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Good Girl

Good Girl

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Good Girl

evaluări:
3/5 (585 evaluări)
Lungime:
21 pages
13 minutes
Lansat:
Nov 26, 2011
ISBN:
9781465951748
Format:
Carte

Descriere

What’s the difference between a “good girl” and a “bad girl”? Which one would he rather have? Which one would she rather be? Or is it possible to be both? This tasty short erotic tale by Sharazade gets to the (bare) bottom of the issue.

Utterly sexy and clever. A hell of a way to wake up on a Sunday morning. –Sommer Marsden, author of "Calendar Girl" and "Base Nature"

"Good Girl" has wicked humor, biting wit, and steamy heat, everything you’d expect from Sharazade. No disappointment in this hot little number. –KD Grace, author of "The Pet Shop" and "The Initiation of Miss Holly"

Shar’s erotica never fails to combine sexy sensuality with red-hot scenarios that are both believable and searingly honest. –Kay Jaybee, author of "The Perfect Submissive"

Lansat:
Nov 26, 2011
ISBN:
9781465951748
Format:
Carte

Despre autor

I'm a professional writer, editor, and consultant, with more than 20 books published under another name. I divide my time among Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the U.S. I enjoy stories that are realistic enough that they might have happened and fanciful enough that they might not have. I value communication, adventure, exploration, passion, and love.

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585 evaluări / 77 Recenzii
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  • (2/5)
    I might have given this book one star, but for the sections with the British-born mother. Those passages are, for the most part, at least credible, and the emotional depth is appropriate. The other sections, however, those of the detective and the criminal, were desperately in need of an edit. The voices are cliched, so much so that the detective sounds like a parody of 1940s noir literature (and not a good one at that). The criminal is the same, only without the occasional unintended giggles. On top of that, the plot is predictable and slow moving. How I wished for more.
  • (4/5)
    Its been compared to Gone Girl but I found this novel much more enjoyable. Read it!
  • (4/5)
    The Good Girl This was an interesting book that didn't turn out to be at all what I expected.
    I don't quite remember where I got the recommendation from, but this had been on my list of books to listen to for a while. I do prefer the audiobooks for my fiction, and this one turned out great. The synopsis does a good job of setting up the story, but there are still some surprises along the way.
    First of all, there's the way the story is told. The author uses rotating first person perspectives between Colin, Eve, and Gabe. This lets us be in the mind of the perpetrator, someone worried about the victim (her mother), and the detective who is trying to find the victim. It also jumps in time throughout where Colin's perspective are consistently in the moment of the kidnapping but Eve and Gabe could either be looking for Mia or trying to piece together what happened after it all.
    I was also pleasantly surprised to find that the "emotional entanglements that eventually cause this family's world to shatter" was not just some straightforward Stockholm syndrome. It's much more complicated than that. Both Colin and Mia are much more complicates than that.
    As the pieces began to fall into place, it became satisfying to watch it all play out but wasn't particularly surprising anymore. I thought Mia's brief moment as a point of view character in the epilogue was interesting but not really necessary to close out the story. I suppose that's why it was the epilogue, but I usually find them more satisfying than I did with her. Perhaps it was what she added to the story more than that it was there.
