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Auberge du Chocolate

Auberge du Chocolate

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Auberge du Chocolate

Lungime:
263 pages
1 hour
Lansat:
Dec 1, 2016
ISBN:
9781607654155
Format:
Carte

Descriere

Chocolate - irresistible to so many of us - has gone upmarket, with chocolate shops full of the most beautiful confections. Luckily, creating mouth-watering confections at home no longer requires hours of training and this book will teach you all the inside tips, techniques and methods for making chocolates like a professional chocolatier. Using ingredients such as strawberries and cream and espresso, to the more adventurous flavour combinations such as jasmine and rose, chilli chocolate, rosemary and thyme and white chocolate and cardamom, you will learn how to make fabulous chocolates to suit any taste. There are also recipes for a range of dairy-free chocolates and a collection of chocolates that even the youngest children can help to make. With chapters on the history of chocolate as well as a comprehensive section covering ingredients and equipment and techniques such as melting, tempering, making molds and gift-wrapping your chocolates, this is the perfect book if you want to dazzle your friends and family with delicious chocolate gifts.
Lansat:
Dec 1, 2016
ISBN:
9781607654155
Format:
Carte

Despre autor

Anne and Ian Scott set up Auberge du Chocolat in 2005 and have rapidly established a significant presence in the premium chocolate community with their prize-winning chocolates and bars. Their workshops, parties and corporate events are designed to be fun. In October this year, they introduced a new Signature chocolate range designed by their 18-year-old son Jonathan (who is the youngest winner of an Academy of Chocolate award). The company is committed to sourcing products in a sustainable and ethical way.


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Auberge du Chocolate - Anne Scott

Contents

All about chocolate

Techniques

Presentation

Chocolates

Dipped chocolates

Truffles

Moulded chocolates

Flavoured chocolate

Dairy-free chocolate

Children’s chocolate

About Auberge du Cholcolat

Suppliers

All About Chocolate

CHOCOLATE IS SUCH A WELL-KNOWN TREAT. AN AMAZING PROPORTION OF PEOPLE EAT IT AROUND THE WORLD, BUT HOW MUCH DO WE KNOW ABOUT CHOCOLATE? IT HAS AN INTRIGUING HISTORY, IT’S A COMPLEX PRODUCT AND THE PROCESSES BY WHICH CHOCOLATE IS MADE ARE SO INTERESTING. UNDERSTANDING SOMETHING OF THE HISTORY AND BACKGROUND OF CHOCOLATE CAN ONLY ENHANCE YOUR ENJOYMENT OF MAKING AND EATING IT.

The History of Chocolate

The history of chocolate is full of myths and mystery and sometimes it can be hard to separate fact from fiction. What follows is generally perceived to be the basic facts.

FOOD OF THE GODS

The earliest records we have of chocolate are about 1500–2000 years ago in the Central American rain forests. Here we find the Cacao tree, worshipped by the Mayan civilisation. Cacao is Mayan for ‘God Food’, which later gave rise to the modern generic Latin name of Theobroma Cocoa, being ‘Fruit of the Gods’. Although we might agree with the sentiment behind the name, this is certainly not a form of chocolate that we would recognize today. The Mayans produced a spicy, bitter sweet drink made by roasting & pounding the cocoa beans and then adding maize and capsicum. This was then left to ferment. The Mayans thought this drink was something very special. It was used in religious ceremonies and by the very wealthy. It is also thought to be something only men were allowed to drink, as one of the properties attributed to the drink was that it was a powerful aphrodisiac. It was thought that allowing women to drink it would give them all manner of ideas above their station.

The Aztecs also considered the cocoa bean to be something extremely special. Unfortunately, their climate and land did not lend itself to the cultivation of cocoa trees and this may have given the beans an even higher value. Beans were used as a currency and it is reported that 100 beans could buy you a slave.

The Mayans made a chocolate drink by pounding the beans from a cocoa pod.

As they were unable to grow the beans, the Aztecs obtained them through trade or the spoils of war. As well as needing them for currency, the Aztecs made a similar drink to the Mayans. Like the Mayan’s Cacao, the Aztec’s Xocolat was linked with religion and the supernatural. According to legend, their creator and god of agriculture, Quetzalcoatl, arrived on a beam of the morning star, carrying a cocoa tree from Paradise. Wisdom and power came from eating the fruit of the tree. The value given to Xocolat can be seen in the description of the drink by Emperor Montezuma, who reportedly drank Xocolat 50 times a day: he is reported to have said that the divine drink ‘builds up resistance and fights fatigue. A cup of this precious drink permits a man to walk for a whole day without food.’

MORE THAN JUST A DRINK

In 1519 the Spanish conquistador Henri Cortes found cocoa beans whilst ransacking Aztec treasure stores. He realised the beans had commercial value and took them to Spain, where a drink more suitable for the European palate was eventually produced, by mixing the powered roasted beans with sugar and vanilla. Chocolate remained highly valuable and its origins were kept secret in Europe for almost a century. So much of a secret that in 1579 when some English buccaneers boarded a Spanish treasure galleon and found what looked like ‘dried sheep’s droppings’, rather than the gold and silver they’d expected, they set fire to it in frustration. Traders in Europe eventually discovered Spain’s secret and chocolate soon became available throughout Europe.

Shown here top left, Questzalcoatl is often depicted holding a cocoa bean or cocoa tree.

In 1520 chocolate arrived in England and it quickly became all the rage. In 1657 London’s first chocolate house, ‘The Coffee Mill and Tobacco Roll’, opened and the new chocolate drink quickly became a bestseller. Clubs built up around the drinking of chocolate and many a business deal was conducted over a cup. Chocolate houses were the forerunner of the highly popular coffee houses we have today. As chocolate became more popular politicians imposed an excessive duty of 10–15 shillings per pound (comparable to approximately ¾ its weight in gold). This made chocolate very much a luxury item and therefore something to be enjoyed by the aristocracy and the business community. It was nearly 200 years before this duty was dropped.

FROM DRINK TO MILK CHOCOLATE BAR

The next main event was the production of the first chocolate bar. In 1828 a Dutch chemist called Johannes Van Houten wanted to make a smoother, more palatable chocolate drink so invented a process to remove the cocoa butter from the cocoa beans. This paved the way for production of chocolate as we know it today: in 1847 the Fry & Sons factory in Bristol, a family-run business that had been making chocolate since the mid-18th century, used the Van Houten process to add sugar and cocoa powder to the extracted cocoa butter and were thus the first to produce a chocolate bar fit for widespread consumption. In 1875 Daniel Peter, a Swiss manufacture, then further developed the chocolate bar by adding milk powder to the mix, thus creating the first milk chocolate. Earlier attempts to make a milk chocolate had been made using liquid milk but this did not combine well with the other ingredients and soon turned rancid. Peter, after years of experimentation, was in the end inspired by his neighbour Henri Nestlé’s inventions of condensed milk, which Peter used to make milk drinking chocolate, and farine lactée, a milk food he used to feed his own daughter.

Chocolate houses sprang up all over Europe, selling a popular chocolate drink. This was eventually sold to make at home.

The first chocolate bar was produced in the mid-19th century and changed the way the public enjoyed chocolate.

How chocolate is made

All chocolate starts life as a cocoa pod. Although coca pods come in various colours, shapes and sizes most of them are the size and shape of 25–30 cm rugby balls. They are cut from the tree, slashed open, the flesh scooped out and the many small fruits piled onto a plantain leaf mat. Here they are left to ferment for up to seven days, depending on

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