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Finders Keepers: A Novel

Finders Keepers: A Novel

Scris de Stephen King

Povestit de Will Patton


Finders Keepers: A Novel

Scris de Stephen King

Povestit de Will Patton

evaluări:
4.5/5 (476 evaluări)
Lungime:
13 hours
Lansat:
Jun 2, 2015
ISBN:
9781442384354
Format:
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Descriere

A masterful, intensely suspenseful novel about a reader whose obsession with a reclusive writer goes far too far-a book about the power of storytelling, starring the same trio of unlikely and winning heroes King introduced in Mr. Mercedes.

"Wake up, genius." So begins King's instantly riveting story about a vengeful reader. The genius is John Rothstein, an iconic author who created a famous character, Jimmy Gold, but who hasn't published a book for decades. Morris Bellamy is livid, not just because Rothstein has stopped providing books, but because the nonconformist Jimmy Gold has sold out for a career in advertising. Morris kills Rothstein and empties his safe of cash, yes, but the real treasure is a trove of notebooks containing at least one more Gold novel.

Morris hides the money and the notebooks, and then he is locked away for another crime. Decades later, a boy named Pete Saubers finds the treasure, and now it is Pete and his family that Bill Hodges, Holly Gibney, and Jerome Robinson must rescue from the ever-more deranged and vengeful Morris when he's released from prison after thirty-five years.

Not since Misery has King played with the notion of a reader whose obsession with a writer gets dangerous. Finders Keepers is spectacular, heart-pounding suspense, but it is also King writing about how literature shapes a life-for good, for bad, forever.
Lansat:
Jun 2, 2015
ISBN:
9781442384354
Format:
Carte audio

