Găsiți următorul dvs. carte audio preferat

Deveniți un membru astăzi și ascultați gratuit pentru 30 zile
A Midsummer Night's Dream: Fully Dramatized Audio Edition

A Midsummer Night's Dream: Fully Dramatized Audio Edition

Scris de William Shakespeare

Povestit de Full Cast


A Midsummer Night's Dream: Fully Dramatized Audio Edition

Scris de William Shakespeare

Povestit de Full Cast

evaluări:
4.5/5 (127 evaluări)
Lungime:
2 hours
Lansat:
Aug 5, 2014
ISBN:
9781442374355
Format:
Carte audio

Descriere

Folger Shakespeare Library, The World’s Leading Center for Shakespeare Studies

The Folger Shakespeare Library, home to the world's largest Shakespeare collection, brings A Midsummer Night's Dream to life with this new full-length, full-cast dramatic recording of its definitive Folger Edition.

In A Midsummer Night's Dream, Shakespeare stages the workings of love in unexpected ways. In the woods outside Athens, two young men and two young women sort themselves into couples - but not before they form first one love triangle, and then another. The king and queen of fairyland, Oberon and Titania, battle over custody of an orphan boy. Oberon uses magic to make Titania fall in love with a weaver named Bottom, in an effort to distract Titania from the custody battle. While all of this is going on, Bottom and his companions ineptly stage the tragedy of "Pyramus and Thisbe".

This new full-cast recording — based on the most respected edition of Shakespeare’s classic — expertly produced by the Folger Theatre, is perfect for students, teachers, and the everyday listener.

A Simon & Schuster audio production.

Lansat:
Aug 5, 2014
ISBN:
9781442374355
Format:
Carte audio

Despre autor

William Shakespeare was born in April 1564 in the town of Stratford-upon-Avon, on England’s Avon River. When he was eighteen, he married Anne Hathaway. The couple had three children—an older daughter Susanna and twins, Judith and Hamnet. Hamnet, Shakespeare’s only son, died in childhood. The bulk of Shakespeare’s working life was spent in the theater world of London, where he established himself professionally by the early 1590s. He enjoyed success not only as a playwright and poet, but also as an actor and shareholder in an acting company. Although some think that sometime between 1610 and 1613 Shakespeare retired from the theater and returned home to Stratford, where he died in 1616, others believe that he may have continued to work in London until close to his death.


Legat de A Midsummer Night's Dream

Cărți audio conex
Articole conexe

Recenzii

Ce părere au oamenii despre A Midsummer Night's Dream

4.3
127 evaluări / 98 Recenzii
Ce părere aveți?
Evaluare: 0 din 5 stele

Recenziile cititorilor

  • (5/5)
    Classic Shakespeare tragedy.
  • (4/5)
    The only Shakespeare plays I had read before this were Romeo and Juliet and Macbeth, Macbeth being my favorite. Having now read Hamlet, I can honestly say that Macbeth is still my favorite.

    Let's discuss.

    So, Hamlet himself is an emo icon, and also a misogynist, who basically goes crazy, murders someone, and essentially ruins everything.

    The ending came a little too quickly for me, tbh. There wasn't enough time to really develop any other characters. It was pretty quotable, though. Really, it gave me more Romeo and Juliet feels than Macbeth feels.
  • (5/5)
    The Penguin edition remains the best edition for highschool students, undergrad students and actors. Not as dense as the Arden nor as casual as the RSC, but the perfect in-between for people in those categories.
  • (4/5)
    It amazes me how many people like Hamlet, no exception here, when it's really hard to relate to, but yet it's just one of those plays once you get into it, you come to love it. I read it for the first time in 12th grade and everyone would talk about it even when they didn't have to. The characters in Hamlet are amazingly complex and it doesn't just state how they are, you learn it through their actions and what they say. It's just so unique, I know everytime I read it I get a different opinion of the characters and the overall play.
  • (5/5)
    My favorite, of all the histories and tragedies. I've seen it in performance at least 5 times--with Kevin Kline and Ralph Fiennes two of the most memorable.
  • (5/5)
    Almost intriguing play, and not the easiest work to read. The tale of a young prince trying to come to terms with his father’s death is probably the best known of Shakespeare’s tragedies. There’s something for everyone here: high drama, low comedy, intriguing characters. I’d advise watching a video or move, or perhaps listening to an audio presentation either before or while reading this one. No matter how good your reading skills are, the enjoyment and understanding of any play is enhanced Psy seeing it performed. This time out I watched an old stage production starring Richard Burton. The highlight of that one is Hume Cronyn’s marvelously humorous take on Polonius.Highest recommendation possible.
  • (5/5)
    Forcing myself into reading Shakespeare as an adult, I started here. I'm not sorry. Excellent poetry. "What a piece of work is man" is one of my favorite bits of writing period, not just within Shakespeare's works. I believe this is also the longest of his plays? Partly my reason for tackling it first. If you only read one of his works, read Hamlet.
  • (4/5)
    Vertaling van Komrij. Uiteraard een tijdloos stuk met een ongelofelijke diepgang, maar geen gemakkelijke lectuur. Ligt me minder dan de iets eenduidiger stukken King Lear of Macbeth.
  • (4/5)
    One of the bard's all time classics, so frequently performed that it occasionally needs to be re-read to experience it the way he wrote it, without all the directorial impulses to pretty it up or modernize it. It had been a long time since my last read, and I was somewhat surprised to realize that this play comes with very few stage directions outside of entrances and exits; there are so many things that directors do exactly the same, you forget they weren't mentioned in the stage directions, and have simply become habit. Anyway, this play, about ambition and revenge, still holds up well through the centuries, though many of the actions seem outdated to us now. The poetry of the language and the rich texturing of the characters, even the most minor of characters, creates a complex story that successfully holds many balls in the air at once. Shakespeare's frequent use of ghosts is noteworthy, since that is something that modern day playwrights are told to be very careful about, and avoid if at all possible. A satisfying story, and a satisfying re-read.
  • (4/5)
    The more I learn about the English language and literature in general, the richer Shakespeare's works become. Hamlet is no exception.

