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The Talisman

The Talisman

Scris de Stephen King și Peter Straub

Povestit de Frank Muller


The Talisman

Scris de Stephen King și Peter Straub

Povestit de Frank Muller

evaluări:
4.5/5 (138 evaluări)
Lungime:
28 hours
Lansat:
Nov 6, 2012
ISBN:
9781442359079
Format:
Carte audio

Descriere

Stephen King and Peter Straub's epic thriller about a young boy's quest to save his mother's life.

Jack Sawyer, twelve years old, is about to begin a most fantastic journey, an exalting, terrifying quest for the mystical Talisman—the only thing that can save Jack's dying mother. But to reach his goal, Jack must make his way not only across the breadth of the United States but also through the wondrous and menacing parallel world of the Territories.

In the Territories, Jack finds another realm, where the air is so sweet and clear a man can smell a radish being pulled from the ground a mile away—and a life can be snuffed out instantly in the continuing struggle between good and evil. Here Jack discovers "Twinners," reflections of the people he knows on earth—most notably Queen Laura, the "Twinner" of Jack's own imperiled mother. As Jack "flips" between worlds, making his way westward toward the redemptive Talisman, a sequence of heart-stopping encounters challenges him at every step.

An unforgettable epic of adventure and resounding triumph, The Talisman is one of the most influential and highly praised works of fantasy ever written.
Lansat:
Nov 6, 2012
ISBN:
9781442359079
Format:
Carte audio


Despre autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

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  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite Stephen King books
  • (5/5)
    Read this book when I was eleven years old, which is also the year it came out. I was enthralled with it. I loved it then, the layers, the depth. It was a stretch for King. I think he was pulling on some personal demons while writing this. Now as an adult I am reading it again. It has not lost its sense of wonder. Of course it is easer to understand. There are a few chapters where you really feel for Jack. His first night alone in the territories is frightening. Kings makes it clear what it would be like for ourselves as a child to experience this lonlieness. I admit, I am not that familiar with Straub, but I will soon be putting a remedy to that. This is a direction however that I did not want to see King step into. Of course a good writer cannot pigieon hole themselves, but his later fantasy work just flew by me.
  • (3/5)
    This book was twice as long as it needed to be. I spent most of the trip through fantasizing about being the one given the task of abridging it. That said, the story was entertaining and was satisfactorily concluded (though with a bit more optimism than I've noted in other King books I've read. I credit that to Straub, I guess.)





    That said,
  • (3/5)
    God pound it, that was a tedious read! There is an awesome 300 page book in this behemoth! Jack Sawyer takes on a Herculean task and must cross the country/Territories to achieve it. Part Tom Sawyer, part Jack Kerouac, and even a bit of Jesus in this 12 year old! A good tale, but stretched out much too long. Makes me nervous about the sequel. Wolf!
  • (3/5)
    A coming-of-age, fantasy, horror story, starring the usual resourceful, intelligent white boy. An entertaining read.
  • (5/5)
    Read it when I was a teen loved it.
    I have the sequel but have yet to indulge.
  • (1/5)
    Horridly adolescent story (tee hee, he said "penis"!). Too many characters are introduced, never to be heard from again. So what is the talisman? How does it work? What is the guitar pick? Even Jack/Jason doesn't fully understand what they are. They should have cut out half this book and then developed the remaining characters. I only read this as a prelude to "The Black House", which is much, much better.
  • (5/5)
    Solid book now on to the next rd . I hate that I’m just now getting into these great books
  • (3/5)
    It’s an unusual story by King. It’s very long and so the story doesn’t flow but rather gets going and then stops for a few chapters. The characters are onedimensional and lack depth and motivation. There are a lot of coincidences and a lot of intuition, which makes the story a bit hard to believe.
    There isn’t a good antagonist. The World in which the story is set is huge, but we barely learn about it. I don’t think I’ll re-read, but I do recommend for fans of coming of age stories and fantasy travel.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite books ever! I love the story!
  • (5/5)
    Red this book when I was younger, it always stuck in my mind, finally tried it again in audio book format... Still the best book I've ever read in my life.. PS. Still waiting for the series for TV, come on, just make it soon.. ?
  • (5/5)
    I read this book when I was in my teens and it’s still to this day my favorite book. It gets me in the feels every time.
  • (1/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    This is one of my favorite books, but the guy reading is terrible. It’s unlistenable. He ends every sentence... and I mean every sentence, with a low, slow breathy word, like a cheesy impression of William Shatner. It never stops!

