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Mental Health and Illness

Designed for Year 10


Based on the AusVELS Curriculum

Contents

Introduction How to use this booklet. Unit Plan Session 1 Mental Health and You.. Lesson Plan. Teacher Notes.. References.. Appendices. Session 2 Stress and Stress Management Lesson Plan. Teachers Notes. References..... Appendices. Session 3 Building Self-Esteem. Lesson Plan. Teacher Notes.. References.. Appendices. Session 4 Building Resilience. Lesson Plan. Teacher Notes.. References.. Appendices. Session 5 Building Healthy Relationships. Lesson Plan. Teacher Notes.. References.. Appendices. Session 6 Mental Illness Lesson Plan. Teacher Notes.. References.. Appendices. Assessment Task. Assessment Task Criteria Youth Mental Health Resources

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Introduction
Mental Health and Illness is created for use in secondary schools. It is designed for a Year 10 classroom, based upon the relevant AusVELS standards. The goal of these lessons is to provide an awareness of Mental Health and Illness and to provide some strategies for identifying and reducing certain aspects of Mental Health. Mental Health is a common issue amongst young Australians. Almost 20 percent of adolescents in Australia are affected by mental health problems. It is estimated that one in five Australians will experience a mental illness at some stage of their life. This can vary in severity from mild or temporary, to severe and prolonged. It is important for adolescent students to be able to identify what mental health is and to have some strategies to overcome some difficulties they may face. Mental Health and Illness contains: The curriculum document An introduction Details on how to use this booklet Relevant AusVELS standards Current research, information and facts Activities for each session PowerPoint presentations for certain lessons YouTube video clips to enhance learning Relevant worksheets and answers

Mental Health and Illness also contains an assessment task and criteria that can be used to get students to apply and extend their knowledge of Mental Health and Illness. This assessment task is based on Gardner's Multiple Intelligences and Bloom's Taxonomy for learning. This Mental Health and Illness document seeks to engage students to actively explore the issues surrounding Mental Health, to provide accurate information to encourage students to discuss issues and acknowledge certain aspects of Mental Health, and possible strategies that can be used to help minimise negative aspects of Mental Health.

How to use this booklet


Lesson A lesson includes information and activities on a certain aspect of Mental Health. Each lesson has a time limit of 50 minutes. Teachers may wish to modify the activities or sessions to suit the time and needs of their class. Discuss Questions The Discussion Questions provide questions that can be can be asked throughout the lesson. The answers to these can be found under the 'Teacher Notes' section of each lesson.

Teacher Notes Lesson Plan The Teacher Notes provides and lists everything The lesson plan provides a detailed guide on how needed for the lesson. It provides detailed to run the lesson. It provides all relevant AusVELS, information and suggested answers for questions, the focus of the lesson, resources and equipment for each lesson. It also provides an introduction needed, learning intentions, links to prior to why the session is important to a student's knowledge and experiences, assessment and mental health. feedback strategies, and the time allocated to If a heading is underlined it is the activity or each aspect and activity for the lesson. information that is being learned. If the heading is in italics it provides the possible answers and relevant information for each activity and piece Learning Intentions The Learning Intentions for each lesson provide a of information. statement which describes what the teacher wants the student to take from that lesson. Appendices Whether it be knowledge, understanding or skills The Appendices section provides worksheets and as a result of the learning and teaching activities for each lesson. This is located under information and activities. each lessons content. Refer to the contents for relevant pages. Process The process provides the outline and steps to be References/Bibliography followed each lesson. The process is further The Reference section is provided under each explained under each 'Teacher Notes' sections of section for each lesson. This provides all the each lesson. sources used to construct that lesson. The bibliography at the end provides all sources Resources/Worksheets used for all aspects of each lesson and the entire This provides what resources and worksheets are curriculum document. available to use and complete for each lesson. The worksheets are provided under each lessons Youth Mental Health Resources appendix. The link for resources is provided in the The Youth Mental Health Resource is provided at 'Teacher Notes' section of each lesson. the very end of this document. It gives a list of websites that may be helpful for adolescents. This can be used as a handout at the end of the unit, or you can give students extra resources to add to throughout the unit.

Unit Plan
LESSON 50 MINS
1

TOPIC
Mental Health and You

LEARNING INTENTIONS
1. To establish an understanding of what mental health is, including: Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Illness. 2. An understanding of the relevance of mental health and wellbeing to all Australians. 1. To understand what stress is and how it affects us emotionally and physically. 2. To learn one strategy to help provide relaxation.

RELEVANT AusVELS
Identification of a range of health needs of young people, including mental health. Identification of personal behaviours that affect health status, both positively and negatively. Identification of personal behaviours that affect health status. Identification of strategies that promote mental health and wellbeing.

ACTIVITIES
Emotions Whole Class Activity Mind Map of Mental Health.

RESOURCES
Mental Health Emotions Activity

Stress and Stress Management

Discussion of a YouTube Clip. Group Activity Feelings and Physical Effects of Stress. Group Activity Good Stress and Bad Stress. Relaxation activity. Self-Talk Skittles Activity Discussion of a YouTube Clip.

Self-Esteem

1. To develop an understanding of self-esteem and its relevance to adolescent life. 2. To develop an understanding of the influence of self-talk on self-esteem and the importance of positive selftalk. 3. To establish effective self-talk building strategies.

Identification of a range of health needs of young people, including mental health. Identification of personal behaviours that affect health status, both positively and negatively. They demonstrate understanding of appropriate assertiveness and resilience strategies.

PowerPoint Presentation YouTube Video Managing Stress http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=hnpQrMqDoqE The Four A's of Stress Management Relaxation Activity Equipment PowerPoint Presentation YouTube Video We All Have Problems http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=TCqm0V8nerY Self-Esteem Homework Sheet

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4 Resilience 1. To establish an understanding of resilience and why it is important to young people. 2. To develop an understanding of what influences an individual's capacity to be resilient. 3. To establish effective strategies for building resilience in young people. Identification of a range of health needs of young people, including mental health. Identification of personal behaviours that affect health status, both positively and negatively. They demonstrate understanding of appropriate assertiveness and resilience strategies. Identification of a range of health needs of young people, including mental health. Identification of personal behaviours that affect health status, both positively and negatively. Identification of a range of health needs of young people, including mental health. Identification of personal behaviours that affect health status, both positively and negatively. Resilience Picture Activity PowerPoint Presentation Resilience Pictures Resilience Homework Sheet

Building Healthy Relationships

1. To establish an understanding of relationships. 2. To develop your understanding of the characteristics of healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Mental Illness

1. To establish an awareness of the importance of mental illness awareness. 2. To establish an awareness of common occurrence of mental illness within the community and students lives. 3. To develop an understanding of the importance of reducing mental illness stigma within the community.

Think, Pair, Share What is a relationship? Benefits of a relationship. Group Activity Comparison of Healthy/Unhealthy Relationships Healthy/Unhealthy Relationship Class Activity Think, Pair, Share What Mental Illness Do You Know? Mental Illness Stat Swap Activity Myth Busters

PowerPoint Presentation Healthy/Unhealthy Relationship Cards Healthy/Unhealthy A4 Cards Relationship Cards

YouTube Video Mental Health Awareness. http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=wwn52-d6Sc0 You Tube Video Be Aware: End the Stigma Against Mental Illness http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=xsMPHUV11PM Mental Illness Stat Swap Cards Myth Busters Worksheet

Lesson 1
Learning Intentions

Mental Health and You

1. To establish an understanding of what mental health is, including: Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Illness. 2. An understanding of the relevance of mental health and wellbeing to all Australians.

Process
1. Expectation and Learning Intentions. 2. Emotions Cards Activity. Discussion 3. Definition and statistics of Mental Health. 4. Class Mind Map Activity.

Discussion Questions
What do you think mental health is? How do you think mental health relates to you?

Resources/Worksheets
Mental Health Emotions Activity

Mental Health and You Lesson Plan


Year Level: Focus of the lesson:
Introduction to Mental Health and Illness and relevance to young people

Resources and Equipment:


Mental Health Emotions Activity (Appendix A) Teachers notes WHO definition of mental health, mental health statistics

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Relevant AusVELS Content Descriptions:


Identification of a range of health needs of young people, including mental health. Identification of personal behaviours that affect health status, both positively and negatively.

Learning Intentions:
1. 2. To establish an understanding of what mental health is, including: Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Illness An understanding of the relevance of mental health and wellbeing to all Australians

Links to Students Prior Knowledge and Experiences:


Students should have experience with mental health or mental illness within their own lives or those around them. The lesson aims to draw upon this knowledge or awareness and further inform to promote a greater understanding

Assessment /Feedback Strategies:


Classroom group discussion. Questions discussed at end of lesson.

Total Class Time:


50 Minutes

Number of Students:
24 Students

Lesson Sequence Orient


Set Expectations for the Lesson (Learning and behaviour) Clarify Learning Intentions

What will I do?


Mark attendance Outline behavioural expectations

What will students do?


Students will write the learning objectives in their notes. Students will have an understanding of the learning objectives. Students will have an understanding of what is expected of them and what is to be achieved in the lesson

Time Allocated

Reiterate to students that students should feel free to share experiences with the class and that people should respect others privacy and not re-tell students stories to others outside of the class However, remind students that they should when telling stories refer to a friend or someone they know as being the character in the story rather than themselves Introduce and explain the Learning Objectives written on the white board Instruct students to write learning objectives in their notes.

5 Minutes

7
Engage
-

Engage students into the lesson and build curiosity of the new topic through an icebreaker activity Emotions Cards (Appendix 1)

Use Emotions Cards to highlight to students varying emotional states and their positive and negative aspects. Highlights the varying topics encompassing mental health while engaging students in the topic Lay Emotions cards out on the floor Instruct students to pick one positive emotion they often feel and one negative. Go around the circle asking students why they like feeling one way (positive emotion) and dislike feeling another (negative emotion). Interact with students to ensure the task is performed correctly and help with any queries they may have

Students will select a positive and negative emotion card Students will explain why they like feeling the positive emotion card, but dislike the negative emotion card

15 Minutes

Transform and Extend


Definition of Mental Health

Present the WHO definition of mental health Present current prevalence and incidence rates of top four most common mental health issues in youth Outline a brief definition of Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Illness Answer any questions students may have regarding the definitions or statistics As a class construct a mind map of particular aspects of mental health relevant to youth Highlighting the topics to be covered in future lessons Allows students to see the varying aspects of mental health relevant to them

Students will copy definition of Mental Health, Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Illness into their note books Students will answer any questions they have regarding these definitions

15 Minutes

Transform and Extend


Mind Map- Mental Health and You

Students will participate in the class discussion. Students will be able to identify the importance of mental health in their own lives and others Students will have an understanding of topics to be covered in future lessons

15 Minutes

Reflect and Evaluate


Closure of class.

Encourage students to ask any questions related to what they have learnt today Explain what is happening next lesson (look below).

Students will ask any last minute questions they have about what they learnt in today's lesson. Students will know what to expect next lesson.

Observations and notes for next lesson:


Focus for next lesson: Stress

Mental Health and You Teacher Notes


Learning Objectives
1. To establish and understanding of what mental health is, including: Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Illness. 2. An understanding of the relevance of mental health and wellbeing to all Australians.

Resources and Equipment


Mental Health Emotions Activity (Appendix A) Teachers notes outlining prevalence of mental health issues in adolescents, WHO definition of mental health

Introduction
Mental Health and wellbeing is often viewed negatively within society due to a lack of understanding regarding mental illness. As such it is vital for young people to be educated regarding emotional health and wellbeing, not only to reduce negative stigma surrounding mental illness but also to promote positive mental health as many young people face emotional issues throughout adolescents. This lesson is designed as an introduction to mental health and illness and relevance t o young people. The lesson aims to portray the relevance of mental health issues within students lives and an understanding of current mental health issues they may be facing. A positive approach, focusing upon emotional wellbeing rather than mental illness is to be depicted and students should gain an understanding of topics relating to youth mental health to follow.

Layout of Lesson
Learning Objectives Introduce the learning objectives for this lesson. Get students to write the Learning Objectives in their notes. Address Confidentiality Reiterate to students that they should feel free to share their experiences and that anything that is said within the class should not be re-told to outside people. However, also remind them that anything they say should be said in reference to a friend or someone they know as the main character, not as themselves. Emotions Cards Appendix A Have students form a circle within the classroom Place emotions cards within the circle, each student is to pick two cards a negative and positive emotion they often feel Proceed around the circle with each student stating why they like to feel the positive emotion and why they dont like feeling the negative emotion

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Activity is designed to depict to students the multitude of emotions that can be experienced and the variable nature of emotions. Highlight to students how quickly emotions can change in result to influences within their lives Use an example such as: o Susie is in a good mood because her netball team won last night. However, when she goes to leave for school, her mum starts nagging her about cleaning her room. Susie feels like her mum is always nagging he r about something and that she never sees all the good things Susie does, such as her good grades or sporting achievements. This has really been getting to Susie lately and she notices she feels very anxious around her mum as she is always fearful of being nagged or yelled at. Susie goes to school feeling very low and anxious, however when she gets to school she sees her best friend, whom immediately comes up to her and gives her a hug. Susie feels more relaxed and happier again as she knows her friend wont judge or nag her and that Susie can talk to her friend about the situation with her mum and her friend will understand. By providing students with an example of emotional fluctuations and the many pressures upon teenagers which they can relate to, this will lead into addressing how these emotions can progress into mental health issues. Presenting a Definition of Mental Health Present to the class a definition from the WHO of mental health for them to copy into their notes Outline the four most common mental health issues in youth and their prevalence (depicts to students how common some mental health issues are and the relevance to them) Present to the students a definition of Emotion Wellbeing and Mental Illness (to focus upon both positive and negative mental health) World Health Organisation (WHO) Definition of Mental Health o Mental Health is featured within the WHO's definition of health: "A state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease" (WHO). o It is related to the promotion of well-being, the prevention of mental disorders, and the treatment and rehabilitation of people affected by mental disorders o Mental health is 'a state of wellbeing in which the individual realises his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community' . Mental illness describes 'a number of diagnosable disorders that significantly interfere with an individual's cognitive, emotional or social abilities' (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2007).

