealousy and insecurity.
  • (3/5)
    Twin girls Caroline and Sara: the beautiful fragile one and the plain hardy one who has to learn to overcome her jealousy and become proud of her own gifts. The meaning of the title is not immediately apparent unless you are a Bible adept, but is developed through the narrative. The life of east coast fishermen at Chesapeake Bay is pictured well.For mid to older teens.
  • (5/5)
    Touching coming of age book about a twin living in poverty during WWII on a remote island in the Chesapeake Bay.
  • (3/5)
    Caroline is beautiful, musically gifted, and good; she is the shining star of a small town on the water. The story is told by her twin sister Louise, who is almost sick with jealousy and longing. Louise is not a flawless person, but I loved her just the same: her work-roughened hands, her terrible puns, her puzzlement at her anger when a friend falls in love with her sister. It's a good book about complicated family relationships, and Paterson never pulls back on showing the truth of it. In the end, both sisters manage to break free and become their own people.

  • (3/5)
    It was good. I read it awhile ago, and I remember I didn't hate it, but it hasn't stuck with me much. I remember feeling very sorry for the main character. She didn't deserve to be treated the way she was. Not a MUST read, but definitely worth reading at some point.
  • (4/5)
    Beautiful book. Old fashioned language might turn off some readers. Fine for sixth grade on up. Rigorous in terms of topic, subject, and language.
  • (3/5)
    It took me a few times to get into this book - it starts off in the 'present' and then heads back to the past. But once I got into it, I just kept reading. It is a rough book. Another reviewer called it 'whiney,' but I don't think so. I think this is often how it is, life is full of unfairness and awful surprises. In fact, I think that reviewer was male, and I feel like this book is much more relatable if you're female. Anyway, I enjoyed it. Time for more Paterson!
  • (5/5)
    I love this. This is and will remain one of my favorite stories of all time.

    I know my feelings about this particular story are influenced by my great uncle having been a waterman on the Chesapeake and my family having spent so much of our time there. It brought back a wealth of childhood memories. I spent a great deal of my childhood on and in the water and was raised on steamed blue crabs and oysters.

    However, having read three of Katherine Paterson's books in the last 10 days I think she's a great story teller and at this moment my favorite author. I put this on my best-great shelf after I read it but I waited almost three days while reading a couple other books to let the emotion subside before writing this. It hasn't subsided.
  • (1/5)
    The book-book is wonderful, but the audiobook is an abridged version that leaves out so many great passages.
  • (1/5)
    I wanted to like this book, but I did not! The characters were self-absorbed, and I did not care about anything that was happening until page 150 - the book is just over 200 pages. I can't figure out why it ever won the Newbery. Don't waste your time!
  • (5/5)
    Island life in the Chesapeake Bay during WWII. Crabs and oysters, family issues, twin girls growing up in isolation. Louise grows up in the shadow of her beautiful, talented twin sister, Caroline. She must decide what she actually wants from life, rather than letting life happen to her.
  • (4/5)
    Summary: This story takes place in the 1940’s, the main character is Sara Louise. Sara Louise feels like she lives in her sister’s shadow. Everyone seems to love and favor her sister. Part of the book talks about a bible verse “Jacob have I loved but Esau have I hated…” Which is why the book is called “Jacob Have I Loved”Personal Reaction: The book is good because a lot of children go through this when they have siblings, feeling as if they are in their sibling’s shadow. It was kind of hard for me to get into this book but it was a good book, if that makes sense. Classroom Extension Ideas:1. Pick out vocabulary from the book and have the write sentences using the vocab.2. Have the class compare the two characters.
  • (3/5)
    Summary:Sara Louise feels that ever since she was born, she has always been in her sister's shadow. Everyone always loves and favors the delicate, sweet Caroline. The story is set in the 40's and accurately details life from that era. The title and part of the story relate to the Bible and the verse, "Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated. . ."Personal Reaction:I had a hard time getting interested in this book since the story takes place in the 40's. However, I was able to relate with one of the characters which helped me get into the story. The book was not at all like I expected it to be but I enjoyed it.Classroom Extension Ideas:1. This book has many boat and crabbing references. Although this made it a bit difficult to read, these factors would make the book perfect for a unit on boats or how sea food goes from the ocean to our table. There are lots of great vocabulary terms that students can learn from this book.2. I would also have students make a compare and contrast chart based off Louise and and Caroline's relationship and the relationship of Jacob and Esau from the Bible. I think it would be interesting for kids to see how literature from the Bible is still so relevant to literature that is written today.