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)
    Jack Sawyer was my first character crush. Ok, maybe not my first. But what an awesome adventure. It has everything. Horror, mystery, thriller, fantasy, love - mostly familial love, but still. After all this, it is just an amazing story of friendships and the journey.  
  • (3/5)
    3.5 stars 13-year old Jack's mother is dying. He finds himself on a quest from New Hampshire to California to find a “talisman” to cure his mom. This quest will take him back and forth between worlds, this one and the “Territories”. I waffled on this one between rating it ok (3 stars) and good (3.5 stars). I'm not even sure what genre to call it – it was a mix of horror, science fiction, and fantasy, maybe? I'm not always a fantasy fan, and what I did find in this book was that the parts that I lost interest in where mostly the parts in the Territories, the other world. My mind did wander at times, but there were other times where I was interested. In a way, some of the parts felt a little like short stories (which I'm also not a fan of), but more fleshed out short stories, where there would be some focus on the people Jack met and what he was doing for a time, then he'd move and on there would be new people and another “story” before he moved on again. Overall, I'll rate it “good”, but I don't think I'll read the sequel.
  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    When two masters of horror team up you get a masterpiece such as The Talisman. I've actually never read any of Peter Straub's work however am a big Stephen King fan. The Talisman is the story of 12 year old Jakc Sawyer's quest to save his mother and his journey across America and it's twin dimension The Territories. I found this book to be more dark fantasy than horror, however it had its horrific elements as you would expect from the the authors. Truly, the most horrific parts for me were the more human aspects, but this is typical for King at least.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)
    This has a companion book, The Regulators. Aside from being told they were companion books, I really wouldn't have guessed.
  • (2/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Officially the worst book I've read by King as I continue to reread his books in chronological order. First, while I do distinctly remember owning this book when it came out, I had absolutely no recollection of the story whatsoever and now I understand why as it is so forgettable. This book needs to loose 400 or so pages to make it a decent YA fantasy. The book is indeed very adolescent, coming mostly from a 12-year-old's perspective there is hardly anything in the majority of the book to offend anyone. I'm surprised at how cliched the story is. Jack finds out there is an alternate world. His mother is dying in this world and the Queen, who is his mother's twinner, is dying in the other. He has been chosen to be the one who must travel west across the country to find the talisman which will rescue the Queen and his mother. So off he goes on a journey with pages and pages of nothing happening. Even the big showdown at the end with good vs evil was more campy than anything else. I really had to force myself to finish this book, and then only for the sake of my chronological project.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Summary: Jack Sawyer's mother, an aging B-movie actress, picked him up and moved him from California to a moldering hotel in an abandoned-for-the-winter East Coast tourist town. Jack knows there's something wrong, that she's very sick, even though she is doing her best to pretend that everything is fine, and to make things worse, Jack's late father's business partner, Morgan Sloat, is harrassing their family, trying to get Jack's mother to sign over their half of the company. Jack must do something, but he doesn't know what, until a custodian at a local carnival tells him about the Territories - a magical parallel world, a world that Jack's father knew how to visit, and which Jack himself can learn to enter. The Queen of the Territories is also dying, and Jack must go there and retrieve the Talisman, a magical object that will heal both his mother and the Queen. But the Talisman is in California - or the Territories equivalent of California. And how can a twelve-year-old boy make it across the country and back, while being chased by Morgan's evil forces, before time runs out... in both worlds?Review: There are books that have a time limit for me, or an age limit. I've read plenty of books and thought "That was okay, but I bet I would have loved it if I'd read it when I was eight/twelve/fifteen." Mostly these are mid-grade books that don't quite make the leap to adult readership, but in the case of The Talisman, it's more a function of my reading tastes changing over time. Because if someone had handed it to me when I was thirteen or fourteen, when I was in the throes of my horror-reading phase, and was devouring Dean Koontz and Stephen King like they were going out of style, I suspect I would have, if not loved it, at least had an easier time with it than I did as an adult.Because damn, this book was a tough slog for me this time through. It was slow reading, the pacing seemed really terribly off, it rarely drew me in enough to want to go back to it, I didn't get along with the prose style, I didn't really care about most of the characters, I was put off by both the horror/gore and some of the implicit social attitudes in the book, and I knew the quest was going to work out - since that's how these books go - so I wasn't particularly curious about the ending. In fact, I almost DNFed the book despite having committed several weeks to it, and already being 80% of the way through. Instead, I buckled down to some serious skimming to get through the last section (which, unsurprisingly, played out very much like I was expecting.) I think the pacing was the biggest problem. The Talisman is structurally similar to The Odyssey, with the protagonist on a quest, but he keeps getting sidetracked/stuck along his journey. Conceptually, I have no problem with these kinds of road-trip novels, but in the case of The Talisman, the time spent in the various side adventures seemed uneven relative to their overall importance to the story, and just out of balance in general. Fully two-thirds of the book is spent getting Jack from the East Coast to Springfield, Illinois, and then he covers the distance between Illinois and California in only a few chapters, and without any major adventure. I also didn't really care for Jack as a character. I got tired of hearing about how the Territories were changing him to this serene, wise, beautiful boy, especially when I found his companions, Wolf and Richard, much more likeable and interesting, respectively. The rest of the characters didn't fare much better than Jack; particularly distasteful was the character of Speedy Parker, who sets Jack on his way to the Territories with a bottle of magic juice, and could be the model for the "magical negro" character that King's so fond of, complete with dialect. (Also, the shorthand of "casual use of cocaine = villain" got me thinking - that's a trope I remember from my teens, when I read a lot of books like this, but not something that I've seen at all recently. Is that still a thing in more current fiction?) The book shows its age in other ways, too, not only in outdated cultural references but also in some of the attitudes about race, women, and homosexuals that are implicit in the writing. (To wit: "These [sexual advances from grown men] were annoyances a good-looking twelve-year-old boy in Los Angeles simply learned to put up with, the way a pretty woman learns to put up with being groped occasionally on the subway. You eventually find a way to cope without letting it spoil your day." What the hell do King and Straub know about how a woman should react to being groped by a stranger?) Basically, the whole book felt self-indulgent, both in terms of the prose and the plot, without a correspondingly interesting story or compelling characters to merit it. The story definitely has potential: I like the ideas of the Territories, and Twinners, and how actions in one world affect the other; I loved Wolf as a character, and Richard's contrast to Jack; and some of the individual scenes were very tense and compelling... but the bloat of the book quickly swamped out the good parts. I probably would have put up with it (or even eaten it up) as a teen, but I've gotten less patient in my old age. 2.5 out of 5 stars.Recommendation: It seems like there are plenty of people out there who liked this book a whole lot better than I did, so if you like supernatural horror and/or fantasy quest novels, particularly ones set in the real world, it might be worth a try. But for me, I think I've grown out of, or at least away from, this type of book, and King's style of prose.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (2/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I started this book in July. I forced myself to read it. I love King, and the only book of his I *forced* myself to finish was Lisey's Story. I thought that that book was the only book of his I didn't like. I was wrong. The Talisman is a very long book that drags on needlessly. The only thing that struck me was how miserable King & Straub make life seem. Nothing but pain and murder. I didn't see a point at all. Why continue going on? There was just more horrific things to be seen. The ending was very abrupt and God help me, I have Black House. I hope this sequel will be good.

