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10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found a Self-help That Actually Works--a True Story

10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found a Self-help That Actually Works--a True Story

Scris de Dan Harris

Povestit de Dan Harris


10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found a Self-help That Actually Works--a True Story

Scris de Dan Harris

Povestit de Dan Harris

evaluări:
4.5/5 (591 evaluări)
Lungime:
7 hours
Lansat:
Mar 11, 2014
ISBN:
9780062331892
Format:
Carte audio

Nota editorului

Hilarious and engaging...

With anxiety levels up for all of us due to the coronavirus crisis, Dan Harris’s personal journey to understand happiness after suffering an on-air panic attack is the guide we all need to de-stress. Told with the right mix of empathy, humor, and a journalist’s skepticism, Harris helps us focus on what we can control.

Descriere

Nightline anchor Dan Harris embarks on an unexpected, hilarious, and deeply skeptical odyssey through the strange worlds of spirituality and self-help, and discovers a way to get happier that is truly achievable.

After having a nationally televised panic attack on Good Morning America, Dan Harris knew he had to make some changes. A lifelong nonbeliever, he found himself on a bizarre adventure, involving a disgraced pastor, a mysterious self-help guru, and a gaggle of brain scientists. Eventually, Harris realized that the source of his problems was the very thing he always thought was his greatest asset: the incessant, insatiable voice in his head, which had both propelled him through the ranks of a hyper-competitive business and also led him to make the profoundly stupid decisions that provoked his on-air freak-out.

We all have a voice in our head. It’s what has us losing our temper unnecessarily, checking our email compulsively, eating when we’re not hungry, and fixating on the past and the future at the expense of the present. Most of us would assume we’re stuck with this voice – that there’s nothing we can do to rein it in – but Harris stumbled upon an effective way to do just that. It’s a far cry from the miracle cures peddled by the self-help swamis he met; instead, it’s something he always assumed to be either impossible or useless: meditation. After learning about research that suggests meditation can do everything from lower your blood pressure to essentially rewire your brain, Harris took a deep dive into the underreported world of CEOs, scientists, and even marines who are now using it for increased calm, focus, and happiness.

10% Happier takes readers on a ride from the outer reaches of neuroscience to the inner sanctum of network news to the bizarre fringes of America’s spiritual scene, and leaves them with a takeaway that could actually change their lives.

Lansat:
Mar 11, 2014
ISBN:
9780062331892
Format:
Carte audio


Despre autor

Dan Harris is the coanchor of Nightline and the weekend editions of Good Morning America. He regularly reports for 20/20, World News with Diane Sawyer, and the weekday editions of Good Morning America. Before joining ABC News fourteen years ago, he worked for local news outlets in Boston and Maine. He lives with his wife, Bianca, in New York City. This is his first book.

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  • (3/5)
    Amusing anecdotal account of how meditation helped an insecure overachiever become a well known correspondent and newscaster without losing his mind and all his friends. Anti-spiritual in a way but he gets the results. Perhaps "real" in the sense that his practice takes the edge off rather than curing his anxieties.
  • (4/5)
    An excellent portrayal of ones discovery of the benefits of meditation. From dismissal to believability Dan Harris explains how he struggled along the way to ultimately find the answers he didn't know he was looking for.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent memoir on the author's experience with discovering meditation and mindfulness and their benefits. Many times Christians have a fear that meditation will somehow corrupt their spiritual practice, but given what science is learning about the mind, meditation and mindfulness could enhance the spiritual experience of individuals regardless of their religious affiliation. The author himself is not even religious, appearing to consider himself an atheist, and even he sees, and has reaped, the benefits of meditation and mindfulness. To top it off, Harris' writing is by degrees hilarious, insightful and brutally honest.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this quite a bit. Dan Harris has an engaging writing style, and I related to his skepticism. I think I might give this whole meditation thing a try.
  • (3/5)
    10% is a great part of the title for this book. The first 90% of the book, I seriously wondered why I was reading it (hint: put on your speed reading to power though). The last chapter is thoughtful and has some good analysis of what works. A newscasters summary.
  • (4/5)
    Dan Harris is a national television news broadcaster who discovered meditation as a way to quiet his mind, ease anxiety, and find a little more happiness. Early in his career on national television, he was dealing with a lot of anxiety, and doing some pretty self-destructive things, which led him to have a nationally televised panic attack while delivering the news. When he was assigned to be the religion correspondent for his network, he was able to meet with all sorts of religious leaders and self-help gurus. A lifelong skeptic, he was surprised to find himself beginning to take to heart some of the things these gurus were teaching. Slowly, he finds his skepticism waning (though never vanishing) as he begins a daily meditation practice, befriends mindfulness teachers, and even participates in a 10 day meditation retreat. I liked Harris's take on meditation. He is initially turned off to the idea, because so much of what is written and said about it feels so spacey, unrealistic, and sometimes just way too far out in left field. I found the questions that Harris asks Eckhart Tolle and Deepak Chopra regarding their teachings to be some of the same questions I would ask, and I found myself equally unsatisfied with their answers. I had a similar reaction to Harris when reading Tolle, a mix of awe and skepticism. Throughout his meditation journey, Harris had mostly decoupled meditation from spirituality, as many are doing since meditation is becoming more and more mainstream. The military and corporate executives are using meditation to sharpen focus and mental clarity, and many on the more Buddhist end of the spectrum see that sharper minds in these fields might not be such a great thing if not backed with the Buddhist tenants of compassion and loving-kindness. Harris ends up working a little bit of that into his practice. In the end, I liked Harris's story. I appreciated his skepticism, but also his ability to not let this skepticism close his mind, but instead to keep exploring, challenging himself, and asking questions.
  • (5/5)
    Give it a read - give it a try.. I did and instantly saw the benefit. Now I'm a meditator & proud of it.

