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Republic of the Philippines

Department of Education

Region X

Republic of the Philippines Department of Education Region X 20 11 ANNUAL REPORT
Republic of the Philippines Department of Education Region X 20 11 ANNUAL REPORT

2011

ANNUAL REPORT

Republic of the Philippines Department of Education

Region X

Division of Lanao Del Norte

Annual Report

2011

Republic of the Philippines Department of Education Region X Division of Lanao Del Norte Annual Report

Contents

---

Note to Fellow Stakeholders and Partners

4

Framework

6

Profile: Lanao Del Norte

8

Part 1 Major Performance Areas

Status of Basic Education Resources

10

Enrolment

11

Schools

12

Division Office Staff and Teachers

12

Teacher Deployment Analysis

13

Instructional Room Analysis

14

School Furniture Analysis

15

Performance Indicators

16

 

Public Elementary Schools

17

Public Secondary Schools

18

National Achievement Test

19

Divisional NAT Scores Vs. Set Standards

19

Current Vs. Past NAT Scores

20

Divisional NAT Scores V. Scores of Others

21

Part 2

Programs and Projects

Writing to Learn

 

23

Peace Village VI

24

School Building Program

25

Universal Kindergarten Program

26

Alternative Learning System

27

Brigada Eskwela

28

Arabic Language and Islamic Values Education

28

Special Education Program

29

Note to Fellow Stakeholders and Partners

From your Schools Division Superintendent

and Partners From your Schools Division Superintendent "It wasn’t exactly an excellent year in terms of

"It wasn’t exactly an excellent year in terms of performance, but it wasn’t a bad one either. Performance did momentarily swerve off course during the year, using standard indicators, but not so wide and wild as to keep performance from moving forward on the average. In nautical parlance, the Division’s ship of performance “yawed”."

Check your swing! Steer into a steady course!

I have gone over the Division’s performance re- cord for 2011 and I am pleased to give this re- port.

It wasn’t exactly an excellent year in terms of performance, but it wasn’t a bad one either. Performance did momentarily swerve off course during the year, using standard indicators, but not so wide and wild as to keep performance from moving forward on the average. In nauti- cal parlance, the Division’s ship of performance “yawed”.

It has, in fact, been yawing for the past five years, as if in imitation of life’s up-down cycle. And while it has done so, we are encouraged by the fact that performance stayed on its progres- sive course.

The table right below points precisely to this obvious trend, using the same four key indica- tors set by the Central Office, over a period of 5 school years.

set by the Central Office, over a period of 5 school years. Going by the first

Going by the first three indicators for which five-year data are available (i.e., net enrolment ratio, school leaver rate, and completion rate), performance is certainly better in the 5th year (2011-2012) than in the 1st year (2007-2008), de- spite the fluctuating figures for the in-between years. This appears more evident in the average figures for both levels over a four-year period, which show an improvement of 14 percentage- points by the end of the 4th year.

The average NAT scores in both levels, however, have chosen to take a better course – one that moves forward steadily. There’s no yawing: any year’s average score is always higher than the preceding one.

My Report for 2010 concluded with a call for 2011, enjoining all of us to “steer a steady course!” The call assumed that our “ship” was on the right course and needed only a steady steering as she was going through 2011. We know now that performance swung slightly off course, on account of which the helm’s order stays, with the necessary changes: Check your swing! Steer into a steady course!

Dr. Maria Luisa B. Mutia, ceso v

Schools Division Superintendent

Framework

As in the past years, work and activities under- taken by the Division over the year 2010 used as framework a program logic model that is graphi- cally illustrated in Figure 1 below. Following the standard logic modelling approach, the Division’s model follows the basic Input-Process-Output-Out- come chain, in compliance with DepED Order No. 61, s. 2005. Beginning with the end in mind, the four major links are broadly described as follows:

Outcome – the intended change that is expected to happen among the identified stakeholders or beneficiaries in terms of improvement in status, function, behavior, knowledge, skills, or attitude.

Output – direct product of work or activities which serve as stepping stone to achieving the stated outcome.

Process – the activities or work done using avail- able resources to yield the planned output.

Input – the human, material, financial, organiza- tional and other resources made available for do- ing the set work and activities.

The model shows how the Division works and to what end, and thus illustrates our “theory of change” as well. Assumed in the model are the cause-and-effect relationships between and among the components directed toward the achievement of the stated Outcome in synergistic fashion.

The aimed-for Outcome – “Functional literacy of all Filipinos in Lanao del Norte achieved” – draws from the centrally set outcome of attaining functional literacy for all Filipinos nationwide, and thus en- sures the alignment of Division activities with those of the Central and Regional offices.

