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No Room for Monsters

No Room for Monsters

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No Room for Monsters

evaluări:
3.5/5 (98 evaluări)
Lungime:
22 pages
7 minutes
Lansat:
Jul 31, 2014
ISBN:
9781496927804
Format:
Carte

Descriere

Did you ever have a child who just didnt want to go to bed? Theyll come up with anything just to stay up one more minute.

This story is about trying the patience of a parent who loves a child unconditionallyno matter what.

Can you turn a negative moment into a positive one? I think you can. It just takes time and lots of practice. Find the humor in all your child does now, because those moments wont last.

Lansat:
Jul 31, 2014
ISBN:
9781496927804
Format:
Carte

Despre autor

After many years of working with children in various venues, Patricia has learned many insightful and funny things from them. These things have made for very interesting stories, which she has shared with family and friends. Patricia comes from a typical dysfunctional family. She finds humor and stories in most everything they do—especially the children. She first began writing stories for her children when they were young. It was only after her grandchildren were born that she felt confident enough to have her stories published.


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No Room for Monsters - Patricia A. Anderson

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3.7
98 evaluări / 402 Recenzii
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  • (5/5)
    Max gets in trouble with his mother and gets sent to his bedroom for the rest his night. He uses his imagination to go to a land where he is a king and continues with his romp. When he starts to feel home sick he returns home where a hot dinner is waiting for him.
  • (3/5)
    It is a nice books. My son liked it but it did not really stuck with him. I think it was a bit overrated. He also got kinda scared at first.
  • (4/5)
    Use your imagination. This can be used as a mentor text to help with writers workshop to help the children remember a time that they played make believe.
  • (4/5)
    Easily one of my favorite picture books, 'Where the Wild Things Are' is a wonderful tale about the unconditional love and bond between mother and child. This was my first time reading the book in English; I had only ever read the book in its German translation, and I think that I appreciate the German text more because it is the text that I had read to me when I was a child. It has a nostalgic hold on me that the original text, no matter how ingenious, will never have and I'm pretty sure that when the time comes, I will read 'Wo die Wilden Kerle Wohnen' to my child(ren) and not the English original.
  • (5/5)
    This was my favorite book as a child. I still love this book even as an adult. This book teaches about imagination and how you can control it. It also teaches that being great at everything can get lonely, so it is fine to not be good at everything.
  • (3/5)
    In my opinion, I think this is a great read for all ages and is the reason it has become such a beloved story over the years. The 'Wild Things" come to life through the detailed illustration throughout the entirety of the story. The main character, Max, represents many young children who want the ability to express themselves and be who they are without limits or restraints as well as have the acceptance of the ones they love. Because of this fact, readers are able to place themselves in Max's shoes and the story takes the audience on the same journey to the island of the "Wild Things" where they can be fully accepted and appreciated for who they are.
  • (5/5)
    I would use this book to teach how good reader make and confirm predictions. This book would be a wonderful book to use to teach how good readers summarize a book.
  • (3/5)
    Summary: "Where the wild things are" is about a kid who dressed up as a wolf and kept pestering everyone. He went to sleep without eating. That night his room grew a forest and an ocean with a private boat for max. he sailed over a year to where the wild things are. The wild things tried to over power him but he told them all to STOP and Max became King Wild thing. He sailed back to his room and when he got back dinner was in his room still hot.Personal Reaction: I felt this book is good for children because it teaches them to always eat before they go to bed so they aren't wild things.Class room extension ideas:1. Teach the kids to fold paper claws.2. Tell the kids details about the wild things and make them draw them and see what their wild things look like.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely adore this book. It teaches a great lesson, how to use your imagination! We all forget how to use it sometimes and this book is a great reminder at just how important imagination is.
  • (4/5)
    Where the Wild Things Are is a book about a young boy who is sent to his room without supper for misbehaving. His room transforms into a magical forest and he goes on an adventure to the island of the wild things, where he becomes their king. This book explores what it means to experience love and family, which is one of things that the little boy misses while he is on the island. He continues his adventure back home, where he finds that the best love of all is from his family and the comfort of his home. This would be a great book for young little boys who are adventurous and maybe a bit mischievous. It would be great to relate this to family and love.
  • (1/5)
    I was not a big fan of Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak. The book just really did not appeal to me. Max is sent to bed because he is wreaking havoc on his household with a mask on. The illustrations are great. If it had to be in my library it would be for grades first through third.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorites growing up. This book takes readers onto an adventure that you don't want to stop.