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Prevalence of Mental Health Disorders in Adolescents (Health and Wellbeing Survey 2007, ABS) o 1 in 5 Australians have a mental illness o In 2007, 25% of individuals aged 16-24 reported a mental health issue within last 12 months o Anxiety disorders were the most common, affecting 15% of young people, with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder the most commonly experienced Anxiety disorder (8%). o Substance Use disorders affected 13% of young people with Harmful Use of Alcohol the most common Substance Use Disorder (9%). o Around 6% of young people had an Affective disorder with Bipolar Affective Disorder and Depression (3% each) the most common Affective disorders Definition of Emotional Wellbeing Aim is to provide students with a positive perspective regarding mental health, rather than purely a negative or illness focused outlook Social and emotional wellbeing refers to the way a person thinks and feels about themselves and others. It includes being able to adapt and deal with daily challenges (resilience and coping skills) while leading a fulfilling life (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2012). Also outlines the direction the topic of mental health will take; a direction towards positive mental health and resilience. Definition of Mental Illness Mental illnesses are medical conditions that disrupt a person's thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others and daily functioning. Mental illnesses are medical conditions that often result in a diminished capacity for coping with the ordinary demands of life (National Alliance on Mental Illness, 2013). Mind Map of Mental Illness and Youth Possible topics to use in constructing mind map Stress Management Resilience Self-esteem Successfully navigate complexities of adolescence Develop healthy and fulfilling relationships Adapt to change Utilize appropriate coping mechanisms Develop adaptation skills Emotional wellbeing Social wellbeing Psychological wellbeing Anxiety

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Depression Social support Anger Mood Peer pressure / bullying Coping skills As a class add different aspects relevant to youth, connecting concepts as you go and talking in depth as to why they relate to youth especially.

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References
Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2007) National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing (SMHWB). Retrieved April 18 2013 from http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Latestproducts/4840.0.55.001Main%2 0Features32007?opendocument&tabname=Summary&prodno=4840.0.55.001&issu e=2007&num=&view= Australian Institute of Health and Wellbeing. (2012) Social and Emotional Wellbeing Development of a Childrens Headline Indicator. Retrieved April 21 2013 from http://www.aihw.gov.au/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=10737421521 National Alliance on Mental Illness. (2013). What is Mental Illness: Mental Illness Facts . Retrieved April 21 2013 from http://www.nami.org/template.cfm?section=about_mental_illness World Health Organisation. (2013). Health Topics: Mental Health. Retrieved April 21 2013 from http://www.who.int/topics/mental_health/en/ World Health Organisation (WHO). (2013). Mental Health. Retrieved April 18 2013 from http://www.who.int/topics/mental_health/en/

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Appendix A Emotions Cards

Stressed Shy Sad Amused Angry Pride Lonely Enthusiastic Supported Hyper Isolated Hurt

Curious Happy Cranky Distressed Nervous Energetic Aggressive Grateful Ambitious Uncertain Hopeless Anxious

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Lesson 2
Learning Intentions

Stress and Stress Management

1. To understand what stress is and how it affects us emotionally and physically. 2. To learn one strategy to help provide relaxation.

Process
1. Expectation and Learning Intentions. 2. YouTube clip Managing Stress Pair activity discussion. 3. Explanation of Stress Group Activity Feelings and Physical effects of Stress 4. Explanation of Good and Bad Stress Group Activity Situations that cause Good and Bad Stress 5. The Four A's of Stress Management 6. Relaxation Activity

Discussion Questions
What did you learn from the video clip? How do you feel when you are stressed? How did the relaxation activity make you feel?

Resources/Worksheets
YouTube Video Managing Stress o http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnpQrMqDoqE The Four A's of Stress Management Handout

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Stress and Stress Management Lesson Plan


Year Level: Focus of the lesson:
What Stress is and Management of Stress

Resources and Equipment:


PowerPoint Presentation YouTube Video Managing Stress The Four A's of Stress Management Handouts Paper Pencils Play dough Calming music (of your choice)

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Relevant AusVELS Content Descriptions:


Identification of personal behaviours and actions that affect health status, both positively and negatively. Identification of strategies that promote mental health and wellbeing.

Learning Intentions:
1. 2. To understand what stress is and how it affects us emotionally and physically. To learn one strategy to help provide relaxation.

Links to Students Prior Knowledge and Experiences:


Students will have a prior knowledge of mental health and ho w mental health affects us physically and emotionally. This will lead students into stress and stress management.

Assessment /Feedback Strategies:


Classroom group discussion. Homework Task reflection of relaxation activity.

Total Class Time:


50 Minutes

Number of Students:
24 Students

Lesson Sequence Orient


Classroom Management Introduction to Lesson

What will I do?


Mark roll. Introduce today's lesson. Refer to notes. Reiterate to students that students should feel free to share experiences with the class and that people should respect others privacy and not re-tell students stories to others outside of the class However, remind students that they should when telling stories refer to a friend or someone they know as being the character in the story rather than themselves

What will students do?


Students will write the learning objectives in their notes. Students will have an understanding of the learning objectives. Students will have an understanding of what we will be doing this lesson.

Time Allocated

5 Minutes

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Explain what we will be doing this lesson. Introduce and explain the Learning Objectives. Refer to PowerPoint and notes. Get students to write the learning objectives in their notes.

Engage
YouTube Video Stress Management Think, Pair, Share

Show students the Yo uTube Video Managing Stress. Note to students that there will be a discussion about the video at the end of the video. Ask students what they thought about the video. Discuss as a whole class. Ask students what points they picked up from the video clip. Discuss as a whole class. Encourage students answers if they are unsure. Allow and encourage students to ask questions.

Students will watch the Yo uTube Video Managing Stress. Students will think about and discuss what they thought about the video as a whole class gro up. Students will think about and discuss the main points they picked up from the video as a who le class group. Students will ask questions if needed.

10 Minutes

Transform and Extend


Stress Group Activity

Explain what stress is. Refer to PowerPoint. Refer to teachers notes. Get students to write down the points from the PowerPoint in their notes. Assign students into groups of 4 using the Group Cards. Ask each group of students to brainstorm ho w someone might feel when they are stressed and they possible effects of feeling stressed. Interact with students while they are completing their brainstorming. Provide help and advice if needed. Ask each group to share their brainstorming ideas with the class. Write up their responses o n the board so students can add it to their notes.

Students will understand what stress is. Students will write down what stress is in their notes. Students will work cooperatively in their groups. Students will, as a group, come up with thoughts on ho w someone might feel when they are stressed and the possible physical effects of feeling stress. Students will share their thoughts will the class. Students will add others thoughts in their notes, from what they teacher has written on the board. Students will understand how people feel when they are stress and the physical effects of being stressed. Students will ask questions if needed.

10 Minutes

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Discuss and add to the students ideas if needed. Allow and encourage students to ask questions.

Transform and Extend


Good and Bad Stress Group Activity

Explain that there is good and bad stress. Explain what good and bad stress is. Refer to PowerPoint. Refer to teachers notes. Get students to write down what good stress is and bad stress is in their notes. From the PowerPoint Slide. Ask each group of students to come up with 3 examples of situations that can cause good stress and three examples of situations that can cause bad stress. Interact with students while they are completing their examples. Provide help and advice if needed. Ask each group to share their examples with the class. Write up their responses onthe board so students can add it to their notes. Discuss and add to the students ideas if needed. Allow and encourage students to ask questions.

. Students will understand the difference between good and bad stress. Students will write down what good stress and bad stress is in their notes. Students will work cooperatively in their groups. Students will, as a group, come up with 3 examples of situations that can cause good stress and three examples of situations that can cause bad stress. Students will share their examples will the class. Students will add others examples in their notes, from what they teacher has written on the board. Students will ask questions if needed.

10 Minutes

Transform and Extend


The Four A's of Stress Management

Hand out The Four A's of Stress Management document to each student. Explain the Four A's of Stress Management briefly. Note to students that it is o nly a guide, and that it can be referred to if they are feeling stressed. Suggest to students that they keep the document for future reference. Ask students to read through the handout at home. Allow and encourage students to ask questions.

Students will understand the Four A's of Stress Management. Students will understand that the Four A's of Stress Management are just some ideas of how to manage your stress. Students will ask questions if needed.

5 Minutes

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Reflect and Evaluate
Relaxation Activity Quiet Time Homework Task Closure of Class Provide students with 10 minutes of quiet time. Play calming music. Provide students with paper, pencils or play dough for creating if needed. Explain to students that they can put their heads on their desk, or find a quiet space somewhere in the room to relax. Ask students to sit by themselves, and to not to speak to anyone for the 10 minutes. Explain to students that they can draw, write, make something with the play dough, or just concentrate on their breathing and relaxing. They can close their eyes and rest if they would like. After the 10 minutes, let students know that they can do this at ho me if they are starting to feel a little stressed. Ask students (for homework) to write a little passage on ho w they felt before, during and after the relaxation activity. Let students know that they do not have to put their name on it, and that it is due at the start of the next lesson. Encourage students to ask any questions. Explain what is happening next lesson (look below). Students will have knowledge of a stress management activity to use at ho me if they are feeling stressed. Students will know they have to complete the reflection of their relaxation activity. Students will know they have to hand it in at the start of the next lesson. Students will ask any questions if needed. Students will know what to expect next lesson. Students will include themselves in the 10 minutes of quiet time.

15 Minutes

Observations and notes for next lesson:


Focus for next lesson: Self-Esteem

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Stress and Stress Management Teacher Notes


Learning Objectives
1. To understand what stress is and how it affects us emotionally and physically. 2. To learn one strategy to help provide relaxation.

Resources and Equipment


Managing Stress Brainsmart You Tube Video PowerPoint Presentation (Appendix B) The Four A's of Stress Management Handouts (Appendix A) Paper Pencils Play dough Calming Music (of your choice)

Introduction
Everyone gets stressed out now and then. Teenagers get stressed over the pressures and demands of trying to fit so many things into one day. A little stress can be good. It can keep you alert, and on your toes. If you miss a class assignment, you risk getting a low grade. If you dont show up for work, you may be fired. Students need to understand and remember that they are not alone when it comes to being stressed and dealing with stress. They need to understand that there are ways to manage stressful situations. Identifying stress and stressful situations and being able to reduce these feelings are important skills that can help students throughout the rest of their lives.

Layout of Lesson
Learning Objectives Introduce learning objectives for this lesson. Get students to write down the Learning Objectives in their notes. Reiterate to students that students should feel free to share experiences with the class and that people should respect others privacy and not re-tell students stories to others outside of the class. However, remind students that they should when telling stories refer to a friend or someone they know as being the character in the story rather than themselves Video Clip Managing Stress Show video clip to whole class. Ask students what they thought about the video clip. Ask students what points they picked up from the video clip (whole class). Write up their points on the board (possibly a mind map).

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Points from Video Clip Managing Stress Stress is stressful. If you understand what it is you will be better able to deal with it. Deep breaths relaxation/calming technique. Stress is a survival mechanism: o When danger appears it can get you out of trouble quickly. o You body throws all its resources into getting you moving. o You heart pumps faster to improve blood pressure. o Glucose is sent to the muscles as a 'fuel injection' and you become totally focused on what is known as the "fight or flight response" This emergency state is only meant to last long enough to get you out of danger. We stress about different things and for much longer. Brain and body stay on red alert. o Leaves you less able to think quickly, learn or remember things. Stress is a physical reaction (to an emotional trigger) Top tips to reduce stress: o Get plenty of exercise o Get in control of the situation o Talk to someone/socialise/have a laugh. o "Get down" with nature o Something else to do instead What is Stress? Explain what stress is to the students. Get students to write down the main points of stress from the PowerPoint. What is Stress? Stress is the body's response to anything that makes us feel threatened or pressured. It is the body's automatic way of reacting to changes, challenges, and demands placed on us. The human body responds to events that provoke stress (stressors) by activating the nervous system and specific hormones, releasing more of the hormones adrenalin and cortisol into the blood stream. o These hormones speed up heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure, and metabolism. o These physical changes prepare you to react quickly and efficiently to handle the situation. Group Activity Feelings and Physical Effects of Feeling Stressed Get students to brainstorm how someone might feel when they are stressed and the possible physical effects of feeling stressed. Write up their responses on the board so students can add to their notes.

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Possible ways you may feel when you are stressed: Hostile Angry Irritable Anxious Moody or frustrated with things that dont normally bother you Feelings of worthlessness Doubting of abilities Feel like crying regularly Trouble concentrating Possible physical effects of feeling stressed: Feeling sick in the stomach Having Constipation or diarrhea Indigestion Headache Backache Trouble sleeping Eating more or less than normal Increased heart rate Sweating 'Good' and 'Bad' Stress Explain that there is good stress and bad stress. Get students, in their groups from before, to come up with 3 examples of situations that can cause good stress and 3 examples of situations that can cause bad stress. Good and Bad Stress There is 'good' stress and there is 'bad' stress. o Sometimes stress is necessary (good stress), however to much stress can cause wear and tear on the body and mind (bad stress). Good stress can help you get through tough situations because you are alert and ready to face the thing you are anxious about. Bad stress is when you feel uptight and nervous all the time about different situations. Possible Examples of Good Stress: Stress that enables us to survive in times of trauma or danger Stress due to concerts Stress due to sports Stress to finish assignments on time (little bits of stress can help to be productive) Stress due to doing exams (little bits can help be productive) Possible Examples of Bad Stress: Stress due to bullying Relationship stress Family conflicts or grief

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Friendship conflict or grief Being overscheduled Stress due to being teased Stress due to trying to fit in

Stress Management Give out the handout of the Four A's of stress management for their notes. Explain briefly the Four A's of Stress Management (using the handout as a guide). The Four A's of Stress Management: Avoid Unnecessary Stress Alter the Situation Adapt to the Stressor Accept the things you can't change Relaxation Activity: Quiet Time Provide students with 10 minutes of quiet time. Play calming music. Provide students with paper, pencils, or even play dough for creating if needed. Students can put their heads on the desk, or find a quiet space somewhere in the room to relax. Ask students to sit by themselves, and to not speak to anyone for the 10 minutes. Indicate to students that they can draw, write, make something with the play dough, or just concentrate on their breathing and relaxing. They can close their eyes and rest if they would like. Homework Task Ask students to write a little passage on how they felt before, during and after the Relaxation Activity. Students do not have to put their name on it, and they have to hand it in to the teacher at the start of the next lesson.

