Găsiți următorul dvs. carte preferat

Deveniți un membru astăzi și citiți gratuit pentru 30 zile
Stellaluna 25th Anniversary Edition

Stellaluna 25th Anniversary Edition

Citiți previzualizarea

Stellaluna 25th Anniversary Edition

evaluări:
4.5/5 (70 evaluări)
Lungime:
55 pages
34 minutes
Lansat:
Aug 7, 2018
ISBN:
9780547545301
Format:
Carte

Descriere

Celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of Stellaluna with a deluxe edition of this bestselling picture book classic, now with bonus crafts and activities!

Knocked from her mother’s safe embrace by an attacking owl, Stellaluna lands headfirst in a bird’s nest. This adorable baby fruit bat’s world is literally turned upside down when she is adopted by the occupants of the nest and adapts to their peculiar bird habits. Two pages of notes at the end of the story provide factual information about bats. “Delightful and informative but never didactic; a splendid debut.” —Kirkus Reviews

For this anniversary edition, color has been added to the ink drawings and the interior design now allows for more art to be see. Plus there is a code for a downloadable crafts and activity kit, two pages of updated notes about bats, and a special note from the author.

Lansat:
Aug 7, 2018
ISBN:
9780547545301
Format:
Carte

Despre autor

Janell Cannon's picture books have won many awards and are beloved around the world. She is the author and illustrator of Verdi, Crickwing, Pinduli, and the long-time bestselling classic Stellaluna. Born and raised in Minnesota, Ms. Cannon now lives in Southern California.


Legat de Stellaluna 25th Anniversary Edition

Cărți conex

Previzualizare carte

Stellaluna 25th Anniversary Edition - Janell Cannon

Ați ajuns la sfârșitul acestei previzualizări. Înscrieți-vă pentru a citi mai multe!
Pagina 1 din 1