  • (3/5)
    A Newberry award winner--telling the tale of two twins and angst of being the twin in the shadow. Generally I enjoyed the book--but did think that the resolution came too quickly. I would give this book 3 out of 5 stars.
  • (4/5)
    Sara Louise Bradshaw is sick and tired of her beautiful twin Caroline. Ever since they were born, Caroline has been the pretty one, the talented one, the better sister. Even now, Caroline seems to take everything: Louise's friends, their parents' love, her dreams for the future.For once in her life, Louise wants to be the special one. But in order to do that, she must first figure out who she is . . . and find a way to make a place for herself outside her sister's shadow.
  • (5/5)
    I loved JACOB HAVE I LOVED. It's a beautiful book, about a older twin sister, Sara Louise, who is jealous of her twin, Caroline. Caroline was the one who was weak at birth, the one who made all thought of Louise be forgotten as they struggled to keep Caroline's life. For the early part of her life she was in the hospital; Louisa's mother was there so often that Louisa hardly saw her. When Caroline is brought home, she is the one who is considered delicate. She is the one with a talent for singing and piano. She is the one who gets all of the opportunity; going to a boarding school in Baltimore, marrying Louise's best friend. The whole book is set on this foundation: Louise's hatred of Caroline. It affects her to want to leave Rass Island. It makes yearn to leave Rass, to have her own opportunity. As much as I loved the book, I didn't find Louise to be my favorite protagonist. In ways, she is an antagonist- it seems like most people in the book want to push her forward but she is so focused on Caroline's luck that she doesn't take her own opportunities. She never mentions wanting to leave Rass Island, never speaks allowed how upset she feels about how it seems that Caroline gets all the luck. At the end of the book Louise does seem to realize this, however. She becomes more full of hope than before. She actually works for her future and it really shows growing up. Not just a character changing from the beginning of a book to the end, a whole life, a peak, and then the point where she realizes that she hasn't been doing enough for her future, that she needs to stop complaining and start working at it. Her hatred for Caroline is mention less at the end, but in the middle it's fresh. Her hatred was actually scary; dreams of killing her sister dead, and no remorse at all, is one of the examples that really doesn't seem real. The hatred that she focused at her at her twin... was demented.I liked this book, maybe even loved it, it's definitely a book I want to buy. I wavered between four and a half stars, or three and a half stars, I decided on four and a half. The book has definitely nestled down in my head as a favorite. Many pre-teen and teen girls would love this book. It has earned its right as a Newberry .
  • (4/5)
    A coming of age story, somehow both blunt and sensitive, about one girl's growing up on the Chesapeake. The back of my book says, “Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated....” With her grandmother's taunt, Louise knew that she, like the biblical Esau, was the despised elder twin. Caroline, her selfish younger sister, was the one everyone loved. Perceiving the unjustness of her grandmother, this colors her reactions within all her other relationships, as Louise nurses those perceptions and misperceptions, creating for herself a harder childhood than it needed to have been. In the end, those things she learned in her youth stood her in good stead for her calling in life.Katherine Paterson does an excellent job of setting, characterization and story.
  • (4/5)
    Growing up in the 1940s was not the easy. WWII, food shortage, and little money etc. makes the whole situation a messy one. However, for Sara Louise Bradshaw, these are just the beginning of her problems. Her biggest trouble is her younger twin sister, Caroline, who is seemingly perfect at everything she does. Sara is forced to stand back as Caroline unknowingly takes away the love of her mother, her hopes for school and even her best friend. To combat this Sara begins to learn the ways of the watermen spending as much time as possible on a skiff with her father. She soon becomes exposed to a secret of the island when Captain Wallace comes back to the island, after disappearing 50 years earlier. Jacob Have I Loved won the 1981 Newbery Medal, and is written by Katherine Paterson, the award winning author of The Bridge to Teribethia. It was also given the honors of ALA Notable Children's Book and ALA Best Book for Young Adults. This book takes you on a journey with a young girl, as she faces the trials of being a teenager, and discovers her place world.