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References
Alberta Health Services. (2012). Junior High Mental Health Kit: Dealing with Stress. Retrieved April 9, 2013 from http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/6872.asp BBC. (2010). Brainsmart: Managing Stress. Retrieved April 10, 2013 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnpQrMqDoqE Beyond Blue. (2009). Dealing With Stress. Retrieved April 9, 2013 from http://www.youthbeyoundblue.com/factsheets-and-info/factsheet-7-dealing-withstress/ Bratsis, M.E. (2012). The Stress Response: The Good and The Bad. Science Teacher79, no. 9:74. Education Research Complete , EBSCOhost. Retrieved April 10, 2013. Help Guide. (2013). Stress Management. Retrieved April 10, 2013 from http://www.helpguide.org/mental/stress_management_relief_coping.htm KidsHealth. (2011). Stress. Retrieved April 9, 2013 from http://kidshealth.org/classroom/index.jsp?Grade=912&Section=problems ReachOut. (n.d.). Managing Stress. Retrieved April 9, 2013 from http://www.reachout.com/managing-stress#what ReachOut. (n.d.). Stress and Anxiety. Retrieved April 9, 2013 from http://au.reachout.com/Tough-Times/Somethings-not-right/Stress-and anxiety?gclid= CLeT4Meqv7YCFYUhpQodxi4AUQ Teachnology. (2012). Stress Management. Retrieved April 10, 2013, from http://www.teachnology.com/lessons/lsn_pln_view_lessons.php?action=view&cat_id=7&lsn_id=2276

24

Appendix A The Four A's of Stress Management

The Four A's of Stress Management


AVOID Unnecessary Stress
Plan ahead to rearrange your surroundings. Not all stress can or should be avoided. It's not healthy to avoid a situation that needs addressing. You can however eliminate a number of stressors in your life. Learn how to say "no" know your limits and stick to them. It is ok to refuse added responsibilities that may be more than you can handle. Avoid people who stress you out when you can't turn a relationship around, limit the time you spend with the person who constantly causes stress in your life. Take control of your environment if there is something that makes you anxious or feeling unpleasant try a different approach. If going shopping in a large busy shopping centre makes you feel unpleasant, go to a smaller, less busy shopping centre instead. Avoid hot-button topics if you get upset or continually argue over certain topics, don't include them in your conversation list. Narrow down your to-do list if you've got too much on, differentiate between the "should" and "must" dos. Drop tasks that aren't necessary for that day and complete them on another day.

ALTER the Situation


If you can't avoid a stressful situation, try to alter it. Try to figure out what you can do to change things so that the problem is not present in the future. Sometimes, this involves changing the way you communicate and operate in your daily life. Express your feelings instead of bottling them up if something is bothering you, communicate your concerns in an open a respectful way. If you don't communicate your feelings, the situation will likely remain the same. Be willing to compromise be willing to compromise your behaviour. If you are willing to compromise a little, you'll have a good chance of reducing stress. Be more assertive deal with problems more head on and do your best to anticipate and prevent them. If you've got an exam to study for but your friend wants to pop over, just explain that you'll do your study first then call her when you're ready to hang out. Manage your time better plan ahead and make sure you don't overextend yourself. Poor time management can cause some stress, so managing your time better can alter the amount of stress you're under.

25

The Four A's of Stress Management


ADAPT to the Stressor
You can adapt to stressful situations and change your expectations and attitude. Reframe problems try to view stressful situations from a more positive perspective. Rather than getting extremely emotional in stressful situations, look at it as an opportunity to pause and regroup. Look at the big picture take another perspective of the stressful situation. Ask yourself how important it will be in the long run. Adjust your standards set reasonable standards for yourself and for others. Always aiming for perfection can cause a lot of avoidable stress and can sometimes demand failure. Focus on the positive when you are feeling stressed it is good to take a moment to reflect on all the positive aspects of your life. This can help keep things in perspective.

ACCEPT the things you can't change


Some things that stress us out are unavoidable. Sometimes to best way to cope with stress is to accept things as they are. Stressors such as the death of a loved one or a serious illness cannot be prevented. In this case, acceptance is better in the long run, even though it may be difficult. Don't try to control the uncontrollable rather than stressing out about something that is beyond our control, focus on the things you can control. Such as the way you choose to react to problems. Look for the upside when facing major challenges, try to look at them as opportunities for personal growth. Reflect on them and learn from your mistakes. As the saying goes, "What doesn't kill us makes up stronger." Share your feelings expressing your feelings can be very therapeutic, even if there is nothing you can do to change the situation. Even talking to a trusted friend can help. Learn to forgive let go of anger and resentments, and free yourself from negative energy by moving on. Accept that people make mistakes, not everybody is perfect.

Help Guide. (2013). Stress Management. http://www.helpguide.org/mental/stress_management_relief_coping.htm

Appendix B PowerPoint Presentation

26

Stress and Stress Management

27

Learning Objectives
1. To understand what stress is and how it affects us emotionally and physically. 2. To learn one strategy to help provide relaxation.

28

Video Clip Managing Stress

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnpQrMqDoqE

29

Video Clip Managing Stress


What did you think about the video? What points did you pick up from the video?

30

What is Stress?
Stress is the body s response to
anything that makes us feel threatened or pressured. It is the body s automatic way of reacting to changes, challenges, and demands placed on us. The human body responds to events that provoke stress (stressors) by activating the nervous system and releasing specific hormones (adrenalin and cortisol) into the blood stream.

31

Group Activity
How might someone feel when they are stressed? What are the possible physical effects of feeling stressed?

32

Good and Bad Stress


There is good stress and there is bad stress. Good stress can help you get through tough situations because you are alert and ready to face the thing you are anxious about. Bad stress is when you feel uptight and nervous all the time about different situations.

33

Group Activity
Come up with 3 examples of situations that can cause good stress and 3 examples of situations that can cause bad stress.

34

The Four As of Stress Management


AVOID Unnecessary Stress ALTER the Situation ADAPT to the Stressor ACCEPT the things you cannot change

35

Relaxation Activity

36

Homework Task
Write a little passage (roughly half a page) on how you felt before, during, and after the relaxation activity. Due: At the start of next lesson!

37

Session 3
Learning Intentions

Building Self-Esteem

1. To develop an understanding of self-esteem and its relevance to adolescent life. 2. To develop an understanding of the influence of self-talk on self-esteem and the importance of positive self-talk. 3. To establish effective self-esteem building strategies.

Process
1. Expectations and Learning Intentions 2. Self-Talk Skittles Activity 3. You-Tube Clip. Discussion 4. Definition and explanation of Self-Esteem

Discussion Questions
What do you think Self-Talk is? What did you think of the negative Self-Talk clip?

Resources/Worksheets
YouTube Video Clip We All Have Problems o http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TCqm0V8nerY Self-Esteem Homework Sheet

38

Building Self Esteem Lesson Plan


Year Level: Focus of the lesson:
Introduction to selfesteem and building selfesteem

Resources and Equipment:


Bowl of Skittles Self-Esteem PowerPoint (Appendix A) Negative Self-Talk YouTube Clip Self-Esteem Homework Sheet (Appendix B)

10

Relevant AusVELS Content Descriptions:


Identification of a range of health needs of young people, including mental health. Identification of personal behaviours that affect health status, both positively and negatively. They demonstrate understanding of appropriate assertiveness and resilience strategies

Learning Intentions:
1. 2. 3. To develop an understanding of Self-Esteem and its relevance to adolescent life To develop an understanding of the influence of Self -Talk o n Self-Esteem and the importance of positive Self-Talk Establish effective Self-Esteem building strategies

Links to Students Prior Knowledge and Experiences:


Students sho uld have an understanding of basic self-esteem from previous units. Students may have experience in negative self-talk and the influence it can have on their self-co ncept and self-esteem

Assessment /Feedback Strategies:


Classroom group discussion. Questions discussed at end of lesson. Self-esteem Homework Sheet

Total Class Time:


50 Minutes

Number of Students:
24 Students

Lesson Sequence Orient


Set Expectations for the Lesson (Learning and behaviour) Clarify Learning Intentions

What will I do?


Mark attendance Outline behavioural expectations

What will students do?


Students will write the learning objectives in their notes. Students will have an understanding of the learning objectives. Students will have an understanding of what is expected of them and what is to be achieved in the lesson

Time Allocated

Reiterate to students that students should feel free to share experiences with the class and that people should respect others privacy and not re-tell students stories to others outside of the class However, remind students that they should when telling stories refer to a friend or someone they know as being the character in the story rather than themselves Introduce and explain the Learning -

5 Minutes

39
Objectives written on the white board Instruct students to write learning objectives in their notes. Have a bowl of skittles, go aro und the room and let each student take as many skittles as they would like Instruct them they must not eat them yet but will be able to latter Once all students have a certain number of skittles- instruct students to go around the room and for every skittle they have they must list a thought they have had about themselves that day. The thought can be negative or positive but it must be a self-thought in the form of selftalk Present students with the Negative Selftalk YouTube clip Based upon the clip, allocate students into pairs and conduct a Think, Pair, Share Instruct students to think and talk about the influence of negative self-talk upon adolescent self-esteem Each pair should also present an example of negative self-talk and then a reworded version, transforming the negative into a positive Present students with PowerPoint presentation Engage students in talk regarding ho w they could effectively adopt the self-esteem building strategies within their own lives to help build their own self-esteem

Engage
-

Engage students into the lesson and build curiosity of the new topic through an icebreaker activity Self-Talk Skittles Activity

Students will take as many skittles as they like Students must then say to the class a number of thoughts they have had about themselves that day which correspond with the number of skittles they took (e.g. six skittles equals six self-thoughts). Students will be respectful of others self-thoughts when other students are expressing their self-talk Students will watch the Negative Selftalk YouTube clip presented In pairs students will discuss the influence of negative self-talk upon adolescent self-esteem Students will present the influences along with an example of a negative self-thought and then reward the thought to reflect a positive selfthought

15 Minutes

Transform and Extend


Negative Self-talk YouTube Clip Think, Pair, Share

15 Minutes

Transform and Extend


Definition of Self-esteem and Self-Efficacy PowerPoint Presentation (Appendix A)

Students will watch the PowerPoint presentation, taking notes in their work books regarding the self-esteem building strategies Students will engage in class discussion regarding which selfesteem building techniques would be most effective for them

15 Minutes

Reflect and Evaluate


Closure of class. Self-Esteem Homework Sheet (Appendix B) Focus for next lesson: Resilience

Present students with Self-Esteem homework sheet Answer any questions regarding the homework

Students will ask any last minute questions they have about what they learnt in today's lesson. Students will know what to expect next lesson.

Observations and notes for next lesson:

40

Building Self-Esteem Teacher Notes


Learning Objectives
1. To develop an understanding of Self-Esteem and its relevance to adolescent life 2. To develop an understanding of the influence of Self-Talk on Self-Esteem and the importance of positive Self-Talk 3. To establish effective Self-Esteem building strategies

Resources and Equipment


Bowl of Skittles Self-Esteem PowerPoint (Appendix A) Negative Self-Talk YouTube Clip Self-Esteem Homework Sheet (Appendix B)

Introduction
Healthy self-esteem is vital within adolescent development to ensure young people have the confidence to challenge themselves, experience new things and essentially develop their personal identity. Low self-esteem is prominent within many adolescents as it a time of uncertainty and development of a sense of self. Therefore, it is essential students are given effective self-esteem enhancing strategies they can incorporate within their own lives to enhance their self-esteem and confidence. Negative Self-Talk plays a large role within self-esteem and the ability to recognise its destructive influence and combat it is essential in self-esteem enhancement. Therefore, this Self-Esteem lesson aims to develop an understanding of self-esteem and its importance in adolescents, whilst providing self-esteem enhancing strategies and decreasing negative selfevaluations.

Layout of Lesson
Learning Objectives Introduce the learning objectives for this lesson. Get students to write the learning Objectives in their notes. Address Confidentiality Reiterate to students that they should feel free to share their experiences and that anything that is said within the class should not be re-told to outside people. However, also remind them that anything they say should be said in reference to a friend or someone they know as the main character, not as themselves. Self-Talk Skittles Activity The self-talk skittles activity is used as an icebreaker activity to engage the students within the topic of self-esteem

41
The activity aims to focus students attention on instances of their own self-talk (either positive or negative), in order to prompt discussion regarding the influence of self-talk upon an individuals self-talk Students may be reluctant to divulge examples of negative self-talk at the beginning, which is why the activity is designed to produce instances of negative of positive self talk, the focus is just upon highlighting the influence of self-talk in general Negative Self-Talk YouTube Clip Present students with the Negative Self-Talk YouTube Clip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TCqm0V8nerY Break Students into pairs and have them conduct a Think, Pair, Share activity. Based upon the negative self-talk clip, have students discuss the influence of negative self-talk upon self-esteem, in particular adolescent self-esteem Instruct students to provide an example of a negative self-thought and also provide the alternative positive self-thought version. The activity aims to provoke thought into the influence of negative self-talk on their own self-esteem and if they are experiencing negative self-talk, how they can adjust these thoughts in a positive way to reflect greater positive self-talk instances. PowerPoint Presentation- Self-Esteem and Building Self-Esteem Strategies- (Appendix A) The PowerPoint presentation provides definitions of Self-Esteem, Self-Efficacy and provides strategies students can use to strengthen their own self-esteem. The PowerPoint presentation aims to develop a greater understanding of self-esteem and its relevance to adolescents, life events which influence self-esteem and to provide effective strategies students can adopt within their own lives to enhance their self-esteem. Self-Esteem Homework Sheet (Appendix B) The Self-Esteem homework sheet aims to prompt students to look at aspects of their life they are proud of or things they have accomplished and reflect on these to enhance their self-esteem. The sheet also focuses upon how they feel about themselves and to develop an understanding of external things within their lives (question four) and how these things can influence how they feel about themselves. Students should be told the sheet is for homework and will be checked to see if completed, however this is a personal reflection and the answers will not be read, but should be kept for their own use.