    I was told this book was like The Dark Towers series. No wonder I never wanted to read them!

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    For me, the best bits about this book were the excellent locations - a creepy, out of season hotel and its fantastical, horrific 'opposite', a deserted theme park (always a winner!) and a slow, open train ride across a dangerous wasteland. There were also some original and very memorable supporting characters and the flipping between parallel worlds was consistently well realised.

    It misses out on the final star only because, for me, it was a little too long and I didn't really warm to the main protagonist as much as I would have liked.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Great novel...was not sure what to expect with this collaboration but it was amazing.Moving right into Black House.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)
    I've never read anything written solely by Peter Straub, so I didn't really know what to expect from a collaboration between him and Stephen King. Honestly, in the end, it just felt mostly like a Stephen King book, but maybe that's because I haven't read any Peter Straub. In terms of the writing on a basic level, The Talisman is a pretty easy read. The flow is pretty good and there aren't any stupidly show-offy words or anything like it. At times it does feel a bit like it could do with some editing, but overall, I liked it.

    I liked the plot quite a lot. The core principle is something anyone can relate to, really: someone close to Jack Sawyer is dying, and he has to find a cure. The way this plays out isn't so realistic, perhaps -- if one object could cure all ills, life would be so much simpler, after all! But that's fantasy for you. The Territories is a pretty average idea of "the other world", which reminds me of Stephen Lawhead's version in The Paradise War, except less Celtic and more... well, American. The worlds King and Straub build up are rich with detail, all the same. The idea of Twinners and the importance of single-selved beings within the story is interesting, and I enjoyed the Jack/Jason thing that spanned throughout.

    The characters are lovely. The bad guys are all pretty obvious and twisted, it's true, but the sympathetic characters -- particularly, for me, Wolf and Richard -- are amazing. My definition of amazing tends to be "not perfect, maybe even kind of irritating at times, but somehow I love them so much anyway". Which is the same for both Wolf and Richard. As for the main character, Jack -- well, he fits the bill, too. The only problem with him was that I could never quite picture a boy of his age acting in the way he does. I kept imagining him as older than he actually is -- fourteen, fifteen, instead of twelve. But that wasn't a huge problem for me.