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Despre autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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  • (5/5)
    Also the second part of the Bill Hodges Trilogy, was very exciting from the beginning. King also made a link to the first part because a family was also affected in the accident.This book is about a robbery with killing. The robber stole a reputed author not only his money but also the notebooks for two more books in a series. He buries everything and only keeps it in jail, knowing that the prey is waiting for him.But he did not expect a teenager who finds the loot nearly 30 years after the robbery. He uses the money for his family. When there is no more money, he tries to sell the notebooks, which means a whole rat tail of dangerous situations for him and his loved ones.
  • (5/5)
    LOVED this book. The pacing was great, never too slow for me. The characterizations were awesome. Morris the thief, and Pete, the boy who finds his stash. This book mentions events that occurred in Mr. Mercedes, so its best to read that before this one. It's not a horror novel, but still produced a lot of anxiety in me while reading. I'm excited to read the final book in the trilogy, End of Watch.
  • (5/5)
    An interestedly woven tale introducing a pair of characters who occupy us a long while before Bill Hodges comes on the scene, and we get caught up on what he's been doing since Mr. Mercedes. King explores alternate sides of the überfan coin with Morris Bellamy and Peter Saubers, who years-apart become enthralled with the works of a Salinger-Updike hybrid, John Rothstein. Bellamy murders Rothstein and steals and hides notebooks filled with unpublished writings including two new novels featuring Rothstein's Holden Caulfield-esque protagonist, last seen as an advertising executive/sellout in published works. Morris never gets to read the new tales before going to prison on another charge. Pete finds them as well as stolen cash and uses the bucks to help his family, impacted by the Mercedes massacre of Mr. Mercedes. He also becomes immersed in the extended fate of Rothstein's hero. It's when he attempts to profit from the notebooks that things go awry, and the book builds to a complicated and compelling conclusion that requires Hodges and his team of Holly and Jerome. Above all this offers a look at how King uses the novel form and length to weave and layer narrative. It's different from Mr. Mercedes and yet a great continuation of the saga.
  • (4/5)
    In FINDERS KEEPERS, Stephen King returns to one of his old themes. In his book MISERY, a character was obsessed with a certain author’s books, and here King repeats that theme.As a young man, Morris commits a crime because of his dissatisfaction with the way that certain author, John Rothstein, has ended his book series. Morris then buries a trunk full of notebooks containing Rothstein’s stories, poems, even novels that no one has read yet. The idea is that Morris would come back for them later; the notebooks would stay there waiting for him. Thirty-plus years later Pete, who coincidentally also loves Rothstein’s novels, unearths that trunk. Pete has also found lots of trouble. Now come Bill Hodges, Holly Gibney, and Jerome Robinson, three of the characters from King’s MR. MERCEDES, to the rescue.This second book in King’s MR. MERCEDES trilogy is delightful. At the same time, though, although FINDERS KEEPERS does allude to the MR. MERCEDES killings throughout, King takes a little too long to have the Hodges trio enter the story.But that is just my opinion, and you may find no problem at all. King is great, and it’s hard to criticize anything he writes.
  • (3/5)
    A very entertaining thriller. A good story, well told, with very good pacing. None of the mid-way sag of Mr Mercedes. There are signs of the mirroring effect King used in that first volume, but they’re nothing like as pronounced. I did miss them, but what made up for their relative lack was the story’s focus on Morris and Pete with Shaggy, Scooby and Scrappy shunted into a supporting role.
  • (4/5)
    A man murders his favorite author for daring to take the main character in a direction he didn't like. He steals a bunch of notebooks full of the author's unfinished works, but he never gets a chance to read them when another crime lands him jail. Years later, he's finally out and determined to find the notebooks -- only problem is that someone else beat him there.This book is the second in a trilogy; it doesn't appear that it's strictly necessary to read the previous volume, although I think it helps in knowing the previous characters and seeing their development and growth. King does go back and re-visit the opening scene of the first novel, this time from a different perspective. At first, I thought this was unnecessarily long, until all the pieces of this book started coming together and you could see the picture he was painting.Unlike the previous book, much of the action is occurring without the main investigators even knowing there is a case to be solved. For that reason, I did not like this book as much as the previous title. (In that book, the cat-and-mouse between the lead detective and the main suspect made for so much of the suspense. In fact, some of my favorite parts in this book were when Bill Hodges goes to visit Brady Hartsfield in the hospital and wondering what's going on in his mind.) Also, a huge crux of the plot depends on the murderer going to jail for decades; only problem is King has the character convicted of rape --- a crime that really ever results in the perpetrator seeing even a night in jail, yet alone years.I did like the mythos of the author that King created, with the fictional author and his character seemingly stand-ins for J.D. Salinger and Holden Caulfield. In some ways, this felt like re-visiting some of the ground from King's previous work Misery, but in a very different way here. Once again, audiobook reader Will Patton was phenomenal and helped to bring the cast of characters to life.
  • (3/5)
    I liked it. Not quite as much as I like Mr. Mercedes, but it was still a decent read that I am glad I bought and read.
  • (5/5)
    YES!!!!!!!! Finally I feel like I just read a Stephen King book!!! This book started off very much a mystery/thriller and was interesting - though I wasn't staying up late to get through it - but then all of a sudden I felt like I was at the top of a roller coaster and it was starting to tip over the edge. The last third of the book was absolutely incredible!! I'll admit I've not been super excited about the ending of a few of SK's newer works....but this ending?? THIS ending had me out of my chair dancing around and cheering! 5 stars is not enough! Loved, loved, loved this book!
  • (4/5)
    After such a long time, I finally managed to finish this and i have to say i found it pretty great. I was laughing at the sarcastic remarks throughout the story as well as feeling very excited to see what happens by the end of it. I'm so excited for the next one. If you haven't read Me Mercedes, you should definitely give it a read. If you haven't read Stephen King books.......😦😦😦😦
  • (4/5)