42

References
ReachOut. (2010). Building Resilience. Retrieved April 25 2013 from http://teachers.reachoutpro.com.au/media/114613/reachoutteachersnetwork_a4di gitalbooklet_buildingresiliencyinyoungpeople_singlesfinalcopy.pdf ReachOut. (2010). How to Build Self-Confidence. Retrieved April 25 2013 from http://au.reachout.com/How-to-build-self-confidence YouTube Clip. (2012). We all Have Problems Mental Health Awareness Ad. Retrieved March 21 2013 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TCqm0V8nerY

Appendix A PowerPoint Presentation

43

SELF-ESTEEM AND STRATEGIES TO ENHANCE SELF-ESTEEM

44

DEFINITION OF SELF-ESTEEM
Most people see confidence as having a belief in yourself, another person or an idea. When a person is confident, they are showing that they have faith in their talents, abilities and personal strength
Having

confidence can have a really positive impact on your day to day life, as well as your ability to achieve the things you want to do

45

DEFINITION OF SELF-EFFICACY
Having

success in something and then using that as a personal reference point for ability, and working on that t o bring further success, achievement and belief in yourself a belief in their abilityes will help to improve resiliency

Having

46

BUILDING SELF-ESTEEM
1. Look at what youve already achieved Sometimes it can be easy to focus on what you havent done. Its easy to lose confidence if you feel like you havent achieved anything. Focusing on stuff you have done, what you are proud of, big or small.

This can help you gain perspective on all your talents and abilities.

47

BUILDING SELF-ESTEEM
2. Think of things you're good at
Everyone has strengths and

talents, what are yours?


Recognising what

youre good at and trying to build on those things can be a really valuable way of building confidence in your own abilities.

48

BUILDING SELF-ESTEEM
3. Set some goals
Set

some goals and aim to achieve them. By proving to yourself that you can achieve even small things, you will prove to yourself that youre capable of achieving. little things that can be ticked off a list and help you gain selfconfidence in your ability to achieve.

Just

49

BUILDING SELF-ESTEEM
4. Talk yourself up
Youre never going to feel

confident if you have a negative commentary running through your mind telling you youre no good. Think about your self-talk and how that might be affecting your self- confidence.

50

BUILDING SELF-ESTEEM
5. Get a hobby
Try

to find something that youre really passionate about. Do you like playing footy? Like building model trains? Think of some of the stuff youre really interested in and commit yourself to giving them a go. Finding stuff that youre passionate about will help you find stuff that youre good at. Chances are, if youre interested or passionate about a certain activity youre likely to be good at it as well.

Appendix B Self Esteem Worksheet

51

Self Esteem Worksheet


1. Describe at least three things you like about yourself.

2. Who are some of the people in your life who make you feel good about yourself and describe what they do to make you feel this way. (Describe at least two)

3. Discuss some of the things that you do or have done in the past that give you a sense of achievement or accomplishment.

4. Rate each of the following factors on a scale of 1 to 5 (1 being very weak and 5 being very strong) to represent how important you think these things are to your own feelings of positive self-esteem. _ Family's income _ Clothing I wear _ Grades I make _ Car we drive _ My personal faith _ Doing things for others _ Neighborhood where we live _ Friends I have _ Support of parents and family _ House I live in _ Activities I participate in _ Other:

52

Lesson 4
\

Building Resilience

Learning Intentions
1. To establish an understanding of resilience and why it is important to young people. 2. To develop an understanding of what influences an individual's capacity to be resilient. 3. To establish effective strategies for building resilience in young people.

Process
1. 2. 3. 4. Expectations and Learning Intentions Resilience Picture Activity. Resilience Mind Map Activity Explanation of Building Resilience Strategies

Discussion Questions
What do you think a resilient person is? How do people become resilient?

Resources/Worksheets
Resilience Homework Sheet

53

Building Resilience Lesson Plan


Year Level: Focus of the lesson:
Building Resilience

Resources and Equipment:


Resilience Picture Activity Building Resilience Strategies PowerPoint My Connections-Resilience Homework Sheet

10
Relevant AusVELS Content Descriptions:
Identification of a range of health needs of young people, including mental health. Identification of personal behaviours that affect health status, both positively and negatively. They demonstrate understanding of appropriate assertiveness and resilience strategies

Learning Intentions:
4. 5. 6. To establish an understanding of Resilience and why it is important to young people To develop an understanding of what influences an individuals capacity to be resilient To establish effective strategies for building resilience in young people

Links to Students Prior Knowledge and Experiences:


Students will use the knowledge gained from the self-esteem lesson to adapt towards an understanding of resilience. Students will have an understanding of people within their lives who have been resilient in certain situations

Assessment /Feedback Strategies:


Classroom group discussion. Questions discussed at end of lesson. My Connections- Resilience Homework Sheet

Total Class Time:


50 Minutes

Number of Students:
24 Students

Lesson Sequence Orient


Set Expectations for the Lesson (Learning and behaviour) Clarify Learning Intentions

What will I do?


Mark attendance Outline behavioural expectations

What will students do?


Students will write the learning objectives in their notes. Students will have an understanding of the learning objectives. Students will have an understanding of what is expected of them and what is to be achieved in the lesson

Time Allocated

Reiterate to students that students should feel free to share experiences with the class and that people should respect others privacy and not re-tell students stories to others outside of the class However, remind students that they should when telling stories refer to a friend or someone they know as being the character in the story rather than themselves

5 Minutes

54
Introduce and explain the Learning Objectives written on the white board Instruct students to write learning objectives in their notes. Write a definition of resilience onthe white board Spread Resilience pictures throughout the classroom Ask students to select a picture which they believe best describes resilience to them Have students stand in a circle Proceeding around the circle have students state why they selected the picture to reflect what resilience means to them and give an example of when they or someone they know was resilient Keep the definition of resilience onthe white board As a class, construct a mind map or all the aspects that can impact our capacity for resilience Prompt students to recall the information they learnt in self-esteem lesson also as it can relate Present students with the Building Resilience Strategies PowerPoint Present each slide, explaining each strategy and discussing any questions students may have as to how w to adapt the strategy to their own lives

Engage
-

Engage students into the lesson and build curiosity of the new topic through an icebreaker activity Resilience Picture Activity

Transform and Extend


Mind Map- Resilience Building in Young People

Students will copy the definition of resilience into their workbooks Students will select a picture which reflects what resilience means to them When it is their turn, students will state why they selected the current picture to reflect resilience and an example of when they or someone they know displayed resilience Ask any questions relating to resilience Students will raise their hand and suggest influences of resilience Students will use their class notes and knowledge they learnt from the selfesteem class also

15 Minutes

15 Minutes

Transform and Extend


Present Building Resilience Strategies PowerPoint

Students will watch the PowerPoint Presentation and take notes Students will ask any questions they may have as to how w to adapt the strategy to their own lives

15 Minutes

Reflect and Evaluate


Closure of class Homework Sheet- My Connections

Encourage students to ask any questions related to what they have learnt today Hand Out Homework Task My Connections Resilience Homework Sheet

Students will ask any last minute questions they have about what they learnt in today's lesson. Students will ask any questions regarding the homework sheet

Observations and notes for next lesson:


Focus for next lesson: Relationships

55

Building Resilience Teacher Notes


Learning Objectives
1. To establish an understanding of Resilience and why it is important to young people 2. To develop an understanding of what influences an individuals capacity to be resilient 3. To establish effective strategies for building resilience in young people

Resources and Equipment


Resilience Picture Activity (Appendix A) Building Resilience Strategies PowerPoint (Appendix B) My Connections-Resilience Homework Sheet (Appendix C)

Introduction
Adolescence is a particularly stressful period for most young people. Resilience is an essential characteristic for all individuals, enabling them to bounce back from life stressors. Having resiliency skills minimises the effect that negative, stressful situations can have on a young person. These skills allow a young person to face challenges, learn from them and apply these skills towards living a healthy life. The lesson aims to inform students of the importance of resilience within their own lives and provide valuable strategies in promoting resilience within their lives.

Layout of Lesson
Learning Objectives Introduce the learning objectives for this lesson. Get students to write the learning Objectives in their notes. Address Confidentiality Reiterate to students that they should feel free to share their experiences and that anything that is said within the class should not be re-told to outside people. However, also remind them that anything they say should be said in reference to a friend or someone they know as the main character, not as themselves. Presenting a definition of Resilience Resilience is the ability to bounce back from adversity. It is a necessary skill for coping with lifes inevitable obstacles and one of the key ingredients to success. Examples of challenges some young people may face where resiliency skills are essential: o Physical illness o Change of school o Transitioning from primary school to high school o Change in family make up (divorce, break up) o Change of friendship group o Conflict with peers o Conflict with family o Managing study workload

56

Why is Resilience important for Young people? Having resiliency skills minimises the effect that negative, stressful situations can have on a young person. These skills allow a young person to face challenges, learn from them and apply these skills towards living a healthy life Resilience Picture Activity (Appendix A) Things that influence our capacity to be Resilient Mind Map Activity Some examples of aspects that influence a persons ability to be resilient o The level of physical health and wellbeing- Research suggests that regular exercise may increase our bodys natural chemicals (endorphins) that affect mood, sleep, appetite and other functions o A healthy diet, regular meals o Adequate sleep o Good relationships are also really important for building resilience, so it is important that you put into your friendships what you expect in return love, support, respect o The way you think or self-talk (whether it is positive or negative) can impact the way you perceive situations and influence the way you view your life and the world around you o Learn good problem-solving, goal-setting and time-management skills. o Acknowledge your successes and praising yourself for your achievements o Maintaining a level-headed approach to dealing with everyday stresses o How you respond to lifes challenges can influence your mood and outlook o Connecting with others and contributing to family, social groups and the wider community is part of building resilience o Having a spiritual dimension to our life can also make us happier and more resilient, give you a sense of meaning and purpose your faith, family, hobbies, school, work, the environment Now that students have an adequate understanding of the day-to-day influences on individuals capacity to be resilience, they can be provided with strategies to help Build Resilience. Building Resilience Strategies PowerPoint Presentation (Appendix B) Present students with the Building Resilience Strategies PowerPoint Information sourced from the ReachOut website Building Resilience Information presented on slides is summarized here also: 1. Emotional Awareness and Self-regulation The ability to identify emotional experiences and control emotional response to external events is important in resilience. Resilient people are comfortable with their feelings and they express their emotions, without getting stuck in an emotion and letting their feelings prevent them from moving forward. 2. Impulse Control We all have impulses to do things and say things these are not always in our best interest, nor helpful to others. To be resilient doesnt mean to stop these impulses, but it does require you to stop acting on every impulse that does not serve you well. These skills of impulse control can be learned.

57

3. Optimism Optimism involves learning to think positively about the future even when things go wrong. Its about looking objectively at a situation, making a conscious decision to focus on the good. Optimistic people are happier, more engaged, succeed more and are better problem solvers 4. Flexible and Accurate Thinking To be resilient requires flexible and accurate thinking, seeing different perspectives. Someone who is resilient can come up with a variety of reasons for being successful in something (multiple factors). Flexible and accurate thinking allows multiple solutions to a problem, having Plan B and C is vital to resilience. 5. Empathy The ability to recognise another persons feelings and respond accordingly and respectfully. Understanding anothers emotion in relation to that of your own. Empathy assists resilience through developing strong supportive relationships. Understanding other peoples feelings / emotions / experiences is particularly helpful when people are experiencing tough times. 6. Self-efficacy Having success in something and then using that as a personal reference point for ability, and working on that to bring further success, achievement and a belief in yourself. Homework Sheet- My Connections-Resilience (Appendix C) Homework sheet aims to get students to think about the emotional connections they have within their lives. Relationships and connections are essential in feeling supported and building resilience as they provide the support needed to bounce back from lifes stresses and pressures.

58

References:
ReachOut. (2010). Building Resilience. Retrieved April 25 2013 from http://teachers.reachoutpro.com.au/media/114613/reachoutteachersnetwork_a4digitalboo klet_buildingresiliencyinyoungpeople_singlesfinalcopy.pdf

59

Appendix A Resilience Picture Activity

http://theedgepartnership.com/resources/building-resilience/

http://theedgepartnership.com/resources/building-resilience/

http://www.leadershippost.com/2010/03/articles/change-management/buildi ng-a-resilient emotions-

http://lisakifttherapy.com/mental-health/mental-health-tips-tools-advice/re silience-and-the-brain-managing-

http://www.leadershippost.com/2010/03/articles/change-management /building-a-resilient-workforce-managing-change/

http://www.abclass.com.au/resilience.php

http://www.psych4schools.com.au/_bpost_3965/Foundations_for_building_resilience
tra uma /

http://lisa kiftthera py.com/me nta l -health/menta l-hea lth-tips -tools -a dvice/res ilience -a nd-the-brain-ma na ging-emotions -a nd-overcoming-

60

http://blogs.psychcentral.com/bounce-back/2011 /12/resi liency- bouncing-back-fr om-adversity /

http://blogs.psyc hcentral.com/bounce-back/2011/12 /resiliency-bouncing-back-from-adversity/

http://www.theage.com.au/sport/tennis/i ll-bounce- back-says-fallen- serena-20130115-2crpi.html

http://www.bodyandsoul.com.au/soul+happiness/astrology/bounce+back,13499

http://www.relatemag.com/2010/05/bounce-back-from-tough-times/

http://coachotis.wordpress.com/tag/perseverance/

http://blueridge.ashe.k12.nc.us/

http://blueridge.ashe.k12.nc.us/

Appendix B PowerPoint Presentation

61

Building Resiliency STRATEGIES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

62

Emotional Awareness and Selfregulation


The ability to identify emotional experiences and control emotional response to external events is important in resilience. Resilient people are comfortable with their feelings and they express their emotions, without getting stuck in an emotion and letting their feelings prevent them from moving forward.

63

Impulse Control
We all have impulses to do things and say things these are not always in our best interest, nor helpful to others. To be resilient doesnt mean to stop these impulses, but it does require you to stop acting on every impulse that does not serve you well. These skills of impulse control can be learned.

64

Optimism
Optimism involves learning to think positively about the future even when things go wrong. Its about looking objectively at a situation, making a conscious decision to focus on the good. Optimistic people are happier, more engaged, succeed more and are better problem solvers Having a positive outlook, builds resilience as you are more likely to try again if you perceive a bright future

65

Flexible and Accurate Thinking


To be resilient requires flexible and accurate thinking, seeing different perspectives. Someone who is resilient can come up with a variety of reasons for being successful in something (multiple factors). Flexible and accurate thinking allows multiple solutions to a problem, having Plan B and C is vital to resilience.

