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Joyland

Joyland

Scris de Stephen King

Povestit de Michael Kelly


Joyland

Scris de Stephen King

Povestit de Michael Kelly

evaluări:
4.5/5 (164 evaluări)
Lungime:
7 hours
Lansat:
Jun 4, 2013
ISBN:
9781442359925
Format:
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Descriere

"Joyland is a breathtaking, beautiful, heartbreaking book....Even the most hardboiled readers will find themselves moved" (Charles Ardai, Edgar- and Shamus Award-winning editor of Hard Case Crime).

Set in a small-town North Carolina amusement park in 1973, Joyland tells the story of the summer in which college student Devin Jones comes to work as a carny and confronts the legacy of a vicious murder, the fate of a dying child, and the ways both will change his life forever. Joyland is a brand-new novel and has never previously been published.
Lansat:
Jun 4, 2013
ISBN:
9781442359925
Format:
Carte audio

De asemenea, disponibil ca...

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Despre autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and an AT&T Audience Network original television series). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

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  • (5/5)
    Man, King can write. Not that this is news, but he just blows me away sometimes. I think this is my favorite of his so far.
  • (5/5)
    This was a really fun book and I enjoyed reading it. I am a sucker for books about amusement parks or carnivals, so right away this book intrigued me. There is a ghost story at the heart of the book, and some psychic powers, but mostly this book was about a nice boy who is looking into a decades old murder that happened at the amusement park where he is currently working.
  • (4/5)
    A little slow at the beginning, but the ending was packed full.
  • (4/5)
    A murder mystery but also a coming of age story and an evocative nostalgic encapsulation of a place and time
  • (5/5)
    Stephen King--Big Steve--has been quoted as saying, “I recognize terror as the finest emotion and so I will try to terrorize the reader. But if I find that I cannot terrify, I will try to horrify, and if I find that I cannot horrify, I'll go for the gross-out. I'm not proud.” Indeed.

    Oh, how times have changed! As they will, and must. And Stephen King's writing has changed too. I don't dare call it "gentler", but the story content has changed somewhat and I think my first sure sign was "The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon". What a lovely tale! Terrifying, dark, yes...but, yes! Lovely! Even heartwarming, not necessarily any new territory for King, but done so well it might as well have been a complete change of direction. There were no monsters, except for the ones you produced in your own head. Which was okay, as I was in intensive care when I read it, and I'd had enough of blood, thank you very much.

    Now, I am not so enthusiastic about horror as a genre as I used to be, though I still relish the annual Year's Best Dark Fantasy and Horror (to be reviewed soon) which my wife gifts me with each Christmas. Maybe it's age, I don't know. I do know I sure do wince when I see those stupid videos on TV where someone hurts themselves doing something silly. THAT is horror now; perhaps it is that we are so inured to it anymore. And to think I used to do stuff like that! But anyway. Perhaps Mr. King has aged thus as well, and of course he has done his own share of sheet time in the Crash House, and perhaps it's only expected that he produce somewhat mellower works. If that's the case, I'm fine with it because he's still one of those writers I really look forward to reading every time they produce something new. If this is a sea change in King's work, well, then I am all for it.

    So, "Joyland" then, which is an amusement park in North Carolina to which our protagonist Devin Jones retreats whilst taking some time off from school and a girlfriend who has apparently rejected him. Joyland is a sort of a second tier amusement park, a local Coney Island. In fact, that's what the proprietors insist on calling the patrons: "Conies". As opposed to the usual carney term, "Rubes". And there is a a lot of carney talk in this story, which really adds to the realism. I enjoy dialect and it was a pleasure delving into the culture.

    At its core "Joyland" is a murder mystery, which is as it should be: this is a Hard Case book after all. But it's also a Stephen King book, so there will be some elements of what I call "believable unreality", and here it is a ghost which is (probably not coincidentally) located in the Horror House. There is a deep cast of characters including Fred Dean, the boss; Erin and Tom, Devin's fellow "greenies"; Lane Hardy, the rhyming roustabout; Mrs. Shoplaw, the concerned landlady; Rozzie Gold, aka Madame Fortuna; Eddie Parks, the embittered master of the Horror House; and finally Annie Ross and her afflicted son Mike who live in the great house on the beach. What bits of the story don't revolve around Devin neatly pivot around these two, and Annie is one of the most engaging characters Big Steve has ever created. Mike is sort of a Danny Torrance, if you will, and if you've read a lot of King you know what I mean. Lots of other supporting roles just add to the complexity.

