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Love and Roast Chicken: A Trickster Tale from the Andes Mountains

Love and Roast Chicken: A Trickster Tale from the Andes Mountains

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Love and Roast Chicken: A Trickster Tale from the Andes Mountains

evaluări:
4/5 (10 evaluări)
Lungime:
41 pages
47 minutes
Lansat:
Nov 1, 2013
ISBN:
9781467737951
Format:
Carte

Descriere

One day, high in the Andes Mountains, Cuy the Guinea Pig is searching for wild spinach to eat when Tío Antonio the Fox comes in search of Cuy to eat! Tío Antonio thinks he's found dinner, but crafty Cuy has other plans. Quick-witted Cuy fools Tío Antonio not once, but three times. Combining striking wood block artwork with an authentic South American voice, this sly trickster tale shows that clever thinking is key when you're out-foxing the fox. Discover more about this title and Barbara Knutson at www.barbaraknutson.net.

Lansat:
Nov 1, 2013
ISBN:
9781467737951
Format:
Carte

Despre autor

Barbara Knutson was the award-winning author and illustrator of many children’s books, including How the Guinea Fowl Got Her Spots and Love and Roast Chicken. A resident of St. Paul and a cherished member of Twin Cities literary community, Ms. Knutson grew up in South Africa and traveled extensively throughout the world. She drew on her firsthand experiences abroad to create the rich, multicultural stories and folktales for which she became so well known. She passed away in 2005.

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Love and Roast Chicken - Barbara Knutson

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  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed the thick lines in Barbara Knutson's art - it certainly evoked South American culture to me. I really liked the mixture of language that was in this book as well. I really liked the plot as well, it definitely kept me interested! This book is educational as well; in the back of the book there is a list of Spanish words that are used in the book along with their English translations.
  • (3/5)
    Story from the Andes about a Guinea Pig who continually outsmarts a fox. This is a traditional style of tale that has been told many ways. This would be fun writing lesson for kids to come up with new ways to trick the fox.
  • (3/5)
    This folktale from the Andes Mountains is a combination of many told to the writer. She took her favorite parts from the tales and combined them into this clever, laugh out loud rendition.
  • (3/5)
    From a traditional South American trickster folktale- a guinea pig, in his quest for food, outsmarts a fox repeatedly to escape from being eaten.The protagonist is Cuy, a guinea pig. He is hungry for alfalfa and very clever and quick as he creates scenarios to outwit the fox and young farmer couple in his search for food.The antagonist is Tio Antonio, a fox who is hungry and anxious to eat Cuy but is gullible and easily fooled as he is set up repeatedly in outrageous requests. The story takes place in a South American mountain region near a small farming village-perhaps 100 years ago? (It seems to be timeless however). It is springtime and the fields are being planted.
  • (4/5)
    I think that this tale would be great to read to a younger elementary audience maybe grades 1-3. I think that the animals of this story are really engaging for younger students and help to keep them interested throughout the story. I like the idea of using this for a cultural lesson or even just for story time.
  • (4/5)
    This was a cute book. I did enjoy it. I thought it was an enjoyable tale that could teach a lesson.
  • (4/5)
    A fun trickster tale from South America. Love the title of course and the illustrations are very bright, with heavy stylized black outline. Very fun for an older preschool storytime.
  • (4/5)
    It is easy to see why this book received so many awards. It has both super text and illustrations. Barbara Knutsen is such a terrific writer! This read aloud will not disappoint you!
  • (4/5)
    Cuy (who is taking the role of Br'er Rabbit in these tales - he even gets caught with a "tar" (sticky gum) baby at one point!) is very very little. And when you're very very little and there's a big fox that wants to eat you and farms that don't want you to eat their alfalfa, you have to find a way to survive.Cuy survives by tricking people. He convinces Fox that the world is about to end, and that the sky is about to fall. He convinces the farmer that he's a very very small field hand. (This cracks me up every time.)It's hilarious. ABsolutely hilarious, and the art isn't half bad either.
  • (4/5)
    In this tale, much like the Rabbit and the Coyote, a smaller animal tricks the bigger one to avoid being eaten. Here the guinea pig, twice convinces the fox the world is ending and convinces him first to hold up a rock and second to hide himself in a cave. Finally the guinea pig is captured by the farmer and tied up. When the fox finds the guinea pig, he convinces the fox to trade places so he can marry the farmer's daughter and eat roast chicken every night. In the end the farmer laughs at the fox who escapes and never tries to eat the guinea pig again.The straightforward language will appeal to children. The illustrations are engaging with bold back outlines. They also extend the story and add dimension, especially the fox's perplexed expression each time before he realizes he was tricked. This story is funny and children 5 to 8 will enjoy it.
  • (4/5)
    In this trickster myth, Knutson brilliantly illustrates and tells this fameous Andean tale. She is sensitive to cultural norms in her illustrations. Additionally, she sprinkles Spanish phrases into the story. As she notes, often the fox is the subject of folk tales from this reagion of the world, but her love for this story with it's guinea pig protagonist is clear. Cuy, the guinea pig tricks Tio Antonio, the fox, several times and fox swears he will have his revenge. When farmer finally tricks Cuy, Cuy, in turn tricks Tio Antonio for the last time--he keeps his distance from Cuy for a long time after Cuy has him believe that the farmer will have him marrying his daughter and eating a chicken daily.
  • (4/5)
    This is a delightful romp. Although the stories are familiar (as most folktales are), Knutson makes them feel new. I was especially fond of the sprinkling of Spanish throughout. I could see how this book would serve as a great book to read to a child and introduce the idea of other places with other languages. The pictures are also lovely. The bright colors echo VanGogh and really invite the eye to roam through the adventure,It's the perfect book to cuddle up with a 5 or 6 year old to read aloud.
  • (4/5)
    Cuy, a guinea pig from the Andes, tricks fox three times and then gets tricked himself in this clever and authentic folktale. Shades of Henny Penny, Tar Baby and, of course, the Ananse tales--this folk tale is a delight! Great read a loud.
  • (4/5)
    A tale in the Andes Mountains of a trickster Guinea Pig named Cuy whose life is on the line when it comes to a fox name Tío Antonio. Cuy manages to always get away by making up a lie to tell Tío Antonio. At the end of the story when it seems like there is noway out, Cuy manages to do it again!
  • (5/5)
    Barbara Knutson keeps the cultural “flavor” of the Andes Mountain in her book, Love and Roast Chicken: A Trickster Tale from the Andes Mountains. In this trickster tale, a clever guinea pig, Cuy, repeatedly outsmarts Tio Antonio, the fox. On numerous occasions, Tio Antonio catches Cuy to eat, but is tricked into letting Cuy free. From holding a rock to being told he will have to marry the farmer’s daughter, Tio Antonio appears to be gullible and not very smart. Tio Antonio never catches Cuy and Cuy never gets punishment for tricking others. This folktale is silly and will keep readers laughing throughout the twist of events. The Author’s Note and New Words to Stay sections are welcomed additions to this book as it provides useful background knowledge to this folktale. Love and Roast Chicken: A Trickster Tale from the Andes Mountains is a must have trickster tale for any school library.Age Appropriate: 4 to 8 years-old. This story could be used by older children as a comparison piece in traditional literature.