Sunteți pe pagina 1din 10

Mathematics and Science Sample Unit Plan Driving Question In this unit we will be discussing Energy and energy

concepts. Some of our topics will include energy sources, investigations on how energy from the sun is absorbed and reflected, heat and color relationships, food energy, converting energy/photosynthesis, and finally, renewable vs. non-renewable resources. This unit plan is comprised of seven lessons that include: experiments, observations, creating and evaluating hypothesis, reflection journals, graphing, simple mathematical computations such as adding and subtracting, and many other things. Here I have included a sample of the first two lesson plans. Students will be assessed informally through observations during class discussion, and formally through various worksheets and science journals that they will be doing for four days of the unit plan. I have provided the students with a grading rubric for their science journal that they will be turning in at the end of the unit. LESSON PLAN FORMAT

Ben Slusher Your name: School: Grade: Third Cooperating Teacher: Subject: Math and Science Integration What is energy? Where does it come from? Are there different types of energy? If so what are they? Date/Time:

Unit Plan Driving question/Theme/Title:

Lesson title/Topic: Energy Sources

Lesson number: 1

STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS/GLCE addressed in this lesson: S.IP.03.16 Construct simple charts and graphs from data and observations. S.IA.03.11 Summarize information from charts and graphs to answer scientific questions. S.IA.03.12 Share ideas about science through purposeful conversation in collaborative groups. P.EN.03.11 Identify light as a form of energy. P.EN.E.1 Forms of Energy- Heat, electricity, light, and sound are forms of energy. D.RE.03.01 Read and interpret bar graphs in both horizontal and vertical forms. D.RE.03.02 Read scales on the axes and identify the maximum, minimum, and range of values in a bar graph.

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES Through these learning activities, the learner will demonstrate the ability to: Through these learning activities the student will observe and be able to differentiate between different types of energy sources. Through these learning activities the learner will be able to identify where energy comes from. Through these learning activities the learner will be able to interpret a bar graph in both horizontal and vertical forms. Through these learning activities the learner will be able to identify maximum, minimum, and range of values in a bar graph.

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES:

Time: 5 min

Introduction Engagement: Sources of energy are all around us, and come in a variety of different forms. Energy for a person is different than energy for an automobile.

15-20 min

Anticipatory set Boys and girls, today we are starting a new unit plan on energy. What do you know about energy? Are there different types of energy? Well, today I have some items laid out for you to come up and look at, and decide if these are types of energy. Exploration: Students collaborate and explore the different items set out for them and decide using their senses whether or not the item is a type of energy.

Instructional activities (including checking for understanding activities, modeling, guided practice, independent practice)

Explanation: 1. Display all of the items on a table and ask the students which items they think are a source of energy. 2. Each item should be labeled (an index card with title on one side and detailed description on the other side) with a card in front of it. (Number the cards with corresponding numbers on items). 3. Have students list which top three items they think produce the most energy from the listing on the table.

Interdisciplinary approaches: 20-30 min Elaboration After students take turns guessing, go over every item individually and give full description to class. Create a vertical and horizontal (distinguish the difference) bar graph of the students opinions of which item is responsible for producing the most energy.

Accommodations for differentiated instruction for: Resource students: Allow for partner work to collaborate and share ideas.

ESL students: Allow them to work with a partner to help explain to the student. Gifted students: Give them the opportunity to do the potential extension activity

Assessment 20 Min Evaluation: Pass out the first worksheet. Allow students time to work on the assignment in class and then go over the worksheet afterwards with the class. Collect afterwards for a daily science grade.

Conclusion/closure Okay, boys and girls what did we learn today? Are there different types of energy? Which of the items that we have here in front of us today is responsible for producing the most energy?

5 Min

Assignment/follow up Pass out the energy words and descriptions to the children. Have them write sentences using the words to familiarize themselves with them Extension

Have the students write a short paragraph on the top three sources of energy they chose, why they thought they were the top three, and after our class discussion do they still think the same?

LIST of MATERIALS and CLASSROOM SET UP needs:

Picture of the sun, Fruit or vegetable, Piece of firewood, Piece of charcoal or coal, Container of motor oil, Gas lighter, Cup of water and an empty cup, Childs pinwheel, Picture of lightning or a light bulb, Picture of a nuclear power plant, Piece of discarded trash, Battery, Worksheet #1 Energy Sources (Assessment - one for each student)

SAFETY/CAUTIONS: Make sure students walk to and from the front table Allow for personal space (maybe dont release them all to the front at once.)