    And to boot??? It's the next BIG thing!
  • (5/5)
    Excellent. Except that unnecessary jab at The Power of Positive Thinking. But Norman would forgive him.
  • (4/5)
    It’s not called a memoir, but it’s a memoir. Had I known this, I’m not sure if I would have chosen to read it; I’m not one for celebrity memoirs. Glad I didn’t know this, going in. Yes, it’s a memoir, but it’s also a book about a person who is not very happy becoming a little bit happier. He shares ways that we can all become a little bit happier, too. And that’s worth the cover price.
  • (4/5)
    As sardonic in his writing as he is on tv. Enjoyed reading the book about his search for inner calm.
  • (5/5)
    I've read a fair share of self-help books, most of them underwhelming, and I can tell you this is not the case with 10% Happier by Dan Harris. First off, it's not self-help; it's a memoir. And it's a side-splitting, hilarious one at that.
  • (5/5)
    I picked this book up by chance not thinking that I would like it a lot. I did not anticipate that a news anchor would have much new insight on the topic of happiness and meditation. Boy, was I wrong. I found Dan Harris' book very absorbing and surprisingly insightful.I enjoyed his witty and often very funny narration style and could easily relate to his struggles. In the first part of the book the author details his career in television which was quite interesting. Then he gets into the meat of the story and details his battle with anxiety and compulsive/obsessive thoughts. Almost by accident he stumbles onto spirituality and meditation. A skeptic by nature Harris is not easily won over by the claims of Buddhism that meditation can lead to greater calm and peace in his frantic life. However, when he begins to practice meditation he quickly notices an improvement in his daily life. It helps him to calm the voices in his head and to let go of petty obsessive thoughts. The book concludes with some detailed instructions on how to start a mediation practice and some great tips on how to stay focused. Overall,I thoroughly enjoyed this book and can only recommend it.
  • (5/5)
    After having a nationally televised panic attack on Good Morning America, Dan Harris knew he had to make some changes. A lifelong nonbeliever, he found himself on a bizarre adventure involving a disgraced pastor, a mysterious self-help guru, and a gaggle of brain scientists. Eventually, Harris realized that the source of his problems was the very thing he always thought was his greatest asset: the incessant, insatiable voice in his head, which had propelled him through the rans of a hyper competitive business but, he now recognized, had also led him to make the profoundly stupid decisions that provoked his on-air freak out. After learning about research that suggests meditation can do everything from lower your blood pressure to essentially rewire your brain, Harris took a deep dive into the underreported world of CEOs, scientists, and even marines who are now using it for increased calm, focus, and happiness.
  • (3/5)
    Oh, Dan Harris. You knew guys like Dan Harris in college. They wore white baseball hats and those Adidas flip flops with socks. They made it very far on their charm, then in their 30s realized that life was more than partying and making money and started having Deep Insights that the rest of had when we were 22. Dan wrote a book about his Deep Insights--which happened to be Buddhist meditation, though it just as easily could have been about a conversion to Islam or his discovery of energy vortexes. Luckily, Dan is a very good writer, is very funny, has good stories to tell, and is very good at explaining the benefits that he has found. This is a very good introduction to meditation. How much you enjoy it depends entirely on what you feel about guys like Dan. (Also, if you are concerned about the state of journalism in America, this is not going to make you feel any better about it.)
  • (4/5)
