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UNIT PLAN EDPR 3200 / EDSO 3200

Unit Title:

Introduction to Ancient Greece

Number of Lessons:

4

Time: (in weeks)

1.5

Name:

Julie Schuurman

Subject(s):

Social Studies

Grade(s):

7

Rationale: The aims of this unit are:

to identify and recognize how our culture and system of government has been influenced by the innovations of Ancient Greece.

to raise awareness of the limitations that social status, gender, and wealth used to hold over people’s lives in former civilizations.

to build connections for students between their own lives and the lives of people in Ancient Greece.

Overview:

Each lesson within this mini-unit is laid out with the intention of making meaningful connections between Canadian students and the ancient civilization of Greece. Through multimedia presentations, textbook readings, and interactive classroom simulations students will be introduced to the revolutionary ideologies from this time period that still effect our current system of government today. Students will be challenged to examine their own country as well as making inferences of the life conditions of the citizens of the Ancient Greece.

Prescribed Learning Outcomes from IRPs:

Social Studies

B2 analyze social roles within one or more ancient civilizations

B3 identify influences and contributions of ancient societies to present-day cultures

C2 assess how ancient systems of laws and government have contributed to current Canadian political and legal systems

Drama

A1 use the creative process to explore a range of issues and abstract concepts

Prerequisite Concepts and Skills:

Besides the prescribed learning outcomes described in the Grade 6 IRP for Social Studies (concerning understanding of Canadian rights, etc.) students will be drawing heavily on their own life experiences (assuming that they all grew up in Canada). It will also be necessary for students to imagine themselves in the shoes of individuals from Ancient Greece.

Teacher Preparation Required:

Locate pictures comparing architecture, theatres, governing assemblies, Olympics, medicine, mathematics, philosophers, etc. from Ancient Greece and from our modern day Western civilization

Develop Smart Board Presentation (displaying these pictures)

Prepare twelve zip-lock lock bags consisting of photos of theatres, Olympics medical practices, mathematical reasoning’s from Ancient Greece

Prepare slips of paper describing various social classes from Ancient Greece for Interviews

Develop Smart Board presentation incorporating pictures of various flags from Canadian provinces, as well information contrasting the ancient city-states of Athens and Sparta (taken from

Cross-Curricular Connections:

Drama Interviews (Lesson 3)

Extensions to Unit:

Socials Continued study of other aspects of Ancient Greece (i.e. architecture, philosophy, mythology, theatre, etc.) Further comparisons of systems of government with other ancient civilizations (i.e. Roman, Egyptian, Indian, British, and American)

Art

Students could design tourist brochures promoting visits to either Athens or Sparta based on the living conditions and

rights lalallalal discussed during Lesson 4.

Differentiated Instruction:

ESL students may have difficulty understanding terms like rights, democracy, and social status as they are rather abstract terms and may have different contexts in different cultures. One-on-one explanations can be made during work time, or sent home with the student to study before class. References to cultural equivalents to such terms can also be built into the teacher’s instruction.

Adaptations for Remedial students can include:

o

systematic approaches to setting goals, choosing or creating flexible materials and media, and assessment.

o

audio tapes, electronic texts, or a peer helper to assist with assigned readings

o

access to a computer for written assignments (e.g., use of word prediction software, spell-checker, idea generator)

o

alternatives to written assignments to demonstrate knowledge and understanding

o

advance organizers/graphic organizers to assist with following classroom presentations

o

extended time to complete assignments or tests

o

support to develop and practice study skills (e.g., in a learning assistance block)

o

use of computer software that provides text-to-speech/speech-to-text capabilities

o

pre-teaching key vocabulary or concepts; multiple exposure to materials

o

working on provincial learning outcomes from a lower grade level

o

Some may be able to achieve the learning outcomes of some subjects or courses with adaptations. A small proportion will need to work on individualized outcomes and goals different than the curriculum; this is referred to as modification.

Resources:

British Columbia Grade 7 Social Studies Integrated Resource Package

British Columbia Drama Kindergarten to Grade 7 Integrated Resource Package

Ancient Worlds: Outlooks 7, Arnold Toutant and Susan Doyle

Democracy is… Animation by Lukasz Szozda (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Arn8Fp1jyok)

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTlrSYbCbHE&feature=youtube_gdata_player )

Two Faces of Greece: Athens and Sparta Lesson activities (http://www.pbs.org/empires/thegreeks/educational/lesson1.html)

Overview of Lessons:

Lesson #

PLOs

(a)

Instructional Objectives

 

Lesson Activities

Assessment Strategies

Materials (Specific to This Lesson)

and Title

in

(b)

Teaching Strategies

 

(time in minutes)

lesson

 

1. Welcome to Ancient Greece… Anything Look Familiar?

(60min.)

B3

a)

Instructional Objectives

Introduction:

 

Locate pictures comparing architecture, theatres, governing assemblies, Olympics, medicine, mathematics, philosophers, etc. from Ancient Greece and from our modern day Western civilization

SWBAT…

KWL Chart (What do you know about Ancient

Assess KWL Chart and Teacher Observations for students’ previous knowledge level on the topic of Ancient Greece.

 

List influences and contributions of Ancient Greece to present-day Canada

 

Greece?)