    Altogether it was a great book, though. It kept my interest and was well paced. I thoroughly enjoyed all the characters. Surprisingly, I think Colin was my favorite. He was developed well enough that I just couldn't help it.
  • (4/5)
    Enjoyable with a nice plot twist at the end
  • (4/5)
    Digital audiobook narrated by Lindy Nettleton, Johnny Heller, Tom Taylorson, and Andi Arndt.3.5*** From the book jacket: Born to a prominent Chicago judge and the stifled socialite wife, Mia Dennett moves against the grain as a young inner-city art teacher. One night, Mia enters a bar to meet her on-again, off-again boyfriend. But when he doesn’t show, she unwisely leaves with an enigmatic stranger. With his smooth moves and modest wit, at first Colin Thatcher seems like a safe one-night stand. But following Colin home will turn out to be the worst mistake of Mia’s life. My reactionsKurbca write a good psychological thriller. She uses four narrators: Eve (Mia’s mother), Colin, Gabe (the detective), and Mia (for just the epilogue); and two time lines: “Before” and “After.” In this way, the reader quickly knows that Mia is back at home with her family, but finding out what, why and how things exactly happened takes patience … and several twists in the plot.I was caught up in the intrigue, and interested in these characters and how they fit together. The changing points of view and time lines kept me off balance, much as the characters in the scenario might feel, each of them having only a piece of the puzzle and struggling to make sense of, and even survive, a situation they could not possibly control. What I most look for in this genre is a plot that keeps me interested, and keeps me guessing. Kubica delivered that. After that final plot twist, I went back and skimmed over it to see if there were clues I had completely missed. There were.The audio book is narrated by four talented voice artists, though I don’t know who performed which characters. They were all very good, maintaining a great pace and making it easy to follow the back-and-forth time line and perspective.
  • (4/5)
    Great twist at the end!
  • (3/5)
    Picked this up in our Airbnb and will probably leave it here, too. Decent suspense, though outcome was pretty much telegraphed early on. I think this was a debut novel, so might keep an eye open for future works. Good vacay read.
  • (5/5)
    The Good Girl by Mary KubicaMia, the daughter of a prominent Judge goes missing. At first her Mother (Eve) thinks nothing of it, but soon starts to have doubts. Mia meets up with a stranger at a bar, (Colin) thinking it will be a one night stand. But she finds herself in an abduction for extortion and things take a different turn. Soon Detective Gabe Hoffman is on the case, determined to find out exactly what happened.A fast paced psychological thriller, with an intriguing plot, non stop drama, suspense, twists and turns. The characters are well developed , with engaging dialog pulling you into the story and not letting go. I was hooked from the first page until the last. I highly recommend The Good Girl to those who love a great psychological thriller/suspense.
  • (4/5)
    I could not turn the pages fast enough. Loved this book. My heart rate accelerated, and I shed a couple of tears, it was so good!!!! Read it!
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this book.
  • (2/5)
    This book is often compared to Gone Girl. I did not like Gone Girl; I liked this one even less. I listened to the audiobook, otherwise it would have been a DNF.
  • (4/5)
    This was definitely a thrill ride. I loved how the chapters were written for each character 'before' and 'after'.