    I really, really enjoyed this book, overall. I can see flaws in it, and in places it turned out to be a little too predictable for me, but all the same, all that aside, I loved it.
  • (4/5)
    Terrific revisonist version of Huckleberry Finn. Wolf is one of King's best reations.
  • (4/5)
    Jack arrives at the Alhambra hotel in New Hampshire with the knowledge that his mother is sick and probably dying. In the slow season for the tourist town, no one is around and Jack spends his days wandering around empty beaches and an old abandoned amusement park. His only friend is Speedy Parker, an old jazz musician turned custodian, who sends him off on a journey between world in search of a magical talisman that can save his mother's life. The story is epic in scope, jumping between this world and an alternate parallel world, each presenting their own unique horrors, as Jack travels across the U.S. Though firmly rooted in fantasy, with our young hero going on a quest for a magical object that can defeat evil in the name of a good queen, the novel also presents numerous horror tropes, including lots of blood splatter, popping eyeballs, grotesque creatures, and other moments of gore and the macabre, as well as the occasional gratuitous allusion to sex. The first chunk of 100 pages or so were slow going for me at first. One, because there's the long build up before Jack finally takes action (he's a kid, so I can forgive him his indecision). And two, because the character Speedy Parker (a.k.a. the "Magical Negro") annoyed me from the get-go, because he's just such a caricature of a person without much (or any) depth beyond giving Jack a boost into his adventure and show up at opportune times to keep him going. King is kind of known for using the "Magical Negro" trope in several of his novels, so I'm not surprised to see it, but still. Anyway, after those first hundred pages, I was into the story enough that it all began to flow and it carried me easily through the bulk of the story. I simultaneously loved and was annoyed by the character Wolf, as I was with the character Richard. The villains are all ugly and villainous, with not much dimension to them beyond their desire for power and their delight in cruelty. The good guys are very good and the bad guys are very, very bad and there is no in between.Jack is the only one that was fully and complete character. You get to see him grow from a very young boy into an early adulthood by the end of the book. He has moment of darkness and cruelty in him, while all the while striving to be brave and noble and good. He's very, very different by the end of the book than he is at the beginning. It's interesting that this was cowritten by King and Straub, because it was so cohesive that I couldn't tell who wrote what. However, the moments of sheer gore certainly had King's particular flair and in general this seemed a King sort of book, so much so that I didn't see much of Straub in it (maybe it's because I haven't read enough Straub, but based on what I have read he seems more multidimensional than this).So, I guess my final analysis is that I really, really enjoyed this book with some rather strong reservations.
  • (5/5)
    The Talisman by Stephen King and Peter Straub was my first journey into the world of Jack Sawyer and the Territories, and as a fan of King's Dark Tower series (of which this eventually became a companion novel), I was thrown back to a time when the Dark Tower universe was young and largely unexplored. Or as King might phrase it, much of the fossil had yet to be discovered.Getting comfortable with Jack's world takes some time even though it's similar to our own. Mostly similar. It wouldn't be King without a few supernatural surprises. Fortunately, Jack has no idea what he's in for so we get to learn and grow with him.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. I lost my old copy and bought another when I, with my significant other,started a book club. I wanted to review Black House, and thought it best to read the Talisman first. This was a great move! Although Black house is "not a sequel," it does find an adult Jack Sawyer (with no memory of his past adventure) living in a small town. He is a police officer who investigates some strange happenings that cause him to have bizarre dreams. Eventually he remembers, and knows he must act quickly to save the town. If you liked Talisman, you'll love Black House..
  • (5/5)
    I read The Talisman when I was in high school, and the story still sticks with me today. It's part horror, part fantasy, part adventure. What King and Straub managed to do was weave a wonderful story with intrigue and suspense, regardless of how you want to classify it. In The Talisman, Jack Sawyer must travel between his world and a parallel universe where his mother is the queen all in the hopes of saving his mother, who is dying. The novel has a clear dark edge to it despite the youth of its protagonist. It's not all fun and games for Jack, who has the ability to flip between worlds in this adventure. In the process he befriends Wolf, a werewolf from the alternative universe. Wolf provides some comic relief as well as some scary moments for Jack as he transforms into a werewolf in our world under a full moon.Trying to stop Jack in his quest is his evil uncle Morgan Sloat and the forces that work for him, who would like to see Jack's mother perish. The novel has a definite epic feel to it. There are a lot of interesting parallels between the worlds like how time and distance are related to each other as well as the contrast between the use of magic and technology. The Talisman is one of the novels that really turned me on to the worlds of fantasy and horror and made me want to write. It's brilliantly crafted and well written. Separately Stephen King and Peter Straub are great writers, but together they work magic.Carl Alves - author of Two For Eternity.
  • (4/5)
    To be honest, I read this book back when I was 14 when the paperback came out, and I loved it. I've never been much of a King fan (and I've never read another Straub book), and if I read it now I don't know if I would love it as much, but I will say that I can still conjure up images from this book in my mind after all this time.
  • (2/5)
    Trying to finish The Talisman has been frustrating. I lost interest during the Blasted Lands and just haven't been able to get back into it. Perhaps I'll make it through some other time, but as it stands I have a To-Read pile to get to.