The stepping stones to attaining the Outcome are the three Major Final Outputs, stated as follows:

MFO 1 - Access to quality basic education in schools

provided;

MFO 2 - Access to quality basic education through

Alternative Learning System provided; and

MFO 3 - Regulatory and developmental service poli-

cies implemented.

Since these Outputs, too, are centrally set per

DepED Order No. 61, s. 2005, adapting them as the

Division’s own ensures again a tight fit with the

work and directions of the Central and the Regional

Offices.

More than this, what the model aims to gain is

the needed fit and alignment within the Divisional

organization itself. The Process component of the

model covers precisely those Key Activities that are

derived from or called for by the intended MFOs.

It is assumed that the completion of these activi-

ties will yield the corresponding MFO following the

theorized causal chain.

In the same manner, the Key Activities provide the

criteria for knowing and choosing the right Input

items, such as the estimate of budgetary support

needed, to spur, complete or sustain a given pro-

gram, project or activity. Overall, the model car-

ries the advantage of allowing the organization to

march in step toward a common end. It offers a tool

for finding our own bearing and locating the role

of each unit and individual members in the whole

scheme of things.

LOGIC MODEL FOR ACHIEVING FUNCTIONAL LITERACY

DepED Division of Lanao Del Norte

Human, material, financial and other resources earmarked and used to spur, complete or sustain the matching activities, as spelled out in detail below.

other resources earmarked and used to spur, complete or sustain the matching activities, as spelled out
other resources earmarked and used to spur, complete or sustain the matching activities, as spelled out
other resources earmarked and used to spur, complete or sustain the matching activities, as spelled out
the matching activities, as spelled out in detail below. accreditation schemes for 3.2 Implementation of
the matching activities, as spelled out in detail below. accreditation schemes for 3.2 Implementation of
the matching activities, as spelled out in detail below. accreditation schemes for 3.2 Implementation of
the matching activities, as spelled out in detail below. accreditation schemes for 3.2 Implementation of

accreditation schemes for

3.2

Implementation of

service providers

School-Based Management approach

3.1 Implementation of the

School-Based Management approach 3.1 Implementation of the literacy, continuing education, programs & projects on

literacy, continuing education,

programs & projects on basic

and sustainability/lifelong learning

2.1

Implementation of

sustainability/lifelong learning 2.1 Implementation of Scholarship Program schemes 1.4   programs and

Scholarship Program schemes

1.4

 

programs and projects on

1.3

 

secondary educational

1.2

 

elementary educational

 

1.1

Implementation of

cultural diversity

Implementation of

services

Provision of public

services

elementary and pre-

Provision of public

services elementary and pre- Provision of public MFO 1 Access to quality basic education in schools
MFO 1 Access to quality basic education in schools provided MFO 2 Access to quality
MFO 1
Access to quality
basic education in
schools provided
MFO 2
Access to quality
basic education
thru Alternative
Learning System
provided
MFO 3
Regulatory and
developmental
service policies
implemented

OUTCOME Functional literacy of all Filipinos in Lanao del Norte achieved

Input

Key Activity

Major Final Output

Outcome

Profile: Lanao Del Norte

T he province of Lanao del Norte is strategically located in Northern Mindanao along the northwest

and southwest coasts of the island. The province serves as the land bridge of the Zamboanga peninsula to the rest of Mindanao. It also serves as the gateway to the cities of Pagadian, Tangub, Oroquieta and Ozamis. Below are other significant facts and figures:

Land Area:

Population: 483,062

Income Class: Second class

Number of Municipalities:

Number of Barangays :

3,092 sq. km.

463

22

Major Dialect:

Cebuano, Maranao

Major Industry:

Agriculture

THE DIVISION OFFICE

Six years following the creation of the province of Lanao del Norte, the schools division was di- vided into two: the Lanao del Norte and Iligan City Schools Divisions.

The new Division has 22 school districts cov- ering 329 elementary schools and 15 private elementary schools. It is staffed by a total of 2,904 teaching and non-teaching personnel in the elementary level.

