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The Girl from Everywhere

The Girl from Everywhere

Scris de Heidi Heilig

Povestit de Kim Mai Guest


The Girl from Everywhere

Scris de Heidi Heilig

Povestit de Kim Mai Guest

evaluări:
3.5/5 (25 evaluări)
Lungime:
10 hours
Lansat:
Feb 16, 2016
ISBN:
9780062447326
Format:
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Descriere

Heidi Heilig's debut teen fantasy sweeps from modern-day New York City, to nineteenth-century Hawaii, to places of myth and legend.

Sixteen-year-old Nix has sailed across the globe and through centuries aboard her time-traveling father's ship. But when he gambles with her very existence, it all may be about to end.

The Girl from Everywhere, the first of two books, blends fantasy, history, and a modern sensibility. Its witty, fast-paced dialogue, breathless adventure, multicultural cast, and enchanting romance will dazzle readers of Sabaa Tahir, Rae Carson, and Rachel Hartman.

Nix's life began in Honolulu in 1868. Since then she has traveled to mythic Scandinavia, a land from the tales of One Thousand and One Nights, modern-day New York City, and many more places both real and imagined. As long as he has a map, Nix's father can sail his ship, The Temptation, to any place, any time. But now he's uncovered the one map he's always sought-1868 Honolulu, before Nix's mother died in childbirth.

Nix's life—her entire existence—is at stake. No one knows what will happen if her father changes the past. It could erase Nix's future, her dreams, her adventures...her connection with the charming Persian thief, Kash, who's been part of their crew for two years. If Nix helps her father reunite with the love of his life, it will cost her her own.

A HarperAudio production.

Lansat:
Feb 16, 2016
ISBN:
9780062447326
Format:
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Despre autor

For a Muse of Fire. Her debut novel, The Girl from Everywhere, was an Indie Next Pick and was also named a Best Book of the Year by NPR. Heidi Heilig holds an MFA from New York University in musical theatre writing, and she’s written the book and lyrics for several shows. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her family. www.heidiheilig.com

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  • (4/5)
    The Girl from Everywhere contains one of the most original time travel methods I’ve ever seen. More than that, it’s simply a beautiful book.Nix has grown up on her father’s ship, traveling from one place and time to another. Their travel depends on hand drawn maps from the original time period, each of which can only be used once. Her father wants nothing more than to find a map which can take him back to 1868 Honolulu and Nix’s mother before she dies in childbirth. He wants to save her and rewrite history… even if it means rewriting Nix. What will happen to her if her father get’s his heart’s desire?While The Girl from Everywhere obviously takes place in many locations and time periods, the majority of it is set in 1884 Honolulu. For the first time, Nix has returned to her native time and is discovering the place where her mother grew up.But Nix doesn’t want to stay settled in one place and time – she wants a ship of her own and the ability to navigate the waters of time. She just needs to convince her father to teach her how. Unfortunately, I never got much of a sense of Nix beyond this goal. Her motivation was stated, but I never really felt it. She’s just not a memorable character. In fact, I’d say none of the cast of The Girl from Everywhere really jumped out at me.Like many other YA books, The Girl from Everywhere includes a love triangle. While I found both of her love interests rather bland, I didn’t dislike them either. At least they weren’t the bad boy types YA seems obsessed with – they were never abusive or controlling. The love triangle was boring, but it could have been worse.It did feel like all of Nix’s significant relationships were with men. Her father and her two male love interests were her most important relationships. She only interacted with two female characters – one of the sailors on her father’s ship and an old woman who knew her mother. Perhaps I shouldn’t be surprised – this is the norm for most books I’ve read, it’s just not the type of story I prefer.There was something that struck me as odd about The Girl from Everywhere. So much of the book is about Hawaii losing it’s independence, and the native Hawaiian population being colonized by white Americans. Native Hawaiian culture elements end up playing a significant role in the story. Yet I don’t think there were even any native Hawaiian characters with speaking lines. It just strikes me as really strange.Besides it’s great concept of time travel, the best thing about The Girl from Everywhere was the pacing. It got me staying up way later than I’d intended! I definitely enjoyed reading this book, but I’m not sure it’s one I’d reread. Still, I am interested in getting a hold of the sequel.Originally posted on The Illustrated Page.
  • (3/5)
    Received via Edelweiss and Harper Collins Children in exchange for an completely unbiased review.
    Also posted on Silk & Serif

