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Bob Books Set 2: Advancing Beginners

Bob Books Set 2: Advancing Beginners

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Bob Books Set 2: Advancing Beginners

evaluări:
4/5 (5,235 evaluări)
Lungime:
202 pages
18 minutes
Lansat:
May 1, 2006
ISBN:
9781941148112
Format:
Carte

Descriere

The books in Bob Books Set 2 - Advancing Beginners provide your new reader with more material at the beginning level. These twelve stories in mostly three-letter words build confidence for the very youngest readers. Simple text combined with slightly longer stories builds reading stamina. Elements of humor and surprise keep children’s interest high.Add Bob Books Set 2 to your collection for invaluable beginning reading practice. Reading this foundation set help children master basic phonics before they advance to consonant blends.Inside this eBook you’ll find:- 12 easy-to-read books, 16 pages each- Mostly two and three letter words (C-V-C words)- Can be "sounded out" (phonics based)- Limited sight words- 20 to 30 words per book

Lansat:
May 1, 2006
ISBN:
9781941148112
Format:
Carte

Despre autor

Founded in Portland, Oregon, Bob Books started when teacher Bobby Lynn Maslen was looking for reading material suitable for children taking their very first steps into reading. When she couldn't find books interesting enough for her young students, she created the Bob Books. Bobby's 13 years of teaching experience, and hands-on field testing of Bob Books, means they truly suit the needs of youngsters starting the great adventure of reading. Each new Bob Books reader will soon be able to happily say, "I read the whole book!"® The first books were handmade, inspired by two small dolls that Bobby bought at a craft fair. She named the dolls Mat and Sam and spun stories about them, illustrated with line drawings that the children could copy and color. Articles recommending Bob Books appeared in The Washington Post, USA Today, and regional newspapers and magazines around the country. The books had entered the spotlight, and parents wanted Bob Books. The Maslens turned to a major publisher of children's books, Scholastic, Inc., for help publishing Bob Books. With Scholastic, Bob Books have grown to sixteen titles: five sets of books written by Bobby, five sets by her daughter Lynn Maslen Kertell, and six leveled early reader books. Bob Books have sold millions of copies. Bobby is retired, and lives with original Bob Books illustrator and husband John, in Portland, Oregon.

Legat de Bob Books Set 2

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Previzualizare carte

Bob Books Set 2 - Bobby Lynn Maslen

No Part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanicial, recording or otherwise, without written permission of the publisher. For information regarding permission, write to Bob Books Publications at info@bobbooks.com

The digital edition first published by Bob Books Publications, LLC in 2013. Published in print in the USA by Scholastic, Inc.

Copyright © 2008 by Lynn Maslen Kertell. All rights reserved. Published by Bob Books ® New Initiatives, LLC. Bob Books is a registered trademark of Bob Books Publications, LLC.

Welcome to the World of Bob Books®!

Picture your child with bright eyes, saying the magical words, I read the whole book!

•  This is the second set in the Bob Books series. The use of three-letter words and consistent short vowel and consonant sounds continues in this set, giving children words to depend on. They learn to blend more sounds into words and sentences.

•  Humor and drama are emphasized in John Maslen’s hilarious yet gentle illustrations.

•  To increase children’s comprehension and enjoyment, talk about the meaning and feelings in each story.

•  Children should learn short vowel sounds such as a, the beginning sound of apple; e elephant; and i inchworm.

