Găsiți următorul dvs. carte audio preferat

Deveniți un membru astăzi și ascultați gratuit pentru 30 zile
Things That Make White People Uncomfortable

Things That Make White People Uncomfortable


Things That Make White People Uncomfortable

evaluări:
4.5/5 (68 evaluări)
Lungime:
6 hours
Lansat:
Apr 10, 2018
ISBN:
9781684410453
Format:
Carte audio

De asemenea, disponibil ca...

De asemenea, disponibil ca carteCarte

De asemenea, disponibil ca...

De asemenea, disponibil ca carteCarte

Descriere

Super Bowl Champion and two-time Pro Bowler Michael Bennett is an outspoken proponent for social justice and a man without a censor. One of the most scathingly humorous athletes on the planet, he is also a fearless activist, grassroots philanthropist, and organizer.

Bennett, a defensive end for the Seattle Seahawks, has gained international recognition for his public support for the Black Lives Matter Movement and women's rights. Bennett donates all his endorsement money and half of the proceeds from his jersey sales to fund health and education projects for poor underserved youth and minority communities, and has recently expanded his reach globally to provide STEM programming in Africa.

Dave Zirin has been called the "finest, most important writer on sports and politics in America," by Dr. Cornel West, Professor of the Practice of Public Philosophy at the Harvard Divinity School. He is sports editor for The Nation and author of several titles for Haymarket Books, including his critically acclaimed book The John Carlos Story, written with 1968 Olympian John Carlos.

Lansat:
Apr 10, 2018
ISBN:
9781684410453
Format:
Carte audio

De asemenea, disponibil ca...

De asemenea, disponibil ca carteCarte

Despre autor


Legat de Things That Make White People Uncomfortable

Cărți audio conex
Articole conexe

Recenzii

Ce părere au oamenii despre Things That Make White People Uncomfortable

4.5
68 evaluări / 10 Recenzii
Ce părere aveți?
Evaluare: 0 din 5 stele

Recenziile cititorilor

  • (4/5)
    Things That Make White People Uncomfortable by Michael Bennett 2018Haymarket BooksI put off reading this book for a long time, although I was interested immediately in reading it. Why? Well.....it made me.....a white person.....uncomfortable....Then I read the book. Michael Bennett doesn't stand up for just himself, he has the courage and conviction to put his support behind programs that work with people marginalized in society for their beliefs or lifestyle choices. This is a man who believes the backbone of society is its community and its people. **Improving food programs and teaching youth about the benefits of good nutrition**STEM based education**Intersectionality**Pro cannabis use for injury recovery**Black Lives **Putting college education before sportsMichael Bennett believes in people, first. He uses his celebrity to help support causes he believes in, hoping to influence others to stand up for their own beliefs; that Corporations that want to use his image might see what he is doing to help, and what he stands up for and want to match his support.He has become a member of A4I (Athletes For Impact) an organization that supports athletes who faced discriminating attitudes because of their personal beliefs, convictions or lifestyle choices.This book was so inspiring. I have so much respect and admiration for Michael Bennett. I'm no longer uncomfortable. I'm totally onboard. I love this guy!Amazing what we can learn and do when we finally step away from "comfortable"......when we put people before the "brand".Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    Michael, along with his brother Martellus, are true champions, and it is refreshing to see them use their positions as athletes to raise a voice for justice in a field were they are expected to remain silent. Salute!
  • (5/5)
    Excellent book and very important. Made me think about many things that make me uncomfortable and then gives a blueprint to navigate those feelings and even move towards doing something about it. Also openedy eyes to what pro-athletes go through and how they need to be supported.
  • (5/5)
    Raw and real. Title is provocative but the substance of the book has more to do with making an impact amd change in the world.
  • (5/5)
    So honest! Every white person must read this - eye opening
  • (5/5)
    A great insight into the mind of an athlete that wants to leave his mark.
  • (5/5)
    Wow really eye-opening I had no idea who Michael Bennett was or understand football for that matter. Being a black South African man I relate a lot with the author.

    What I like most about the book is that he goes beyond black and white racism to touch on the plight of black women and the lgbt community.

    I also enjoyed the authors vulnerability as he’s raising his girls, I’m also a father of a 9 year old girl and I took a lot of advice there.

    Thanks Mr Bennet your consciousness changes me especially since I’m few years older than you
  • (5/5)

    2 people found this helpful

    If you can't understand why NFL players kneel,read this. Powerful. Memorable.