    I'm not sure where to begin with this book so I'll just dive right in. The Girl From Everywhere is a novel that isn't quite YA but not really Adult lit either. I'm not entirely sure how successful this novel will be with young readers, but I can see the allure for older young adult readers. The novel deals with independence, family and the struggles experienced on the cusp of adulthood which I think probably makes this book in a strange quasi-YA land rather than fitting into either niche. Either way, it was the imagery and world building of this book that really impressed me rather than the characters themselves.

    This being said, The Girl From Everywhere isn't really YA. I think this would have fit better with an older cast of characters - but this is purely personal preference.

    Not much really happens until close to the end when things REALLY start to take off. It's a shame since the novel tends to ebb and flow without really getting around to the point of Nix's story until the middle of the book. I'm not going to lie, this book wasn't a one sitting kind of read and there were plenty of parts where I had to push through flowery imagery and unrelated historical details to get to the meat of the tale. It looks like later in the series we may see more romance with Kashmir, but I'm hoping not since I don't particularly like Kash and the lack of romance in this series is refreshing.

    On the subject of flowery imagery and unrelated details - this book excels at being beautiful and interesting. The reader is introduced to local Hawaiian lore, ghostly processions, ancient Terracotta warriors and political struggles Hawaii faced before moving away from its royal roots. I found the back story of Hawaii (a place I've only read about it Kathy Reichs' Spider Bones) very fascinating and the cultural lore a wonderful side story. In retrospect, the lore was important to the events later in the book, but at the time it was an irrelevant side story for pure info dumping. As an anthropology major with focus on cultural anthropology I could really appreciate the depth, detail and beautiful language Heidi used to describe the Terracotta warriors and Hawaii while also bringing cultural lore magically to life. Seriously, this book is beautiful and insightful in unexpected ways even if it doesn't really add to the characters themselves.

    Warning to romance lovers: there's very little romance. This is more of an adventure tale than a romantic endeavour.

    Regardless I already plan to purchase The Girl From Everywhere to go on my bookshelf because it looks great (that cover!) and also the eloquent writing bears re-reading at a later date (and I don't re-read anything!).

    This book will appeal to readers who enjoy historic fiction, nautical related novels, unique adult literature and is definitely a bonus for those who hate YA romance. I don't suggest this to younger YA readers or people looking for epic romance - you won't find what you're looking for here.
    I suggest you guys check this one out if you like excellent writing and slow plots. It's a gloriously unique read.
  • (4/5)
    Sigh. Another book I'm conflicted over.

    My rating is probably closer to a 3.5 to be honest. There was so much about this I loved. The characters are so wonderfully written, so lovingly crafted that you feel like you know them in real life. The relationships are complex and difficult and interesting and the writing is so well done. The author has put so much work and talent into crafting her words and you can practically feel the emotion on every page. The concept behind the book is fascinating too! Navigators, who can travel from place to place, time to time, myth to myth as long as they have a map! It's so super original and I loved the hints we got about how complicated and magical and heartbreaking Navigators' fates can be.

    The book is also wonderfully diverse, and written by an #ownvoices author. The MC has a Chinese background and the crew of the ship is diverse too--a queer woman from ancient Sudan, a former monk, and Kashmir, a boy from an imagined version of Persia. It's so refreshing to read about characters with diverse backgrounds, presented in a respectful and caring way by the author and I recommend this book most highly to anyone wanting a diverse read.

    But the plot is just....not as good.