    If you like a mystery and a suspense thriller, you will not be disappointed with this book.
  • (4/5)
    A special thank you to Goodreads First Reads for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

    I really enjoy Mary Kubica. If you have read either/both of her other two books, you are going to love this one too. In the genre of thrillers, Kubica asserts herself as a top player.

    Kubica's writing is clever, I didn't have it all figured out. There were just enough plot twists, both subtle, and dramatic to make this book a contender to appear on various "best of" lists for 2015. The writing is tight, descriptive, and the pace is fast enough to keep the reader engaged to polish off this book in one sitting.

    Thank you Goodreads, this page-turner was just what I needed on a winter's day.
  • (5/5)
    When Mia is kidnapped, her hired kidnapper, Colin, doesn’t deliver her to the actual kidnapper; instead, he takes off with her! The story is told “before” and “after” from a few different points of view: from Colin’s, from her mother Eve’s, and from the detective Gabe’s. The chapters tell you whose POV you are following and when, so I found it easy to follow. It was a bit slow-moving at times, but I was still fascinated with what was happening. In my opinion, I thought the author did a very good job of keeping me “on board” with what was going on (as I try to describe it without giving too much away!). The twist at the very end – impressive. If I was one to reread, I would definitely reread and look for potential clues! I did reread the epilogue.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this audio book. I liked the multiple different readers. The story was well done with many surprises and what an ending. I would recommend this book.
  • (5/5)
    WOW! This was an amazing story. I could hardly put it down.
  • (4/5)
    I listened to this book which had multiple narrators all of whom did a good job. The book is constructed as a series of first person narratives so the different narrators made it clear who was giving the information. Interestingly, none of the narrators is the titular character until the epilogue when she finally speaks.Maia is the younger daughter of James and Eve and something of a black sheep in the family. Her parents are well-off and James is a judge. The other daughter is a lawyer in a high-priced firm. Eve is from England and met James when she was in Chicago on holidays with some friends (do people actually go to Chicago for holidays?). She worked initially as an interior decorator but when the children were born she stayed home with them and never went back to work. Maia is an art teacher in a school in the poor part of town, an occupation that her father disapproves of. Maia had not been in touch with her parents for some time so they might not have noticed her disappearance if a friend from school had not called Eve. Then the police were called and a detective (Gabe) was assigned to the case. He doggedly tracks down evidence and narrows in on the location of Maia and her captor. The book shifts between the time before Maia was found and the time after so we know almost from the beginning that she does survive the kidnapping. She has lost her memory and even thinks her name is Chloe. The kidnapper, Colin, is one of the narrators so we also know that he was hired by a local criminal to kidnap Maia and that he decided not to turn her over to the criminal because he knew she might not survive. So he takes her to a small cabin in northern Minnesota that his father owns. It is remote and especially in late fall/early winter no one else is around. Since we know Maia survives you would think it would not be much of a mystery but we don't know what happened to Colin until the end. The epilogue also drops a stunner.An interesting story construction and a stunning ending--what more could you want?
  • (4/5)
    What a great read! And what a sad, sad story about families. This was obsessively page-turning and such a quick read I didn't even mind the POV switches at each chapter, which usually drive me crazy. Another thing that drives me crazy - alternating past/present chapters and this book did that also. But again, didn't even phase me. This read was that good.
  • (5/5)
    I'm still digesting this one. I will post a review soon. (Have you ever read a book that consumes you so much that you can't even pick up another book for a couple days?) That's where I am. I feel like I am trying to recover from a breakup or something. All I can say is IT. WAS. GOOD.
  • (3/5)
    This one borders on an ok and a like. I liked it enough to finish reading it but really I wasn't all that interested overall. There are several things that I thought would happen that indeed did and one that was so absolutely irritating that I was never quite won back as a reader. Still, I'm glad that I read this as I've got another off my TBR pile and in a summer full of books, that's a very good thing. I'd read another by this author as I liked her writing though I felt some of the plot here fell down and never recovered.
  • (4/5)
    This book is the author's debut. It is quite an impressive beginning! Well written with a very good plot, this held my attention from first - last page.Born to a wealthy family with a beautiful mother and a father who is a judge, Mia Dennert longed to be free of her father's rigid standards. When she was 18, she obtained her own apartment. Unlike her society bound lawyer sister, Mia rebelled from uptight standards and taught art at a school for wayward teens.When she wanted male companionship, she called her on again/off again boyfriend. Tragically, one fall night when her boyfriend stood her up, she hooked up with another. Soon she realized that she was kidnapped and there was no chance of escape. Held at gun point in a secluded Minnesota cabin, as winter approaches, she is acutely aware that food and fire wood are low. As the winds howl, Mia turns inside her self. As the winds howl, and the sun accumulates, they somehow must find a mutual ground in order to survive.Told from differing viewpoints of the kidnapper, Mia's mother, and the detective who must find her before it is too late, we only glean the emotions of Mia via her captor. Tightly woven, with a surprise ending, this suspenseful novel is a must read.
  • (1/5)