  • (4/5)
    A Caldecott Winner in its best! This 28 page book has very detailed drawings of monsters. It is a creative book of fantasy that features a little boy and monsters. Although most children would be afraid of monsters, the author creates a wonderful book that children would love.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: When Max gets too wild, he's sent to bed without supper, when his room is transformed into a world where he sails to the land where the wild things are and becomes their king.
  • (5/5)
    I believe every student should read this book at some point. When I become a teacher I would love to have a week of books that consist of classics. I could read this book and do activities pertaining to the book during this book week. Also, since there is a movie on it as well, I could Incorporate that in the week.
  • (4/5)
    Where the Wild Things Are is a Caldecott Medal winning story about a young boy named Max at bedtime. The pictures in this story really make it come to life. Max imagines a forest in his room and he sails across an ocean. He comes to an island where the wild things are and he becomes king. Max has many adventures with the wild things, but eventually returns to his own room, where his dinner is waiting for him. This story is about imagination and being able to have adventures from anywhere you want. This story is a favorite amongst children and it shows that having an imagination can be so much fun.
  • (3/5)
    Where the Wild Things Are is a great book but had some problems in some parts with me. The art style is certainly interesting however I just didn't enjoy the way that the scenery was laid out and shown. The fact that it was an island and the monsters were on it was fine but I felt like the scenery had no impact on what was happening and was there simply to be there, which might just be nitpicking on my part. I did enjoy the progression of the main character however because it is something that is relate able. Almost every child has had a spat with their parents and not 100% agreed with what they had done and thought of running away.
  • (5/5)
    This book is about a little boy who turns his bedroom into a imaginative world where wild creatures are. "That very night in Max's room a forest grew--and grew until his ceiling hung with vines and the walls became the world all around." I really like this book because it is such a classic and important book in picture book history. I believe the illustrations give a lot of meaning to the reader. The reader can easily make a story of their own just from the illustrations, which is an example of successful illustrations. The illustrations support the text and enhance the story. The illustrations start off small when the boy's imagination is small and the illustrations get bigger and bigger as the story goes on. This is because as the story goes on the boy's imagination keeps growing bigger and bigger. At the end of the book the illustrations get smaller again when he is back in his bedroom. There is repetitive language in the book, which I think is a positive aspect and enhances the story. The pages connect through really long sentences, which keeps the reader turning the page and reading the story. This is a way the author keeps the reader interested and captivated in the story. The illustrations are colorful and entertaining. The language is descriptive and patterned. The writing is organized and flows from page to page. "And when he came to the place where the wild things are, they roared their terrible roar and gnashed their terrible teeth and rolled their terrible eyes and showed this terrible claws." The character is a believable young boy with a large, playful imagination. I think the main idea of this book is imagination and journeys.
  • (5/5)
    This book is about a boy who travels to a far away island as if he is in some sort of dream. The boy later leaves the island of his imagination and returns back to his bedroom. This is a good teaching book because of its mysterious content and will get many students interested in the story. The grade levels for this book is from kindergarten to second grade (k-2).
  • (4/5)
    A classic that share the adventure and emotional relief of a young boy who gets scolded.
  • (4/5)
    1.) This book is about a boy who was sent to his room with no supper due to his behavior and issues he is having with his mom. In his room he turns into a crazy looking jungle with trees and vines and creatures and he sails to an island (dressed in a wolf costume) and he runs into monster like creatures called "Wild Things". He intimidates & wins them over and crowned the king of the wild things, and although they don't want him to leave he decides to go home. Returning home things are back to how they were and a plate of hot food is waiting for him. 2.) I have loved this book as a kid because of the crazy looking pictures and how vivid the author written the story. I can still remember being able to see the book come to life while I heard it for the first time. I thought it was weird but cool seeing this kid randomly wearing a costume for no particular reason. I liked,that even though he came across the monsters he didnt make a huge big deal that they were different. 3.) For a classroom extension idea I would have liked the kids to write and illustrate their own version of this book. I would want to know how they would have reacted coming across the Wild Things and what their monsters would look like. I think it would be so interesting to see different versions of this book from the eyes of kids especially in this day and age with so many different cultures and environments in this generation would Beverly diverse.
  • (3/5)