Recenzii

Ce părere au oamenii despre Stellaluna 25th Anniversary Edition

4.4
70 evaluări / 65 Recenzii
Ce părere aveți?
Evaluare: 0 din 5 stele

Recenziile cititorilor

  • (5/5)
    Genre: FantasyReview: This is a popular story about a bat that loses it's way and tries to find her way back to where she belongs. This is a fantasy book because the bats and the birds in the story talk to one another. Characterization: Stellaluna is protagonist round character that grows and learns from her experiences as she tries to find her way back where she belongs. She is the main character in the story.Media: Liquitex acrylics and Prismacolor pencils on bristol board
  • (5/5)
    Sweet story about a young bat who loses her mother after they are attacked by an owl and is subsequently adopted by a family of birds. It delightfully demonstrates how diverse creatures can coexist. The illustrations are lovely and luminescent. 4.5 stars.
  • (4/5)
    A young bat named Stellaluna is missing from her mom, but she finds other flying friends to live with. As Stellaluna is living with the birds, she learns their way of living compared to her own. They are not the same, but that is okay. Not everyone comes from the same backgrounds or lives the same way, but we can learn from one another and the different ways in which we do things. This book teaches young readers that everyone has their own identity and that it can be influenced by those around you, especially since everyone is different.
  • (3/5)
    Stellaluna and her mom get attacked my a bird and lose each other. The baby bat falls into a birds nest and becomes part of their family. Stellaluna cannot act like a bat with them, says the mother bird, she has to act like a bird. As they get older the birds learn to fly and Stellaluna gets left out. She ends up meeting other bats and getting to see her mom again. Even though the birds and her are different, they are still family.
  • (5/5)
    This classic story is an essential part of any classroom or home library for elementary-aged children. The book integrates complex science ideas with detailed and realistic illustrations to provide a rich scientific experience for readers. At the same time, the touching narrative about adventure and family will resonate with both children and adults.
  • (4/5)
    Stellaluna by Janell Cannon is a Reading Rainbow Book, and won the American Booksellers Book of the Year Award for Children in 1994. It has been adapted to many forms including a popular animated video.Stellaluna is the charmingly illustrated tale of a baby fruit bat who becomes separated from her mother before she’s old enough to fly. Luckily for Stellaluna, she lands in the nearby nest of a mother bird, complete with three chicks inside. Stellaluna tries her best to be like her new brothers and sisters, but she just can’t help her batty habits! She pretends to be a normal bird, until she meets…another bat! And another! Soon there’s a whole flock of them ready to welcome Stellaluna home, including her long-lost mother. After she realizes she’s supposed to be the way she is, Stellaluna embraces her batty ways, even getting her bird siblings to try something new.This quirky, clumsy bat can’t help but steal readers’ hearts. She’s tries so hard and makes us remember the times in our lives when we just couldn’t do anything right. But Stellaluna will encourage children to be true to themselves, because every person is special just the way they are.
  • (4/5)
    This is an example of a book I love more for the pictures than the text. The illustrations of the fruit bat and her bird friends are so very endearing, but the story words do not match the wonder of the pictures. The story is sweet, but not as special as the pictures.
  • (5/5)
    This book is great for the first week of school. You could use this book to help your students understadn that we are all differetn but that we can all still be friends no matter what we look like
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite books as a child, my mother would often read me Stellaluna before I went to bed. The story follows the young bat Stellaluna, as she becomes separated from her mother and attempts to adjust to life with a family of birds who find her bat characteristics strange (such as sleeping upside down.) The story is an endearing tale of family, and how despite differences we are all more alike than we think. Stellaluna is a good story for the first half of elementary, and though it is at a 3rd grade reading level ,it's outstanding illustrations would make is a good choice for a class read-aloud in lower grades. The very back of the book contains some facts about bats, and as such this would be a good story to use in conjunction with a bat unit in the classroom.
  • (3/5)
    Can you believe Ellen Pompeo named her daughter after a bat?!? Not just any bat either. NO! One who is separated from her mother in a traumatic attempted murder by an owl and subsequently forced to live with birds and eat BUGS?!?!
  • (5/5)
    OMG! this is an awesome book!
  • (5/5)
    "Stellaluna" was a very imaginative and fun book to read; it is not every day you read a book about a bat who lives with and acts like a bird. Stellaluna is a bat who got seperated from her mother and fell into a birds nest; the mother bird took her in and raised her as her own, but Stellaluna had to act as a bird and not do normal bat things. For example, Stellaluna was sleeping upside down outside the birds nest and the other birds were curious so they did the same. The mother bird came home and was very unhappy so she told Stellaluna that she had to act like a bird, not a bat. This was also a good book because at the end it had an informational section on bats and the different kinds there are. The illustrations were very simple and straightforward. There is one illustration that shows the Momma bird feeding Stellaluna a grasshopper and it looked like a real picture out of an informational book. The overall message of this book is that it is okay to be friends with people (in this case birds and bats) who are significantly different than you, and that it is okay to be yourself even if others tell you otherwise.
  • (4/5)
