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Black House

Black House

Scris de Stephen King și Peter Straub

Povestit de Frank Muller


Black House

Scris de Stephen King și Peter Straub

Povestit de Frank Muller

evaluări:
4.5/5 (114 evaluări)
Lungime:
26 hours
Lansat:
Nov 6, 2012
ISBN:
9781442359055
Format:
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Descriere

Bestselling authors Stephen King and Peter Straub's epic thriller about a small American town held in the grip of unspeakable evil is now available from Simon & Schuster Audiocompletely unabridged —for only $19.99!

Twenty years ago, a boy named Jack Sawyer traveled to a parallel universe called the Territories to save his mother and her "Twinner" from an agonizing death that would have brought cataclysm to the other world. Now Jack is a retired Los Angeles homicide detective living in the nearly nonexistent hamlet of Tamarack, Wisconsin. He has no recollection of his adventures in the Territories, and he was compelled to leave the police force when a happenstance event threatened to awaken those long suppressed and dangerous memories.

When a series of gruesome murders occur in western Wisconsin that are reminiscent of those committed several decades earlier, Jack's buddy, the local chief of police, begs Jack to help find the killer. But are these new killings merely the work of a disturbed individual, or has a mysterious and malignant force been unleashed in this quiet town? What causes Jack's inexplicable waking dreams—if that is what they are—of robins' eggs and red feathers? As these cryptic messages becomes impossible to ignore, Jack is drawn back to the Territories and to his own hidden past.
Lansat:
Nov 6, 2012
ISBN:
9781442359055
Format:
Carte audio

De asemenea, disponibil ca...

De asemenea, disponibil ca carteCarte


Despre autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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114 evaluări / 41 Recenzii
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  • (4/5)
    If you can get through the first 150 pages it becomes a good book which races to the final conclusion.
  • (4/5)
    This was a good follow up to the Talisman. But it was not as you would expect...there was a lot more in "real world" rather than the "other world." and this lead the way to thinking that this was a different book. I found that the set up for a potential third book rather obvious and they could have done a better job of making it less so...even though I would read it if it came out!
  • (3/5)
    Good, classic King, but not the thrilling saga The Talisman was.
  • (3/5)
    Audio version. I remember the first time I read this, I found the style of the narration incredibly irritating. If this had not been a Stephen King story, I'd have abandoned it before finishing the first chapter. But it *is* SK, and more importantly, the sequel to The Talisman. So I had to finish it. Rereading it many years later, it's still irritating, but Frank Muller's sublime voice makes it better. A little. And of course the story overcomes the obnoxious style and adds to the Dark Tower universe. But I'm sure glad this is the only story where we fly over scenes and observe them with the narrator. Bleh.
  • (4/5)
    Even a blind man can see that this book is much better than it's predecessor, The Talisman! Jack Sawyer is back! Now he is a coppiceman and he must stop the Fisherman! And Gorg and Mr. Munshun too! This is a darn good read all on its own, for the first 400+ pages or so. Then it gets all Dark Towery, but still good. And top notch ending too!
  • (2/5)
    I'm not really a Stephen King fan I think. It had a decent beginning and ending, but it was bogged down by too much trivial, strange information.
  • (3/5)
    Six-word review: The crime is not the mystery.Extended review:Fie. Either this author doesn't play fair or the marketers, promoters, and cover blurb writers are misrepresenting her work.This second novel in the series billed as "Simon Serrailler mysteries" shows us a good deal more of the difficult, elusive character of Detective Chief Inspector Simon Serrailler than did the first installment, in which he was little more than a peripheral presence. But here again we don't see him solving any crimes. I'm starting to wonder if we ever will.Structured similarly to the first novel of the series, this book unfolds episodically from the points of view of several characters each in their turn, not always giving any indication as to which of them is important or why. I almost said "important to the plot," except that as before there isn't much of a plot.There's nothing wrong with a character-driven story, and this one is certainly that. But again, a novel billed as a mystery and featuring police detectives as principal characters gives rise to certain expectations. If I'm disappointed in the conclusion, the author may not be at fault, but I must ask: is the genre label correctly applied?If I say much more, I will be guilty of publishing spoilers. So I'll just add that my appetite for continuing with the series has diminished. Perhaps my curiosity about the development of the Serrailler character himself will be enough to lure me on, and perhaps it won't. If I continue, however, it will be without my usual confidence that the conventional promises will be fulfilled.
  • (3/5)
    I actually give this book 3.5 stars.
  • (5/5)
    Can’t for the final book should be very very good
  • (5/5)
    This book blew me away! I enjoyed the pace of it, loved every character. The world was described in every color and emotion possible. I connected with everyone in the book absolutely no grey areas in this story. The journey was one I will not forget and am very certain will be continued. Well done ...sometimes things work out well in tandem.
  • (3/5)
    The talisman was such an engaging tale that any kind of follow up would’ve been difficult. However, king relied a great deal on some pretty common tropes of his story for the world building.
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I enjoyed this book. So much so that I was disappointed in the following collaboration. Anyway, I'm not one to read books by multiple authors, I usually find the mixing of styles to be jarring to read. This book, however, was nicely written and didn't make me feel like I was reading two different stories.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)
    Black House is the sequel to The Talisman. It doesn't feel like it, though. The style is very different, and slightly odd, emphasising the nature of the reader as observer. It feels to me like that gimmick gets fairly tired and also made me keep some distance from the characters, instead of losing myself in them as usual. It's also different in tone to The Talisman: it feels darker. I know a lot of bad things happen in The Talisman, but Black House has more of it. I didn't like it as much, even though I read it much faster. It was nice to see Jack Sawyer again, but so much time has passed for him that he doesn't quite feel like the boy we knew at all. I didn't really care about his love story, either: I didn't really see the point in it, plot-wise. That goes for several other points in this book -- sometimes it was just too wordy.