A total of 31 public and 21 private high schools serve the secondary educational needs of the community. There are 733 teaching and non- teaching personnel for the secondary level.

and non- teaching personnel for the secondary level. Top: Region X area (colored) in Mindanao; Lanao

Top: Region X area (colored) in Mindanao; Lanao del Norte in circle. Bottom: Enlarged map of Lanao del Norte showing its 22 municipalities, each playing host to a school district

PART 1 MAJOR Performance AREAS
PART 1 MAJOR Performance AREAS
PART 1 MAJOR Performance AREAS
PART 1 MAJOR Performance AREAS

PART 1

PART 1 MAJOR Performance AREAS
PART 1 MAJOR Performance AREAS

MAJOR

Performance

AREAS

Status of Basic Education Resources

T here is nothing like a good and handy

source of data. For this report, and

past reports for that matter, the Basic

Education Information System (BEIS) has served

the purpose well. It has been helpful in drawing

out figures and information with which to

know and show the Status of Basic Education

Resources in the Division of Lanao del Norte.

The BEIS builds its statistical database using a straightforward count of items, from schools at different levels, the school districts, and the Division itself. Thus it feeds for example, the automated generation of data for pupil-teach- ers analysis, pupil-instructional room analysis, pupil-furniture analysis, and more.

The BEIS data also come handy for planning,

preparing the budget, allocating resources, and setting performance targets. These are also used for generating management summaries on various items when needed. A reliable database has helped the Division identify and provide new teaching positions, give priority to schools suffering from teacher shortage, and rationalize the deployment of newly hired teachers.

BEIS data have allowed us to know where and when new classrooms are needed for DepEd’s School Building Program and ensure that school desks and armchairs go to those schools that need them the most.

Enrolment

Public and private schools enrolment (Table 1) for both elementary and secondary levels increased by only 2%. The combined total stands at 121,536, up from 118,656 enrollees. Public and private elementary enrolment registered a total of 91,763 pupils - 2,499 pupils more, or up by 3%, over last SY's. Public and private secondary schools' com- bined enrolment now stands at 29,775, up by only one percent. Private elementary posted the highest in- crease at 22%. Private secondary enrolment went down by one percent. Figure 1 below illustrates the enrolment data.

one percent. Figure 1 below illustrates the enrolment data. Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of
one percent. Figure 1 below illustrates the enrolment data. Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of

Schools

One public and 2 private elemen- tary schools increased the total number of schools to 399 (Table 2). No new schools for either pub- lic or private secondary level were added to the previous SY's total of 52 schools.

were added to the previous SY's total of 52 schools. Office Staff and Teachers Seventy nine

Office Staff and Teachers

Seventy nine more teachers have beefed up the Divi-

sion for 2011: 24 in public elementary and 55 in public

secondary. Total teaching staff for public elementary

and secondary stands at 3,138. (More in Table 3.)

elementary and secondary stands at 3,138. (More in Table 3.) Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division

Teachers Deployment Analysis

The Teacher Deployment Analysis

uses the Pupil-Teacher Ratio (PTR) for the elementary level and the Student-Teacher Ratio (STR) for the secondary level as indicators of the status of teacher deploy- ment in schools, as shown in Table 4. If the benchmark PTR or STR is one teacher for every 35 - 39.99 learners (code yellow):

- 105 (32%) elementary schools

would fall below the standards; 225 (68%) would meet or exceed them;

- 25 (81%) high schools would fall

below the standards; only 6 (19%) would meet or exceed them.

The Quick Count Module of the Basic Education Information System (BEIS) uses the rainbow spectrum for the Teacher Deployment Analysis, Instructional Room Analysis and the School Furniture Analysis. It uses as code a range of col- ors that are arranged in the order of varying characteristics of schools in terms of provision of teachers, classroom and school furniture.

of provision of teachers, classroom and school furniture. Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of Lanao
of provision of teachers, classroom and school furniture. Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of Lanao
of provision of teachers, classroom and school furniture. Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of Lanao

Instructional Room Analysis

The Instructional Room Analysis shows the availability of classrooms in the elementary and secondary levels relative to the number of learners, known as Classroom to Pupil Ratio (CPR) or Classroom to Student Ratio (CSR). The ideal ratio set by law is 1:45, color code blue in Table 5. - Seventy-four percent, 244 of all elementary schools and 48% or 15 of all high schools meet the ideal ratio. - Eighty-six elementary and 16 high schools have yet to meet the ratio.

elementary and 16 high schools have yet to meet the ratio. Annual Report 2011 - DepED
elementary and 16 high schools have yet to meet the ratio. Annual Report 2011 - DepED
elementary and 16 high schools have yet to meet the ratio. Annual Report 2011 - DepED

School Furniture Analysis

The School Furniture Analysis

gives an idea on the availability of classroom seats for learners. The set standard is one seat for every learner, color code yellow in Table 6 below. By this standard:

