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Optic Nerve

Optic Nerve

Până la Maria Gainza

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Evaluări:
Evaluare: 3 din 5 stele3/5 (47 stele)
Lungime: 162 pagini3 ore

Descriere

This category-defying, English-language debut by Argentinian María Gainza will equally enchant fans of Rachel Cusk or John Berger, Jenny Offill or Leonora Carrington, Samanta Schweblin or Gaston Bachelard, Rikki Ducornet or Lynne Tillman Optic Nerve has already been sold into nine languages, and nearly all will be published in simultaneous coedition with Catapult's US/Canadian edition While Optic Nerve compellingly blends autofiction, humor, imagined memories, art history, fairy tales, and memoir, its central premise is the story of a girl (with no formal education) who seeks refuge from life in museums The author, who herself has no formal university education, is a self-taught art historian and admirer of fine art from around the world. Her motivation for writing the book stemmed in part from the frustrations she felt as she “kept finding texts in museum brochures extremely boring, opaque, off-putting, so I developed this fantasy of writing an art guide that would be seductive and capricious” Some of the most compelling passages of the book concern the emotions, memories, and fictions that works of art provoke. Gainza writes eloquently and immersively of the way the mind wanders and plays as it views and is moved by a particular piece of art. Her narrators—often merging in voice with the author herself—must leave gallery spaces to catch their breath after seeing a painting, or are swept away imagining the lives of those who commissioned the works of art centuries before, or are more obsessed with the rumored lives of the artists than the work itself. In other sections, artists' inspirations and microhistories (such as those of Henri Rousseau) are unexpectedly juxtaposed against the author's own (such as her fear of flying) Translator Thomas Bunstead has also translated Eduardo Halfon's The Polish Boxer, works by Enrique Vila-Matas, Yuri Herrara, and more of the important Spanish literary voices in print today For bookstores whose staff and customers appreciate NYRB, Europa, Sarabande, or Dorothy Project titles, and for stores with strong Spanish-American communities (the five states with the largest Argentinian diasporas include Florida, California, New York, New Jersey, and Texas)

Bookseller praise for Optic Nerve

"Genre is a silly constraint, and Optic Nerve by María Gainza is proof of that. Joining works like Krasznahorkai's Seiobo There Below, Enrigue's Sudden Death, and Browning's The Gift, Optic Nerve is art history and theory joined with the narrator's own stories. It is a giant painting on its own, made up of short episodes and sudden turns, beautiful and elegant." —Anton Bogomazov, Politics and Prose (Washington, D.C.)

"Reading Optic Nerve feels far more like meandering through an art museum than like sitting down with a book. Its stream-of-consciousness leaning reminded my of Virginia Woolf, while its poignant reflections on art and how we absorb it reminded me of Olivia Laing in The Lonely City and John Berger in Ways of Seeing. Extremely visual, this meandering meditation proves again and again—and without feeling like it's trying to prove anything—that we can never look at things and keep them separate from us; to look is to create a relationship and to alter. Either pay extremely close attention to the speaker's ever-shifting mind, or let the whole book wash over you like a gallery. To sit in between the extremes will ruin Gainza's work for you." —Afton Montgomery, Tattered Cover Book Store (Denver, CO)

"Optic Nerve is a stunning blend of fiction and art history, compulsively readable, and delicately connected. The narrator is not simply a woman who loves art and is knowledgable about its histories, but rather, she's a woman whose vision is entirely shaped by works of art, and for whom the lives and passions of the artists she loves are more re

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Optic Nerve

Acțiuni carte

Începeți să citiți

Informații despre carte

Optic Nerve

Până la Maria Gainza

Evaluări:
Evaluare: 3 din 5 stele3/5 (47 stele)
Lungime: 162 pagini3 ore

Descriere

This category-defying, English-language debut by Argentinian María Gainza will equally enchant fans of Rachel Cusk or John Berger, Jenny Offill or Leonora Carrington, Samanta Schweblin or Gaston Bachelard, Rikki Ducornet or Lynne Tillman Optic Nerve has already been sold into nine languages, and nearly all will be published in simultaneous coedition with Catapult's US/Canadian edition While Optic Nerve compellingly blends autofiction, humor, imagined memories, art history, fairy tales, and memoir, its central premise is the story of a girl (with no formal education) who seeks refuge from life in museums The author, who herself has no formal university education, is a self-taught art historian and admirer of fine art from around the world. Her motivation for writing the book stemmed in part from the frustrations she felt as she “kept finding texts in museum brochures extremely boring, opaque, off-putting, so I developed this fantasy of writing an art guide that would be seductive and capricious” Some of the most compelling passages of the book concern the emotions, memories, and fictions that works of art provoke. Gainza writes eloquently and immersively of the way the mind wanders and plays as it views and is moved by a particular piece of art. Her narrators—often merging in voice with the author herself—must leave gallery spaces to catch their breath after seeing a painting, or are swept away imagining the lives of those who commissioned the works of art centuries before, or are more obsessed with the rumored lives of the artists than the work itself. In other sections, artists' inspirations and microhistories (such as those of Henri Rousseau) are unexpectedly juxtaposed against the author's own (such as her fear of flying) Translator Thomas Bunstead has also translated Eduardo Halfon's The Polish Boxer, works by Enrique Vila-Matas, Yuri Herrara, and more of the important Spanish literary voices in print today For bookstores whose staff and customers appreciate NYRB, Europa, Sarabande, or Dorothy Project titles, and for stores with strong Spanish-American communities (the five states with the largest Argentinian diasporas include Florida, California, New York, New Jersey, and Texas)

Bookseller praise for Optic Nerve

"Genre is a silly constraint, and Optic Nerve by María Gainza is proof of that. Joining works like Krasznahorkai's Seiobo There Below, Enrigue's Sudden Death, and Browning's The Gift, Optic Nerve is art history and theory joined with the narrator's own stories. It is a giant painting on its own, made up of short episodes and sudden turns, beautiful and elegant." —Anton Bogomazov, Politics and Prose (Washington, D.C.)

"Reading Optic Nerve feels far more like meandering through an art museum than like sitting down with a book. Its stream-of-consciousness leaning reminded my of Virginia Woolf, while its poignant reflections on art and how we absorb it reminded me of Olivia Laing in The Lonely City and John Berger in Ways of Seeing. Extremely visual, this meandering meditation proves again and again—and without feeling like it's trying to prove anything—that we can never look at things and keep them separate from us; to look is to create a relationship and to alter. Either pay extremely close attention to the speaker's ever-shifting mind, or let the whole book wash over you like a gallery. To sit in between the extremes will ruin Gainza's work for you." —Afton Montgomery, Tattered Cover Book Store (Denver, CO)

"Optic Nerve is a stunning blend of fiction and art history, compulsively readable, and delicately connected. The narrator is not simply a woman who loves art and is knowledgable about its histories, but rather, she's a woman whose vision is entirely shaped by works of art, and for whom the lives and passions of the artists she loves are more re

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