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LESSON PLAN Class:

Unit: Lesson: Time allotted: Materials Needed:

English Literature (GRADE 10)


Hamlet- Shakespeare To his Coy Mistress- Andrew Marvell 1 class period (50 MINUTES) Copies of the poem for everyone.

Prior Knowledge Accessed: Basic Poetry Analysis (imagery, tone, symbolism, metaphors) Lesson Objectives: SWBAT analyze Marvell's poem, "To his Coy Mistress," and compare the text with Hamlet's love situation in ACT 3, and formulate an opinion on how Hamlet should deal with Ophelia. Lesson Assessment: Students will verbalize their thoughts and opinions by expressing them in a class-wide debate. The analysis will be based on teacher observation of participation, as well as their completion of the writing prompt.

LESSON PLAN: 50 MINUTE CLASS PERIOD Time 5 minutes Student Task Respond to prompt in daily journal Method Teacher Task Written Ask writing prompt: contemplation "How do you feel about Hamlet alienating himself from Ophelia? Should Hamlet stay focused on revenge, or should he try to mend his relationship with Ophelia? What would YOU do?" Pass out copies of the poem while students are responding. Read "To his Coy Mistress" out loud to the class.

5 minutes

Follow along while talking to the text (underlining images, circling words that evoke tone, star any metaphorical language examples)

Listening to poem read aloud

5 minutes 5 minutes

Read silently through the poem again With the person sitting next to you, share your notes and discuss which parts of the poem seemed interesting to you. With the same partner, consider whether this poem would be good advice for a dude in Hamlet's situation Halftime breatherDivide into two groups on either side of the classroom, based on your opinion of what Hamlet should do: Focus on revenge OR Win back Ophelia. As a group, formulate your position. Have some people taking notes as you "prepare for war" with the other group. Try and use examples from Hamlet AND the poem Battle Royale- have a speaker introduce your argument, then have other speakers take turns arguing your various points. Be respectful. Debrief

Reading for Allow the students a deeper moment to consider comprehension the poem on their own Paired discussion

5 minutes

Paired discussion

Walk around and guide the student discussion as needed. Play a "love and relationships" related song or YouTube clip to "keep things fresh" while the students divide themselves

3 minutes

5 minutes

Large Group Discussion

Conveniently slip into either group and make a quick suggestion on how they should go after their opponents. Facilitate, keep it rolling.

15 minutes

Class-wide Debate: Mild structure/ partially open-floor format

2 minutes

Collect writing prompts. Talk briefly about the debate.

Lesson Purpose: The reason I chose this particular poem in correlation with Hamlet's ACT 3 contemplation is because I believe that they pertain directly to one another. For one, Marvell is a mid-17th century writer, so the era is relative. Marvell's poem is metaphysical and deals with the perception of life, love, death and time in the same way that Hamlet does in his "To be or not to be" speech. In this way, they draw a parallel to one another and can provide insight into the philosophies of the 17th century. Conveniently, these metaphysical

ideologies are still richly considered today, so the students can connect through their prior experiences and access their own "deeper thinker." The first half of the lesson plan is designed to get them thinking about these concepts by writing and discussing in small groups. Here, they need to tap into their own prior knowledge of literary devices to analyze the poem. Eventually, the lesson plan moves into a class debate where they can express their opinions of Hamlet's situation by connecting the two texts. By doing this "battle royale," the students get to share experiences and interpretations in order to further their own understanding of Shakespeare's Hamlet. Perhaps for homework or for a later assignment, I might have the students form their argument in a written response, calling on textual examples from the two texts to support their position. I feel like this would provide some interesting opportunities to observe the student's perspectives between love and revenge. CCS's Covered: Analyzing diverse texts for recognition and citation of textual evidence of explicit and implicit meaning. Comparing texts to other works. Discussing ideas verbally with other students (small group and large group discussion) Evaluate the speaker (Both Hamlet and Marvell). Present opinion in clear, concise and logical manner. Explore language in multiple contexts, clarifying meaning of figurative language.

To his Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell

To his Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell

Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, lady, were no crime. We would sit down and think which way To walk, and pass our long love's day; Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find; I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood; And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow. An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart. For, lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate. But at my back I always hear Time's winged chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song; then worms shall try That long preserv'd virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust. The grave's a fine and private place, But none I think do there embrace. Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may; And now, like am'rous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour, Than languish in his slow-chapp'd power. Let us roll all our strength, and all Our sweetness, up into one ball; And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life. Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, lady, were no crime. We would sit down and think which way To walk, and pass our long love's day; Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find; I by the tide Of Humber would complain. I would Love you ten years before the Flood; And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow. An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart. For, lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate. But at my back I always hear Time's winged chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song; then worms shall try That long preserv'd virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust. The grave's a fine and private place, But none I think do there embrace. Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may; And now, like am'rous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour, Than languish in his slow-chapp'd power. Let us roll all our strength, and all Our sweetness, up into one ball; And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life. Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run