 

Initial Smart Board presentation (Displaying pictures of architecture then and now; considering how our architecture may have been influenced by the Greeks)

   

Body:

b)

Teaching Strategies

Students work in pairs examining photos from

KWL Chart

zip-lock bags determining what is the modern

 

Multimedia

day equivalent (i.e. Theatre of Dionysus vs.

Broadway theatres)

     

Partner Work

Class discussion of what students pairs came up

 

Develop Smart Board Presentation (displaying these pictures)

Discussion

 

with

 

Follow-up Smart Board presentation assessing what are the modern day equivalents to what the photo’s depict.

Closure:

Twelve zip-lock lock bags consisting of photos of theatres, Olympics medical practices, mathematical reasoning’s from Ancient Greece

List of students’ names cut up into separate slips of paper for drawing out of a hat.

Call on 2-3 students (by drawing names out of a hat) to give an example of something in Western society that originated in Ancient Greece.

 

2. What is Democracy?

B3

a)

Instructional Objectives

Introduction:

Assess students’ pop quiz responses for participation and understanding of concept.

Assess students’ ticket out for understanding of concept.

Textbook

C2

SWBAT…

Pop Quiz: Students write down three

Notebooks

(75min.)

 

Describe the similarities and differences between the systems of democracy in Ancient Greece and in modern-day Canada.

 

innovations from Ancient Greece that are still evident in Canada today.

 

Watch Video Democracy Is…

Body:

Lead class in a webbing exercise highlighting characteristics of a democracy based on the video and any of the students previous knowledge.

Democracy Is… (http://www.youtube.c

Whole class reads through the democracy

b)

Teaching Strategies

 

section of the Ancient Worlds Textbook (pg.161 and 164).

 

Pop Quiz

Teacher sketches a Venn Diagram on the white

Discussion

 

board while students sketch a similar Venn

Seat Work

Diagram in their notebooks (one circle

Multimedia

representing Ancient Greece’s system of

democracy; other circle representing Canada’s

Graphic Organizer (Venn Diagram)

system of democracy; based on Think for Yourself Activity in Textbook pg.166).

     

Students fill in Venn Diagram as Teacher leads a class discussion comparing Ancient Greece’s system of democracy with the Canadian system of democracy.

   

Closure:

Watch Video Democracy Is… (1min)

Ticket Out students must write a short paragraph summing up their opinion of which system of democracy is better (modern vs. ancient) by picking one aspect of comparison (i.e. equal rights among citizens).

3. What are rights? Do

B2

a)

Instructional Objectives

Introduction:

Assess Interviews, Conversations, and Teacher Observation for students’ involvement and understanding of concept.

Textbook

C2

SWBAT…

Teacher will display democracy mind web that

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

   

was developed in our last class and review concept of democracy.

they apply to everybody?

(60min.)

 

Define what a right is

Identify how circumstances such as wealth, gender, and social status have effected individual’s rights in the past

Probe the class on their previous knowledge of

human rights and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Watch Video The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

er)

Body:

Slips of paper describing various social classes from Ancient Greece for Interview

Discuss the concept of human rights and equality.

Based on what we’ve already learned about democracy in Ancient Greece, students will

 

b)

Teaching Strategies

Questioning

 

make inferences on whether these human rights

Multimedia

existed for all people in this ancient culture.

 

Interview

Simulation

Teacher will distribute a handout outlining the

 

social classes in Ancient Greece and discuss the various levels.

 

Equality Simulation: Students will choose a slip of paper from a basket without looking at it. Each slip of paper will describe an individual from Ancient Greece and how their social class affects their life. The teacher will explain that in this simulation, your livelihood or wealth will be demonstrated by how many candies you receive, which depends on which social class you belong to (i.e. a wealthy

       

aristocrat may receive 6 candies, whereas his slave won’t receive any). One at a time, students will read out their slips of paper to the class, and the teacher will distribute the candies appropriately.

   

Afterwards, we will discuss how the simulation made students feel. Was it fair? Why or why not?

Closure:

Students will write down their responses to the simulation for their ticket out.

4. Athens vs. Sparta Applying What We’ve Learned so Far!

B2

a)

Instructional Objectives

Introduction:

Assess students’ conversations and teacher observations for students’ participation and understanding.

Develop Clicker Quiz

SWBAT…

Roughly summarize life in ancient Athens and Sparta

Overview of last class’s discussion and what

we’ve learned thus far.

Using the SMART Response Clickers, the teacher will lead students through a short review quiz based on what we’ve learned.

Body:

Democracy mind webs

Athens vs. Sparta Worksheet

Election box and secret ballots

(75min.)

 

Describe which social class from ancient Athens and/or Sparta they would prefer to be a member of

Discuss the city-state of Sparta and begin to document comparisons and differences between it and Athens in a Venn Diagram on the white board.

Students will work in partners to complete their own venn diagram comparing Sparta and Athens on the worksheet. Students may use

 

Textbook

b)

Teaching Strategies

Lecture

 

their textbook pgs. 156,157, and 159 as

Multimedia

reference.

 

On the other side of the worksheet, students

 

Think-Pair-Share

 

will write about which city-state they would rather live in with 4-5 facts to defend their reasoning. Students may use their textbook as a reference.

 

Closure:

Secret Ballot Election: Students will vote on which city state theyd rather live in.