•  Consonant sounds,

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  • (4/5)
    The Cat's in the Cradle. The silver spoon. The moon. All that.
  • (4/5)
    Each Vonnegut book I have read is similarly the same, but still manages to be about something completely different. Cat’s Cradle is about Jonah, a writer working on a book about what people were doing when the atomic bomb was dropped. It eventually starts an obsession with the Hoenikker family, a brilliant scientist father and the absent minded inventor of the atomic bomb, the oldest daughter, who gave up her life to raise her siblings, the middle son, a misfit, only good for at model making, and the youngest, always treated as a child and a dwarf. The whole book is tied together by a religion called “Bokanism”, a belief that every person Is part of a larger group that has a purpose. What that purpose is, no one knows, but it is fated.So what is this book about... I don’t know. Maybe the end of the world can’t be prevented, it that people will always do what they feel is write, or maybe it’s a statement about the futility of war. Or maybe it is whatever a reader takes out of it. Regardless, it’s a great book.
  • (5/5)
    Vonnegut always makes me laugh. And sometimes want to cry, but mostly laugh.
  • (4/5)
    Is this where the germ of an idea for Moon over Parador came from ? who knows? A surrealist collision between invention, a band of unlikely characters and a few very antithetical assumptions about leadership, progress, religion and social mores - does anyone know if this story or these characters have ever been taken up as a stage play ?
  • (2/5)
    Really not sure what to make of this book!

    The blurb on the back says:

    "Timequake explores what happens to Vonnegut when, in 2001, a 'timequake' hits. The universe has a decade of self-doubt, shrinking back to 1991 and forcing everybody to relive the last 10 years of their lives exactly as they had before, but without free will. The same mistakes. The same corny jokes. The same doses of clap."

    Now, I don't know what you think that's going to be, but I certainly wasn't expecting the wierd and wonderful mix of fiction, autobiography, musings and history that I found. Based very losely around the 'timequake', Vonnegut explores the ideas around losing free-will for 10 years and then suddenly finding yourself 'free' again. Would you cope? What would you do? When Free Will kicks back in, would you notice or would you sit back and expect it all to happen again? Using his alter-ego, fictional author Kilgore Trout, as well as his own personal experiences and those of other fictional and real people he covers a wide range of thoughts and situations.

    I found this an eclectic read, but not a book that I could sit and read for any length of time. Each chapter is only 2 or 3 pages and then we jump, like a butterfly, to the next chapter and next set of, not necessarily related, musings.