- 250 elementary schools, 76% of

total, and 25 high schools, 81% of total, fall below it; and

- 81 elementary schools, 24% of

total, and 6 high schools, 19% of total, meet or exceed it.

total, and 6 high schools, 19% of total, meet or exceed it. Annual Report 2011 -
total, and 6 high schools, 19% of total, meet or exceed it. Annual Report 2011 -
total, and 6 high schools, 19% of total, meet or exceed it. Annual Report 2011 -

Performance Indicators

Performance Indicators Performance indicators are used to mea- sure the outcome or impact of the programs

Performance indicators are used to mea- sure the outcome or impact of the programs and projects implemented by the Division. These may also indicate the quality of edu- cation delivered to learners. If DepED work is a journey, then the indicators are the sign- posts along the way, which tell us how far we have gone and how far more we have to go. Our destination, following the logi- cal framework discussed above is a state in which all Filipinos in Lanao del Norte are functionally literate. Hence, such indicators as enrolment, graduation rate, dropout rate, and the like, are particularly helpful in evalu- ating performance.

We have formed a set of key DepED indica- tors in terms of which we have attempted to measure work progress and performance over a period of three school years from 2009 - 2010 to 2011 - 2012. For quick reference, each selected indicator is described in Box 1 below.

Box 1

Selected Key Performance Indicators

This Indicator

Answers the question:

Gross Enrolment

How many children from among the enrollable population (e.g., ages 6-11 years old) are actually enroled in a given school year?

Ratio

Net Enrolment

How many children from among the enrollable population within the same age range are actually enroled in a given school year?

Ratio

Cohort Survival

How many learners who enter Grade I (or 1st Year High School) get to finish Grade VI (or 4th Year HS)?

Rate

Completion Rate

How many Grade 1 or 1st Year HS entrants who finish Grade 6 or 4th Year HS – do so in 6 years or 4 years, respectively?

Graduation Rate

How many of those enroled in the terminal year get to graduate in the same SY?

Promotion Rate

How many learners get promoted to the next higher grade or year level?

Repetition Rate

How many repeaters are there in a given year?

School Leaver Rate

How many dropouts and repeaters are there in the previous SY?

Failure Rate

How many learners failed a given grade or year level

Retention Rate

How many learners stay in school for the following SY

Dropout Rate

How many enrolled learners drop out of school in a given year?

Public Elementary Schools

The year 2011 for the Division has proved to be a "bust" year in terms of the official indicators, as shown in Table 7 - in stark contrast to 2010's "boom" performance. The two biggest gainers last year - Cohort Survival Rate and Completion Rate - swung for 2011 into being the two big- gest losers. Other indicators showed slight increases low- er than last year's.

One other way of looking at performance for the SY un- der review is by looking back at prior SY's performance by the same indicators and compare the two. Table 7 shows the figures. The cor- responding line chart plots the changes over the period covered.

line chart plots the changes over the period covered. Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of
line chart plots the changes over the period covered. Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of

Public Secondary Schools

Public secondary school perfor- mance by selected indicators has gone from last year's bad to this year's worse, as Table 8 shows and Figure 9 illustrates graphi- cally.

as Table 8 shows and Figure 9 illustrates graphi- cally. Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division
as Table 8 shows and Figure 9 illustrates graphi- cally. Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division

National Achievement Test

Performance measurement also uses the National Achievement Test or NAT results as indicator. The results serve the purpose by them- selves. But to optimize their use, we've tried to set them against the backdrop of the following:

ƒ Set standards;

ƒ Past scores; and

ƒ Scores of others.

Divisional NAT Scores

The NAT scores across all DepED di-

visions nationwide indicate a corre- sponding qualitative value, as fol- lows:

75% and above = mastery of the subject

Using these as the set standards, how does the Division fare for the current SY?

Public Grade 6 NAT The Division's Grade 6 NAT scores in

< 75% to 50%

= near mastery

all key learning areas have consis-

< 50%

= low mastery

tently improved from year to year

50% = low mastery tently improved from year to year LOW MASTERY NEAR MASTERY MASTERY OF
50% = low mastery tently improved from year to year LOW MASTERY NEAR MASTERY MASTERY OF
50% = low mastery tently improved from year to year LOW MASTERY NEAR MASTERY MASTERY OF
50% = low mastery tently improved from year to year LOW MASTERY NEAR MASTERY MASTERY OF
50% = low mastery tently improved from year to year LOW MASTERY NEAR MASTERY MASTERY OF

LOW MASTERY

low mastery tently improved from year to year LOW MASTERY NEAR MASTERY MASTERY OF SUBJECT Annual

NEAR MASTERY

tently improved from year to year LOW MASTERY NEAR MASTERY MASTERY OF SUBJECT Annual Report 2011

MASTERY OF SUBJECT

(Table 9) and seem set to inhabit the "Mastery of the Subject" range (Figure 10). Math and English have joined Filipino and Hekasi in that prime range, leav- ing Science alone in the "Near Mastery" range.