66

Empathy
The ability to recognise another persons feelings and respond accordingly and respectfully. Understanding anothers emotion in relation to that of your own. Empathy assists resilience through developing strong supportive relationships. Understanding other peoples feelings / emotions / experiences is particularly helpful when people are experiencing tough times.

67

Self-efficacy
Having success in something and then using that as a personal reference point for ability, and working on that to bring further success, achievement and a belief in yourself. Adds in resilience: if you believe you can do something, if at first you dont succeed, you can have the selfefficacy to try again

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Building Resilience
Resilience is an important personality characteristic for all individuals Using these skills and strategies within you everyday life can help to build your ability to be resilient and bounce back from life's pressures and stressors.

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Appendix C My Connections

MY CONNECTIONS-Resilience Worksheet
Fill in the Connections circle below. List those people who you connect with the most in the circle closest to the middle (ME).
Next to each person, write where do they fit with your connections are they from school? A Community group? Family, friends?, friends online? Etc

ME

With the connections you have listed closest to you. Share how they make you feel connected / could feel connected.

ReachOut.com, Keeping Connected

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Lesson 5
Learning Intentions

Building Healthy Relationships

1. To establish an understanding of relationships. 2. To develop your understanding of the characteristics of healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Process
1. Expectations and Learning Intentions 2. Think, Pair, Share What is a relationship and benefits of relationships. Discussion. 3. Group Activity Healthy vs. Unhealthy Relationships. Discussion 4. Class Group Activity Healthy vs. Unhealthy Relationships. Discussion.

Discussion Questions
Why did you choose that definition of a relationship? What characterises a healthy relationship? What characterises an unhealthy relationship? Why is it sometimes difficult for someone to acknowledge that they are in an unhealthy relationship. Why do people stay in unhealthy relationships? If someone is in an unhealthy relationship, what can he/she do about it?

Resources/Worksheets
Healthy vs. Unhealthy Group Activity Scenario Cards Healthy vs. Unhealthy A4 Cards Relationship Cards

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Building Healthy Relationships Lesson Plan


Year Level: Focus of the lesson:
Building and Identifying Healthy Relationships

Resources and Equipment:


PowerPoint Presentation Healthy vs. Unhealthy Group Activity Scenario Cards Healthy vs. Unhealthy A4 Cards Relationship Cards Butchers Paper

10

Relevant AusVELS Content Descriptions:


Identification of a range of health needs of young people, including mental health. Identification of personal behaviours that affect health status, both positively and negatively.

Learning Intentions:
1. 2. To establish an understanding of relationships. To develop yo ur understanding of the characteristics of healthy and unhealthy relatio nships.

Links to Students Prior Knowledge and Experiences:


Students should have prior experience with relationships throughout their lives. Students should have knowledge of resilience and self-esteem and see aspects of this throughout this lesson

Assessment /Feedback Strategies:


Classroom group discussion. Questions discussed at end of lesson.

Total Class Time:


50 Minutes

Number of Students:
24 Students

Lesson Sequence Orient


Classroom Management

What will I do?


Mark roll. Introduce today's lesson. Refer to notes. Explain what we will be doing this lesson. Reiterate to students that students should feel free to share experiences with the class and that people should respect others privacy and not re-tell students stories to others outside of the class However, remind students that they should when telling stories refer to a friend or someone they know as being the character in the story rather than themselves

What will students do?


Students will write the learning objectives in their notes. Students will have an understanding of the learning objectives. Students will have an understanding of what we will be doing this lesson.

Time Allocated

5 Minutes

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Introduce and explain the Learning Objectives. Refer to PowerPoint and notes. Get students to write the learning objectives in their notes.

Engage
Relationships Think, Pair, Share

Assign students into pairs using the Relationship Cards.

Students will work cooperatively in pairs. Students, in pairs, will come up with their own definition of what a relationship is and what they think are benefits of a relationship. Students will share their definition and benefits of relationships with the whole class. Students will write down aspects of others definitions and benefits of relationships that werent included in their definition in their notes. Students will ask questions if needed.

Think, Pair, Share Activity: Ask each pair to come up with their own definition of what a relationship is and the benefits of a relationship Interact with students while they are completing their definition and benefits of a relationship. Provide help and advice if needed. Get each pair of students to share their definition and benefits of relationships with the class. Write down a summary of each students response so that other students can add it to their notes. Discuss and add to the students definitions, if needed. Refer to notes. Allow and encourage students to ask questions.

15 Minutes

Engage
Healthy vs. Unhealthy Relationships Group Activity

Assign students into groups of 4 using the Group Cards. Provide each group of students with a piece of butchers paper. Ask each group of students to come up with a comparison list of healthy and unhealthy characteristics of a relationship. Interact with students while they are completing their comparison list. Provide help and advice if needed. Draw a comparison table o n the board.

Students will work cooperatively in their groups. Students will, as a group, come up with healthy/unhealthy characteristics of a relationship. Students will share their healthy and unhealthy characteristics with the class. Students will draw up a comparison table in their notes with the healthy/unhealthy characteristics of relationships written in it. Students will ask questions if needed.

10 Minutes

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Ask each group to share their healthy and unhealthy characteristics with the class. Write the characteristics onthe comparison table. Get students to write down the table in their notes. Discuss and add to the students definitions, if needed. Refer to notes. Allow and encourage students to ask questions.

Transform and Extend


Healthy vs. Unhealthy Relationships Class Group Activity

Instruct students on ho w to do this activity. Place Healthy/Unhealthy cards onthe wall at each end of the room. Refer to notes for instructions/steps. Allow and encourage students to ask questions.

. Students will stand up the end of the room that corresponds with what whether they believe their relationship scenario card is healthy/unhealthy. Students will understand what healthy and unhealthy relationships are like with the examples of the statement cards. Students will ask questions if needed.

10 Minutes

Transform and Extend


Healthy vs. Unhealthy Relationships Group Discussion

Discuss questions with students in regards to the relationship cards from the Class Group Activity. Refer to PowerPoint Refer to Notes. Allow and encourage students to ask questions.

Students will participate in the class discussion. Students will be able to identify and understand unhealthy relationships

10 Minutes

Reflect and Evaluate


Closure of class.

Encourage students to ask any questions related to what they have learnt today Explain what is happening next lesson (look below).

Students will ask any last minute questions they have about what they learnt in today's lesson. Students will know what to expect next lesson.

Observations and notes for next lesson:


Focus for next lesson: Mental Illnesses

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Building Healthy Relationships Teacher Notes


Learning Objectives
1. To establish an understanding of relationships. 2. To develop your understanding of the characteristics of healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Resources and Equipment


PowerPoint Presentation Healthy vs. Unhealthy Group Activity Scenario Cards (Appendix C) Healthy vs. Unhealthy A4 Cards (Appendix B) Relationship Cards (Appendix A) Butchers Paper

Introduction
Relationships are an important part of adolescence. They play an important role in the physical, social and emotional development of an adolescent. Relationships provide an opportunity for adolescents to: Understand who they are Learn how to interact with and relate to others Share feelings Develop intimacy Have a sense of belonging Learn different ways of problem solving Have fun and excitement Learn and practice communication skills. However, there can also be downsides to relationships. It is important that students understand what constitutes a healthy relationship, and how to identify an unhealthy one.

Layout of Lesson
Learning Objectives Introduce the learning objectives for this lesson. Get students to write the Learning Objectives in their notes. Reiterate to students that students should feel free to share experiences with the class and that people should respect others privacy and not re-tell students stories to others outside of the class However, remind students that they should when telling stories refer to a friend or someone they know as being the character in the story rather than themselves

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Think, Pair, Share What is a Relationship? Assign students into pairs using Relationship Cards. Ask each pair to come up with their own definition of what a relationship is and benefits of being in a relationship. Allow each pair to share their definition with the class. Write up on the board a summary of each pairs definition, so other students can add it to their notes (as students are sharing). Discuss with the students. Possible definition of a relationship: A relationship is a connection, association or involvement between two or more people. It can be emotional, physical, romantic, or sexual. It involves a mutual feeling between two or more people. We form relationships as soon as we are born with parents, siblings and family. As we move outside of the family home we form relationships with people at school, and in our neighbourhood. As we get older our relationships broaden to include relationships with teachers, employers, people within out workplace, people at our sports clubs and people within our extended schooling community. Some people have many relationships, a wide circle of friends and acquaintances, and others prefer to only a have few close friends, a small circle of friends and acquaintances. Let students know that it is ok to have either a large circle of friends or a small circle of friends. It is important to pick up on students thinking that relationships only involve 'dating' relationships. It is important to note and for students to understand that there are different types of relationships, other than romantic ('dating'). It is also important to note how important different types of relationships are for healthy development throughout our lifespan. Possible Benefits of Relationships: Love Companionship Safety Shared interests Affection Sharing hopes, dreams, problems Someone is there for you Shared culture or religion Someone to have fun with It can boost your immunity. Reduce stress. Sends good endorphins throughout your body that make you feel great and happy! Also been said to help reduce your chances of illness. Only add to the list the students come up with if it is important to note, or if it has not been included by the students.

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Healthy vs. Unhealthy Relationships Assign students into groups of 4 using the Group Cards. Provide each group of students with a piece of butchers paper. Ask each group of students to come up with a comparison list of healthy and unhealthy characteristics of a relationship. Draw a comparison table on the board. Ask each group to share their healthy and unhealthy characteristics with the class. Write these characteristics on the comparison table. Ask students to write down the table in their notes. Discuss students responses. Possible Characteristics of Healthy/Unhealthy Relationships: Healthy Unhealthy Happiness No trust No Trust Love respect Jealousy Affection Equality Mutual Abuse (emotional, physical, sexual) Respect Poor Communication Friendship Low self-esteem Laughter Power Issues Unfair arguments Common Interests Other person tries to change you Support Fair Arguments Lies Coercion Acceptance Manipulation Comfort Lack of understanding No fun Inequality Good Communication Kindness Strong Blaming Self-Esteem Fear Feeling like you can't be yourself Humour Fun Lack of trust Not independent people You can be yourself No fear of each other Honesty Independence Healthy vs. Unhealthy Group Activity Students identify healthy and unhealthy characteristics of a relationship. 1. Introduce the activity stating that sometimes it is necessary to step back and evaluate our relationships. Often we cannot see the unhealthy trends within our relationships. 2. Place the A4 cards that say HEALTHY and UNHEALTHY on opposite sides of the room (attach to the walls if possible). 3. Hand out one relationship scenario card to each person. Ask the students to stand at the end of the room that they think relates to their relationship card. 4. Ask the following questions to each student about their relationship card: Ask students to read out the statement from their relationship card.

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Ask students why they believe their relationship card was healthy/unhealthy? Group Discussion Discuss the following questions with the students in regards to the relationship cards: What characterises a healthy relationship? o Possible Answers People in healthy relationships have the following characteristics: Listen to you and take you feelings and ideas seriously Talk openly and honestly with you about what matters to them Respect you and say good things to you and about you Enjoy spending time with you, and show it whether alone with you or in a group Trust you and earn your trust Allow you to enjoy the activities and people that matter to you Accepts your limits about sexual activity, every time. Never use threats of harm, violence or suicide to get his/her own way Never hit, punch, kick, bite, slap, push or otherwise strike out in anger or jealousy Not try to control what you do, where you go or who you talk to What characterises an unhealthy relationship? o Possible Answers People in unhealthy relationships have the following characteristics: Believing one person has more rights than the other Excessive calling, texting or emailing. Don't respect you or say good things to you. Don't listen to you or consider your feelings. Use threats of harm and violence (physical and emotional) Tries to control what you do/ Why is it sometimes difficult for someone to acknowledge that they are in an unhealthy relationship? o Possible answers: The expression 'love it blind' is often true. Sometimes someone may feel that they are so in love that they do not see the problems deeply enough and stay in the relationship. Why do people stay in an unhealthy relationship? o Possible answers: Sometimes it brings comfort familiar doesn't always mean 'good'. They are scared of something new. Fear they are actually scared of them. Low self-esteem they don't believe that anyone else would want them. It is usually the current relationship that has cause them to feel that way about themselves. Fear of being along. People sometimes believe that things will get better or that they can change their partner.

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Teenagers may feel that having a boyfriend/girlfriend is more important than not having one. If someone is in an unhealthy relationship what can he/she do about it? o Possible answers: Talk to their partner about it and that things need to change. They might not be aware that they are doing some of the bad things. Talk to friends or someone else that you trust sometimes they can let you know how they see the relationship. Talk to a professional. These website can provide more information and advice: www.au.reachout.com www.relationships.org.au www.helpguide.org www.headspace.org.au www.kidshelp.com.au

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References
All About You. (2008). The Benefits of Relationships. Retrieved April 7, 2013 from http://www.allaboutyou.com/health/mentaladvice/the -benefits-of-relationships21480 Definition of a Relationship. Retrieved April 7, 2013 from http://www.thefr eedictionary.com/relationship Manitoba Education. (2009). Understanding Healthy Relationships. Retrieved March 29, 2013 from http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/cur/physhlth/frame_found_gr12/rm/#e Parent Line. (2009). Peer Relationships Adolescents. Retrieved April 7,2013 from http://www.parentline.org.au/Page.aspx?element=817&category=9 Teaching Sexual Health. (2012). Building Healthy Relationships. Retrieved March 29, 2013 from http://teachers.teachingsexualhealth.ca/lesson-plans/relationships Teaching Sexual Health. (2012). Identifying Unhealthy Relationships. Retrieved March 29, 2013 from http://teachers.teachingsexualhealth.ca/lesson-plans/relationships

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Appendix A Relationship Cards


These relationship cards can be used to organise students into pairs. Cut each card out and then cut each single card into two. You could even cut one card into three, just in case you have an odd number of students in the class (therefore, there would be one group of three). If you would like you can laminate these cards so you don't have to keep printing them out. Give a piece of each card to each student and then ask (when you're ready to organise students into pairs) each student to find their match.