    I have to admit that I'm not loving this series as much as I normally love King's work, BUT... I did enjoy this second installment quite a bit more than I enjoyed Mr. Mercedes, the first in the trilogy, and reading this work has actually left me really anxious to read the next work in the series. Here, the (new) characters were a bit more engaging and dynamic, and I simply got pulled into the story faster and harder than I did in the previous book. By the time I got to the halfway point, I was having a hard time putting it down, and I think I read the last 130 pages in a single sitting.King's strategy to open this one up also really pulled me in--I'm normally not a fan of going back and forth in time to illuminate a story's start and characters, but it worked really well here, opening up a few different pieces of the puzzle at once. Readers who loved Hodges and the characters in the first book might be disappointed to find that they don't come into play until a good piece of this second book has passed by--at least, not in a major way--so that is the one caveat, but it really didn't bother me.All told, I'd recommend it, and having read it, I'm probably more likely to recommend the book that comes before it, Mr. Mercedes.
  • (4/5)
    In his first novel of the Bill Hodges trilogy, MR. MERCEDES, Stephen King dedicated the book to James M. Cain, in the second novel of the series, titled, FINDERS KEEPERS, the dedication went to John D. MacDonald, two great authors of crime and mystery fiction; and though King clearly admires both men’s work, he is not in their league. But as I stated in my review of MR. MERCEDES, I think King does a fine job channeling Alfred Hitchcock in these books, which are a change of pace for him, and not always to the liking of many of his diehard fans who eat up his horror epics.In FINDERS KEEPERS, the constant reader is given way more information than the characters in the story, but King uses it well to create suspense, as the unsuspecting charge ahead into harm’s way, not knowing what lies in wait for them, but we do. That there is evil lying in wait for the unwary seems to be the subject of the novel. But the true theme of FINDERS KEEPERS is the love of books, or more to the point, the love of a good story and a great character, and how they can get hold of a reader and never let go. In the opening pages, set in 1978, we meet John Rothstein, once one of the most prominent writers of post WWII America, a kind of a cross between John Updike and J.D. Salinger, who walked away from the public spotlight and became a recluse, depriving his multitude of fans any more novels featuring Jimmy Gold, a young man in search of himself in mid century America. But one of those fans, a youth named Morris Bellamy, invades Rothstein’s home, steals the many moleskin notebooks Rothstein has been using for years to hand write the further adventures of his hero, and then kills the author before leaving. In a twist of plot, Bellamy commits rape while in a drunken black out, and goes to prison for life before he can read the notebooks he has carefully buried behind his mother’s house. There they lay for decades, until 2010, when they are discovered by Pete Saubers, a kid whose family has fallen on hard times, and not just from the Great Recession, but also from the fact that Pete’s father was badly injured by Brady Hartsfield when he plowed into that crowd of job seekers at the beginning of MR. MERCEDES; the cash Pete finds in the buried trunk comes in handy after he comes up with an anonymous way to help his financially and emotionally beleaguered parents, but after a few years, the money runs out, and young Pete must find a way to turn the stolen notebooks into a windfall. Meanwhile, Morris Bellamy is paroled, and he comes out of prison meaner and crazier than ever, and the one thing he has thought about every day of his sentence is what he would do when he got out and dug up the buried treasure that only he knows about. It is obvious from that brief synopsis, that there is a lot of plot, and a lot of twists, more than a few of them improbable, as many reviewers pointed out, so too some of the character motivations, but so what, King works very hard to create a great setup, where young Pete and mean old Morris are put on a collision course, one I could not wait to see play out. This is where King fell down on the job in my view, as the middle part of the book loses some of its momentum; and the plotting is downright clunky at times. The main problem is that the trio of Bill, Holly, and Jerome, who were central to the first book, but in FINDERS KEEPERS, have to be shoe horned into the story mid way, and as much as I liked them the first time around, they often felt like walk-ons in the story of Pete and Morris, which is a shame, because I really liked these characters, more so because their relationship is such an unlikely one. Lots of King’s fans have expressed their dislike of Bill Hodges for reasons I cannot understand, I think it’s great to have a hero who had been around more than a few blocks more than a few times, and is the wiser for it. Pete Saubers and Morris Bellamy are two faces of the same coin; Pete is the reader who learns to love a story and a character for what it is, and what it means to them, and to find the pleasure and joy of discovering literature that speaks to something deep inside, while Morris is the toxic fan whose love becomes obsession, who wants to possess the creations of others, make them flesh and blood real, but only for themselves, only for an audience of one. And yes, I get it that King is visiting familiar ground again, as it is obvious that Morris Bellamy and Annie Wilkes would find much in common, but only after Annie had washed his cockadoodie dirty mouth out first.In the end, I will say that FINDERS KEEPERS, along with the other Bill Hodges books, are certainly not in the class of THE STAND or THE SHINING, or even up to the level of 11-22=63, but after finishing this latest book, I do not feel that vague sense of disappointment I felt after finishing DOCTOR SLEEP or REVIVAL. And if his crime fiction does not produce characters enduring as Travis Magee, Philip Marlowe, or even Mildred Pierce, he can still spin an entertaining yarn, and on level, FINDERS KEEPERS is a winner.
  • (5/5)
    This was a perfect follow up to Mr. Mercedes. Once again Stephen King has produced a tightly woven tapestry of suspense and page turning drama and fright. Can't wait to move on to the third segment.
  • (4/5)
    When Morris and a couple of friends break in to an author’s home, Morris really just wants to steal notebooks. His favourite series didn’t end how he wanted and Morris hoped to find a better ending to the series in the author’s notes. They end up murdering the author and they steal the notebooks and money. Morris later goes to jail for raping a girl, but only after he’s hidden the notebooks and money. Decades later, when teenager Pete finds them (his family now lives in what was once Morris’s home), he doesn’t tell his parents, but instead anonymously mails them some of the money every month, in order to try to stop them from breaking up over money. When Morris is released from prison, though, he is looking for that money and those notebooks…I listened to the audio, and though there were occasional parts where my mind wandered somewhat, there was enough that kept my attention that I liked it. Even better, as it got closer to the end, I was kept wanting to listen to find out what would happen. What I’ve found with some mystery/suspense/thriller books – whether on audio or if I’m actually reading the words – the parts where I’m more likely to lose focus is usually when it’s the POV of the “bad guy”. Though that wasn’t the case all the time for this book, it was for a portion, I think. Overall, though, another really good book by King.
  • (5/5)
    Another Stephen King masterpiece - he rarely earns less than a 5 star from me, being that I am one of his Constant Readers.