    One thing I loved a lot about this book, though, was Henry Leyden. I believed in him as a character, and in Jack's feelings for him, and I nearly cried when he was hurt. Some of the deaths in this book do still hit you hard, but I didn't find many of the characters all that memorable. More could have been done with Dale and the Beez, etc. But Henry was brilliant.

    I also didn't like the constant references to the Dark Tower. Maybe if I'd finished reading that series, I'd enjoy the little nods to it, but it felt like it wasn't necessary for this story, didn't quite fit, and I feel like Stephen King is far too much in love with that creation of his.

    I feel like if this book had been pared down a bit, or characters like Henry getting bigger parts, or more characters like Henry, I'd have enjoyed it a lot. As it was, it was fun enough to read, but it wasn't The Talisman or particularly like The Talisman, and I'm not sure if I'd have read it without that connection.

    (Probably. Who am I kidding? I'm reading basically everything Stephen King has written.)
  • (2/5)
    King's most schitzophrenic book. I started this book 3 times before I finally made it past the first 100 pages of inexplicable narration (I'm sure this was Straub's contribution). Then it becomes a terrific supernatural police procedural. The last act is a Dark Tower tie-in that is just bizarre. Not looking forward to a 3rd book in this series.
  • (3/5)
    I like thorough characterization as much as the next person, but is it really necessary to see the same scene from five different points of view when all those different points of view are having the same damn reaction? And the constant smug references to Bleak House got a little thin after a while. Other than that, pretty solid Stephen King fare, lots of Dark Tower references and some marginally-to-mildly-creepy stuff. Decent time-waster.
  • (3/5)
    this book is supposedly the sequel to the talisman - sure if you say so...i was expecting to be riveted, horrified, swept away. instead i was just expectant.and ultimately disappointed.a dull read considering the powerhouse authors involved. peter straub obviously penned the lion's share of this tale. he should have let stephen take the wheel a bit more. talisman was a five star read. this one, sadly, a three.
  • (4/5)
    ** spoiler alert ** I was really looking forward to reading this book since I loved The Talisman so much. But I was kind of disappointed. The Talisman was written in King's voice which is part of the reason I loved it so much. But King's voice is somewhat absent at the beginning of Black House. It steadily grows stronger throughout the book though and it made the ending great although sad. I've never read anything else by Straub and I don't think I will. His writing just sounds so.... fake. And forced. And the beginning doesn't flow like it did in The Talisman.Black House is also mostly horror unlike The Talisman, which was sci-fi. It's incredibly gory.The storyline was amazing. I felt all the feelings I'm sure the authors wanted the reader to. I could have cried when Henry died and at the end when Jack couldn't go back to his home world. And every time they mentioned Black House or Burnside eating all those kids, I got chills up my spine.If it wasn't for Straub this book would have gotten five stars. That said, everything else earned it four.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting read. It might have been useful to have read Talisman first, which I haven't.
  • (5/5)
    After reading this book, which I loved, I wished I had read the Talisman first. The characters are great; a blind deejay, genius bikers? The bikers were my favorite and I would definitely want them on my side.
  • (3/5)
    My only complaint about the book is the opening chapter and the occassional parts where the story is written as if we are hitching a ride on a crow. I feel that these parts have been made unnecessarily wordy and are a distraction from the flow of the story. The best parts are when Mr King and Mr Straub is simply telling a story about wonderful characters such as Jack Sawyer and his best friend Henry Leyden. Honourable, dependable Jack and wise Henry.
  • (5/5)
    You can feel the hands of both Straub and King on this work, and it's the stronger for the combination. From the beginning, this is a creepy and engaging exploration of believable characters in the horrifying and beautiful world King and Straub created with The Talisman. You CAN read this without reading their earlier collaboration (and I did), but I think you might as well start with The Talisman since I'll be venturing their next. The book might be a bit longer than it needs to be since there are moments when it drags, but on the whole, this is a graceful and perfectly executed horror novel with engaging characters, and I can't recommend it highly enough. Enjoy.
  • (4/5)
    An alright sequel. The novel makes a good connection with The Dark Tower. King's novel's are all intertwined.
  • (4/5)