    Stellaluna is a wonderful book about finding where you belong. When Stellaluna is separated from her mother, she is adopted into a family of birds - who does everything differently than her! The mother bird shows her kindness and feeds her, but Stellaluna has to follow the rules of the nest so that everyone will stay safe. When Stellaluna eventually is reunited with her bat family, she clearly sees the differences of the lives that she has lived, and sees that though she and her bird friends are different, they can still be family. The imagery and illustrations of this book is fantastic, and the storyline would be really great for a young child learning about the differences between birds and bats.
  • (3/5)
    About the Author: The author of this book is Janell Cannon. She is an American illustrator and writer. Character: The main character in this book is a female bat called StellalunaPlot/Summary:A mother fruitbat loves her baby called Stellaluna very much and would never let anything happen to her. When the two are attacked by an owl, the predator knocks Stellaluna out of her mother's safe embrace. Soon the baby bat ends up in a bird's nest filled with three baby birds named Pip, Flitter and Flap. The mother bird will let Stellaluna be part of the family only if she eats bugs, does not hang by her feet and sleeps at night.When all the baby animals grow, they learn to fly. When Stellaluna and the birds are out playing, it gets dark and the birds go home without her because they will not be able to see in the dark. Stellaluna keeps flying, but when Stellaluna's wings hurt, she stops to rest. When she does, she hangs by her thumbs. Soon another bat comes to ask why Stellaluna is hanging by her thumbs. She tells the bat the story of what had happened after she and her mother were attacked by the owl. Another bat interrupts the story. That bat is Stellaluna's mother. Stellaluna and her mother are happily reunited and Stellaluna finally understands why she is so different.Excited about learning how to be a bat, Stellaluna returns to Pip, Flitter, and Flap in order to share her new experiences. They agree to join Stellaluna and the bats at night, but find they are unsuited to flying at night and nearly crash. Stellaluna rescues them and the four of them decide that while they may be very different, they are still friends and family.Theme: Discovering that they may be very different, but they are still friends and family.Setting: The Setting is outside at nightTwo direct quotes: "What was that?" pg. 4 "I don't know, but its hanging by its feet" Chirped Flitter Pg 4Recommendation: I would recommend reading this to a classroom. It shows how everyone is different, but aside from their differences they can all still be friends and family.
  • (5/5)
    This sweet story will connect students to their past experiences because the illustrations are so beautiful and the author does an excellent job of connecting the read to how all the emotions of the Stellaluna. It would be great in a writer's workshop for brainstorming and planning one's favorite memory.
  • (5/5)
    I love this book for just about every reason. The illustrations are AMAZING. This book works great for a shared reading because you can really tell how the characters are feeling from her pictures. This is a great book for expression. And it's also a great book for writers workshop in just about every category. This book really touches on the main character feeling happy, sad, proud, embarrassed, alone, excited. So it's great for recalling times when you felt that way for planning and brainstorming.
  • (4/5)
    Sweet story about how being different does not mean you can't be friends, in fact it's more fun that way. Also great for being yourself and being proud of it.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely adore this realistic fiction book. This is a realistic fiction because bats are real, and the actions in the book are things a bat legitimately does (such as fly and eat fruit, etc., however the personal story of the bat is most likely not accurate such as living with birds for a while. I really enjoyed this book because it explored the theme of belonging and being yourself and I think that that is always a good message for students. This book would be a good mentor book, and I would definitely use it in a variety of ways in my own classroom. I think this would be a better book for 2-4th graders.
  • (5/5)
    Stellaluna is a great book to read when teaching friendship. This book teaches children to be friends to others even if they are different. Courage is also another theme of this story. It shows how a little bat had to be courageous when she was not in her comfort zone. Great book to teach during the first week of school.
  • (5/5)
    Stellaluna is the story of a little fruit bat that was separated from her mother when an owl attacked them. Stellaluna was able to survive and was raised by a bird who had three babies. Stellaluna behaved as good as any bird would even though she was so different. The birds learned to accept her and they became very good friends. This is a very nice story to share with younger children. Being different didn't impede the birds and Stellaluna to care for one another. I love books like this one where acceptance is one of the messages of the book.
  • (4/5)
    SUMMARYStellaluna is accidentally dropped by her mother into a nest of birds. They accept her as one of the family as long as she acts like a bird. She tries her best, but she struggles. Once day she becomes separated from her bird family. Stellaluna is found sleeping with her head up by a bat, which he finds unusual. Stellaluna is reunited with her mother. REVIEWI definitely see Stellaluna as a tale that relates to The Ugly Duckling. They both have very similar messages. Both books advocate that the reader accept themselves for who they are. The reader is special in their own unique way even though they might not see it at first. I loved that the author decided to do this story with bats. It was very humorous to watch a bat try to act like a little bird.
  • (4/5)
    Stellaluna is separated from her mother and is raised by birds, eating insects and definitely not hanging upside down. One day, while trying to fly as gracefully as her friends, Stellaluna is reunited with her bat family who show her how bats live. Despite their differences, Stellaluna and the birds remain friends. Although I didn't love the initial illustrations, I enjoyed the later illustrations, especially the one that shows Stellaluna with her wings wrapped around her bird friends. I also enjoyed the author's information about different types of bats that was provided at the end of the book. This book would appeal to young children as a read aloud book.