    Good fantasy book to share with students, also shows it's okay to feel lonely sometimes and it's good to use your imagination! It also introduces a little bit of "time travel" but at the end of the book when it specifies Max's dinner is still warm, it indicates he wasn't "gone" for very long. This book also shows a "conflict" between mother and child but the mother still loves you and cares about you by feeding you dinner.
  • (3/5)
    I have to say that I liked this book mainly for the illustrations. The boy in the story has an amazing imagination, and he is able to create a imaginary world in his bedroom after he gets in trouble with his mom, and he gets sent to his room. To get to this imaginary world, the boy travels on a boat until he gets to a far away island. In this world, there are monsters who the boy pretends to rule. The boys seems to have a lot of fun in the island but decides to come back home. I think one of the great messages of this story is the loving relationship the boy and the mom share. The boy is punished but he seems to understand his consequences when he decides to leave his imaginary world to go back home to his mother. Many kids would be able to relate to this story since they experience situations like this one in their homes more often than not.
  • (4/5)
    Where the Wild Things Are is such a great book. I remember reading it when I was a child. I have always enjoyed the characters. I think a lot of kids really enjoy this book because of the imagination that Max has. When you get older, I think you lose your imagination and this book makes it okay to have an imagination. Max is so believable because I think every child has been sent to their room after misbehaving so that makes this story very realistic. I also really enjoy the illustrations. They look like someone actually drew them right on the page. I think the main idea in this story is don't take things for granted. Max leaves his home because he is mad at his mother and then at the end of the story, he realizes he needs to go back if he wants to be feed.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! I remember enjoying it when I was a child, but I don't think I really understood all of the reasons why until rereading it recently.One of the best aspects of this book was the illustrations. Many of the illustrations foreshadow the events to come; like the sheet on the first page foreshadowing his tent, the vines in the background, and the drawing of the wild thing on the wall of the second page. The illustrations also grow in size as the story progresses, along with Max's imagination, until they eventually take up all of both pages before slowly receding as Max leaves the Island Where the Wild Things Are to return home for supper.I also really enjoyed the character of Max, and thought he was very believable. Max was punished for acting out and sent to his room, as I was many times as a child, and I'm sure many others were. However, Max found a way to make the best out of his situation through using his imagination, which again, is something I think all of us did as children.The big idea of this book is that imagination can be a great source of entertainment, and you can never have it taken away from you.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely loved this book growing up and I still love it now! The writing in this story followed a pattern in some sections "they roared their terrible roars, gnashed their terrible teeth, and rolled their terrible eyes and showed their terrible claws" this repetitive language gives emphasis in a silly way. The format of this story is mainly run-on sentences which build suspense and make the reader continue to turn the pages. My favorite part about this story was the illustrations. The illustrations grow on the page as the boy's imagination grows. They start small on one page, then grow to a full page, merge over the gutter, until there is three pages of complete illustration without text. The illustrations in this story are so strong that there is no need for text to describe what is happening in the pictures. The main idea of this story is to show the power of children's imaginations.
  • (5/5)
    The main idea of this book is the strong idea of imagination and all the places it can take you if you allow it. I loved this book especially because I feel the illustrations really draw you into the adventure as well as the text. An example of this would be the illustrations at the beginning of the story are small and the colors dull, but as you continue reading the illustrations become bigger and the colors brighter as the imagination is at height. I also liked the illustrations because of how much of the story they told where the words did not. The author filled up two whole pages with illustrations in the middle of the story allowing the reader to use the pictures to fill in what is going on. The illustrator does an amazing job painting us the image of the wild rumpus going on!
  • (1/5)
    I decided to read this after hearing of the author's death and seeing this book's popularity. Unfortunately, I didn't enjoy it. The story seemed pretty pointless to me. There's no moral and the boy learns nothing. It's a snapshot of a boy's imagination. However, I did enjoy the illustrations of the monsters. Having been published in 1963 perhaps this book is a product of its time, lovingly remembered by those who were read this as children and who wish to pass it on to their own offspring. Or maybe it just wasn't for me.
  • (4/5)
    This short story is about a young boy who visits his room to find another world of his own inside. He quickly transforms from a young boy to the ruler of many monsters. The monsters obey his every demand. Although he misses home, he enjoys his time there. When he returns home he finds his dinner warm and waiting for his arrival. This story is simple and humorous.
  • (4/5)
    The students would enjoy me reading this book because most kids probably imagine playing like Max did. They probably would enjoy the monsters are drawn in the book and the colors of it.