    This is a book, a very personal book, about meditation,10% happier by Dan Harris. He is a major network T.V. journalist, anchorman, an announced agnostic who professionally researched and covered various spiritual avenues/events for his work assignments. It seems a courageous memoir in that he shows an exposed side that searches for meaning and self improvement . He tries searching for things to support his emotional needs for growth, to keep his "chattering" ego under control, often going against the grain of his professional peers and the milieu in which they operate. It is refreshing and honest as he faces the ideas he has and the conclusions he draws and he admits that he often gets it wrong. I liked this book! It is practical, gives lots of explanations for Buddhism and its practises, especially meditation and gives lots of real information. He certainly puts a very big postive plug in for this practice. He's a bright guy and he writes well. We saw his interview on Charlie Rose about this book and he is funny and self depreciating while being smart. He mentioned that while he was 10% happier from his new meditation regime, he is, according to his wife, still 90% of an a**hole! I thought this was funny!
  • (5/5)
    Simply put - a very useful book. Notwithstanding the title - which is a bit too catchy for my taste. But the subtitle - that's the vital thing! This is a hands-on take on mindfulness meditation and Buddhism in general, coming from the experience of a modern man who learned how to meditate and profoundly benefited from it.Dan Harris, a TV news anchor, is mercilessly candid, not without dark humor, in the description of the road that took him to meditation. The first few chapters are about that. But the rest of the book is what impressed me most. It's very relatable, as for the struggles any newcomer to meditation might face. And his insights and revelations are quite valuable. The concepts such as "Acceptance in not passivity" (!), or "Respond, not react" are so monumental that reiterating them only serves us best. Harris went straight for and managed to bring to light "an accurate diagnosis" of numerable examples of "our inner lunacy".I am with Harris - I don't think it's over-reaching to say that "Mindfulness.... could... change the world". In the long run, I think he has really managed to make meditation more appealing to anybody even hardly interested in it. Somebody who couldn't understand Eckhart Tolle - would surely get this guy, even though the message is basically same. After all, as Harris says - "If it could help a monumental skeptic like me, I could imagine what it could do to others."
  • (4/5)
    Audio Book review. Interesting perspectives. Takes a bit to get going as he goes through the back story. Some parts are a bit long winded, but over all worth a listen.
  • (5/5)
    I love everything about this book. He writes beautifully, clearly and hilariously. I was not disengaged for a single chapter, he keeps attention, challenges you and definitely keeps you laughing.
    A brilliant writer, I will be following more of his work.
  • (5/5)
    This book changed the way I think completely to attain happiness
  • (5/5)
    Dans journey into finding mindfulness and making it a continuous part of his life is just amazing. His story telling skills are fantastic and so very engaging. Right mix of humour and wit make this one of my most loved books on how someone stumbled upon mindfulness and made it part of his life!
  • (5/5)
    Extraordinary book. I recommend this book to all those who are struggling to be mindful, compassionate or 10% happier.
  • (5/5)
    A good book to listen to. Lots of great insight that can help to clear the mind.
  • (5/5)
    Dan Harris is great and I really enjoyed his stories and learning about meditation!
  • (1/5)
    I couldn't find anything worth spending the tine for me.
  • (5/5)
    Es un buen relato del acercamiento a la meditación, ya que le quita el misticismo y lo vuelve real y gracioso
  • (5/5)
    It's that to this audiobook that inspired me to go on a meditation retreat. It forever changed my life. Thank you for writing it.
  • (5/5)
    Dan Harris’ first book on meditation served as the motivator, and this book is the instruction manual. Altogether, I found his first book to be more enjoyable, but that book had a different mission - telling a story. In my mind, his two books go hand in hand, and I recommend them both.
  • (5/5)
    This book is super relatable, easy read and very funny! Dan has opened my eyes to what mediation can do for each and every one of us! Definitely recommend :)
  • (5/5)
    Witty, funny, interesting, entertaining, informative....found it difficult to stop listening even when I was so tired I could not stay awake!
    Would recommend, and have done so to many friends, any day.

    Job well done!
  • (4/5)
    There’s some good lessons in this book. A very skeptic atheist embracing Buddhism is intriguing and helps validate his thought process. Mindfulness is the Golden thread through this book and most others regarding personal development.