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Appendix B: Healthy/Unhealthy Relationship Cards

HEALTHY

84

UNHEALTHY

85

Appendix C Relationship Scenario Cards


Cut out each scenario into separate cards. Laminate them if you would like so you don't have to print them out again. Milly went to Adams house last night to watch a movie. Adam is Milly's boyfriend. Before they started to watch the movie they got into an argument about something. Adam got very angry and smacked Milly in the face. Jack went to a party. While he was there he saw his friend Miles yell at his girlfriend and push her against the wall. Sarah called her friend Ashlee to see if she wanted to go to the mall later in the day. Ashlee said she had something else one. Ashlee is always too busy to make plans with Sarah. Ashlee always breaks her plans with Sarah. Sarah can't count on Ashlee. Maddy introduced her friend Taylor to Kylie, another friend of hers. Now, Taylor won't invite Maddy to any social events and no longer includes you in her plans. Poppy didn't have many friends at school and one day made friends with Abbey. Now, every time Abbey speaks to other friends, or spends some time with her other friends Poppy says defensive remarks to Abbey such as "Why do you like them?" or "Why don't you like hanging out with me?" Even though Abbey spends most of her time with Poppy. Julia ended her long friendship with Patrick because Julia's boyfriend Connor promised that he would stop arguing with her for a month if she did. Xavier has been friends with Kyle since they were little. Since Year 8, Xavier made friends with a new groups of guys at school and now Xavier ignores Kyle and makes fun of Kyle when he is around his friends. Grace is angry at Katie because Katie was talking to a boy she liked in maths class. Since then, Grace has been telling their other friend Carlee that Katie has been saying mean things about her behind her back. Gill has a great group of friends at school. However, one of the girls thinks she is the 'leader' of the group and always tries to turn each girl again the other. One time she even 'kicked' Gill out of the group for a week because she made up a rumour that Gill had been talking about one of her friends behind her back. Megan is always texting on her phone. Every time Phoebe and Megan hang out, Megan still doesn't get off her phone. When Phoebe was upset about something at home, she tried to talk to Megan about it, but Megan didn't answer her because she was too busy texting on her phone.

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John was always a good student at school and always maintained good grades. John always gets along really well with his teachers. Recently John's English teacher has been treating him unfairly during class and questions his performances in his latest tests. John's teacher unfairly accuses John of being a cheater. John feels as though the teacher is making fun of him. Jordan wants to take a year off from studying when he finishes school to travel and work around the world. However, his parents keep telling him that it is a waste of time and money, and that he won't achieve anything great if he does that. Mary has an older sister and used to look up to her older sister. Lately, Mary's older sister has been putting Mary down a lot and telling her that she isn't pretty and that she isn't skinny enough. She also tells Mary that she shouldn't have any friends. Mary's sister barely talks to her at home, and never talks to her in public. Billy and Jake were at a gathering with friends. Billy brought drugs with him. He kept offering them to Jake. Jake declined every time. Jake decided to stay at the gathering, however Billy started to get aggressive. Jake got up to leave when Billy stood in front of him and started making fun of him and calling him a wimp. Jake went to take a step around him when Billy pushed him into the cupboard with glass doors. Nick and Chris are friends and are always competing for top spot in the sports teams. Chris always beats Nick, and heavily rubs it in every time and always talks about how much better he is than Nick. This time Nick beat Chris. Chris said to Nick that he couldn't see how he could have beaten him and that he must have been having a bad day. Nick is still feeling very down about himself, even though he won. Chris barely talked to him for the rest of the week. Andrew and Mark were out for lunch. When they went to pay Andrew realised he had forgotten his wallet. Mark said that was no worries and that he would pay for hi m. Andrew promised to pay him back. Andrew payed him back the next day. Martha and Laila consider themselves best friends. Recently Martha has been complaining about how she is 'fat' and that she is not good looking. Laila has been very supportive and has been complementing Martha all the time. Laila suggested that they go shopping for some new clothes hoping that it would lift Martha's spirit. Amanda went to a party and drank a lot of alcohol. She made a fool of herself and has been receiving cyber abuse from some of the girls that were present at the party. Amanda confided in her friend Amelia. Amelia suggested that she go and talk to the school councillor about and offered to go with her for support.

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Emily had decided to tell her parents that she no longer wanted to study medicine when she finished school, and that she wanted to look in being an accountant. Her parents were delighted for her and were very happy that she was doing what she desired to do. Rebecca and Joseph have been dating for six months. Joseph always compliments her and always talks about how amazing she is to his friends. Cameron and Lachlan were at a party. Someone decided it would be fun to bring drugs along. Cameron had mentioned to Lachlan that he felt uncomfortable about there being drugs at the party and that he was going to leave. Lachlan said that was fine and offered to leave with him. Lachlan suggested that they go to the arcade instead. Kayla and her boyfriend Hayden were invited to Kayla's fri ends birthday. Hayden was a little unsure about going but went for Kayla. When they arrived, Kayla introduced him to all her friends and Hayden ended up talking to one of the boys there that Kayla introduced him to and Hayden ended up having fun night. Jess and Tara are best friends. Tara just found out that she got the first job she applied for. She was very excited. Jess was so excited for her and took her out for lunch as a celebration. Sam and Adele both tried out for the same netball club. Sam got into the A grade team, however, Adele only got into the B grade team. Adele was still very excited for Sam and congratulated Sam on getting into the A grade team. Both Sam and Adele were both happy that they got to play at the same netball club that year . Jono and Luke had their school dance coming up. Jono didn't have a date for the dance, but Luke did. Luke suggested that he would ask his girlfriend if she had a friend that would be his date for the dance, so that he didn't have to go by himself. Maria agrees to go out with her friend for pizza and to the movies on Friday night. A few hours late Maria's friend Jenny asks her to come to a concert that same night. Maria politely refuses and explains that she had already agreed to go for pizza and mov ies with another friend. Maria agrees to go another time with Jenny as she has not seen her other friend for a while. Chantel tried on an outfit that isn't very nice and looked terrible on her. Her two friends, Katrina and Melanie didn't want to hurt her feelings, but felt as though they should say something as Chantel is thinking about buying the outfit. Katrina and Melanie decided to suggest to Chantel that they look around the mall a little bit more before she buys the outfit in case she sees something that she likes even better.

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Michael and Daryl were walking to the cafeteria to eat their lunch. On their way Daryl tripped over and he fell on the ground, along with his lunch. Instead of laughing at him like everyone else, Michael helped him up from the ground, made a little joke about it, and offered Daryl his lunch. Isobel wants to join the gymnastics club at school. She really wants to learn gymnastics but she is worried that she will get teased because she has never done it before. Her friend Jasmine offers to join with her so they can both learn together. Jacqui and Hannah got into a huge fight at school because Hannah's new boyfriend is a boy that Jacqui used to like. They didn't talk for the rest of the day. Later that night, Jacqui called Hannah and apologised for acting that way and for causing the fight. Both of the girls apologised to each other and forgot about it all the next day at school.

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Lesson 6
Mental Illness
Learning Intentions
1. To establish an awareness of the importance of mental illness awareness. 2. To establish an awareness of the common occurrence of mental illness within the community and students lives. 3. To develop an understanding of the importance of reducing mental illness stigma within the community.

Process
1. Expectations and Learning Intentions. 2. YouTube Clip Mental Health Awareness Pair Activity and Discussion 3. Mental Illness Stat Swap Card Activity 4. YouTube Clip Be Aware: End the Stigma against Mental Illness Myth Busters and Discussion

Discussion Questions
What do you think mental illness is? Has anyone you have a close relationship to ever experience a mental illness? Why do you think people with a mental illness are viewed differently within the community? What does mental health mean to you?

Resources/Worksheets
YouTube Video Mental Health Awareness o http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwn52-d6Sc0 YouTube Video Be Aware: End the Stigma Against Mental Illness o http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsMPHUV11PM Mental Illness Swap Stat Cards Myth Busters Worksheet Mental Illness Scale Homework Sheet

Mental Illness Lesson Plan


Year Level: Focus of the lesson:
Introduction to Mental Illness

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Resources and Equipment:


Mental Illness Awareness Yo uTube Clip Think, Pair, Share post-it notes Mental Illness Stat Swap Cards Mental Illness Stigma Yo uTube Clip Myth Busters Worksheet Mental Illness Scale Homework sheet

10

Relevant AusVELS Content Descriptions:


Identification of a range of health needs of young people, including mental health. Identification of personal behaviours that affect health status, both positively and negatively.

Learning Intentions:
7. 8. 9. To establish an awareness of the importance of mental illness awareness To establish an awareness of common occurrence of mental illness within the community and students lives Develop an understanding of the importance of reducing mental illness stigma within the community

Links to Students Prior Knowledge and Experiences:


Students should have experience with mental health or mental illness within their own lives or those around them. The lesson aims to draw upon this knowledge or awareness and further inform to promote a greater understanding

Assessment /Feedback Strategies:


Classroom group discussion. Questions discussed throughout the lesson Mental Illness Homework Sheet

Total Class Time:


50 Minutes

Number of Students:
24 Students

Lesson Sequence Orient


Set Expectations for the Lesson (Learning and behaviour) Clarify Learning Intentions

What will I do?


Mark attendance Outline behavioural expectations

What will students do?


Students will write the learning objectives in their notes. Students will have an understanding of the learning objectives. Students will have an understanding of what is expected of them and what is to be achieved in the lesson

Time Allocated

Reiterate to students that students should feel free to share experiences with the class and that people should respect others privacy and not re-tell students stories to others outside of the class However, remind students that they should when telling stories refer to a friend or someone they know as being the character in the story rather than themselves

5 Minutes

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Introduce and explain the Learning Objectives written on the white board Instruct students to write learning objectives in their notes. Present Mental Illness Awareness Clip from YouTube Ask students to form pairs Using Think, Pair, Share, ask pairs of students to write o n a post-it note: any mental illnesses they think they know Collect the post-it notes Write onthe white board correct mental illnesses suggested If students have suggested a mental illness is not in fact a mental illness, explain way it is not considered o ne Add to the list any common mental illnesses they may have missed Answer any questions relating to any of the illnesses they may have Present students with one mental illness stat swap card each Instruct students to go around the room and take in turns to ask another student their question relating to a mental illness statistic Once the student has answered that question and the correct answer is given, the other student can ask their question and give answer Once questions have been shared, instruct students to move onto another student and repeat process Present students with Yo uTube clip regarding Mental Illness Stigma Present students with Myth Busters Worksheet Once students complete worksheet, as a class decide on whether each statement is true or false Go through each statement and bust the myth As a class discuss how being misinformed

Engage
-

Engage students into the lesson and build curiosity of the new topic through an icebreaker clip from YouTube Think, Pair, Share

Watch the clip on mental illness presented Ask any questions they may have regarding the clip In pairs, write ontheir post-it notes any mental illnesses they can think of Ask any questions regarding mental illnesses that teacher writes onthe white board

15 Minutes

Transform and Extend


Mental Illness Stat Swap Cards

Students will collect a Stat Swap Card Students will move about the room and ask other students the statistic related question ontheir own card. Once that student has answered what they believe is the answer, the student will tell them the statistic Students will then swap and listen to the other students question and answer accordingly Students will continue process until they have asked each other student a question

15 Minutes

Transform and Extend


Reducing Stigma YouTube Clip relating to mental Illness Stigma Myth Busters Worksheet

Students will watch Yo uTube clip regarding Mental Illness stigma Students will complete myth busters worksheet by deciding if they believe each statement is true or false Students will participate in discussion by providing their answers of true or false to each statement Students will provide their opinions or ask any questions regarding why it is

15 Minutes

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about mental illness may lead to people being stigmatised within the community To assess the students revised understanding of mental illness Provide students with a mental illness scale Instruct students to read the scenarios and indicate where on the mental illness scale each scenario would fall Answer any questions or clarifications students may have regarding a mental illness or the scenario Encourage students to ask any questions related to what they have learnt today important to be informed about mental illness, to prevent unnecessary stigma Students will read each scenario and indicate on the mental illness scale where they believe each falls for homework. Students will ask any questions relating to the homework task

Reflect and Evaluate


Mental Health Scale Homework Task

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Mental Illness Teacher Notes


Learning Objectives
1. To establish an awareness of the importance of mental illness awareness 2. To establish an awareness of common occurrence of mental illness within the community and students lives 3. Develop an understanding of the importance of reducing mental illness stigma within the community

Resources and Equipment


Mental Illness Awareness YouTube Clip Think, Pair, Share post-it notes Mental Illness Stat Swap Cards (Appendix A) Mental Illness Stigma YouTube Clip Myth Busters Worksheet (Appendix B) Mental Illness Scale Homework sheet (Appendix C)

Introduction
Mental Illness is often viewed negatively within society due to a lack of understanding and misconception. As such it is vital for young people to be educated regarding mental illness, its prevalence within our society and an understanding of the impact mental illness stigma can have upon an individual with mental illness. The occurrence of mental health issues within the adolescent population is exponential and as such adolescents require an understanding of the common occurrence of mental illness within the youth population, and feel supported enough to seek help if they ever require it. This lesson is designed as an introduction to mental illness and its relevance to young people. The lesson aims to broaden students understanding of mental illness in an attempt to achieve better informed opinions of mental illness and reduce stigma directed towards individuals with mental health problems. Rather than providing students with in depth knowledge of mental illness prevalence, symptoms and treatment, based upon the AUSVELS standards of a level ten, progressing towards level eleven achievement, the lesson focuses upon providing insight into the prevalent nature of mental illness within society, in attempt to reduce stigma and essentially enable students to be greater informed and able to seek help for mental health issues. In developing greater insight into mental illness and reducing the stigma attached, it is hoped young people will feel more open to seeking help and feel better supported if ever experiencing mental health issues.

Layout of Lesson
Learning Objectives Introduce the learning objectives for this lesson. Get students to write the learning Objectives in their notes.