    I feel like the most interesting part of the story, the most important thread of it is just lost among plots and plans and go-nowhere scenes that don't add to the overall work. The story meanders and then moves far too quickly, glossing over moments that would have been better served with greater detail. The only character with a very clear, defined motivation is the captain of the ship and for everyone else, the story just sort of...moves them around without much reason. I wish the plot and pacing had been stronger. I wish more of the story had focused on Joss to be honest. I wish it hadn't turned into a fairly weakly-developed caper. I appreciate the author's link to actual historical events but I felt like it harmed the overall impact of the story.

    Regardless of plot issues, this book is still worth a read. If you want a diverse cast and beautiful writing and an intriguing premise, this book has all of that! I will for sure read the next one in the series if only because the writing and the characters are more than worth it.
  • (3/5)
    I thoroughly enjoyed the fantastical elements of this book. Nix and her father are navigators - they can go to any time and place with a map. That part - awesome and fun and unique. My issue with this book is the same as it is with pretty much all YA books. Why does there always have to be some boy that the protagonist is falling over? (Yes, I'm pretty sure that I have written that exact sentence in another review) In this case, there is a wonderful little love triangle (shades of Hunger Games, anyone?). I get it, teenagers have hormones and lust and stuff, but I would like to read a YA fantasy book with a strong female character that ISN'T lusting after some boy, although that is exactly what sells to this particular demographic. So, I'll just ignore that part and enjoy the plot and the inventiveness.
  • (4/5)
    Imagine you could travel to any time or place -- all you need is your sailing ship and the right map. That is Nix's life, one that is full of adventure and some serious problems. Her father, the Captain, is obsessed with getting back to Hawaii in time to save the one true love of his life, Nix's mother. It is not his only addiction. Their relationship is so strained that she calls him "Captain" or "Slate" much more often than she calls him Dad. When they sail through time back to Hawaii in the late 1800s, they get caught up in an intrigue that will determine Hawaii's independence. In the meanwhile, more than one young man is in love with Nix and she has to decide where her own heart should take her. The novel is intriguing, and the main characters will win you over. My reservation is that the plot and the conditions ruling the magic of their time travel are sometimes confusing. There are points at which the plot line seem to jump, as if it were a poorly edited movie. Oh, and it would make a great movie!
  • (3/5)
    Imagine growing up on a ship that can time travel anywhere, as long as you have a map that can lead you there. It sounds kind of intriguing, right? Sixteen-year-old Nix does just that, having traveled throughout the world & throughout time with her father and a small crew aboard their ship, The Temptation. But the memory of Nix's mother, who died in childbirth, continues to haunt Nix's father, who continuously strives to find a map that can take him back to 1868 Hawaii. When such a map turns up, Nix dreads the ultimate journey, fearful that going back in time will erase her existence.This novel had such potential. I loved the idea of time traveling via ship based on lost maps. But the story got lost somewhere between the theory and the execution. I found the plot very loosely written with lots of holes and awkward transitions. Many times while reading (on audio, in this case) I felt as though I had missed something. I thought maybe it was just my mind wandering while listening to the audiobook, but the fact that I was confused on more than a few occasions makes me think it wasn't just me. The sequel to this book, The Ship Beyond Time, was released just earlier this week. I'm a bit of a sucker once I start a series, so I'll undoubtedly read that, not so much because I want more of the same, but because I'm optimistically hoping that the author stepped up her game in book #2. We'll see.
  • (4/5)
    Why did I wait so long to read this book? It's definitely more original in its world-building than most of the YA fantasy I've read recently and I loved the idea of time-travel via map. Characters from a variety of backgrounds make an appearance (as you might expect), and the narrator Nix presents a compelling conflict while also being easy to relate to. In addition, I have to give props to the author for using nineteenth-century Hawaii as a setting for much of the story - it's not a place I've visited often via literature, making it yet another refreshing part of the book.
  • (5/5)