    I won't say too much more lest I spoil it for everyone, but suffice to say that "Joyland" is all that and more: a complete joy to read and a book you won't be putting down till you're done. It cost me several late nights and that's the kind of admission price I don't mind paying. Get up there where the air is rare and read this one while you can; also check out King's other entry in the Hard Case library, "The Colorado Kid". It bears little resemblance to the TV show which spun from it (SyFy's delightfully weird "Haven") but it's a darned good read. I may have to start collecting these Hard Case books now…as if I needed another literary obsession…

    PS: Look closely for the name-dropping of one of my favorite fantasy authors. Wire me when you find it!
  • (4/5)
    2013. Cinematic carnaval/ amusement park murder/chase scenes. Kept me guessing.
  • (3/5)
    Joyland by Stephen King is much different than a lot of his work. First of all it is less than 300 pages, and secondly, it is not his usual thriller type read, but instead a part of the Hard Crimes Collection which concentrates on traditional mysteries.
    In the case of Joyland, the story started much the same as his longer work. Great character development and everything else that draws a reader in. The problem is that there was not much happening for nearly half way through other than character development, relationship ties, and a coming of age bit that really wasn't relative to the overall story.
    The positive here is that I was invested enough in the characters to care about what was going to happen and it kept me reading; the writing style, although different than King's usual stuff, was pretty terrific; the mystery was satisfying in the end for fans of the traditional noir style; and the shorter length appeals to me as it has always been my opinion that King's work has usually been too lengthy, just for the sake of being so, and could be culled of a couple of hundred pages with the result of a more positive reading experience.
    Overall, I am glad that I read Joyland, was pleased with the end result, but could have very well done without the lengthy "coming of age" garble.
  • (5/5)
    I wasn't super excited to read this one after The Colorado Kid (ending was unsatisfying in way that didn't feel like it had purpose), but then another author described it in a way that seemed appealing, so I gave it a shot and it was perfect. People are criticizing the book for not adhering to Dashiell Hammett conventions of crime genre because there is a supernatural component, but I think the melange works and still comes out a crime novel. Regardless of genre preferences, it transcends and is just a really good read.
  • (4/5)
    Another enjoyable King entry in the book world and as usual, we find well written and fleshed out characters and well detailed story line to go along with it.

    4.5 Stars for a nice enjoyable quick story.
  • (4/5)
    "Joyland" by Stephen King was great fun. Set in the summer of 1973, college student Devin Jones takes a job at an amusement park known as Joyland. Like any good amusement park, it is supposedly haunted by the ghost of a young woman who was murdered on one of the rides. Devin's friends Tom and Erin are skeptical, until they ride the haunted house ride and Tom sees her ghost. Erin starts doing research to see if she can find out more about the other murders that were committed by the same man. Meanwhile, Devin stays and continues working at Joyland after the park closes for the winter. In town he meets a sweet young boy named Mike who is dying of MD. Mike's mom is very overprotective of her son, but all Mike wants to do is go to the amusement park he's heard all summer long. Devin arranges it and Mike has a wonderful time. Mike is also psychic, and ends up saving Devin's life. It was a great quick read.
  • (5/5)
    It's a coming of age story about a young college kid who gets his heart broken by picking the wrong girl and not reading the signals. It's about this same kid leaving New England for a summer job at Joyland, a beAt up old amusement park on the Carolina shore. That summer he learns the ropes as a carny. And he hears from a fortune teller that he will meet two children, one with the gift of sight. It is a haunting nostalgic tale that takes place in the early 70s and is told by a master storyteller. If you read just one book this year, this should be the one.
  • (4/5)
    Stephen King gets it! First love, first loss, crushing emotions, questions not easily answered, mystery and the mysterious. I always wonder when someone says "I just don't like his writing." How can you not love an author who can sum up life with:

    " When you're twenty-one, life is a roadmap. It's only when you get to twenty-five or so that you begin to suspect you've been looking at the map upside down, and not until you're forty are you entirely sure. By the time you're sixty, take it from me, you're fucking lost."
  • (5/5)
    I once heard someone say that Stephen King writes worlds that the reader can step into and live in for a while. Joyland is one of those worlds and may just be a new favorite King book for me.I'm not a huge fan of your typical ghost story. However, despite the supernatural elements that so often show up in King novels, this is really less a ghost story and more a coming-of-age/slice-of-life tale - with a murder mystery. While there are certainly supernatural goings-on, this story is nearer in spirit, (pardon the pun), to The Body or Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption than it is to the more overt Christine or The Shining.Speaking of the mystery... though I sussed out the killer fairly early, it did not detract from the rest of the journey. By the time I reached the denouement, I found Joyland had been a real page-turner that flew by all too quickly.
  • (5/5)
    College student Devin Jones takes a summer job at a small amusement park in North Carolina known as Joyland, which is rumored to be haunted by the ghost of a murdered girl. More haunting to Devin is the memory of his first love, who recently broke up with him. A psychic employed by the amusement park also makes cryptic remarks about two children impacting Devin's life, one of whom will be a psychic as well. I was very impressed with this book. In it, King's superb writing style shines. The characters are all deeply interesting and mostly well-rounded. The jumps back in forth between the 1970s when Devin is in his early 20s to the present when Devin is an older man reflecting back on this time in his life work very well, creating appropriate amounts of foreshadowing and dramatic tension. The mystery is intriguing as well, although it is really only a small part of the story. (There is an element of the supernatural here, but it's worth noting this isn't really a ghost story. You won't be creeped out by this book.) Rather, the book is largely about Devin growing up and the people who help that maturation process. For the audophile, Michael Kelly was exceptional as the reader of this audiobook. He employed just the right amount of emotion for each turn in the plot and an array of different voices to distinguish the characters. His reading was compelling from beginning to end. I highly recommend this book for fans of King or just fans of well-written drama.
  • (4/5)
    "Joyland" is a steady, haunting melody of memory and youth and innocence that was euphoric. Devin Jones is a heartbroken college student getting away from the world and taking a job in a little theme park called Joyland. The summer of 1973 Devin will tell you was one of the most beautiful and also probably his saddest. Devin's a jack of all-trades in Joyland, sometimes he works the rides, other times he's forced to "wear the fur," and during that time he learns the lingo of the carnival, The "talk" as it's called. All of this helps to place you in Devin's world.

    This isn't you're standard Stephen King story. It's introduced early on as something of a ghost story, about the Haunted House ride really being haunted by a woman who was killed there years ago... and the mystery develops as the plot does. This book is really more of a character drama. We follow Devin's summer and then autumn and we watch him grow up. Some of those growing up moments are truly wonders to read. King turns what could be a rather boring moment of Devin wearing a dog costume and entertaining children into one of the best moments I've read all year. Devin states at one point that it's his last summer as a child, and by the end of the book you see him emerge that autumn as an adult. It's an all the more heart felt experience when you remember that it's a 60 year old Devin that's telling the story.
  • (4/5)
    This isn't like the majority of Stephen King's work, but, at the same time, it still possesses his trademark writing style. Fans of Stephen King will no doubt enjoy this work, but it may not become a favorite. I enjoyed Joyland, but I enjoy King's work more when he sticks to the horror genre. He has a real talent for telling scary stories, but this just isn't one of them. The first half of the story went by very slowly, at least to me. If I wasn't such a big fan of King, I might not have stuck with the book. It's his writing style that really enlivens some of the dragging plot here. Only at the end does the plot really pick up, and when it does it feels a bit too abrupt after the slower pace of the rest of the novel. Anyway, die hard King fans will enjoy this, but die hard crime novel or mystery fans may leave a bit disappointed.
  • (3/5)
    King's writing is compelling and engaging as ever, but this novel is average overall. The characters don't come alive the way other novels of his do. In fact I would have enjoyed more of the characters beyond just Devin. It troubled me that a now elderly man wpuld still be stuck in the mindset of "screw this girl who broke up with me to have sex with another man" literally decades later. It's immature and it's sexist, and here it is so overdone that it warps the rest of the novel. I could understand maybe if the narrator were still 21, but he's grown, and the events of that summer should so very much overshadow a breakup. A grown man relating a crime story while fixated on a girl he thinks didn't deserve him because she didn't want to have sex with him? Sigh.
  • (3/5)
    good- a little slow but enjoyably so. a good summer or winter book. One for a long evening, under the sun by the pool/beach or curled up underyour fuzziest, softest blanket with a mug of hot cocoa and a roaring fire to keep you company.
  • (4/5)
    I definitely enjoyed it. Whenever I would pick it up I would get lost and wouldn't put it down until something jogged me back into reality. There are a lot of "quotable lines" in here as well. Stephen King is a very odd mix of thriller and literary, and I like it a lot.I can't say it was perfect, though. While the ultimate conclusion WAS surprising and moderately satisfying, it wasn't as good as I was expecting. Mike's constant "It's not white" reminder took me a long time to figure out after I'd finished the book, and the clues that actually led Dev to the killer seemed a little far-fetched.I get so nit-picky on endings that just this fact alone made me less excited about the book overall, but it really is a good read and I definitely recommend. I'm excited to finally be getting into Stephen King.
  • (5/5)
    I love Steven King, but this one is a favorite. The writing is picturesque and the narrator fit perfectly - highly recommend.
  • (5/5)
    I’m so glad this story wasn’t like all those other amusement park/carnival type horror stories.
    I wouldn’t even put this in the horror category nor would I consider this a thriller. It was like reading an old school murder mystery.
    This was a coming of age story with paranormal elements. It’s was magic in the making....not some cheap thrill ride.
  • (5/5)
    This is a great book. The narrator was really good too. I'm not going to give it away because you're going to read this right now. Just do it you can thank me later
  • (3/5)
    Have you read any Stephen King novels? Did they have a psychic with a deadly illness or physical ailment? Well, prepare for more of the same. I didn't have strong feelings for Joyland. For being part of a Hard Boiled novel series (via publisher Hard Case Crime), I was left wondering if it was ever going to pick up pace.