    I was told Vonnegut was one of 'the authors to read' and I still believe that - just don't do what I did and start with this book. I don't know if he wrote any more after it, but he certainly wrote it expecting it to be his last. Read an earlier once first!
  • (5/5)
    My reread of Vonnegut continues with one of my favorites by him. His structure and storytelling were brilliant. I am reading his books in the order he published them and you can really see him settling into his style in this book.
  • (5/5)
    vonnegut's best.
  • (2/5)
    Who knows what this was about -- your guess is as good as mine -- and I just finished reading it! I don't really understand Vonnegut's writing. It's easy to read but I don't usually get the point. I guess I should be in a class where someone explains it all. In Cat's Cradle, the narrator has decided to write a book about the man who invented the atomic bomb (fictional, but inspired by a real person). Events fit together like a puzzle to lead the narrator to a small island where the inventor's three adult children also arrive, along with some of the atomic matter that their father invented. Well, by accident some of this matter gets out and destroys everything on earth and all the people, except the narrator (who was still able to write this book) and about five other people there. The point? Be careful with atomic matter? Oh well... I got to mark it off several of my lists! ;)
  • (4/5)
    A quirky apocalyptic tale as only Vonnegut could write. Full of odd characters and strange situations. And why is it called "Cat's
    Cradle?" Well, you will have to read it to fimd out, as well as to learn about Bokononism and ice-nine.
  • (5/5)
    Vonnegut leads you laughing down the icy road, straight to Hell.
  • (5/5)
    Cat's Cradle is a satirical science fiction novel which manages to pack a powerful punch. The themes of nuclear terror, the complications of science, American imperialism, global capitalism and the role of religion in public life are still relevant today. The storyline centers on a young writer's quest to research the history of the atomic bomb, which leads to a political and apocalyptic showdown on the shores of a Island near Peru. This story is told with humor but really makes you think. Vonnegut allows us to view the world from an entirely different perspective. I am not really a fan of science fiction but I really did enjoy this book so much that I look forward to reading more of his books. I would highly recommend to fans of science fiction or philosophy and humor.
  • (5/5)
    Vonnegut always makes me laugh. And sometimes want to cry, but mostly laugh.
  • (5/5)
    What an amazing book. Reads quickly. Is witty and thought provoking. Has amazing quotes. Can't say enough about how great it is.
  • (4/5)
    This is a book I wish I'd read years ago but am finally getting around to. Vonnegut's genius is how he can convey so much in such simple prose. In this satirical tale, the narrator is writing a book about one of the father's of the atomic bomb. His research leads him to the man's three grown children, a mysterious substance called ice-nine, and the ultimate end of times, at least for Earth. I suppose I would have had a stronger reaction to the message contained in the book's pages had I read this in my teens or twenties, but it does still resonate. The world might end in a cataclysmic war, or it might end in a totally banal fashion due to the arrogance and carelessness of humanity. Into that mix, Vonnegut threw in a fake religion created by a calypso singer, something that doesn't sound at all strange in today's world.
  • (5/5)
    Fucking amazing.
  • (5/5)
    OK. I read and fell in love with it in high school, but it is still a wonderful book about the self-destruction of man and his inanities. Dark humor.
  • (4/5)
    A book about innocent/naive men being capable of great destruction and the need to keep great weapons away from humans. Often bleakly humorous and a very enjoyable read.
  • (4/5)
    For many years this was my favorite book, but now as I have grown I wish this was written when Vonnegut was a little older. It is something very interesting and funny. While it is thought provoking it would be nice if the story wasn't so two-D. Many interesting visuals in this book. One of the few endings I like.
  • (4/5)
    An unnamed narrator begins working on a book about one of the father's of the atomic bomb (in this case, a fictional person). In the course of doing so, he meets the man's three unusual children and uncovers an even more dangerous creation by the scientist.This book was the first one by Vonnegut I've read, and I really enjoyed it. The short chapters and the tongue-in-cheek humor made it a very quick read. However, all that humor belied a very serious moral tale, which gives the reader plenty of food for thought after reading this book. I very much recommend it for fans of sci-fi and/or dark humor.
  • (4/5)
    A weird and wonderful read! The main character starts the story trying to write a book about the atom bomb and somehow along the way becomes president of a small island! Quite a tale! Throw in some ice-9 and it's a recipe for disaster! Crazy enough to make me want to become a Bokononist! "No damn cat, and no damn cradle."
  • (2/5)
    It was a while since I last read a book by Vonnegut. He belongs to my early studentperiod. I can't say I really enjoyed this one (I bought it to read about 'granfallons' in the original formulation). But I recognized what made him special at that time. He's a pop Schopenhauer (Bokonon is like Schopenhauer's Buddhism: non-christian). Short chapters make easy reading for easily distracted teenagers. And there is his convivial, casual tone. I haven't read his biography, but his Dresden-experience, prominent in Slaughterhouse Five, returns here in slightly different form. In the beginning I also wondered who was first: Salinger with his Glass family or Vonnegut with his Hoenikkers, but later on the Hoenikkers recede to the background. In the Netherlands we have a 'media-historian', renowned for his unwillingness to give in to the demands of the mediaculture-demands (appearing with the same shabby clothes, aversive to hyping the now (he downplayed the historic significance of 9/11 when it happened). Vonnegut reminded me of him somewhat too. Vonnegut reads like a man constantly returning to his personal 'defining moment', the defining experience of his life. But his pessimism (with a humanistic touch to it, compassion with stupid mankind) is idiosyncratic, presupposed, not conveyed convincingly by the novel. It's more "Since the war Vonnegut has never been the same". Others have to deal with his hang up.