    Nix has been everywhere. From 1774 to 2016 back to the Qin Dynasty and ahead to the 1884 there's no map she can't travel to...except for 1868 the year her mother died and the year she was born. Aboard the Temptation her father's ship she navigates their crew wherever they need with the purpose of getting their hands on a map to Honolulu 1868. Time traveling on a ship sounds like an adventure because it is and Nix is going to discover a lot about herself on this last hurrah for that map.I love it when books surprise me with how clever they are. Personally I hate when an author doesn't have a grasp on how time travel should be used to move a plot. It makes a book unnecessarily long and complicated but when done properly it's full of life and adventure.It had the perfect amount of everything a solid female lead, good trusting companions, great evenly matched love intereststhough personally I think Kashmir was always her choice even if their long awaited kiss was literally towards the end. I saw it as a battle of need: Blake vs want: Kashmir..., exploration of an unconventional family dynamic, minor characters were not throwaways with no life of their own, and the resolution was satisfying with just the touch of excitement for the characters to move on with their lives even if we don't get to read about it.I loved it!!
  • (4/5)
    Fresh and lively, if this is not the best book from 2016 I've read, it's close too it!
    Time travel as a personal ability, belief determines destination, it makes the outrageous believable with love of historic and mythic detail. Good characters, fast action, and heady locations.
  • (3/5)
    My teen-aged granddaughter read this novel and thought it was wonderful. She felt I'd really enjoy it because I have read and liked other YA novels. There were lots of topics in this one: time-travel, pirate ships, navigation, maps, Hawaii, history, imagination, and mythology. The protagonist was 16-year-old Nix whose father (the Captain of a ship) was trying to locate a map to take him back in time to 1868 Honolulu. That was the place and year that Nix's mother died.The novel centers around searching for this map and the conflicts the Captain, Nix, and the ship's crew faced. Lots of the novel takes place in Victorian Hawaii and, having been there in the 1990s several times, it brought back lovely memories for me of the vegetation and scenery. But since this is a time-travel novel, modern-day New York City makes an appearance! There is a love triangle that is embedded in the story which seemed less like a romance and more like friendship to me.This is a 450-page novel and it moved slowly for me. I didn't care much for the cast of characters except for one crew member who was a thief from Persia. His charm and intelligence, not to mention his affection for Nix, made for some interesting scenes.
  • (5/5)
    Originally seen on Emily Reads Everything I love maps. I can look at a map and imagine all the possibilities that exist. My favorite books all have maps in the front and I study them. While reading it, I love to flip back and forth so I can see where the characters are and what they are dealing with. My love for maps was an instant connection with this book. I was reading the ARC though and throughout it said Map to Come. I immediately preordered it.The method of time travel in this book is the most unique I've ever seen. It's fascinating and I can't stop thinking about it. It gave me such a different view of every map I've ever seen; especially maps in fantasy novels. Imagine being able to cruise to Ravka, Ketterdam, or Westeros. All of those are terrible ideas. Don't go to those places. Go to Hawaii like Nix does instead. In fact, go anywhere! All you need is a map and a pirate ship!The romance in this book was pitch perfect too. It was incredibly subtle. I loved that it was not the focus of the book at all. In fact, sometimes it was hard to decide if the romance even existed. For me, this was a good thing because it meant that the focus was where it belonged, on the plot. For as subtle as it was, it was also so sweet. There was a little bit of a love triangle but all of the romance was understated so it wasn't an issue or a concern at all. I am sick of the love triangle trend, but this book instead has one of my favorite things. good friends! Love a good friendship!!There are lots of pirate books this year, however, underneath the trappings they aren't really about pirates. This one is no different. The Girl from Everywhere is about Time Travel. It's about a grand heist. It's about love. It's about family, both the family you are born with and the family you choose. It's not really about pirates. It's about much much more.
  • (5/5)
    So, I loved this book. It was entertaining, I loved the main characters, I loved the story line, so happy to see there's going to be at least one other book in this series. Easy reading, I don't feel like there was a lot of unneeded stuff here. Brilliant. I would recommend it. 5 out of 5 stars.
  • (4/5)