    Despite being the second of the Bill Hodges trilogy, this book can be read as a standalone, although if you know the first novel, Mr Mercedes, you get much more out of it. In fact, King tantalises the reader with developments from the first novel, planting seeds of discomfort and curiosity midway through the novel that have nothing to do with the main story, and leaves us hanging right up to the very end.

    Finders Keepers is a slow burner, beginning with King weaving three different story lines that slowly intertwine, going back and forth between them until we see how they are going to collide, and by which point we are ready and eager to see how it is going to play out. For me the last 130 pages were a sprint to the end. I struggled to tear myself away, but when I had to, my mind was still in the book, imagining what might happen. And I wasn't disappointed.

    Stephen King's ability to create suspense and deliver shocking, sometimes brutal scenes, as well as characters the reader cares about is as strong as it has always been.
  • (4/5)
    Finders Keepers is a great sequel to Mr. Mercedes and it has me dying for the final installment.

    Morris Bellamy is obsessed with the writer of his favorite series Jimmy Gold by John Rothstein. Jimmy Gold is the face of teen angst, but in the final book he gets a job in marketing, this upsets Morris because his idol sold out. John Rothstein becomes a bit of a recluse and stops publishing any new work, he continues to write short stories and even more Jimmy Gold books over the years, but its for his eyes only and they are to be burned when he dies. Morris isn’t having that and brings 2 accomplices to rob John, he kills John and his two accomplices, he has the notebooks and a nice stack of cash. Morris goes to his friend Andy Halliday to tell him he has the notebooks, but Andy is freaked out because the news broke John Rothstein was murdered and tell Morris to keep him out of it and the cops will find out about him in a matter of time. Morris is outraged by this, he hides the notebooks in a field behind his house in a trunk and goes out drinking, he commits another crime and is punished for it, he gets life in prison without having a chance to read the notebooks in 1978.

    In present time, Pete Saunders is a child of one of the Mr. Mercedes victims and his family is going through a hard time, his dad can’t work, his mom had to take a job with less pay and less hours and it is causing tension between his parents. Pete finds the trunk with the money and notebooks in the field that is behind the house he lives in, Morris’ old house. He sends the money to his parents anomalously over the next few years and he reads the notebooks and becomes a fan of the Jimmy Gold series. When the money runs out and the family financials are still too tight and his sister wants to go to private school, he finds out how to go about selling one of the stolen notebooks, he finds Andy Halliday, who is more than willing to take them and knows that Pete is shafting him, Morris said there were more than what is being presented to him.

    Little do they know, Morris is out on parole and when he goes to find the notebooks he’s been dreaming about all this time in prison, he discovers they are missing. The only person who knew about them was his buddy Andy and that is the first person he goes to see about his missing notebooks.Tina, Pete’s sister, senses something is going on with Pete and knows he’s the one who gave the money. She gets in contact with Bill Hodge to find out what is troubling her brother.

    The story is great, it didn’t go in the direction that I kept expecting and I’m glad it didn’t, the plot was more interesting the way it was written. I would of liked more of the story to involve Bill, since this is his series after all, but when he is finally introduced into the plot it works. Mr. Mercedes even makes an appearance throughout the second half of the book and sets up what the third and final book will focus on. The characters of Morris and Pete were well written with good background given, more so with Pete. As a reader you can relate to their love of a series and a particular author, just one of them takes it way too far. I am worried that Finders Keepers will be the weak link in the series, a filler even, I hope there will be a connection with the characters in this story and the final book.
  • (5/5)
    I started this yesterday. Read it at the gym. Couldn’t read much more because my in-laws were in town. Read it this morning at the gym, walking to and from an appointment, and then just finished it while eating dinner.

    SO GOOD.