    Started out very, very slow. I was afraid I would not be able to get into it, but it turned out to be an engaging story. I cared about the characters and I would love to read more about them.
  • (4/5)
    In this novel, King returns to his classic style of storytelling: an epic tale, a band of great heroes, a powerful child, parallel worlds and enormous stakes. The added bonus is that it returns us to the world of the The Dark Tower saga, adding another important piece to that super-epic tale. In fact, I find it hard to believe that Straub wrote more than the first 20 pages or so, since the style is so clearly vintage King.Billed as a sequel to The Talisman, Black House doesn?t really continue that story so much as pick up the thread of its main character?s (Jack Sawyer) life as an adult. King aficionados will relish this novel as a full-force return to the type of story King tells best.
  • (4/5)
    Like a lot of Stephen King's books, this book had a slow start but turned out to be a great read. Black House is the sequel to The Talisman but not having read the first book in no way detracted from my enjoyment of the second.I have little experience with Peter Straub, but Stephen King always develops rich, believable characters, and this story is no exception. I especially love the radio host, Henry Leyden. He has got to be my favourite King character yet. He's the kind of person I could see myself falling for in another life!Black House is written with the flair and style typical of Stephen King, with a slightly different narrative style that I assume is the result of Straub's influence. I picked this book up expecting to be impressed and I was not disappointed.
  • (4/5)
    Although the book starts out just a bit slow, the story drew me in quite soon. If you are unfamiliar with Stephen King's other novels involving his "otherworldly" characters and settings, then this book may not make a whole lot of sense to you. I recommend that at the very least you read "The Talisman" prior to reading this book as well as "The Black Tower" series as "Black House" makes several references to topics and characters introduced in the series. My favorite character in "Black House" was Henry Leyden. King and Straub describe him so richly and make him such a unique character from his "personalities" to his multi-faceted intelligence, to his manner of garb, it made me sad that I could not know the man in person. In fact, the entire book is written this way-drawing you in and making you feel as though you are experiencing everything along with the characters being described. All in all, a great read.
  • (5/5)
    Having just finished The Talisman, I decided to jump into the sequel. This book surpasses its predecessor in every way possible. The writing style is mature and polished. The horror is truly horrifying. The plot is captivating. The character development is rich, without slowing the pace of the narrative.To make things even better, there are no subtle allusions to the world of the Dark Tower: it?s explicitly part of the plot. Hearing about the beams, the Crimson King, the Gunslinger, and the breakers all over again brought me right back into that world.If that last sentence made no sense, you should really read the Dark Tower books followed by The Talisman before opening up this one. It?s worth the time.Now we wait for the anticipated third book of the trilogy.
  • (1/5)
    Some of Stephen King's books are interesting. None of Peter Straub's books are the least bit interesting. The problem is that neither of them can use one word when 400 will do. Every boulder, stone, rock, pebble, and grain of sand is described in excruiating detail. You just wish they would get on with the story, but then again, probably not, when the story involves implacable evil doing the most gross and disgusting things (especially to children) that they both could think of. I have no problem with graphic detail, but it seems that graphic detail is all that the book is about. If you are interested in the mythos of The Dark Tower, read the Stephen King books about the Gunslinger, but skip this book.
  • (4/5)
    Dark Tower, without being Dark Tower. Held the space between books well.
  • (4/5)
    Sometimes I like King, and sometimes I like Straub, but together they make pretty good reading. Straubs poetic imagery mixed with King's blatant in-your-face punches really compliment each other. Black House started very slowly and didn't really pick up until the middle - I much preferred The Talisman, but this wasn't bad. Not as good as I remembered it the first reading, but not bad.The story picks up Jack Sawyer's life after forgetting his experiences in the Territories, and after a successful career as an LA cop. He retires to a small town, where he is once more required to save the world through his specialized knowledge of the Territories. There is a visit from Speedy/Parkus from The Talisman, and of course, many references to The Gunslinger series. If you like either The Talisman or The Gunslinger, this should appeal. Not nearly as horrific as many of King's other novels . . .