    I thoroughly enjoyed reading The Girl From Everywhere. Nix and her father can use maps to travel to the time that the map was drawn. Nix's father is obsessed with his quest to return to a particular point in his timeline, to try and save Nix's mother from dying, and Nix is torn between wanting to help him, and the fear that if she does so, her own timeline will be irrevocably altered. Heidi Heilig has created a vibrant world, with interesting characters, and a compelling and intelligent plot. I found myself neglecting my other reads as soon as I'd started this, and I will look out for other books by this author in the future!
  • (4/5)
    I'm not usually a big fan of time travel stories because I have difficulty accepting the paradoxes but this book is more believable than most. Nix has been traveling with her father and an eclectic crew on his sailing ship since he picked her up in Hawaii when she was an infant. He had left her mother, the love of his life, and sailed off to find fortune but, when he returned, he learned that she had died leaving an infant. Ever since, he has been trying to get back before she dies and save her. The problem is that saving his wife could mean that Nix might never have been born. She is very worried about what would happen to her if her father's plans succeed. Luckily for Nix but not for Slate, they hadn't been able to find a map that will take them back to Hawaii in time to save his wife. Now, however, a new map has surfaced and her father is determined to own it and use it.Most of this story takes place in Hawaii in 1884 which is where the map leads despite its 1868 date. The captain and crew find themselves mixed up in a plot to bring down the Kingdom of Hawaii. Nix also meets a woman who knew her mother and who seems to know quite a bit about the sort of time traveling that Nix and her father are capable of doing. Nix also meets a boy. Blake Hart is the nephew of the mapmaker who created the 1868 map that Slate is determined to own no matter what the cost is to the Hawaii that currently exists. He is an artist and a strong supporter of the Kingdom of Hawaii. His father, however, is one of the key supporters of the plot to overthrow the current government. He and Nix have an 1880s sort of romance with him courting her. This causes a conflict for her because her deep friendship with a crewmate named Kashmir might also be turning into a romance. Kash is a fascinating character that the captain and crew picked up on one of their voyages to a legendary place. Kash is a thief and one of Nix's only agemates and friends on the crew. I enjoyed this story. I liked the conflict that Nix has as she decides whether she can support her father's agenda or whether it is time to go off on her own adventures. Nix's fears about the captain's plans were realistically shown. Nix is at a turning point in her life and the tension shows in the story.Fans of time travel and romance will enjoy this debut story.
  • (4/5)
    Pros: great premise, interesting characters, mostly set in Hawaii, creative use of mythologiesCons: drags a bitNix has lived her 16 years on the Temptation, sailing to any map - real or imagined - using her father’s special navigation abilities. Slate is looking for a map that will allow them to travel back to the time just before the death of Nix’s mother. But Nix is afraid that saving her mother will un-write her own life. The characters are all somewhat conflicted in their desires. This makes them feel like real people, with their own hopes and fears, clashing with others. I loved that the characters were all from different backgrounds too. Nix is half Chines and half American, Kashmir is from a Persian map, etc. Hawaii before the American takeover is a fascinating setting, and I was impressed at how closely the author kept to the history of the period (as relayed in the author’s note). it was also wonderful learning about some Hawaiian myths. The use of mythology was pretty clever. I loved the premise of the book and how belief is the most important factor in how the ‘magic’ works.I did find that the book dragged a bit. When they first land in Hawaii it took a while for things to get going.This is a fun book, with a unique perspective.
  • (4/5)