    A deeply flawed novel, this thriller only differs from the example set by other, better books such as "Gone Girl" in its blatant racism and misogyny. "The Good Girl" is the story of Mia Dennet, a prominent judge's daughter, is kidnapped, and the novel switches between different characters' perspectives and different points in time to tell the story of Mia's captivity and rescue. The plot twists couldn't be telegraphed any louder, but it's the novel's treatment of African Americans and women that bothered me the most. The presence or absence of African Americans in a particular area is referenced as a measure of its safety and this assumption is never challenged. Meanwhile, all women want babies and only evil characters recommend abortions. Ultimately, I found that these factors outweighed any charm the novel might have.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this novel. It could have gone so wrong, so easily, but Mary Kubica pulled everything off perfectly. The story shifts not only points of view, but points in time. The story shifts between the mother, the police officer, and the kidnapper. These sudden shifts could have gotten very confusing, but Kubica never lost her way or her momentum. Everything moved seamlessly until the very end. When I read the epilogue, my jaw dropped to the floor.
  • (3/5)
    A nice twist, but I am not sure it deserves all of the hype that accompanied its release.
  • (4/5)
    The Good GirlMary KubicaMY RATING ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️▫️PUBLISHERBlackstone AudioPUBLISHEDJuly 29, 2014A most unique telling of a kidnapping gone awry, an gripping thriller that will surprise you in the end.SUMMARYMia Dennet, a young free-spirited inner-city high school art teacher from wealthy parents is kidnapped. Her abductor, some guy that picked her up in a bar, was suppose to turn her over to the man who hired him. But Colin Thatcher, her abductor does not stick to the original plan, and instead takes her from the bustling city of Chicago to a remote and frigid Minnesota cabin. There he makes plans for their next move while trying to keep them both warm and fed. But chopping wood and slurping chicken noodle soup gets old fast. I’ve been following her for the last few days. I know where she buys her groceries, where she has her dry cleaning done, where she works. I’ve never spoken to her. I wouldn’t recognize the sound of her voice. I don’t know the color of her eyes or what they look like when she scared. But I will.”REVIEWThis riveting story grabbed my attention and held me captive. It is woven with twists and turns which will surprise any reader. My favorite part of the book was the smartly structured and creative format, jumping both in perspective and time. The story is told from alternating perspectives of Colin, Mia’s anxious mother, Eve, Gabe Hoffman, the detective on her case and finally from Mia herself. Each of the narrators are adding to the story by unraveling Mia’s life both before and after the abduction. Seeing Mia from the four different perspectives is a gratifying way to add depth to the story. I listened to the audio version of the book and found both the writing and the format surprisingly easy to follow and understand. The vivid descriptions of the frozen and snow-filled Minnesota forest had me layering on blankets as I was reading. The main characters were well developed, and while I didn’t necessarily love any of them, it affirmed my realization that you don’t need to love the characters to love the book. Although it certainly doesn’t hurt!The Good Girl was author Mary Kubica’s 2014 debut novel. Since then she has published three additional novels: Pretty Baby (2015), Don’t You Cry (2016) and Every Last Lie in 2017. So I guess I’m a little late coming to the table and have some catching up to do!
  • (3/5)
    Lovers of a good mystery would find a lot to like in this book, including the ending which radically changes the story. I liked this one, but just didn't love it. The story is told in a nonlinear fashion, with "before" and "after" segments narrated by various characters, which added to the suspense element of the plot. I appreciated the structure of the story and it certainly made for a story which changed the minute I thought all the pieces had fallen into place.
  • (1/5)
    I had read reviews of this book, and it looked good, so I decided to give it a try. I have to say that despite how many people liked this book, I found it disturbing. Before I continue this review, WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD! I will be mentioning parts of the plot in this review. Not sure if that is correct, but truthfully I have never reviewed a book before. I also feel that reviewing what made me give this book a low rating requires speaking on the plot, which cannot be done without giving away at least parts of the book.While I liked the writing style and the first part of the plot, this book lost me at the "love" parts. The author mentions Stockholm Syndrome, but writes more like the two genuinely loved each other. I have trouble accepting that a girl can really love a man who treats her this way. To even consider this a love story puts into perspective that a woman should accept bad treatment if love is involved. This characterization and the acceptance of it on the part of the mother disturbed me a great deal. That, and the main character getting no voice throughout most of the book. She is silenced. Beyond this, I cannot accept a character who is portrayed as so cruel and controlling changing so much by the end. It doesn't feel like it works.Aside from the shaky plot, the writing style was quite good. I was pulled into the story quickly, and I liked what little I saw of the other characters. I would have loved to see them get fleshed out a bit more. Overall, I did not like the book, but would be willing to give Kubica another chance with one of her other books.
  • (4/5)
    worth staying up til 1am, to finish.
  • (4/5)
    Poor man's Gone Girl. Plot involved the kidnapping of a judge's daughter with the incident being related through the eyes of the kidnapper, mother and detective. It is somewhat difficult to maintain the timeline as the work moves from before and after the incident in the eyes of the three interpreters. Surprise ending.
  • (2/5)
    The adult daughter of well-established judge has been kidnapped. The descriptors on the book state it is similar to Gone Girl. While there is a main theme that makes it similar, it is different in its execution. This reads much more like a mystery, than a thriller. It's less shocking and more of a "who done it" game. A bit of a complex read, in that the story is told through several voices and jumps in timeline.