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Address Confidentiality Reiterate to students that they should feel free to share their experiences and that anything that is said within the class should not be re-told to outside people. However, also remind them that anything they say should be said in reference to a friend or someone they know as the main character, not as themselves. YouTube Clip- Mental Health Awareness http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwn52-d6Sc0 Present the above YouTube clip to students Think, Pair, Share In pairs, give students a post-it note and ask students to think of as many mental illnesses they can think of, writing them on the post-it note Collect all students post-it notes and write mental illnesses on the white board. Only write correct mental illnesses. If you discard a mental illness written down by a student, explain to the class why this is not considered a mental illness this may be as simple as it is not yet considered by the DSM-IV as a mental illness Once all student responses have been written on the board, add any mental illnesses that may have been missed This can be done by prompting students to consider illnesses which may have not been considered yet List of common Mental Illnesses which a Year 10 student would most likely be familiar with (Appropriate to teach at a year 10 level) Explain to students that there are many more mental illnesses (297 encompassed within the DSM-IV), each with differing levels of classification, however that is more depth than we are able to cover in one lesson.
Acute Stress Disorder Acute stress reaction is a psychological condition arising in response to a terrifying or traumatic event Generally, the teenager has an intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat even though underweight. Self-evaluation of body weight and shape may be distorted and there may be denial of the potential health hazards caused by the low body weight. Anxiety is the fearful anticipation of further danger or problems accompanied by an intense unpleasant feeling (dysphonia) or physical symptoms. A teenager with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder has problems with paying attention and concentration and/or with hyperactive and impulsive behaviour. Despite good intentions, a teenager may be unable to listen well, organize

Anorexia Nervosa

Anxiety Disorder

Attention deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

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work, and follow directions. Bipolar Disorder is a type of mood disorder with marked changes in mood between extreme elation or happiness and severe depression Bulimia Nervosa occurs when an adolescent has repeated episodes of binge eating and purging. Binges are characterized by eating large quantities of food in a discrete period of time. The teen also has feelings of being unable to stop eating and loss of control over the amount of food being eaten Teenagers with conduct disorder have a repetitive and persistent pattern of behaviour in which they violate the rights of others, or violate norms or rules that are appropriate to their age. Their conduct is more serious than the ordinary mischief and pranks of children and adolescents. Change of appetite with either significant weight loss (when not dieting) or weight gain Change in sleeping patterns (such as trouble falling asleep, waking up in the middle of the night, early morning awakening, or sleeping too much) Loss of interest in activities formerly enjoyed Loss of energy, fatigue, feeling slowed down for no reason, "burned out" Feelings of guilt and self-blame for things that are not one's fault Inability to concentrate and indecisiveness Feelings of hopelessness and helplessness Recurring thought of death and suicide, wishing to die, or attempting suicide Learning Disorders occur when the child or adolescent's reading, math, or writing skills are substantially below that expected for age, schooling, and level of intelligence Teenagers with OCD have obsessions and/or compulsions. An obsession refers to recurrent and persistent thoughts, impulses, or images that are intrusive and cause severe anxiety or distress. Compulsions refer to repetitive behaviours and rituals (like hand washing, hoarding, ordering, checking) or mental acts (like counting, repeating words silently, avoiding). The obsessions and compulsions also significantly interfere with the teens normal routine,

Bipolar Disorder

Bulimia Nervosa

Conduct Disorder

Depression

Learning Disorders

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

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academic functioning, usual social activities, or relationships. PTSD can occur when a teenager experiences a shocking, unexpected event that is outside the range of usual human experience. The trauma is usually so extreme that it can overwhelm their coping mechanisms and create intense feelings of fear and helplessness. The traumatic event may be experienced by the individual directly (e.g. physical or sexual abuse, assault, rape, kidnaping, threatened death), by observation (witness of trauma to another person), or by learning about a trauma affecting a close relative or friend Psychotic disorders include severe mental disorders which are characterized by extreme impairment of a person's ability to think clearly, respond emotionally, communicate effectively, understand reality, and behave appropriately. Psychotic symptoms can be seen in teenagers with a number of serious mental illnesses, such as depression, bi-polar disorder (manicdepression), schizophrenia, and with some forms of alcohol and drug abuse. Psychotic symptoms interfere with a persons daily functioning and can be quite debilitating. Psychotic symptoms include delusions and hallucinations. A psychotic disorder characterized by severe problems with a persons thoughts, feelings, behaviour, and use of words and language. Psychotic symptoms often include delusions and/or hallucinations. These delusions in schizophrenia are often paranoid and persecutory in nature. Hallucinations are usually auditory and may include hearing voices speaking in the third person, as well as to each other, commenting on the patient's deeds and actions. Narcolepsy is a chronic neurological disorder affecting the part of the brain that regulates sleep. Those suffering from narcolepsy can experience excessive daytime sleepiness and sudden loss of muscle control, often triggered by strong emotions The presence of recurrent, unexpected panic attacks and persistent worries about having attacks. Panic Attack refers to the sudden onset of intense apprehension, fearfulness, or terror, often associated with feelings of impending doom. AACAP, 2013

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Psychosis

Schizophrenia

Narcolepsy

Panic Disorder

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Mental Illness Stats Swap Cards- Appendix A Present each student with a Mental Illness Stat Swap Card Ask students to walk around the room and ask each other student the question relating to a mental illness statistic on their card. Students present the correct answer once the other student has answered what they believe is the answer. Students then swap and the other student asks the question on their card Students move around the room until all students have attempted all statistic questions Activity aims to highlight to students the prevalent nature of mental illness within our society It also aims to make students think about their own beliefs and expectations in relation to mental illnesses and whether information regarding mental illness is either generally down played or over exaggerated within society. YouTube Clip Relating to Mental Illness Stigma Present students with YouTube Clip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsMPHUV11PM Mental Illness Myth Busters Student Worksheet- Appendix B Present students with Mental Illness Myth Busters Worksheet Students are to state whether they believe each statement is true or false Once all students have answered, as a class discussion, examine each statement and assess whether the statement is a myth or fact Activity aims to identify to students typical misconceptions of mental illness and individuals with a mental illness. In doing so, class discussion should focus upon the impact that misconceptions such as these may have on individuals with mental illness when they are stigmatized within the community Example of discussions topics for each Myth on Myth Busters Worksheet Reach Out Teachers Network, 2010 Myth 1: Mental illnesses are not true illnesses like heart disease or diabetes. BUSTED: Decades of research have revealed that mental illnesses have a biological basis. While environmental factors play a role in the development and maintenance of mental illnesses, they similarly play a role in the development and maintenance of physical illnesses. Myth: People with a serious mental illness, such as schizophrenia, are usually dangerous and violent. BUSTED: People with psychotic illnesses are rarely violent. People with schizophrenia are more likely to be victims of violence than to commit violence themselves.

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Myth: Schizophrenia means split personality. BUSTED: Schizophrenia is often confused with multiple personality disorder but it has nothing to do with personality. Schizophrenia is a brain disorder that affects the way that people think. People with schizophrenia have a unique personality in the same way as everyone else. Myth: Depression results from a personality weakness or character flaw. BUSTED: Depression has nothing to do with being 'weak'. Many highly successful people have suffered from depression. Depression results from an imbalance in the neurochemistry of the brain. Medication and counselling are effective in helping people to recover. In an environment where mental illness is stigmatized, it takes strength and courage for people with mental health problems to seek the professional help that they need. Myth: If you have a mental illness, you can will it away. BUSTED: A serious mental illness cannot be willed away. Avoiding or denying the problem will make the problem worse. In an environment where mental illness is stigmatized, it takes strength and courage for people with mental health problems to seek professional help. Myth: People who are mentally ill are violent BUSTED: Research indicates that people receiving treatment for a mental illness are no more violent or dangerous than the general population. People living with a mental illness are more likely to be victims of violence, especially selfharm. It has been calculated that the lifetime risk of someone with an illness such as schizophrenia seriously harming or killing another person is just .005%, while the risk of that person killing themselves is nearly 10%. There appears to be a weak statistical association between mental illness and violence. This seems to be concentrated in certain subgroups, for example - people not receiving treatment who have a history of violence, and those who abuse drugs or alcohol. The correlation between episodes of violence in people experiencing mental illness is comparatively weaker than violent behaviour in the context of alcohol abuse and violent behaviour in young males between the ages of 15 and 25 Myth: Mental illness is a life sentence BUSTED: Depending on the age of onset and the severity of the mental illness, generally speaking, most people will experience complete recovery, especially if they receive help early. Some people may require ongoing treatment to manage their illness. Some people have only one episode of mental illness and recover fully. For others, episodes of mental illness occur occasionally with years of wellness between episodes. For a minority of those with a more severe illness, periods of acute illness will occur regularly and, without medication and effective management, leave little room for recovery. Though some people experience significant disability as a result of a mental illness, many go on to live full and productive lives, while receiving ongoing treatment. Myth: Mental illnesses are all the same BUSTED: There are many types of mental illnesses and many kinds of symptoms or effects. Though a particular mental illness will tend to show a certain range of symptoms, not

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everyone will experience the same symptoms - for example many people with schizophrenia may hear voices, while others may not. Simply knowing a person has a mental illness will not tell you how well or ill they are what symptoms they are experiencing, or whether they may recover or manage the illness effectively. Mental illnesses are not purely 'psychological' and can have many physical features. While a mental illness may affect a person's thinking and emotions, it can also have strong physical effects such as insomnia, speech impediment, weight gain or loss, increase or loss of energy, chest pain and nausea. Myth: Some cultural groups are more likely than others to experience mental illness BUSTED: Anyone can develop a mental illness and no one is immune to mental health problems. People born in Australia have slightly higher rates of mental illness than those born outside Australia in either English-speaking or non-English-speaking countries. Many people from culturally and linguistically diverse and refugee backgrounds have experienced torture, trauma and enormous loss before coming to Australia. These experiences can cause significant psychological distress and vulnerability to mental illness. Cultural background affects how people experience mental illness and how they understand and interpret the symptoms of mental illness. Mental Illness Scale Homework Task - Appendix C Present students with the Mental Illness Scale homework task Inform students to read each scenario and indicate on the scale where they believe each scenario falls, from mental wellbeing to mental illness Students are to have completed by next lesson Activity aims to assess the students new understanding of mental illness and what constitutes a mental illness Successful completion provides indication of a better understanding of what constitutes a mental illness as well as the influence mislabeling of individuals with mental illness can have upon individuals

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References
American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychology (AACAP). (2013). Glossary of Symptoms and Illnesses. Retrieved April 18 2013 from http://www.aacap.org/cs/root/resources_for_families/glossary_of_symptoms_and_ illnesses/schizophrenia Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. (2011). Young Australi ans: Their Health and Wellbeing 2011. Retrieved April 16 2013 from http://www.aihw.gov.au/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=10737419259 ReachOut Teachers Network. (2010). Mental Health Myth Busters. Retrieved April 18 2013 from http://teachers.reachoutpro.com.au/blog/2010/1/27/mental-health mythbusters.aspx YouTube Clip. (2011). Be Aware: End the Stigma against Mental Illness . Retrieved April 18 2013 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsMPHUV11PM YouTube Clip. (2011). Mental Health Awareness. Retrieved April 21 2013 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwn52-d6Sc0

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Appendix A Mental Health Swap Stat Cards


Swap Stat Card- Mental Health
Question: Proportion of young people aged 1624 years having high or very high levels of psychological distress? Answer: Nine out of 10 (9%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: Prevalence of mental disorders among young people aged 1624 years?

Answer: Twenty Six out of 100 (26%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: Proportion of young people aged 1524 years rating their health as excellent, very good or good? Answer: Ninety Three out of 100 (93%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: Proportion of Indigenous young people rating their health as excellent, very good or good?

Answer: Ninety out of 100 (90%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Australians have a profound mental of behavioural disorder? Answer: Forty out of 100 (40%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Australians aged 16-24 experience high or very high levels of psychological distress? Answer: Nine out of 100 (9%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Australians experience at least one mental disorder? Answer: One in Four

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Australian Females report experiencing high psychological distress? Answer: Thirteen out of 100 (13%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Australian Males report experiencing high psychological distress? Answer: Six out of 100 (6%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Australians report having an Anxiety disorder? Answer: Fifteen out of 100 (15%)

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Swap Stat Card- Mental Health
Question: How many young Australians report experiencing a substance use disorder? Answer: Thirteen out of 100 (13%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Australians report experiencing an affective disorder? Answer: Six out of 100 (6%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: When visiting the doctor, how many visits were mental health related in young people?

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Indigenous Australians report experiencing mental illness?

Answer: Thirty-two out of 100 (32%)

Answer: Thirty-One out of 100 (31%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young people contact a professional health service when experiencing mental illness? Answer: Twenty-nine out of 100 (29%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Australians experience a mood disorder? Answer: One in Five (20%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Australians experience an Anxiety disorder? Answer: Fifteen out of 100 (15%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Australians experience a psychotic episode? Answer: Two out of 100 (2%)

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: What percentage of mental health issues begins before the age of 25 years? Answer:

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Australians experiencing mental illness seek any form of treatment? Answer:

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Seventy-Five (75%) Swap Stat Card- Mental Health Question: How many substance abuse problems are preceded by mental health issues in young people? Answer: Fifty out of 100 (50%) Twenty out of 100 (20%) Swap Stat Card- Mental Health Question: What percentage do substance abuse and mental health problems account for in young peoples total burden of disease? Answer: 60-70%

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Australians experiencing mental illness seek professional help? Answer: One in Four

Swap Stat Card- Mental Health


Question: How many young Australians sought help to manage depression from their GP? Answer: Thirteen out of 100 (13%)

Appendix B Mental Illness Myth Busters -Myths Exposed!!


Next to each statement write True or False
1. Mental illnesses are not true illnesses like heart disease or diabetes. True or False?

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MENTAL ILLNESS

2. People with a serious mental illness, such as schizophrenia, are usually dangerous and violent. True or False?

3.

Schizophrenia means split personality.

True or False?

4. Depression results from a personality weakness or character flaw. True or False?

5. If you have a mental illness, you can will it away. True or False?

6. People who are mentally ill are violent True or False?

7. Mental illness is a life sentence True or False?

8. Mental illnesses are all the same True or False?

9. Some cultural groups are more likely than others to experience mental illness True or False?

Appendix C Mental Illness Scale Homework Task

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Mental Illness Scale Homework Task


Read each scenario and indicate on the Mental Illness Scale where each behaviour falls. Do you consider the behaviour as mental illness related or mental wellbeing related?

Joe is extremely anxious before a job interview Stacy is excited about getting into the university course she applied for 48 hours after his Grandfathers death James has no energy, stays in bed all day, does not eat much, does not shower, has a constant headache, stays awake all night and has bouts of crying intensely Over a period of four months Jake has no energy, stays in bed all day, is moody, has uncontrollable anger, does not leave the house and refuses to talk to his family

Jan worries how she looks before going to a party, sometimes so much that she ca nt leave the house without checking her appearance in every mirror in the house Mel is so angry at her brother for using all the hot water in the shower Chris is so angry with his sister for using all the hot water that he does nt speak to her for a month Kerry is so worried about her appearance when going to a party that she ca nt leave the house

Place each persons name on the scale according to where you think their behaviour falls on the continuum.