    Nixie has grown up on board the Temptation, a time-travelling pirate ship, with her father and a small crew. Together they can travel to any place, real or mythological, as long as they have a map. But Slate, the ship's captain and Nix's father, desperately wants to find a map of Hawaii in 1868, to go back in time and save his love, Nix's mother, who died at birth. And finally, in present-day New York, he finally finds what he's looking for; but if he succeeds, will he change the past and thereby endanger his daughter's life?Firmly aimed at the female YA readership, I'm sure this novel will find many fans who want to see a departure from the ubiquitous supernatural romance novels. In Nixie readers will find someone to relate to easily: Heidi Heilig has done an excellent job of describing a girl feeling adrift and at sea (pardon the pun) in a situation that's beyond her control, but trying her best to be brave by taking charge of her fate. The fact that she's not terribly close to her father, who at first comes across as a self-absorbed and obsessed individual, puts an interesting spin on the central dynamic.Written in the first person, Nixie comes across as a typical teenager in an untypical situation, but she is a likeable and feisty heroine who can think on her feet, while also unsure of herself when it comes to romantic feelings. In that respect, the love triangle with Nixie at the centre felt slightly predictable and conforming to the cliché of what YA novels for girls should feature to attract high sales. But the other ingredients also commend the book: exotic locations (even if they're rather centred on one particular island); an intriguing blend of historical fact and fantasy; an engaging set of characters; adventure, danger and intrigue. Oh, and I could read a whole book just about Kashmir.The novel ends in a satisfying way and could well be viewed as a stand-alone book, though I've read that the author is planning to write a sequel for a duology. I'm certainly hooked enough to want to know how the story continues, and will board the Temptation again when the second volume becomes available.(This review was originally written for Amazon's Vine programme.)
  • (5/5)
    Review courtesy of Dark Faerie TalesQuick & Dirty: This was an incredible, original novel that was a lot of fun to read.Opening Sentence: It was the kind of August day that hinted at monsoons, and the year was 1774, though not for very much longer.The Review:Nix and her father travel the globe. They are not restrained by any time, place, or even mythical regions. All they need is a map, signed and dated, to steer themselves to a brand new world. Kashmir, Nix’s best friend and possibly more, was from the early Persian empires before he was picked up by the crew. But Nix’s father, the captain, is planning a voyage that could mean danger to Nix and the only version of herself she’s ever known. She doesn’t know what will happen when they return to save her mother, who died in Honolulu in 1868. But she does know that it will change everything.It’s finals week in San Diego, so I’ve been stressed stressed stressed. It just so happened I was brushing up on my AP World textbook when I was reading something about the early Chinese dynasties, and the ruthless ruler Qin Shingandi. For those who don’t have any background on Qin, he led a highly centralized empire that died very quickly after he did, but he was brutal and ambitious, and any scholars or writings that questioned him were burned alive. He was killed when he drank mercury, which he believed to be an elixir to mortality, but was poisoned; a tomb was built with hundreds of terra cotta soldiers, rivers running with lethal mercury, and models of his realm.What did this little history lesson have to do with my review? Well, one, it makes me feel like I’m studying (which is definitely what I should be doing now), but also, while I was reading about this ruthless leader, he turned up in the book. Nix and the crew travel back to the time of late Qin china, and you can’t imagine how excited I was to draw parallels to my studies. It also demonstrated how well researched the book was; everything was matching what my textbook said. It was a lot of fun for me, and that really increased my reading experience tenfold, because I related to it much more. This was a random little note – believe me, I know.Anyway, even without my fun relating it to my favorite class, this novel was a good one. The characters were well developed and had depth. My favorite was Nix’s father the captain, Slate, who had so many layers and was very intriguing. I did enjoy Kashmir, who I also related back to my studies – he came from the Persian empires and was an Arab thief before Nix’s crew picked him up. His different upbringing made him interesting as well. There seems to be a romance between Nix and him, but it was only one part of the novel, not the main focus by a long shot.The concept of the book was also so unique. I absolutely adored the idea of traveling all of those amazing places, all with the help of a map. The book had so many different plotlines going at once, but by the end they all connected and came full circle. When it ended, I was excited to hear it was a series, because it could very well have ended as a stand alone. Rejoice! Another book of Nix and her adventures is to come!Notable Scene:“And I’m glad to earn my keep. I never learned to beg.” He shrugged. “Besides, liked you said, it’s for love.”“Love?” The word was bitter as hemlock. “It’s just another addiction.”FTC Advisory: HarperTeen provided me with a copy of The Girl from Everywhere. No goody bags, sponsorships, “material connections,” or bribes were exchanged for my review.