    In the classic King formula, Joyland is about an author (no surprise) who is writing about the past (no surprise) and the terrible experience he had to overcome (still no surprise) with the help of a terminally ill psychic child.......No Suprise..

    There is a murder, there is a ghost, fortune teller, cranky old people, and carnies. And no real surprises.

    Was it good? Well yeah, look who wrote it, of course it was good. Was it anything new? No.. Was it hard boiled, no no no..

    Just more of the same. Fans should read it, but don't expect ground breaking new King work.

    It is more interesting as a carny life retrospective than anything else. I found those aspects highly fascinating and the novel led me down a couple internet black holes as I researched interesting carny topics spurred from reading this.


    Reblurb-
    Not needed, the original is more than adequate.
    The cover is amazing, I wish I liked the book as much as the artwork. What is stupid ridiculous is how much more I like the limited edition cover, which came with a hard case false book box and a fold out map of the JoyLand world. The green dress cover is incredible, but shotgun on the beach is what I expect of a King novel.


    Publisher Description:
    All-time Best-selling Author STEPHEN KING Returns with a Novel of Carny Life—and Death . . .

    College student Devin Jones took the summer job at Joyland hoping to forget the girl who broke his heart. But he wound up facing something far more terrible: the legacy of a vicious murder, the fate of a dying child, and dark truths about life—and what comes after—that would change his world forever.

    Life is Not Always a Butcher’s Game.Sometimes the Prizes Are Real.Sometimes They’re Precious.

    A riveting story about love and loss, about growing up and growing old—and about those who don’t get to do either because death comes for them before their time—JOYLAND is Stephen King at the peak of his storytelling powers. With all the emotional impact of King masterpieces such as The Green Mile and The Shawshank Redemption, JOYLAND is at once a mystery, a horror story, and a bittersweet coming-of-age novel, one that will leave even the most hard-boiled reader profoundly moved.
  • (4/5)
    What is Joyland? A summer of firsts. First love. Summer job. First broken heart. Summer friends. First sex affair. Joyland is pure nostalgia and a look back at a long passed (lost?) youth by a man in his sixties. Joyland is pure nostalgia and the remembrance of a time in one's life where even if tragic things were happening -- the future was laid out in front of you like a map and it seemed like an adventure.

    “When you're twenty-one, life is a roadmap. It's only when you get to be twenty-five or so that you begin to suspect that you've been looking at the map upside down, and not until you're forty are you entirely sure. By the time you're sixty, take it from me, you're fucking lost.”

    Joyland is told from the point of view of an older man remembering a summer from his college years in the early 1970s -- Devin. For summer break, Devin applies to work at an amusement park in the south along the Atlantic coast -- Joyland. Joyland is an amusement park of America's past, just like Devin's youth. The park is not Disney, it is not big and shiny, but owned by one man and held together with hope and the desire to provide fun.

    “The Disney parks are scripted, and I hate that. Hate it. I think what they are doing down there in Orlando is fun-pimping...”

    Joyland is not just a nostalgic stroll down the memory of someone long past youth – this is a Stephen King novel! And because it is a Stephen King novel it involves murder, death, pain, mystery and ghosts interwoven with a story of the past. Or maybe, is the murder, mystery and ghost a way to tell a nostalgic story? Maybe that is what King is doing here. The story is youth. The story is remembering. And the story is nostalgia. The setting is the summer of 1973 and a southern amusement park and this provides King with an opportunity to create a unique world that almost seems fantastical and is populated by a cast of interesting characters. Life long carnies, a widowed homeowner who rents out rooms and serves to tell the history of the murder, a disgraced single mom of a dying boy, a ghost of a murdered woman, and idealistic college kids working for the summer -- these are the characters of Joyland.