The improvement is enough to pull up the average Grade 6 NAT score to 77%, relocating overall Grade 6 performance from "Near Mastery" to "Mastery of the Subject" range.

Public Secondary NAT Public secondary NAT scores (Table 10) have also con- tinued to improve by set standards, but not high enough to move the average score into the next, up- per range. All learning areas scored increases, except Science. From scoring an embarassing low the previ- ous year, Araling Panlipunan successfully managed a long steep climb with a score of 67%, from previous year's 46%.

The challenge remains: set a steady course toward "Mastery of the Subject". It's not an easy one, but neither is it beyond reach. The average score is just 12 percentage-points away from the threshold. Math score is the nearest with around 68%, closely followed by AP.

is the nearest with around 68%, closely followed by AP. Current Vs. Past NAT Scores Public

Current Vs. Past NAT Scores

Public elementary NAT scores for the year under re- view in all learning areas chalked up only modest increases at an average of three percentage points, down by 5 points compared with the 8-point increase over the prior period (Table 11).

Math redeemed itself by pulling a high of 10-point in- crease, as against a one-point increase over the prior period. English and Science and HEKASI and Filipino went the opposite of Math's way by gaining far lower increases for the year under review compared to those in the previous year.

The public secondary NAT score increases and decreas- es are shown in Table 12. After pulling the most im- pressive performance for the previous year, Math and Science did relatively poorly for the year under review:

a 6-point increase for Math and a 3-point decrease for Science.

Araling Panlipunan seemed to have broken the spell of negative performances over the previous years by scoring a hefty 21-point increase for the year under

by scoring a hefty 21-point increase for the year under Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division

review. English, too, did good by scoring a 5-point in- crease.

Overall, the average increase across the 5 high school learning areas is 7 points for the period under review, up by only one point for the previous period.

Divisional NAT Scores Vs. Scores of Others

The Division’s average NAT scores across elementary and secondary learning areas exceed the Regional and National averages. Grade 3 NAT beats the National average by 10 percentage points (Table 13); Grade 6 NAT exceeds the Regional average by 8 points, the Na- tional by 9 (Table 14); Secondary NAT scores 13 points more than the Regional average and 14 points more than the National average(Table 15).

and 14 points more than the National average(Table 15). By these average scores, the 12 Divisions

By these average scores, the 12 Divisions in Region X may get their corresponding ranks to compare their standing among themselves. For Grade 6 NAT, DepED Lanao del Norte ranks 6; secondary, rank 2.

6 NAT, DepED Lanao del Norte ranks 6; secondary, rank 2. Annual Report 2011 - DepED
6 NAT, DepED Lanao del Norte ranks 6; secondary, rank 2. Annual Report 2011 - DepED
6 NAT, DepED Lanao del Norte ranks 6; secondary, rank 2. Annual Report 2011 - DepED
PART 2 Programs & Projects Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of Lanao del Norte
PART 2 Programs & Projects Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of Lanao del Norte
PART 2 Programs & Projects Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of Lanao del Norte
PART 2 Programs & Projects Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of Lanao del Norte

PART 2

PART 2 Programs & Projects Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of Lanao del Norte 2

Programs & Projects

PART 2 Programs & Projects Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of Lanao del Norte 2

Writing To Learn

Launched in 2007, the Writing To Learn Project is a modest initia- tive in support of the overall DepEd effort in Lanao del Norte to enhance student learning in major curricular areas, initially cover- ing demonstration classes, using writing as a tool for learning and processing knowledge. The project aims to deploy approach- es and strategies leading to increased appreciation for writing among the students and an improvement in their writing skills, both in Filipino and English.

The program was officially launched with start-up phase activities such as the following: Action planning for year one implementa- tion and holding of successive workshops for teachers and others involved on WTL orientation, approaches and strategies; work planning; evaluation; and similar others.

In SY 2007-2008, as a demonstrative activity, 9,000 Writing To Learn Journals were distributed to the honors classes in Grades 4 to 6 and First to Fourth Year High Schools. Other support ac- tivities were also undertaken to ensure a successful implementa- tion of the project like the conduct WTL Workshop for Teachers, launching of the Search for Best WTL Implementer and the build- ing of a WTL Monitoring Team composed of members of the Divi- sion Promotional Staff.