    This is the second in a series that I happened to start reading about a week ago, not knowing that there would be three total books about these characters. But what’s so fascinating about this one is that the main folks from the first book in the series don’t appear until about 150 pages into this 430-page book. And I didn’t miss them. Didn’t care, because the story Mr. King was telling is masterful.

    Basic premise: someone steals something of value, but ends up in prison for another crime and doesn’t get to enjoy that something. 30 years later, a teenager finds that something. It goes from there, taking turns I don’t expect.

    I had a bit of a disagreement with my mother-in-law while she was here, because I hadn’t yet really seen how Mr. King’s books were horror as opposed to thriller. Sure, the entire set-up for this trilogy involves someone running a bunch of people down, but I didn’t feel like that was entirely graphically depicted. But who boy do I owe my mother-in-law an apology because holy shit does some truly gruesome stuff go down in this book. So, you know, if you think you have an aversion to the description of someone being run over being likened to the smashing of a gourd, I’m guessing this book isn’t for you.

    It was totally for me, though.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. It's one of those books you don't want to put down once you start reading it.
  • (4/5)
    Starting Finders Keepers, I was worried that I was reading a book like the Cloverfield movies, where a story exists in the same universe but not with the same people.

    Luckily as I read on, I was wrong. And in fact, I was shocked by how good this book was. The plot is sensational, and it is so nice to see our crew again.
  • (4/5)
    One of the last books I finished before things went all to hell in a handbasket. This is the second in a trilogy by King, followup to Mr. Mercedes. It reminded me in a way of Tana French's Dublin Murder Squad series, because while it's set in the same universe as the first book it's told from a completely different point of view this time around, with the first book's main characters taking a secondary (though important) role. The storyline also moves back and forth in time, from the late 1970s when a two-bit punk pulls off a robberty-cum-murder of a reclusive novelist clearly meant to evoke J.D. Salinger, to the present day, when a very likable teenager finds the loot from that long-ago caper. When the punk is released from prison he comes after his ill-gotten spoils and thus our young protagonist is in mortal danger.I liked this book really well, right up until some supernatural elements started creeping in. They were barely mentioned here but will clearly form the foundation of the final book and I'm not excited about that. The older I get, the more I appreciate King when he writes "straight".
  • (3/5)
    Set a couple years after Mr. Mercedes, Finders Keepers brings us back to the motley group of unofficial private investigators that saved the kids at the 'Round Here concert. Only this time, a teenage boy has stumbled across a treasure that could spell his demise.

    I can say with certainty that I definitely preferred the first book in this trilogy to the second, and that's largely because it seems as if it's a little too difficult to feel anything for the characters of Finders Keepers. In startling contrast to what I'm used to seeing from King, Pete and his family are unusually flat characters. The most exciting moment involving his family was towards the end, and even that turned out in an oddly un-King-like way, which I find to be extremely disappointing. I won't go into details, as that brings spoilers into play. If you read it, you'll see what I mean. It did succeed in drumming up a little bit of emotion, at least.

    As far as our main cast of characters go, Hodges and the crew don't really show up until nearly halfway through the book. Normally, this wouldn't be so bothersome; however, this is the Bill Hodges Trilogy, and as such I expected Hodges to play a much larger role earlier on than he did. Admittedly, though small and late in the book, it was nice to see some growth in regards to Holly. Jerome had the least screen time (page time?), which is a crying shame because next to Holly, he's my second favorite.

    In comparison to Mr. Mercedes, the plot of Finders Keeper was also startlingly inferior. Rather than having thousands of lives on the line after a massacre, we are only dealing with a handful of murders, most of which are insignificant and have little effect on the plot as a whole.

    As always, I adore King's writing, but this probably falls into my pile of least favorite King works. If it wasn't for the last few pages and the foreshadowing therein, I might not even open up End of Watch. Fortunately, King has created a beautifully ominous segue into the final book of the trilogy so I'm looking forward to it at least.
  • (4/5)
    Stephan King never fails to keep you enthralled all of the way through a story. Audiobooks seem to have been invented so that you can listen to his prose be performed for you. This was a re-read in preparation for the release of the new novel in this series and really looking forward to it.

