Începeți să citiți

42: Academic Neuromuscular Neurologist Talks About Her Specialty: Session 42 Dr. Vanessa Baute is a Neuromuscular Neurologist. She has been in the academic setting for the last five years out of her fellowship training. We discuss what drew her towards it, what she likes and what she doesn’t, and much more. Also,...

Evaluări:
0 pagina

Rezumat

Session 42 Dr. Vanessa Baute is a Neuromuscular Neurologist. She has been in the academic setting for the last five years out of her fellowship training. We discuss what drew her towards it, what she likes and what she doesn’t, and much more. Also, check out all our other podcasts on the MedEd Media Network. [01:16] Her Interest in Neurology and Neuromuscular Medicine, Patient Types, and Procedures As a medical student, Vanessa was completely blown away by cranial nerves and their complex, visual system. She would read about it and study it and it didn't feel like work. The neuromuscular part evolved from having good mentors in the area for neuromuscular medicine. She enjoys doing procedures as well as the patient population. Not to mention, there was a fellowship spot available. She still sees general neurology patients as with her inpatient work. She considers 75% of her practice as neuromuscular, which is a good chunk. Although she also sees patients having issues of neuropathic pain, different forms of neuropathy, and other neuromuscular diseases. She likes the variety of cases as well as the teaching part of it. Some of the procedures she does to patients include occipital nerve blocks with ultrasound guidance, carpal tunnel injections with steroids, EMGs (which are a big part of her practice), skin biopsies, lumbar punctures, BOTOX for migraine and facial spasms. "A big part of my practice is procedural." [04:34] Traits that Lead to Becoming a Good Neuromuscular Neurologist Vanessa cites some traits that lead to becoming a good neuromuscular physician would be the ability to stay with the patient through the journey and explain every step of the way. Every patient is going to be different so you have to be able to tailor your approach. It's not always black and white. [06:20] The Misconception about Localizing and Being Able to Do Anything About It Vanessa gives her take on the concept of localizing but not being able to do anything about it once you localize it. She thinks of this as a misconception considering the number of genetic therapies coming out as well as a whole slew of medications used to treat disease. When you think of neuropathic pain and other forms of pain in neurology like headache or disc diseases, this brings on a whole holistic, integrated approach they can offer patients. This involves lifestyle medicine. "There aren't many times in my career where I feel I can't do anything for a patient." By this, Vanessa means doings things like walking with them in trying to figure out their diagnosis. For her, the ultimate goal depends on the person. Some people don't want to take a pill to have everything fixed. For other people, their healing journey is figuring out what's going on and how it's affecting their family. How can they live with it? Is their doctor going to be with them? Are their doctors listening to them? So she sees a lot of these in her practice just counseling patients. "Even if I can't figure it all out in one visit and fix everything, that's not really a lot of people's goal." Nevertheless, Vanessa assures there are cures for epilepsy as well as medications and treatments for MS. They have a lot of good treatments apparently. So she feels that her patients could be empowered. And maintaining their neurologic health, it's not always a big neurologic disorder they're coming with. [08:40] Other Specialties She Considered Vanessa describes herself as a happy person so she likes everything. She knew the complexity of neurology but she also loved her prelim medicine year. in almost everything she rotated through. She knew though that surgery wasn't for her even if she likes procedures. Funny as it may sound but she actually broke the sterile field on her first day of surgery rotation when her pants fell off. She likes hematology oncology and found it's similar to neurology in some ways in terms of its complexity and the diversity of diseases. She loved the nephrology rotation, but not the a

Citiți pe aplicația mobilă Scribd

Descărcați aplicația mobilă Scribd gratuită pentru a citi oricând, oriunde.