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Mapping The Democratic Forest: The Postsouthern Spaces of William Eggleston: An article from Southern Cultures 17:2, The Photography Issue

Mapping The Democratic Forest: The Postsouthern Spaces of William Eggleston: An article from Southern Cultures 17:2, The Photography Issue

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Mapping The Democratic Forest: The Postsouthern Spaces of William Eggleston: An article from Southern Cultures 17:2, The Photography Issue

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4/5 (1 evaluare)
Lungime:
41 pages
13 minutes
Lansat:
Jun 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780807882443
Format:
Carte

Descriere

Eggleston, the iconoclastic and colorful groundbreaker, imbues the mundane with vibrancy.This article appears in the Summer 2011 issue of Southern Cultures:The Photography Issue. "When the color photographs of William Eggleston first appeared at the Museum of Modern Art in 1976, the boldness of Eggleston's palette and his disregard for the conventions of black-and-white photography were shocking; nearly all the major critics were scornful, and Ansel Adams wrote a scathing letter of protest."

Lansat:
Jun 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780807882443
Format:
Carte

Despre autor

Ben Child is a PhD student in English at the University of Mississippi whose research interests include intersections between vernacular culture and modernism, and constructions of urbanity and rurality. His work has appeared in Popular Music and Society and The Journal of Popular Culture. He is also a frequent contributor to PopMatters.com.

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Mapping The Democratic Forest

The Postsouthern Spaces of William Eggleston

by Ben Child

"I’m taking pictures of life today."

William Eggleston

One influence William Eggleston’s photography acknowledges is Walker Evans’s, an artist whose work also searches out the everyday corners of his cultural milieu. Evans’s approach is marked by a leveling of discriminations, between the beautiful and the ugly, the important and trivial. Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1936, by Walker Evans, courtesy of the Collections of the Library of Congress.

When the color photographs of William Eggleston first appeared at the Museum of Modern Art in 1976, they had no clear antecedents. The boldness of Eggleston’s palette and his disregard for the conventions of black-and-white photography were shocking; nearly all the major critics were scornful, and Ansel Adams wrote a scathing letter of protest to curator John Szarkowski, baldly calling Eggleston a put on. Using a dye-transfer printing method primarily associated with advertising, Eggleston’s images draw out the deep, frequently striking tonal potentials of natural colors. But within the tradition of photography, as critic Peter Schjeldahl succinctly notes in his essay on Eggleston, color befuddles—and Eggleston’s colors certainly did. One influence Eggleston’s photography acknowledges, however, is Walker Evans, an artist whose work also searches out the everyday corners of his cultural milieu. Evans’s approach is marked by an expansive, Whitmanesque vision that Susan Sontag describes as a leveling of discriminations, between the beautiful and the ugly, the important and trivial. And yet, in On Photography, Sontag finds little use for Evans’s ambitions. Photography, she holds, is no longer required to be literate, authoritative, transcendent, as Evans hoped it might be, and his photos could never achieve the transcendence they aspire to in the contemporary world,

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