    When considered as a boundary/change marker in the landscape of literature, it makes an interesting mile-marker between earlier eras of the oral heroic, the epic and the blossoming of humanism. (Forgive me if I'm using any of these terminologies incorrectly; I will elaborate what I mean.) Which is to say, the oral heroic focused (in general terms) on family units, clans, tribes, etc. and the conflicts between them. These narratives usually dealt with inscribing some sort of expected behavior(s) that sorted out the violent chaos that accompanied the birthings of civilizations. As an example of a major trope in this early literature that's relevant to Hamlet: blood-feud violence.

    The Odyssey comes from the beginning of this and in its ending tries to address the ending of such tit-for-tat retribution.

    In this way, Hamlet might be considered (and I'm happy to do so) the ending of this particular literary tradition as a major trope. Instead of focusing on the blood feud (the plot going on with Fortinbras & Norway), it turns a bit more inward. Instead of Hamlet marching off to claim what is his by rights from Norway, there's a more humanistic struggle at play.

    I feel that most Shakespeare could benefit from a little extra knowledge and context than most of us get upon our first exposure. Hamlet's definitely gotten 'better' for me over time.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best things I've ever read. Hamlet's got it all. Shakespeare at his best, filling so few pages with so much story.
  • (5/5)
    Hamlet is a phenomenal play. Just spectacular.
  • (4/5)
    Vertaling van Komrij. Uiteraard een tijdloos stuk met een ongelofelijke diepgang, maar geen gemakkelijke lectuur. Ligt me minder dan de iets eenduidiger stukken King Lear of Macbeth.
  • (5/5)
    My fav editions of the Bard.
  • (5/5)
    Great classic
  • (5/5)
    I don't think I've ever enjoyed a Shakespearean work more than this play. Its riddled with ghost, revenge, crazy people, deaths, politics and psychological drama. Reading it along with the BBC's 2009's Hamlet does help in understanding the text, but its quite obvious how Hamlet's popularity survived half a millenia.