    4.5 stars for a great read and recommended for all King fans.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed the heck out of S.K.'s latest, "Finders Keepers", a sequel to "Mr. Mercedes". Back in the 1970s, Morris Bellamy is entranced with an author named John Rothstein, who stopped publishing abruptly after having his signature character, Jimmy Gold, sell out. Morris goes to Mr. Rothstein's house, robs him off his unpublished manuscripts and some cash, and kills him. He takes the notebooks back home, intending to read them and someday sell them and make a fortune, but before he can he's arrested for an unrelated crime and sentenced to prison. Many, many years in prison. He buried a trunk with the money and the notebooks before he goes away and intends to dig it up once he finally gets out.In the intervening years, a boy named Pete happens across the trunk. The money is a lifesaver: his dad was seriously injured when some idiot in a Mercedes mowed down an innocent group of people waiting in line at a job fair, and his family is in danger of falling apart. Pete's a smart boy, and he reads the manuscripts and realizes what a treasure he has.Meanwhile, Morris has gotten out of prison and goes back to his hometown to retrieve what's rightfully his, only to discover someone's beaten him to it. It was tense and suspenseful and great, I really enjoyed it.
  • (3/5)
    Better than the first book of the trilogy, even though there was less Bill Hodges & his crew. At the end, however, it got away from being just a crime novel and became a Stephen King novel...
  • (4/5)
    Dammit, Stephen King is a fine storyteller.
  • (5/5)
    This is a classic.
  • (4/5)
    Another great read from the master. My only complaint is at the end of the book it left some questions unanswered about what the police thought about the burned up evil Morris and no mention that anyone thought anymore about the $20,000 that Peter got out of the trunk.
  • (4/5)
    A bit of a step down from the first book, but still gripping and enjoyable.
  • (4/5)
    "Finders Keepers" is book two of the Mr. Mercedes trilogy. However, it is unnecessary to read the first book to enjoy this one. Despite several cross-references and tie-ins, this novel tells its own stand-alone story. Think of this as a literary thriller, not as a horror or pulp novel. Don't look for a repeat of other work by King. With these thrillers, he has ventured into a slightly different genre than many readers might expect.

    In this novel, King explores the love of literature, the fascination of fans with their favorite authors, and the desperate search for lost works that authors never chose to have published. King gives us a reclusive, but wildly popular author, who continues to write, but chooses to no longer share his visions. King also gives us two young men, one a teenager and one only slightly older, who share a fascination with the author's work and his life-changing series. What would you give to have your favorite author complete your favorite series, to have him finish the arc of character development so that your favorite character is no longer left as a sell-out. Would you steal?

    Would you kill? How many years would you wait to get your hands in such a treasure?
    It would be a mistake to call this a suspense novel as the plot is obvious a mile away and you can feel the tension building as the characters all come together in one crazy climax. Most of the novel is a long setup for the end.

    It's a good story and well worth reading. In the end, it only missed by a little being a great read.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this book very much. The second part of the Bill Hodges Trilogy. It started out slow but picked up and has made me eager to read the third book in the group! The characters are likeable, however I still have questions about what part Brady played in this story, as he was more of a side story, which makes me anticipate how he will emerge in the third book. Brady as a main character in the first story seems like a ticking time bomb sitting idle in this story, and I feel like he is waiting to explode in the third and final part of the trilogy. I enjoyed the main characters of Finders Keepers and the story line, but I could not help but think while reading what was being built up for the third book. I also enjoyed Mr. Mercedes, and I feel like Finders Keepers was the calm before the storm for the main characters. When reading the first book I felt that there were some common King elements missing, but as I read this second book and anticipate the third I can see my favorite author emerging through the story. Looking Forward to the final book of the trilogy!
  • (3/5)
    Enter a world where people obsess over books that aren't Harry Potter.

    Peter Saubers' family is having a tough time of it. The GFC has hit hard, his dad was hit hard with a car, and the arky-barkies might tear the family apart. Then he stumbles upon a literal treasure chest: stolen money and notebooks from the late John Rothstein - a reclusive author in the mould of JD Salinger. Of course, the man who killed for those notebooks, Morris Bellamy, has a wee fixation on Rothstein and his character Jimmy Gold, so not even a life sentence will stop him coming for Peter Saubers and his treasure.

    I'll be honest, I was going to give up on this book. If it hadn't been Stephen King I probably would have. This is the second novel in the Bill Hodges trilogy, and Bill doesn't show up until a third to half-way through the novel. That is part of what makes this novel frustrating. It takes a long time to set things up and get the plot moving, with that first third or more acting as backstory that you're not quite sure has a point to it.

    But the final third of the novel redeems this ignoble start in a taut and suspenseful manner. Definitely not one of King's better works, but if you can get past the waffly backstory, this is an okay read.