LIST of RESOURCES: http://www.magnet.fsu.edu/education/ret/program/2005/documents/lawhornplan.pdf http://www.michigan.gov/documents/MathGLCE_140486_7.pdf

LESSON PLAN FORMAT

Ben Slusher Your name: School: Grade: Third Date/Time:

Cooperating Teacher:

Subject: Math and Science Integration What is energy? Where does it come from? Are there different types of energy? If so what are they?

Unit Plan Driving question/Theme/Title:

Lesson title/Topic: Energy Activities Lesson number: 2

STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS/GLCE addressed in this lesson: S.IA.03.12 Share ideas about science through purposeful conversation in collaborative groups. P.EN.03.11 Identify light as a form of energy. P.EN.E.1 Forms of Energy- Heat, electricity, light, and sound are forms of energy. M.UN.03.04 Know benchmark temperatures such as freezing (32oF, 0oC); boiling (212oF, 100oC); and compare temperatures to these, e.g., cooler, warmer. N.MR.03.12 Find solutions to open sentences, such as 7 x = 42 or 12 = 4, using the inverse relationship between multiplication and division. STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES Through these learning activities, the learner will demonstrate the ability to: Through these learning activities learners will be able to demonstrate the ability to know freezing point, boiling point, and compare temperatures in between. Through these learning activities learners will be able to express ideas and observations in a collaboratively Through these learning activities the learner will find solutions to open sentences.

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES:

Time:

Introduction Engagement: Class will be conducted outside where students will conduct a series of experiments placed around the area provided. Students will be placed in collaborative groups to perform these tasks.

5 min

Anticipatory set Boys and girls, today we are going to continue or discussion about energy. What are some forms of energy that we discussed yesterday (wind, water, natural gas, food, etc). Today, we are going to continue our unit about energy, and we will be conducting a series of experiments. I will hand each of you a packet, answer the questions by following the directions on the packet. Exploration: Students conduct experiments using their senses, (touch and sight) ,calculators ,and thermometers to understand different forms of energy.

Instructional activities (including checking for understanding activities, modeling, guided practice, independent practice)

Explanation: 1. This activity is best conducted outdoors in an area protected from the wind. 2. After a discussion of energy and a reminder of the sources of energy from the previous day, direct students in these energy experiments. 40 min 3. Divide the class into 2 groups. Hand out the Energy Experiments worksheet to each student. 4. Have all of the materials set up at individual centers. 5. Each group will perform all 5 experiments with students taking turns having 2-3 conduct each experiment. 6. Since 3 of the 5 experiments require a temperature reading after 10 minutes, allow students to do more than one of these at a time. 7. Have students plan their time so that they can complete the experiments in the time allotted for the activity. 8. Be available to assist your students in their experiments or in

their explanations of what happened. Guide them through 15 min difficult explanations. 9. When all of the experiments are completed, take a few minutes and have the students explain the experiments. Be sure the students clean up the remains of the experiments.

Interdisciplinary approaches: Elaboration When we return back to the classroom and have finished all the activities randomly ask them questions about the experiments that they conducted. What are some things that they discovered? What did they find more shocking? Finally, go through some of their observations that they noted on their worksheets. Cover freezing and boiling point (characteristics of water above and below these points). Accommodations for differentiated instruction for: Resource students: Allow for partner work to collaborate and share ideas. ESL students: Allow them to work with a partner to help explain to the student. 5 min Gifted students: Have them go into more detail on why some things happened.

Assessment Evaluation: The assessment for this lesson will be the packet that each student will fill out when performing the experiments.

Conclusion/closure Okay, boys and girls what did we learn today? Are there different types of energy?

What are some things that affect energy?

Assignment/follow up No assignment will be done to follow up, just class discussion. None. Extension

LIST of MATERIALS and CLASSROOM SET UP needs:

Watch or clock with second hand 5 thermometers 10 tart pans, 3 inches in diameter (one pan painted black) Solar calculator Water Desk lamp Newspaper 2 cups of ice For individual windmills (enough for each student to make one) Paper cut into 3-inch by 6-inch strips Paper cut into 3-inch by 2-inch squares (4 per experiment) Tape Unused pencils Paper clips String Handout (one for each student)

SAFETY/CAUTIONS: Make sure students walk to and from stations Do Not abuse the equipment Allow for personal space

LIST of RESOURCES: http://www.magnet.fsu.edu/education/ret/program/2005/documents/lawhornplan.pdf http://www.michigan.gov/documents/MathGLCE_140486_7.pdf