Since its launching four school years ago, the Division has con- sistently showed an increase in NAT results in all major learning areas. Although there is no scientific data that directly correlates NAT results to the Writing To Learn Program, supervisors have ob- served that children are now comfortable expressing themselves

in writing and even verbally. Learners also manifest higher level of confidence in terms of class participation i.e. raising and answer- ing questions, recitation. The journals also helped the teachers know what the students learned, what they did not learn and even the things they want to learn.

The practice of Writing to Learn has expanded to students in regu- lar classes. They took the initiative of using notebooks to serve as their Writing To Learn Journals. Some elementary and high school graduates offer these WTL journals to their parents dur- ing graduation as their way of honoring them and saying “thank you” to them. For SY 2011-2012, the division distributed another 14,000 Writing To Learn Journals to elementary and high school honors classes.

Learn Journals to elementary and high school honors classes. Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of
Peace Village VII The Peace Village initiative traces its beginning seven years back to a

Peace Village VII

The Peace Village initiative traces its beginning seven years back to a cultural exchange between groups of young people from La- nao del Norte and from the Smokey Mountain in Tondo, Manila. It offered a venue for Christian and Muslim youth to exchange knowledge about each other’s culture for deeper understanding. The seminal activity was called Cultural Youth Exchange for Peace and Prosperity.

That event in January 2004 inspired the holding of the Northern Mindanao Peace Village in May 2006. It was an experience rich and fulfilling enough to call for a second initiative six months later in November 2006. The goal has been to maintain the initiative as an annual event enlivened by new designs and approaches to make each one a unique fun-filled learning experience for fos- tering a culture of peace. And so it became an annual gather- ing. In October 2007, and again in October 2008 the children came again, journeying like pilgrims from far and wide, to gather together for peace. Since then, the holding of the Peace Village became an annual event that the children in Lanao del Norte and even the whole of Northern Mindanao look forward to.

Year after year, more and more partners, teachers and school children joined in this annual activity of celebrating peace. Mus- lims, Christians and Lumads have proven that we can all get-along because friendship has no borders. For the past seven years or so, we have joined hands in learning peace, teaching peace and reaching peace.

In October 2009, when the Peace Village turned 5, it has found a space of its own that signified its permanence. A real Peace Vil- lage was established in Kapatagan, Lanao del Norte. This has fur- ther boosted the divisions’ efforts at sustaining the peace initiative in the division. On the same site, a peace school was established, the Kalinaw-Kalilintad Integrated Peace School. The school serves the need for peace education among teachers and learners alike.

The 7th Peace Village held on October 2011 revolved around the theme, “In a world so BIG, discover that our differences are SMALL”. Activities were geared toward finding similarities and celebrating differences.

School Building Program

The Division’s School Building Program (SBP) addresses the class- room requirements of schools belonging to the red and black zones of the Basic Education Information System (BEIS). Red and black schools refer to areas experiencing acute classroom short- age. These are areas where the number of students divided by the existing number of classrooms result to a classroom – student ratio of 1:56 or more, areas where classrooms are temporary in nature or are makeshift structures and hose areas without any classroom at all.

The Division-led School Building Program’s total fund allocation was PhP7,845,000.00. PhP5,712,000.00 was allocated for the First Congressional District of Lanao del Norte where 8 elemen- tary schools have benefited. PhP2,133,000.00 was allocated for 37 elementary and 1 secondary schools in the Second Congres- sional District.

Total allocation for the regular School Building Program under the DPWH for CY 2011 was PhP5,196,000.00. The allocation for the First Legislative District was PhP3,703,000.00 with 2 beneficiary schools in the elementary level. The allocation for the Second Leg- islative District was PhP3,703,000.00 which helped 4 elementary schools in the second district of the division.

A total of Php3,486,000.00 was allocated for the School Building Repair and Rehabilitation in the First Congressional Dis- trict of the Division which was distributed to five (5) elementary schools and one (1) secondary school. While Php3,102,000.00 was allocated for the seven (7) elementary and one (1) secondary school in the Second Congressional District of the Division. For the improvement of the Water and Sanitation Facilities of the schools in the Division, a total of Php3,486,000.00 was distributed to five

(5) elementary schools and seven (7) secondary schools in the First Congressional District of the Division. While Php7,907,000.00 was distributed to 21 elementary and five (5) secondary schools in the Second Congressional District of the Division.