  • (3/5)
    This was a MUCH better story than the first book I read by the author, & I'm glad I took the chance on reading it. Without giving too much away, a journalist decides to write a book on a man who worked on the atom bomb. Through a strange series of events, he finds himself on the tiny island of San Lorenzo with an odd cast of characters. Bokonon is the "mad priest", who invented his own religion, & represents good. "Papa" is the island's king, emperor, dictator, ultimate ruler, what have you, & represents evil. The man who he originally wanted to write the book about has died, & the missing son has become the second in command of the ruler Papa. However, the scientist also experimented with freezing properties before he died, & created a rather vicious thing called ice nine. The properties of ice nine, as revealed in the book, are frightening, & seemed even more frightening to me because the transmission seems plausible when he describes it.This book has more twists & turns in it's short cover to cover span than the Autobahn, & it's very entertaining reading as well.Remember this phrase though, you'll see it pop up..."see the cat? See the cradle?"
  • (4/5)
    Bizarre.Of course, I could have also went with biting, dark, witty, ironic, or any other number of adjectives to describe Vonnegut's fourth novel. All considered, however, bizarre works best.In Cat's Cradle, the lead character Jonah set out to write a book about what important Americans were doing on the day the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. In researching his book, he converts from Christianity to a newly minted religion, Bokonism. He discovers that one of the bomb's Fathers, Dr. Hoenikker, also created a far more potent weapon that is now in the hands of his eccentric children. He lands on a privately owned island/Country where Bokonism was founded and, although every person on the Island is a Bokonist, the religion is outlawed. Cat's Cradle builds to an apocalyptic finale complete with ... well, read and find out.The best part of reading Vonnegut is his trademark ironic edge. Take this exchange between Jonah and Marvin Breed, monument seller (51): "You can laugh at that stone, if you want to," said Marvin Breed, "but those kids got more consolation out of that than anything else money could have bought. ... "It must have cost a lot." "Nobel Prize money bought it. ..." "Dynamite money," I marveled, thinking of the violence of dynamite and the absolute repose of a tombstone. ... "What?" "Nobel invented dynamite." "Well, I guess it takes all kids ..." Had I been a Bokonist then, pondering the miraculously intricate chain of events that had brought dynamite money to that particular tombstone company, I might have whispered, "Busy, busy, busy." Busy, busy, busy, is what we Bokonists whisper whenever we think of how complicated and unpredictable the machinery of life really is. But all I could say as a Christian then was, "Life is sure funny sometimes."Like all of Vonnegut's books, if you speed through them to enjoy a plot you'll likely be disappointed. If you take the time to think through the layers of sarcasm and irony, his works have serious depth.
  • (5/5)
    There were many moments when I cried out in delight whilst reading this fine, crazy book. Just this: read it.
  • (3/5)
    I may need to re-read this someday. It seemed awfully dry and characterless, despite the good wit, which resulted in me not really paying it enough attention and reading it in spurts with long breaks between.
  • (4/5)
    Very creepy and surreal--I remain terrified of Ice-9.
  • (2/5)
    I'm not sure what to think about this one. This is the first Kurt Vonnegut I've ever read, and I was expecting something revolutionary, given the way people talk about him. It's actually just sort of weird. Chapters are bite-sized. Characters and events fall in weird ways. Everyone says Vonnegut writes satire, but I didn't feel that here. Maybe the book is out of time. It did seem to have relevant themes, like science out of control, atomic bombs. Those were current of the day. And I'm willing to say that the themes were lost on me. But not because the book is bad/weird, but because I'm an idiot. It could be that it's more straightforward than I was led to believe, and I'm searching for something that's not there.
  • (3/5)
    I've not read much Vonnegut so I'm trying to make up for that. This Cold War novel is a dark satire of the atom bomb (and the scientists behind it), US government support of corrupt "Banana Republics," and religious cults with a dose of science fiction. The short chapters are full of biting satire and cynicism. Vonnegut creates some memorable, over the top characters and an interesting parallel to our world.
  • (5/5)
    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It put me in mind of Tom Robbins, which is always a good thing as he's one of my top 3 favorite authors of all time. I just love the kind of style used, with the sort of biting satiric humor and whatnot... And I found the ending flawless. Which is difficult, endings are one of the things I am most critical of, it's hard to get them just right, and it's rare for an ending to leave me properly satisfied. But this one? Simply perfect. I will definitely have to start reading more Vonnegut.
  • (4/5)
    It's Vonnegut. It's good. Not as good as Breakfast of Champions or Slaughterhouse Five but it's a very good book.