    Full review to come.
  • (4/5)
    It was a very interesting story. It wasn't boring as I thought it would be.
  • (5/5)
    This is truly an amazing work, and is a very well-known story. Even if you haven't read the play, or seen any of the film versions, you probably have heard enough to know much of what happens, and are likely familiar with several very famous lines. This was my first time reading the play, and I truly loved it, because it does go far beyond just the famous lines and core story. There is true depth here, with layers of meaning that really strike at the soul of the audience. As to the edition itself, I found it to be greatly helpful in understanding the action in the play. It has a layout which places each page of the play opposite a page of notes, definitions, explanations, and other things needed to understand that page more thoroughly. While I didn't always need it, I was certainly glad to have it whenever I ran into a turn of language that was unfamiliar, and I definitely appreciated the scene-by-scene summaries. Really, if you want to or need to read Shakespeare, an edition such as this is really the way to go, especially until you get more accustomed to it.
  • (5/5)
    Critics have varied in their enthusiasm for this play over the centuries. In many ways Hamlet is a typical "modern" - a relativist, caught in perpetual indecision, uncertain of his place in the world, frozen by his anxieties. It also contains some of the best-known lines and soliloquies in all of Shakespeare. It can be, and has been, read and performed from a religious perspective, an existential perspective, a Freudian perspective, or a feminist perspective.
  • (4/5)
    My favorite of Shakespeare's plays(that I've read). Is there a more interesting character than Hamlet? The amazing this about this play is that I know the end from the very beginning, but I'm always compelled to read on.
  • (4/5)
    Possibly one of the only tragedies Shakespeare wrote that I can really, truly say I enjoyed. I really can't say much about it without ruining it though, so I'll just say READ IT (avoid the movie until you've done so though. I really like Kenneth Branagh, but it's just a little overkill.)
  • (4/5)
    I finally read this tale for the first time and I wasn't disappointed. Hamlet wasn't a character to read about lightly, giving a perplexing feeling every time he spoke. The emotions of most of characters are what carry the story, and what will be the effects of their actions. In the beginning of the book, the Ghost's words were the most interesting to read. Near the end of the play, Hamlet's hilarious comments to Ophelia were so funny because they were out of nowhere, before the tragic ending of the play.
  • (5/5)
    After King Lear, this is one of my favorites. Hamlet, in short, is the Lion King. Rather, I should say The Lion King is Hamlet. My reassurance of Shakespeare's credibility and talent is purely unnecessary so a review is kind of pointless. But if you liked the Lion King, attempt Shakespeare's version. It has more blood and wit.
  • (5/5)
    Perfection. Not one false word. Not one false moment. A play in which every part makes the whole stronger. A more perfect play I've never read. Genius.
  • (5/5)
    This is, I believe, my absolute favorite of Shakespeare's tragedies. Primarily because Hamlet is a thinker throughout most of the play. When we first meet him, he is thinking of the inevitability of death and the loss of his father. Then he is tasked to dispatch his uncle when he learns from his father's ghost that Claudius poisoned him for his crown, and he spends the rest of the story considering the logistics of actually doing the deed.Many of my favorite Shakespeare lines also come from Hamlet, not only the brilliant soliloquies, but also little bits like "neither a borrower nor a lender be," "sweets for the sweet," and "goodnight, sweet prince." Also, Hamlet provided the inspiration for one of my favorite modern plays, "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead."This particular edition also includes a series of essays on the play and Shakespeare's writing, my favorite of which is an in-depth look at Gertrude by Carolyn Heilbrun in a piece titled "The Character of Hamlet's Mother." It also ends with a look at Hamlet on stage and screen, breaking down the various and varied performances of Hamlet through the years, ending with the Laurence Olivier film version (fitting since that is what inspired me to reread the play this time around).I'm pretty sure this exact copy was my sister's in high school, it is also filled with several notes written by her hand, in pencil, in the margins.
  • (5/5)
    This is a mature play of Shakespeare's, blending all the elements of drama, psychology, gutter humor, passion, ambition, doubt. The Playbook version is unique, but valuable. I haven't seen anything approaching it.
  • (4/5)
    Good solid Shakespeare read. A bit too much of a "he did, she did" plot at times.
  • (4/5)
    This was the first time that I've read Hamlet, I've heard it quoted so many times and I thought it was about time I read it.Hamlet's mother is married to her dead husband's brother. And after seeing his father's ghost Hamlet decides to take revenge on his uncle/step-dad who apparently murdered his father. It's a kind of crazy story with lots of death, and there were some places where I didn't really understand what was going on, but I still got the overall jist of the story.I enjoyed reading this but when reading a play as a book I find it a bit hard to keep track of the characters and the settings, I think I would like to see it performed so that I can really get a feel for the story.
  • (4/5)
    It feels odd to be giving Shakespeare a rating in stars - who am I to judge?After many many years, I re-read Hamlet in a fine edition by Signature Shakespeare. This is a beautifully produced book and has a helpful layout with the original text supplemented with meanings of obscure words and suggested explanations for passages. It was a treat to read, and improved my appreciation of the text.I can't see it making it big in prime time - all the lead characters end up dead, but it is a tragedy!Read February 2015.
  • (5/5)
    Magnificent.Like nearly all plays, it has to be acted. Just reading won't bring out the emotions. I played Rosencrantz (or was it Guildenstern, better toss a coin!!) I also saw Hamlet at the Exchange Theatre in Manchester. This modern theatre built as a square inside the old Victorian building gave me a tremendous insight. It is theatre in the round. Sitting on the top tier looking almost vertically down I noticed that when Hamlet spoke his soliloquoys he was not actually speaking to anyone in the audience. He was speaking as if to an empty space in front of him and his speech turned inwards to himself. Then I noticed the dialogues. The two actors were not speaking one to the other: each was speaking as if to an empty space between them. This is the magic power of Theatre altogether. The Empty Space between the actors and the audience. Wonderful.