A total of PhP4,656,000.00 was allocated for the division un- der the School-Based Repair and Maintenance Scheme (SBRMS). PhP4,038,000.00 was allocated for the repair and maintenance of elementary schools, PhP336,000.00 for the division office while PhP436,000.00 was allocated for the repair and maintenance of secondary schools.

In CY 2011, a total allocation of Php6,534,660.00 was re- leased for the 2011 School Furniture Program of the division. Php3,288,000.00 was intended for procurement of elementary armchairs for Grades I-IV, Php 2,364,000.00 for procurement of elementary armchairs for Grades V-VI and Php882,660.00 for pro- curement of armchairs for the secondary level as well as teacher’s tables and chairs.

The Adopt-A-School Program shares the SBP goals of address- ing classroom shortage. This time, the support comes from the private and non-government sectors. Under the Adopt-A-School Program,Interested companies can sponsor school programs and projects based on a menu of assistance packages developed by the DepEd. Donor assistance can come in the form of classroom construction, teaching skills development, provision of computer and science laboratory equipment/apparatus and other educa- tional supplies and equipment. For SY2011-2012, a total of PhP 4,125,000.00 was donated to various schools in the form of class- room, playground, toilet and hand washing facilities.

Universal Kindergarten Program

In SY2011-2012, DepEd has started implementing the Universal

Public Kindergarten Program for 5-year olds.

Education was made mandatory and compulsory for entrance to Grade 1.

The Kindergarten

The Universal Kindergarten Program aims to: 1. Expand the cover- age of Kindergarten Education to reach 5-year old children in the poorest households; and 2. Improve their readiness and founda- tional skills to be ready for the primary grades.

For ten months from June 2011 to March 2012, two types of Kin- dergarten Education Program were implemented. These are:

1. The Kindergarten Regular Program (KRP) handled by perma- nent teachers holding two classes with 25-30 pupils per class. This division has a total of 28 KRP teachers.

2. The Kindergarten Volunteer Program (KVP) are classes orga- nized by volunteer teachers having the required educational quali- fications. They will provide Kindergarten education to 5-year olds who cannot be accommodated in the KRP. They will be receiving an allowance of P3,000.00 for a class of 25-30 pupils.

The division of Lanao del Norte has a total of 194 KVP teachers currently deployed in 260 schools. Teachers under the KRP and KVP were provided with the National Kindergarten Curriculum Guide which contains performance standards and daily learning

which contains performance standards and daily learning activities covering 10 months. This is also known as

activities covering 10 months. This is also known as the 40-week curriculum. About 90% of our kindergarten teachers underwent orientation cum training on the kindergarten curriculum.

A total of 453 Kindergarten classes were organized in SY 2011- 2012 with a total enrolment of 11,709 which is 40% higher than the enrolment in the previous school year.

Five Kindergarten buildings have been built and furnished in the division. They are located in Kolambugan, SND, Baroy, Kapata- gan and Pantao Ragat districts. Four more kindergarten buildings are under construction. Schools without Kindergarten classrooms utilized available rooms, libraries, science laboratories, home eco- nomic buildings and other available spaces.

Alternative Learning System

The educational thrust of the government is “Free Quality Educa- tion for All Filipinos”. In line with this, the Department of Educa- tion implements the Alternative Learning System (ALS) to help eradicate illiteracy in parallel efforts with the formal education. The ALS is built around a uniquely non-formal curriculum and uses a range of innovative learning strategies designed to break down traditional barriers of time, accessibility and resources to enable learners to develop their skills and competencies.

The priority clients of the alternative learning system (ALS) are the marginalized learners consists of street children, indigenous peoples, farmers, fisher folks, women, adolescents, solo parents, children in conflict areas not reached by the formal school system, rebel returnees, and others.

ALS is flexible. It is an anytime, anywhere learning. It uses inter- active modules and learning sessions are conducted at commu- nity learning centers (CLC) at an agreed schedule between the learners and the learning facilitator. Primarily, ALS is anchored on the teaching of life skills that goes beyond obtaining information but Is more concerned about application of the competencies and values to develop within the individual the power to make deci- sions towards improving the quality of his or her life.

The ALS in Lanao del Norte offers various nonformal education programs that serve the out-of-school adults (OSA), the out-of- school youths (OSY), and the differently-abled individuals living in far-flung areas. ALS programs include: 1. Literacy cum Liveli- hood and Skills Training, 2. Barangay Action on Illiteracy Eradi- cation (BAILE), 3. Barangay Reading Program (BARPO), and, 4. Accreditation & Equivalency (A&E) System.

