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How to Be a Hero

How to Be a Hero

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How to Be a Hero

evaluări:
3.5/5 (11 evaluări)
Lungime:
29 pages
5 minutes
Lansat:
Oct 4, 2016
ISBN:
9781452139456
Format:
Carte

Descriere

Once upon a time, there was a nice boy and his name was Gideon. He lived in a nice house, and he had nice parents and lots of toys. But Gideon wasn't satisfied. He wanted to be a hero. You know, a hero, with his name on the front page of the newspaper. That sort of thing. So how does anyone get to be a hero, anyway? Heroes have to be strong. Heroes have to be brave. Heroes have to be clever. Don't they? With wry humor, Florence Parry Heide and Chuck Groenink explore how we choose our idols in a witty story that leaves it to readers to decide the real nature of heroism.
Lansat:
Oct 4, 2016
ISBN:
9781452139456
Format:
Carte

Despre autor

Florence Parry Heide (1919–2011) was the author of more than 100 children’s books, including picture books, juvenile novels, two series of young adult mysteries, plays, songbooks, and poetry. She may be best remembered for her now-classic The Shrinking of Treehorn and its two sequels, illustrated by the great Edward Gorey. Florence grew up in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, married during World War Two, and spent her adult life in Kenosha, Wisconsin, with her husband and five children, all of whom grew up listening to the joyful sounds of an old typewriter.


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How to Be a Hero - Florence Parry Heide

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3.4
11 evaluări / 3 Recenzii
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  • (2/5)
    I was really disappointed by this book. I wasn't expecting to have to explain irony to my five year old. Here's a beautiful book son, that's full of exactly the opposite message I want you to hear. It would be better as a satirical book for adults.
  • (4/5)
    If you just read the story, the boy seems to have been the perfect hero! But study the pictures and the truth reveals itself! HAHAHAHA!
  • (4/5)
    Gideon had a very nice life - nice parents, a nice home, nice toys - but he wanted something more. He wanted to be a hero. Unfortunately, all of the fairy-tales he had read - stories like Rapunzel, Sleeping Beauty, and Cinderella - had heroes who simply showed up at the right time and place, without doing anything particularly remarkable. So what made a hero, and how could he become one...?I'm bemused to note that some online reviewers of How To Be a Hero have deplored its message, arguing that it reinforces masculine and white privilege, when I think one of the central ideas in the text is how ill-served young boys are by many traditional tales. Plenty of people complain about stories like Cinderella and the messages they send to young girls - the passivity of the heroine, the idea of finding one's prince being the ultimate end-goal, etc. - without ever thinking about the poor messages they send young boys. As Gideon reflects about what it takes to be a hero, the qualities he'd like to emulate - strength, bravery, cleverness - don't seem to be required, leaving him at something of a loss. His determination to be mindful is admirable, but humorously undercut by his obliviousness in the final scenes, in which he doesn't notice a baby in need of saving. Here perhaps, in the artwork, we can see where the above mentioned critiques might have some justification, although I think the critics may have missed the fact that the artist is deliberately creating a satirical counter-narrative to the text in his illustrations, and that the artwork itself may be a commentary on the issues they have raised. I'd be curious to know illustrator Chuck Groenink's thought process, in expanding upon author Florence Parry Heide's text. I'd also be interested in Heide's reaction, although that won't be forthcoming, since this one was published posthumously.Leaving aside questions of messages, implicit or otherwise, How To Be a Hero struck me as a quirky and amusing book, although I'm not sure the younger picture-book set will be able to appreciate some of the irony it employs.