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Paper Wishes

Paper Wishes

Scris de Lois Sepahban

Povestit de Cindy Kay


Paper Wishes

Scris de Lois Sepahban

Povestit de Cindy Kay

evaluări:
4.5/5 (9 evaluări)
Lungime:
3 hours
Lansat:
Nov 12, 2019
ISBN:
9781541433861
Format:
Carte audio

Descriere

A moving debut middle-grade novel about a girl whose family is relocated to a Japanese internment camp during World War II—and the dog she has to leave behind.

Ten-year-old Manami did not realize how peaceful her family's life on Bainbridge Island was until the day it all changed. It's 1942, after the attack on Pearl Harbor, and Manami and her family are Japanese American, which means that the government says they must leave their home by the sea and join other Japanese Americans at a prison camp in the desert. Manami is sad to go, but even worse is that they are going to have to give her and her grandfather's dog, Yujiin, to a neighbor to take care of. Manami decides to sneak Yujiin under her coat and gets as far as the mainland before she is caught and forced to abandon Yujiin. She and her grandfather are devastated, but Manami clings to the hope that somehow Yujiin will find his way to the camp and make her family whole again. It isn't until she finds a way to let go of her guilt that Manami can reclaim the piece of herself that she left behind and accept all that has happened to her family.

Lansat:
Nov 12, 2019
ISBN:
9781541433861
Format:
Carte audio


Despre autor

Lois Sepahban lives in Herrodsburg, Kentucky, where she writes children's nonfiction books for the school library market. Paper Wishes is her first novel.

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4.6
9 evaluări / 6 Recenzii
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  • (4/5)
    I didn't realize when I picked this up that it's for middle-grade readers, but it was still a good read for adults. It's well-written and the characters are well-developed. It's told from the point of view of Manami, a 10-year-old Japanese-American girl who lives on Bainbridge Island with her family. As Word War II begins, they are sent to an internment camp. Naturally, Manami has trouble dealing with the changes and understanding what is happening, but the love of the people around her helps her adjust.The book is well-researched, well-written, and bittersweet.
  • (5/5)
    This beautifully written book is told through the eyes of Manami, a young Japanese -American girl who is sent with her family to an internment camp. The family adjusts to life at the camp, but Manami misses her beloved dog terribly. Daily life at the camp, and Manami's struggle to adjust form the main part of the book. The events that lead to Manami losing her voice, and ultimately regaining it are told in a simple and touching way. This book would be good for young readers interested in American history. This book would also fit well in a unit on Japanese internment camps. It is also a good book to include on life in America during WW II. Readers who like books with historical accuracy and a gentle female narrator would surely enjoy this book.
  • (3/5)
    After the Japanese are evacuated to internment camps and Manami is separated from her beloved dog, she doesn't speak a word after the first chapter. But her thoughts clearly express her roiling sadness and the trouble she has adjusting to this abrupt, injust upheaval of everyone's lives. A quiet story, simply written; heartbreaking but hopeful, too.
  • (5/5)
    This story is about a young girl named Manami. The story is told around the time pearl harbor was bombed. Manami lived with her mother, father, grandfather, and her little dog Yujiin. Manami, her family, and all other Japanese Americans are told to pack everything they can carry and that they will be moved to new homes off the island where they live. Manami is told she cannot bring her dog Yujiin with her but she will not accept this and speaks Yujiin into her coat before they go. As they are getting off the boat that took them to the main land her mother discovers the dog a tries to help Manami hide him but Yujiin is discovered and take from the and put in a crate. Once they get to their new home Manami is very upset and wont talk anymore she describes a dust that cloges her throught making her unable to speak. She wants to go back to the island, she wants her life to go back to the way it was. Soon a school is built in their "prison village" as Manami calls it. Manami goes to the school with her friend from the island, Kimmi. Manami's teacher is named Ms. Rosalie. Ms. Rosalie gives Manami paper and pencils so she can draw. Manami starts drawing pictures of Yujiin and tossing them into the wind with hopes that Yujiin will find them and come to her. Manami's brother soon comes to the prison and becomes a teacher. Some boys Manami calls the wild boys from Ron's class start getting to trouble and spreading bad news. The wild boys get Ron in truoble and Ron ends up in the jail temporarily. The head of the camp decides that Ron should be sent to another camp where he will be safer. After Ron is moved Manami's parents and Grandfather decide to get Manami a dog. They bring home a small white puppy like Yujiin that they name Seal. Manami likes Seal but she doesn't forget Yujiin. Ron sends a letter to them saying they should move to the camp he is at along with others in Block 3, where all the trouble with the Wild boys was. The warden allows them to move and Manami and her family lave for the new camp. As they are leaving a soldier tells Manami no dogs allowed. Manami finally gains her speech back by remembering Ms. Rosalie saying she is strong and she is brave and she screams "No!" The soldier is startled by her and allows them to go with the dog. In the end Manami starts to speak again and is moved to her brother Ron's camp. I liked this book because is showed how people can have a special relationship with pets, it is touching, and it is well written. This story shows how Manami is so attached to her dog like many people are attached to their pets with special bonds. The story is touching because all the caring things Mamami does to find Yujiin and things others do for her like Ms. Rosalie giving her paper and helping Manami and just being there for her. The story is well written because the author describes whats happening and uses interesting ways to describe emotions. In the end this book is a nice read and very cute.
  • (5/5)
    I never knew there were internment camps in America for the Japanese after WWII! This was a really sad book about a little girl, Manami, who had to give up her dog after she tried to sneak him away with them. Upon losing her puppy Yujiin, Manami basically became a select mute. She was too sad about losing her dog and her regular family routines like tea with grandma. She didn't want to adjust to this new life. Her only outlet was drawing on paper. Every day she drew her puppy, held the paper high, and let it go in hopes Yujiin would recognize himself in the drawing and find her again. This book meant a lot to me because my grandfather and I were also really close, and I could never imagine losing my dog.
  • (4/5)


    Manami is a ten-year-old girl living on Bainbridge Island in 1942, when life changes forever. Thanks to a ridiculous order signed by the President, Manami, her parents and her grandfather, along with all of their Japanese-American friends, are required to locate to an internment camp. Pearl Harbor has been bombed and now the government is suspicious of all the Japanese even if they were born in America.

    Families can bring only what they can carry. Manami loves her little dog, Yujiin so she hides him under her coat. She's quickly caught and forced to give him up. With the loss of Yujiin and realization that life at their new camp won't be easy, Manami becomes mute.

    She and her grandfather are devastated, but Manami clings to the hope that somehow Yujiin will find his way to the camp and make her family whole again. It isn't until she finds a way to let go of her guilt that Manami can reclaim the piece of herself that she left behind and accept all that has happened to her family.