  • (5/5)
    This is an excellent informational read about a fruit bat, Stellaluna and her adventures in surviving a sudden separation from her mom. Stellaluna comes across many different kinds of animals who she tries to mimic in order to feel like she still has a place in the forest. She first befriends baby birds in a nest and attempts to eat like the birds. She changes her sleeping habits and other bat-like mannerisms in order to fit in. Stellaluna comes to the realization by the end of the story that we must accept one and all, no matter the similarities or differences. In my opinion, this is a great book to read to children for a few reasons. The first being, the story pushes readers to think about tough issues such as bullying, and could broaden perspectives about cultural differences and accepting all. Stellaluna gets laughed at and bullied by other animals when they witness her acting like a bird, which makes Stellaluna feel very sad and alone. A great discussion about respecting others, no matter how different, could easily stem from this story. The birds stand up for Stellaluna and say “doesn't matter Stellaluna, we are friends.” I also liked this story because it had a lot of great non-fictional information within. For example, when Stellaluna had to eat from the mamma bird, she squealed “yuck!”, and exclaimed that she was used to eating fruits like mango's, apples, and berries, not worms and other creepy crawlers. The author also depicts clear differences and similarities between the animals sleeping patterns, kinds of shelters created to survive, and foods they eat.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed the language and the plot of this book. I loved the use of similes and metaphors throughout it. For example, when Stellaluna, gets separated from her mother, the author writes, "Her baby wings were as wimp and useless as wet paper." I enjoyed this quote as I read the book because it was a great way to explain that without her mother, she fell through the air hopelessly. Also, the plot of the book was filled with suspension. As I read the book, I continued to question what would happen next. One last thing that I enjoyed was the informational level of the book. After reading, I learned about a bat's diet, its lifestyle, and its vision. For example, I now know that bats eat fruit, that they hang by their feet to rest, and they can see in the dark. The overall message of the story was that no matter how different we all are, we can accept these differences and take advantage of the experiences.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this book for three reasons. The big idea is to accept that everyone has differences and these differences are what make us special. The main character, Stellaluna, can easily be identified with by any child that has been told to act a certain way. The story teaches children that they should not have to hide who they really are. Also, the illustrations are adorable and realistic.
  • (5/5)
    I liked this book for several reasons. First, I liked the plot which was about a baby bat named Stellaluna, who was accidentally separated from his mother and ended up living with a family of birds. The mother bird took Stellaluna under her wing, feeding her and caring for her and even teaching her how to fly. While flying late one evening, Stellaluna is met by a group of bats and among them is Stallaluna's mother. Stellaluna quickly goes to tell the young birds that she has been living with and realizes that they are very different from each other. In the end, the birds and Stellaluna realize that it is alright that they are different, because they are friends no matter what. The plot is a great lesson for children to learn that even the most unlikely animals or people can become the best of friends and take care of one another. Another reason I enjoyed this book are the illustrations. They are so soft and in beautiful shades of blues. The portrayal of the bats and birds reflect their gentle and caring character traits throughout the story. The pages and pictures are large and are an important part of understanding the story. Finally, I enjoyed the imagery used in the text. For example, when Stellaluna was separated from her mother, the imagery and voice were strong and grabbed the reader. The text read, "On silent wings the powerful bird swooped down upon the bats. Dodging and shrieking, Mother Bat tried to escape, but the owl struck again and again, knocking Stellaluna into the air." This was pretty intense for a children's book, but wonderful nonetheless.
  • (3/5)
    I liked this book for a few reasons. I liked the illustrations, I think they really help to enhance the story and bring it more meaning. The overall message of the story is that it is okay to love and except people that are different than you. This topic pushes young readers to broaden their perspectives and think about families that are different than their own.
  • (5/5)
    I hope it was ok to include this book. I have a signed copy and I absolutely LOVE the illustrations. I also have a soft spot in my heart for stories (true or not) that include different animals getting along. Stellaluna is such a wonderful story about a fish out of water (or a bat out of cave), and I love reading this book!
  • (5/5)
    I love Janell Cannon's realistic art, first of all. Secondly, this book would be great to use in the classroom because it is so rich thematically. In the story, we learn that not everyone is made the same way, but we need to include each other and be our true selves. We can be friends with anyone, no matter how different they may seem from us.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed the book “Stellaluna” by Janell Cannon. I liked the detailed and realistic illustrations of both the bats and birds. Even though the story is fantasy the illustrations make the story feel more real. I also liked how the author used Stellaluna’s struggle to become part of the bird world including eating bugs and flying during the day to show the differences between birds and bats. I was surprised that Stellaluna was reunited with her mother and thought it was interesting that she relearned how to be a bat. I think the author’s big idea was to compare and contrast both birds and bats I thought that Stellaluna’s experiences did a great job of this.