Mental Wellbeing

Mental Health Problem

Mental illness

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Mental Health and Wellbeing Assessment Task


The Mental Health unit aimed to broaden your understanding of mental health issues and its relevancy to everyones day-to-day lives. Being greater informed of mental health issues, reduces misconceptions and negative stigma towards mental illness within society, ensuring everyone feels supported to seek help if ever faced with a mental health problem. To assess your understanding of the mental health issues covered within this unit, your deepened knowledge regarding mental health issues relevant to young people and your ability to critically assess mental illness information presented to you in the future, the following assessment has been constructed.

To complete the assessment, students need to collect at least 250 M e n tal W e llb e in g P o in ts . Each activity in the Mental Wellbeing Table is worth a different amount of points. Students can choose which ever activities they find interesting, as long as the activities chosen add to at least 250 points. Each of the Mental Wellbeing Activities relates to a different aspect of intelligence and as such involve using a different form of learning and intelligence, for example Music Smart involves the use of music or music related activities in relation to mental health.

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This table below outlines how may Mental Wellbeing Points are earned for each activity Make sure you earn at least 250 points (can earn more, but no less).

Verbal 'Word Smart' Knowledge -Remember Comprehension -Understand Application -Apply Analysis -Analyse Synthesis -Create Evaluation -Evaluate 5 POINTS 10 POINTS 20 POINTS 30 POINTS 40 POINTS 50 POINTS

Mathematical 'Number Smart' 5 POINTS 10 POINTS 20 POINTS 30 POINTS 40 POINTS 50 POINTS

Musical 'Music Smart' 5 POINTS 10 POINTS 20 POINTS 30 POINTS 40 POINTS 50 POINTS

Spatial 'Picture Smart' 5 POINTS 10 POINTS 20 POINTS 30 POINTS 40 POINTS 50 POINTS

Kinaesthetic 'Movement Smart' 5 POINTS 10 POINTS 20 POINTS 30 POINTS 40 POINTS 50 POINTS

Intrapersonal 'Self-Smart' 5 POINTS 10 POINTS 20 POINTS 30 POINTS 40 POINTS 50 POINTS

Interpersonal 'People Smart' 5 POINTS 10 POINTS 20 POINTS 30 POINTS 40 POINTS 50 POINTS

Mental Health and Wellbeing Assessment Task Matrix 108


The following table provides a choice of activities to complete for your final assessment. Each activity is worth a certain amount of points as described above. You have to accumulate a total of 250 points. Each activity will have to be handed in as one document with a title pag e, contents page and reference list with all the sources of information you used. If your activity requires you to present a certain activity, this will be done and assessed i n class. Please refer to the assessment criteria rubric for reference to what is being assessed in each activity.

Gardner's Multiple Intelligences (MI) Bloom's Taxonomy


Verbal 'Word Smart'
List and define at least 10 key terms from all aspects covered under "Mental Health". These aspects include: mental health, stress, resilience, self-esteem, relationships and mental illness. There must be at least one key term defined from each aspect.

Mathematical Musical 'Number 'Music Smart' Smart'


Draw a pyramid which illustrates the most common mental illnesses in adolescence in the order in which you believe is most common to least common.

Spatial 'Picture Smart'

Kinaesthetic 'Movement Smart'

Intrapersonal 'Self-Smart'

Interpersonal 'People Smart'

Knowledge -Remember

Find a song that you think promotes positive mental health. Provide the lyrics for that song.

Create a mind map showing the benefits of relationships.

Make a list of 20 words that relate to mental health that can be used in a game of charades.

What is your strongest trait in relation to mental health. Write about it and write why it is your strongest trait. It should be no more than 400 words.

Make a list of relationships within your own life which you consider healthy and unhealthy. State whether they are healthy or unhealthy.

Comprehension -Understand

Write a summary of Lesson 3: Resilience. The word limit is 500 words.

Rank each lesson in this mental health unit on a scale of 1 6 in order of your first preference (1) to you last preference (6). Explain why.

Find a song that you think reflects negative emotions or mental wellbeing. Provide the lyrics and explain the elements of lyrics which reflect negative mental health.

Find/take at least 10 photographs that relate to one aspect(s) of mental health. Provide a short explanation of each photograph.

Perform a role play that indicates an unhealthy relationship. This will be shown and assessed in class.

Create a diary entry that summarises what you have learnt from each lesson. The word limit is 600 words.

Retell a story in your own words of a time when you were able to help someone of someone else was able to help you deal with a stressful situation.

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Create a sign language impersonation to illustrate the lyrics of a song that promotes positive self-esteem. This must be videotaped and handed in.

Application -Apply

Write a conversation between two friends who saw their friend hit his girlfriend at a party. You can do this as a script or in your own way.

Research the prevalence rates of a mental illness of your choice. Construct a graph comparing these rates across at least a 10 year period. Create and conduct a survey (on at least 20 people) to find out what people think is the most important aspect of positive self-esteem. Display your findings in a graph. A copy of your survey must also be handed in. Design a set of criteria to assess the effectiveness of a stress management program. This must be displayed in a table form.

Develop a rhythmic pattern to help memorise one aspect of mental health of your choice.

Design an icon that can be used for a stress management program.

Take a collection of photographs (at least 10) of what mental wellbeing means to you.

Watch and examine the movie "It's Kind of a Funny Story" by identifying relevant mental health issues relating to adolescence evident in Craig's life.

Analysis -Analyse

Write up a comparison between the elements of good stress and bad stress. Word limit is 500 words.

Change the words of a song to describe an issue related to mental health. Provide the original lyrics as well as your own version.

Construct a Venn diagram to compare and contrast healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Put on a play explaining the importance of selftalk in building resilience. This will be shown and assessed in class.

Design and conduct a questionnaire examining individuals stress management techniques. Compare to your own techniques. Who s are more effective?

Write a story of an example of an "unhealthy relationship". Outline how this relationship could be adjusted to reflect a "healthy relationship".

Synthesis -Create

Create a "Word Find" consisting of mental health related words. Must include at least five words from each mental health topic covered.

Create a jingle to help others remember the Four A's of Stress Management. Provide the jingle.

Create a stress management strategy. It must be displayed in a visual and appealing way.

Create a physical activity stress management program. Provide the steps and photographs/ picture of how to complete the program. Evaluate the effectiveness of your above physical activity stress management program in reducing your own stress. Word limit is 600 words.

Write an episode of your favourite TV show in which your favourite character experiences low selfesteem. Include thoughts behind this belief and actions taken to overcome it.

Create a poster or video representation aimed at reducing the stigma towards individuals with mental illness within the community.

Evaluation -Evaluate

Research a video on an aspect of mental health. Evaluate its effectiveness on getting its message across to an audience. Word limit is 1,000 words.

Evaluate the relationship between increased resilience leading to increased self-esteem by assessing the six elements of resilience building, ranking the effectiveness of each.

Evaluate Taylor Swifts "I knew you were trouble when you walked in" or The Beatles "What goes on" lyrics for evidence of unhealthy relationship characteristics.

Design and construct a board game on selfesteem. Provide a description, instructions and rules for the board game. Provide the actual board game.

Prioritise the most important aspect that contributes to positive mental health for you. Justify your choice.

Watch the Movie "It's Kind of a Funny Story" and evaluate the relationships between: Bobby and Craig; Craig and Noelle; Craig and his father. Are they healthy or unhealthy. Explain why.

Assessment Criteria- Mental Health and Illness


Knowledge
Marks Criteria Allocated All key terms are listed and clearly defined . Knowledge There is at least one key term from each aspect of "Mental Verbal Health. Pyramid is drawn. The pyramid has the most common mental illnesses in Knowledge adolescence displayed. Mathematical The mental illnesses in the pyramid are displayed and specified in most common to least common order. The song relates to positive mental health. Knowledge The song promotes positive mental health. Musical The lyrics for the song are provided. Knowledge A mind map is created and displayed. Spatial The mind map illustrates the benefits of relationships. Knowledge Mental Health words are listed. Kinaesthetic Mental Health words are relevant to the game of charades. Your strongest trait is portrayed. Knowledge Your strongest trait is clarified. Intrapersonal Your written explanation is no more than 400 words. Knowledge Relationships within your life are listed. Interpersonal Each relationship is stated as either healthy or unhealthy. Activity

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Very Very Not High Medium Low High Low Shown

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Comprehension
Activity Comprehension Verbal Comprehension Mathematical Marks Criteria Allocated A summary of the lesson on Resilience is written. The summary is no more than 500 words. Each lesson in this mental health unit is ranked. Each lesson is ranked in order of first preference to least preference. An explanation is clear and relevant. The song reflects negative emotions or negative wellbeing. The lyrics of the song are provided. An explanation is clear and relevant to the lyrics in regards to negative emotions or negative wellbeing. 10 photographs are displayed. The photographs relate to an aspect(s) of mental health. An explanation is provided for each photograph. Each explanation is clear and relevant. The role play indicates an unhealthy relationship. The role play is relevant to unhealthy relationships. The summary is a diary entry. The diary entry summarises what you have personally learnt from each lesson. Your summary is no more than 600 words. Retell a story in your own words. The story must be about when you were able to help someone or someone else was able to help you deal with a stressful situation. Very Very Not High Medium Low High Low Shown

Comprehension Musical

Comprehension Spatial Comprehension Kinaesthetic Comprehension Intrapersonal

Comprehension Interpersonal

Application
Activity Marks Criteria Allocated A conversation between two friends is written. The conversation is about two friends who saw their friend hit his girlfriend at a part. It is written in your own way, however it must portray a conversation. Prevalence rates have clearly been researched. A graph is evident that compares the prevalence rates. The prevalence rates have been compared across at least 10 years. A rhythmic pattern is developed. The rhythmic pattern helps to memorise one aspect of Mental Health. An icon has been designed. The icon represents one that can be used for a stress management program. A sign language impersonation is created. The impersonation illustrates the lyrics of a song that promotes positive self-esteem. This impersonation is videotaped/recorded . The collection of photographs demonstrate what 'mental wellbeing' means to you. There are at least 10 photographs. Relevant mental health issues relating to adolescence are identified. The mental health issues identified relate to Craig's life. It is evident that the movie has been watched.

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Very High Medium Low Very Not High Low Shown

Application Verbal

Application Mathematical Application Musical Application Spatial Application Kinaesthetic Application Intrapersonal Application Interpersonal

Analysis
Activity Analysis Verbal Marks Criteria Allocated Key elements of good stress and bad stress are identified Differences between good stress and bad stress are highlighted Word limit adhered to At least 20 individuals are interviewed Key positive aspects of self-esteem are identified Appropriate display of survey results in graph form Song choice is appropriate and relates to mental health Original lyrics provided Key elements of healthy and unhealthy relationships identified Interacting themes between health and unhealthy relationships highlighted Play identifies key issues of self-talk and the importance of positive self-talk in regards to self-esteem Personal stress management techniques are identified Interviewed others regarding stress management techniques Identified differences between different stress management techniques Provided reasoning behind evaluate of each techniques effectiveness Story reflects an unhealthy relationship Refection on relationships and how it could be adjusted to reflect a more healthy relationship

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Very High Medium Low Very Not High Low Shown

Analysis Mathematical Analysis Musical Analysis Spatial

Analysis Kinaesthetic Analysis Intrapersonal

Analysis Interpersonal

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Create
Activity Create Verbal Create Mathematical Create Musical Create Spatial Create Kinaesthetic Create Intrapersonal Create Interpersonal Marks Criteria Allocated At least five words associated with each mental health topic covered within the lessons (25 words in total) Appropriate display of words within a word find Criteria is relevant to selected stress management program At least five criteria are outlined Jingle includes Four As of stress management Jingle is relevant and appropriate to stress management and mental health Develop a program designed to decrease or manage stress Program displayed in a visually appealing way Stress management program outlined and relating to physical activity Steps associated with the program with pictures to match are provided Episode presented is relevant to mental health and outlines important characteristics of low self-esteem Thoughts and actions of character are clearly outlined Approach to reduce stigma associated with mental illness is outlined Presented as a poster or video, able to be displayed within the community Very Very Not High Medium Low High Low Shown

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Evaluate
Activity Evaluate Verbal Marks Criteria Allocated Video regarding a mental health issue is researched Mental health video effectiveness in delivering its proposed message is evaluated Relationship between increased resilience and associated increased self-esteem is evaluated Six elements of resilience are outlined Six elements of resilience are ranked according to effectiveness Taylor swifts or The Beatles song is evaluated Evidence of unhealthy relationship characteristics within the song is outlined Five key elements of self-esteem are highlighted Development of a board game as presentation Must have completed Create, Movement task in order to complete this task Physical activity program is evaluated for effectiveness in reducing personal stress Most important aspect of mental health for student personally is outlined Reasoning and evidence is used to justify choice Relationships within the film are identified Evaluate the relationships healthy or unhealthy characteristics Very Very Not High Medium Low High Low Shown

Evaluate Mathematical

Evaluate Musical Evaluate Spatial Evaluate Kinaesthetic Evaluate Intrapersonal Evaluate Interpersonal

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Kids HelpLine 24 Hours a Day Call - 1800 55 1800 LifeLine 24 Hours a Day Call - 13 11 14 24 Beyond Blue http://www.beyondblue.org.au/ eHeadspace https://www.eheadspace.org.au/ SANE 1800 18 SANE (7263) http://www.sane.org/information/helpline ReachOut http://au.reachout.com/Tough-Times/Mental-health-issues DeppressionNet http://depressionet.org.au/ HeadRoom http://www.headroom.net.au/ BounceBack http://www.bounceback.com.au/ Senseability http://www.beyondblue.org.au/senseability

Emergency Help Emergency Help Depression Anxiety Online and Telephone Support Helpline and Online Help

Relationships Australia http://www.relationships.org.au/ Help Guide http://www.helpguide.org/

Depression Anxiety Stress Management Resilience Self-esteem Depression Help, support and Information - Stress - Problem Solving - Bullying - Self-esteem - Resilience Provides information and strategies on developing: - Self-esteem, Self-talk - Emotions - Life planning - Communication - Resilience Relationships Mental Illnesses Stress Relationships