The various components of the Alternative Learning System is made possible by the division’s front-line implementers. 21 Mo- bile teachers, 22 District ALS coordinators and more that 85 In- structional Managers and facilitators assume varied roles in the community – they teach in make-shift classrooms in fields, play- ground, mosques or at any place convenient to learners, they give health and sanitation lectures, teach basic cooking skills, and even settle disputes and conflicts in communities.

A new ALS program was launched in September 2011, the Radio- based Instruction (RBI) Program in partnership with DXVL 107.7 lite FM and the LGU of Lala North District. This program utilizes radio broadcasting as an alternative mode of teaching and learn- ing. The RBI is now aired three times a week at 7:00 to 7:30 in the morning.

now aired three times a week at 7:00 to 7:30 in the morning. Annual Report 2011

Brigada Eskwela

Brigada Eskwela is an annual event that gathers volunteers within the school community to help in the maintenance and minor repair of public schools nationwide. The division of Lanao del Norte School Division, with all its elementary schools and secondary schools, has been actively participating in the Brigada Eskwela program of the Department of Education since its launching in CY 2003.

Various stakeholders volunteered their labor and materials for this school year’s week-long activity, also known as Schools Mainte- nance Week. School officials, parents, local officials and students trooped to their nearest public schools to restore chairs and desks, repaint walls, fix leaky water pipes, patch roofs and repair win- dows in preparation for the opening of classes.

The division took pride in streamlining efforts of various stake- holders to address common problems usually associated with the opening of classes. The activity also helped ensure that facilities are ready and conducive for learning, by the time classes are of- ficially opened in June.

For CY 2011, Brigada Eskwela was conducted on May 23-28 but preparatory activities to ensure wider participation of stakeholders started as early as January of the said year. The total cash and construction materials donated amounted to PhP 5,145,999.00. Volunteers from school communities reached a total of 74,253 with an estimated volunteer services cost of PhP23,262,184.50.

All the efforts during the Brigada Eskwela paid off. Schools were ready for the opening of classes on June 6. Linamon Central El- ementary School of Linamon District was awarded “Best Imple- menter for the Small Central School Category” during the National Awarding Ceremonies. A similar award was given to Fausto Alvia Memorial Elementary School for the Non-Central School category. The Arabic Language and Islamic Values Education (ALIVE) is a peace building strategy where Muslim Filipino children are given an opportunity to learn and understand their own language and culture. ALIVE classes are handled by asatidz or Muslim teachers.

Arabic Language And Islamic Values Education (ALIVE)

The integration of the ALIVE program in schools within the divi- sion initially started in SY 2004-2005 and was fully implemented in SY 2006-2007 after the first National Arabic Qualifying Exami- nation was conducted.

Currently, the division has the highest number of Asatidz in the whole nation. A total of 268 muslim teachers are deployed in 130 schools covering 19 school districts. Eighty six Asatidz are Accel- erated Teacher Education Program (ATEP) scholars holding a de- gree in Bachelor in Elementary Education major in Islamic Values and Arabic Language), 13 have passed the Licensure Examination forTeachers and 2 are University of Brunei Darussalam scholars who earned 1 year certificate on Teaching Arabic as a Second Language and School Administration.

Arabic as a Second Language and School Administration. Annual Report 2011 - DepED Division of Lanao

Special Education Program

Every child has a right to an educational program that is suitable to his needs. Special Education shares with regular education basic re- sponsibilities of the educational system to fulfil the right of the child to develop to his full potential.

The ultimate goal of special education is the integration or mainstream- ing of learners with special needs into the regular school system and eventually in the community. It aims to develop the maximum poten- tial of the child with special needs to enable him to become self-reliant and provide him with the opportunities for a full and happy life.

The program also aims to develop and maximize the child’s learning competencies, as well as the inculcation of values to make the learners with special needs a useful and effective member of society.

The Division’s SPED center is located at the Maranding Central El- ementay School. There are three SPED classes in operation where learners are grouped based on their special needs. These classes are handled by teachers who specialize in Special Education. The division is catering to the special needs of 60 children, 10 are visually im- paired, 21 are hearing impaired, and 29 are mentally-challenged.

21 are hearing impaired, and 29 are mentally-challenged. These special children have shown very positive developments

These special children have shown very positive developments in as far as basic learning is concerned. They have learned basic social in- teraction while some even excelled in sports. 2 mentally-challenged children are now partially mainstreamed into the regular class. All hearing impaired learners are now mainstreamed in the Alternative Learning sessions where they are learning basic computer skills.