    The murder is not shocking, not for 2013 sensibilities and not for readers who have seen even just one episode of CSI or Law and Order, but the story is not centered on the shock or the gore of the murder but the mystery of who did it, who was murdered and why. Joyland won't keep you up at night from fear and you likely won't remember the details of the story a few days or weeks after you put it down, but while you are immersed in the story you will experience the summer of 1973. And that is the beauty of this story, the re-living of youth, the experiencing a different time in a special place -- and the carny talk.

    Joyland is short, less than 9 narrated hours and about 283 pages. It is a quick read and one you can immerse yourself in immediately. Like Joyland and amusement parks like it, once I finished reading Joyland the story slipped through the cracks in my memory. This story is good entertainment; it is a fast ride that involves some quick turns and ups and downs; it is fun but it is not long lasting.

    To read this review and more like it check out Badass Book Reviews.
  • (5/5)
    is a very interesting book to read
    got it at a goodwill store for 50 cents and is a new book it hadn't been read until I started reading it after I got home today from going to the store.
    it was a really good book to read. it is a must read for any one that is a STEPHEN KING fan
    LAST BOOK I READ FOR 2013
  • (4/5)
    I had a great time with this book. After refusing to read Stephen King for most of my life, I have a lot of catching up to do now that I realize I actually love his writing. I decided to pick up Joyland while I had some time off work for the holidays and found it to be a very entertaining way to spend a few hours. I am really starting to understand why Stephen King is such a popular author.This story takes place in 1973 and is largely set at a small amusement park called Joyland. We get to spend the summer with 21-year-old Devin as he works at Joyland for the summer. Devin has a broken heart after being dumped by his college girlfriend but throws himself into his new job with gusto. I love that we get so see so many aspects of the park since Devin seems to work just about everywhere. The characters in this book were fantastic. I loved getting to know Devin and I really felt like I knew him by the end of the book. The storytelling style of this book is as if Devin were telling us a story years after these events and at times he would meander and jump ahead a bit. I thought that this style really made the story feel authentic and added a lot of charm to the story. Devin's friends at the park, his co-workers, and a little boy and his mom all had important roles to play in this story and I felt like King did a remarkable job of bringing each of them to life. The story was a little slow to get moving with the first half of the book more focused on character development. The pace did pick up during the second half of the book and I was really interested in learning how the girl at been murdered in the park years earlier. I thought I had the mystery solved only to learn that I was way off base. I also thought that Devin and Mike's relationship added a lot to the story. There were a lot of different elements that came together in this shorter work to tell a really amazing story.I would recommend this book to others. I thought that this was a very well-told story with great characters, an interesting mystery, and just a touch of paranormal. I can't wait to continue working on Stephen King's amazing backlist.
  • (5/5)
    Traditional mystery novel set in the mid-70's at a small amusement park. It contains classic King elements like illness, insanity, special powers and a ghost. It was a fun, quick read.
  • (5/5)
    unsettling and heartbreaking. classic King.
  • (4/5)
    Joyland was a bit of a departure from the usual Stephen King novel. For one thing, although it had supernatural elements to it, it was at its heart a mystery. Also, I’ve never read a Stephen King book that took place in a carnival setting, although Joyland was technically an amusement park, it still seemed more like a travelling carnival. There was a good deal of carny lingo in there at the least.The story’s protagonist, Dev, is a college kid who had just gotten his heart broken by his college sweetheart. He spends the summer far from his university working at an amusement park in North Carolina. The park has a haunted house type of ride that is actually haunted from a woman who was murdered while going on the ride—and that is the heart of the mystery in this novel. What shapes the story is when Dev sees the park’s fortune teller, who actually has some psychic ability, and she tells him that a young boy and girl will figure prominently in his future. As it turns out, this young boy, besides suffering from a debilitating disease, also has psychic abilities, and figures in his quest to solve the mystery of the haunted ride murder.This was an enjoyable novel. It was really strong from a characterization standpoint. There were very memorable characters, from Dev on through numerous side characters. Although the mystery element was well done, most of the book did not focus on that part of it. Most of the book focuses on his evolving as a person and his relationship with the crippled boy and her mom—both of whom are also standout characters. I liked the supernatural parts of it, and thought it meshed well with the mystery. The one negative was a groan-inducing part at the end that involved the reveal of the killer, but otherwise this was a satisfying novel.Carl Alves - author of Battle of the Soul
  • (5/5)
    Joyland was fantastic! The feel of an classic mystery story. A touch of paranormal. Stephen King's distinctive ability to give his character's believable voices. Desription so well written, you can smell the cotton candy and feel the stickiness of the humidity. You absolutely cannot go wrong with Joyland. Here's hoping Stephen King writes another in this genre because he does it extremely well.