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Beautiful Examples of American Antique Sideboards and Kitchen Furniture - Including Sideboards from Hepplewhite, Sheraton and in the Empire Style

Beautiful Examples of American Antique Sideboards and Kitchen Furniture - Including Sideboards from Hepplewhite, Sheraton and in the Empire Style

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Beautiful Examples of American Antique Sideboards and Kitchen Furniture - Including Sideboards from Hepplewhite, Sheraton and in the Empire Style

Lungime:
118 pages
1 hour
Lansat:
Sep 6, 2016
ISBN:
9781473357617
Format:
Carte

Descriere

Contained within this antique book is a detailed catalogue of exquisite American antique sideboards and kitchen furniture, including sideboards from Hepplewhite, Sheraton, and in the Empire style. This text contains a large number of interesting and beautiful examples of American kitchen furniture, each one complete with detailed photographs and descriptions. A great addition to collections of furniture literature, this text is not to be missed by those with a keen interest in the history of American furniture. The chapters of this book are: Introductory Remarks, Uncertainty as a Style, Happlewhite Style Sideboards, Sheraton Style Sideboards, Empire Style Sideboards, Knife Urns and Knife Boxes, and Gellarets. We are proud to republish this antiquarian book now complete with a new introduction on the history of furniture.
Lansat:
Sep 6, 2016
ISBN:
9781473357617
Format:
Carte

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Beautiful Examples of American Antique Sideboards and Kitchen Furniture - Including Sideboards from Hepplewhite, Sheraton and in the Empire Style - Edgar J. Miller

Cellarets

SIDEBOARDS; KNIFE URNS AND KNIFE BOXES; CELLARETS

—The word sideboard as we now use it needs no definition; but in order to understand what it really means we should know that in its literal and original sense a sideboard was a side borde, which meant a side table, and that a side table was a table placed on the side of a dining room and used as a serving table. These serving tables were called sideboard tables and illustrations of them are in the books¹ of Chippendale, Hepplewhite and Sheraton. These sideboard tables were often very handsome pieces, frequently with marble tops which would not be injured by hot dishes. They are seldom seen in our country,² and, if seen, are not readily distinguishable by an amateur from other large and heavy tables, as there is little in their appearance to associate them with sideboards as we understand that word; these tables are therefore not considered here.

In order to present a clear view of the development of the sideboard, three pieces are shown in illustration No. 948, marked A, B and C. It is not certain, however, that the sideboard was developed exactly in the manner indicated by these illustrations, because there may be evidence to the contrary. The subject is somewhat complicated and uncertain.

In No. 948, A, we see the first step in the direction of a modern sideboard.³ It is said that this step was taken by Robert Adam when he placed at each end of a sideboard table a pedestal, or cupboard, upon which an urn⁴ was mounted. The pedestals were not connected with the table, nor were they connected with the urns, so that there were five separate pieces—the sideboard table, the two pedestals and the two urns.

948. A, ADAM SIDEBOARD TABLE AND PEDESTALS; B, ADAM SIDEBOARD; C, SHEARER SIDEBOARD.

The next step, shown in No. 948, B, was the connecting of the pedestals with the sideboard table, thus making three pieces instead of five;⁵ this also, it is said, was the work of Robert Adam.

The next form of the sideboard, shown in No. 948, C, was the work of Thomas Shearer, who was a contemporary of Hepplewhite. This piece appears in a book containing several of Shearer’s designs of sideboards, as mentioned in the next section. In this example the front of the table part of the sideboard is in a swell, or bow, shape and the pedestals are raised somewhat from the floor, and are plainly cupboards, and a back–board is added.

Two other designs by Shearer are A and B in illustration No. 949, in which the pedestals, the back–board and the urns disappear and in their stead are the ends with drawers and small cupboards, making the sideboard as we now know it. These designs were issued in 1788, as mentioned in the next section at note 6.

The name and designs of Shearer have unfortunately been so overshadowed by the greater names and more numerous designs of Hepplewhite and Sheraton that they are not generally known or appreciated. The two masters copied, and have generally received the credit for, the designs of Shearer.⁶ They made little improvement over his designs, except in the decorative features.

The period in which sideboards were developed and made was a part of the age of mahogany and this wood was almost always used in the better class of pieces. The outside visible parts, such as the front, sides, legs and top were sometimes veneered with mahogany on a less expensive wood, although in some cases they were solid mahogany. In New England maple and cherry were also used, and in Pennsylvania and the South walnut pieces are found. The inlay was mainly of satinwood or maple, with other less familiar woods in many cases.

1. These books are mentioned in sections 15, 17 and 18.

2. It is suggested that section 166 in the chapter on tables be consulted in reference to certain tables which may bear a resemblance to sideboard tables. Several forms are known as hunting tables, hunters’ tables and serving tables.

3. This is copied from Mr. Cescinsky’s English Furniture, volume 3, figure 178, where it is referred to as a five piece pedestal sideboard of the Hepplewhite–Adam period. It is placed here in order to show the development of the sideboard, but not all of the features are in the style of Robert Adam, especially the large ovals on the pedestal cupboards. The date is given by Mr. Cescinsky as about 1790.

4. Urns and boxes used for keeping knives and other articles are shown in section 131.

5. This illustration is copied from the book of Mr. T. A. Strange, entitled "English furniture, woodwork, decoration, etc., during the eighteenth century,’ page

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