    2 people found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Everything I know about Michael Bennett's football career is what is contained in this book, and truthfully, I probably don't know all of that since I started getting confused when words like halfback and linemen showed up. I didn't pick this book up because of who he is as a professional. I didn't even know that. While I was aware that the NFL was in the throws of a controversy centering around racism, Black Lives Matter, and the national anthem, I couldn't have named a single player involved excepting, of course, Colin Kaepernick. Truthfully, I'm not sure if I could have named another football player at all besides Kaepernick.So why the fuck did someone like me even pick up a book by a sportsball player?It started with the title—Things That Make White People Uncomfortable. That is one hell of a title. It jumped out at me from the shelf, and, of course, I'm going to pick that up. I want to know things that will make me uncomfortable. Once I picked it up, I found myself looking into the face of large man who is making what is traditionally considered a tough guy face, no smile and narrowed eyes, but, if you really look, there's something gentle and playful in that face. He looks as though he might just be fucking with you but lovingly. That is my sort of person.I admittedly skimmed the blurb on the inside jacket, which is why I still didn't realize it was a book by a football player until I started reading it. My eyes sort of glazed over at foreign phrases like "Pro Bowl" and "defensive end" and instead only took in words like "activist", "feminist", and "changemaker". Those are my sorts of words.You can count me in as a fan of Mr. Bennett. I now have a favorite athlete. This book of essays, written with Dave Zirin, is the work of a beautiful, compassionate, and growing soul. It is the work of an individual with the drive to understand others and make the world a better place. It is the work of someone who understands that change starts with oneself and one's home but should never stop there. It is the work of someone brave enough to share their personal story and break from the confines of toxic masculinity. The world needs more men like Mr. Bennett, and I sincerely hope that his activism will be a catalyst for change.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    2 people found this helpful

    While what constitutes "whiteness" is a matter of debate, and I don't view myself as being "white" (and as a Jew, I'm sure that racists would agree with that), this book ended up making me a bit uncomfortable anyway. Watching (American) football has always been a bit of a guilty pleasure of mine. Well, I suppose I'd say that I didn't find it a GUILTY pleasure until I read "League of Denial" by Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru (highly recommended, by the way) and saw just how the NFL (and the NCAA) was NOT handling the concussion crisis. And so watching football became a guilty pleasure - one that I still indulged in, but felt a little bad about doing so every time I had a game on the television. I supported Kaepernick's, among others', protest of the national anthem. Raised by a secular Jew and a liberal Quaker for most of my life, I was already well-acquainted with those who didn't stand for the national anthem or repeat the pledge of allegiance. My grandfather (the Quaker) was a WW2 vet (non-combat role) and never once said the words to the national anthem or the pledge of allegiance. To him, those things weren't about patriotism or being a "real American" or other such nonsense. He pledged his allegiance to humanity and our shared experience, not to one nation in particular. I myself have never said the pledge of allegiance, either; my grandfather made it abundantly clear that before I could say those words, I had to understand what they meant and what exactly I was promising. Somehow, in the course of national dialogue, what the players who were protesting against got twisted into something unrecognizable. There seemed to be two camps of people who were angry against the protesters: 1) those who said that they were protesting the military (they aren't) or weren't patriotic (wrong) and 2) those who said that black athletes are all spoiled millionaires who don't give a shit anyway and are just stirring up the pot. Bennett clearly and concisely explains just why he started protesting. I've heard several interviews given by Bennett, and I've always thought him as a well-spoken man, and this translates well into his book (not sure why he needed a co-author, because it sounds quite a bit like Bennett's interviews and public speeches - maybe the co-author helped guide him to various topics? Not sure.). And he isn't afraid to tackle difficult topics - from his childhood, to racism, to concussions, to college football players enduring life-altering injuries all while not being paid (even though they bring in millions every year for their universities), to Kaepernick being "white balled" by the NFL establishment for daring to speak truth, etc. The only subjects that made me uncomfortable were the football-related topics; like I said, I'm having a difficult time reconciling my love for the game with the injuries that players routinely endure for "entertainment." He also draws attention to the power dynamics between "owners" of teams and the players.Most often, I found myself saying "yes" and "tell it like it is" as Bennett spoke about these subjects. So, like I said, I wasn't particularly uncomfortable reading this book. But I would LOVE LOVE LOVE to have any and every football fan who thinks the protests are about the military or patriotism or spoiled millionaire athletes "not just sticking to football" read this book. I guarantee that this book would make THEM uncomfortable. Unfortunately, I don't think many will, simply because they have Breitbart and Trump and Fox News to tell them what to think, so why bother using their brains? As for me, especially the chapter about the NCAA, I'm conflicted even more about football. I don't think I'll watch the NFL anymore, especially because of the new rule not allowing players to kneel anymore (and Trump's ridiculous injection of himself into this manufactured debate about patriotism and the military, as if a draft dodger and someone who MOCKED a gold star family and a POW [John McCain] has ANY RIGHT AT ALL to comment about patriotism or the military - and seriously FUCK every single supporter of Trump's who gets all pissy about athletes protesting police brutality but don't care about Trump's actions). I like how Bennett isn't about focusing blame on people; he's all about moving forward, about doing as much good as possible for all people, for seeing that we're all members of the human race and we should start acting like it, damn it. Highly recommended, especially for football fans - but you don't have to be a football fan to enjoy this book.

    2 people found this helpful