  • (3/5)
    The story of twin girls growing up on a Chesapeake Bay island where one girl compares herself to Esau, the older despised child. Sara Louise has as she sees it a perfect sister name, Caroline, whom everyone looks after. Sara Louise hates her sister and cannot stand to be around her. She loves being outside and catching crabs and oysters like her father. Sara Louise has a bitterness she finally overcomes several years later. Caroline marries Sara Louise's best friend after moving away to take a singing scholarship in New York. Sara Louise befriends a man who moves back to the island, but finds after a tragic storm that she might love him, even though he is much older than she. Events never turn for her benefit, so she is very negative about life. She resolves to helping her father for the rest of her life when the older man she admires encourages her to do whatever she wants with her life. She then decides to go to college and ends up in Kentucky as a nurse and midwife, married to a Catholic man.I think this book would be more appropriate for high school girls. Discussion could be sparked with the students about how there was a failure to communicate between the family and Sara Louise. I think much of her bitterness could have been overcome earlier in her life if she had talked more with those in her family. Students today could compare this family's culture with their own. Even though these people didn't have outside distractions, they still didn't seem to communicate very much. The students could also research this island to see if it is real and how the weather patterns could really affect an island like the one in the book.
  • (5/5)
    It has been quite a while since the last time I read this. I had forgotten a lot of the story. It is a beautiful and heart wrenching story about growing up in the shadow of a sibling and the struggle to become separate and unique. I know that the things that happen to us as children shape us, whether we really understand them or not, and whether things are as we perceive them. Sara Louise struggles mightily, but eventually finds her place and it is perfect.Personally, I'd rather die than turn out like Wheeze's grandma.
  • (4/5)
    This is the tale of Sara Louise Bradshaw, a teenager on a small island in Chesapeake Bay, who comes of age in the early 1940s. It's not a pleasant time in her life--not that she would consider any time in her life particularly pleasant. Her 13-plus years have been spent in the shadow of her twin sister, the delicate, beautiful and talented Caroline. Louise yearns for her own space, her own identity, but such things seem hard to come by in their small community. I found the tale of Louise's struggles a bit tedious, yet for some reason her character reached out and grabbed my interest almost from the beginning. In the end, I was less than satisfied. I guess I wanted a typical heroic/fairy tale ending where Louise triumphs over all her foes. Instead, Ms. Paterson treats us to an ending that's more like real life, where you find satisfaction in a direction slightly different than your original dream. --J.
  • (4/5)
    I resisted this book at first but it drew me in. Potent characterisation and realisation of that particular island lifestyle. Central character's frustration, bitterness, resilience and heartbreak is very well done.
  • (4/5)
    her books always give me such a feeling of weight, of something squeezing the breath out of me, and this one is the heaviest so far, i think: the terrible loneliness of it, the suffocating confines of a little island where everybody knows everyone and there's no space for any difference, the jealousy, the terrible, heavy want to be loved, to be known. i loved how there was no catharsis, no magical moment of being right with the world, just sort of grim, terrified hanging on until managing to let yourself go, finally, for your sake and not others'. i'm not quite sure how to feel about the ending, about recreating the same closed-off space you ran from - though it probably says more about me than sarah - and would it be enough, and would her own children be telling same story sometime down the line - but even so, getting there was a relief, an exhale: she survived herself. what's more to ask?
  • (5/5)
    This book has broken my heart and then put the pieces back together so gently I didn’t even realize it was mended. It was difficult for me to get into the beginning of Jacob Have I Loved. I thought I had read it before but it turned out to be a different book than I thought so I didn’t know what to expect. Then, I kept waiting for Jacob to appear. Who was he? What was his story? Finally, about 50 pages in, I let go of waiting for Jacob and just fell into the story. I couldn’t put it down after that. The story grabbed me and wouldn’t let go. Then, it began shaving off pieces of my heart until it finally shattered what was left with one quick moment.I knew it was coming. I could feel it about to happen. Well, I could feel the build-up that something was going down but at first I didn’t know if it was going to be good or bad. I just knew it was big. Then, I knew it was bad. I could see what was going to happen but she didn’t know yet. I wanted to shake her “don’t you know what is going to come next?” Then, she knew, and I was heartbroken. I didn’t know if we would ever recover but by the end of the book I was yelling “don’t forget the first one.” And after all that I closed the book with a smile on my face.I love Louise and though she lived a very different life from me, so much of her felt familiar. Oh Jacob Have I Loved, how I have loved you.