Sunteți pe pagina 1din 450

SCHUBERT

THE COMPLETE SONG TEXTS


English translations by Richard Wigmore Introduction and Schubert calendar by Graham Johnson

FRANZ SCHUBERT
(17971828)

THE COMPLETE
including piano-accompanied part songs and ensembles

SONGS
SONG TEXTS
English translations by

RICHARD WIGMORE
Introduction and Schubert calendar by

GRAHAM JOHNSON

The Hyperion Schubert Edition original discs available separately as CDJ33001 through to CDJ33037 Recorded between February 1987 & September 1999 in Rosslyn Hill Unitarian Chapel, Hampstead, London; All Saints, East Finchley, London; St Pauls, New Southgate, London; Henry Wood Hall, London; St Georges, Brandon Hill, Bristol; Kimpton Parish Church, Hertfordshire; Elstree Studios; & Teldec Classics Studio, Berlin Recording Engineers: Antony Howell, Tony Faulkner & Julian Millard Recording Producers: Mark Brown & Martin Compton Executive Producers: Edward Perry & Joanna Gamble Songs by Schuberts friends and contemporaries available separately as a boxed set of three discs CDJ33051/3 Recorded in August 2001, March & October 2004 in All Saints, East Finchley, London Recording Engineer: Julian Millard Recording Producer: Mark Brown Executive Producer: Simon Perry This collection 40 discs plus this accompanying book CDS44201/40 Recordings remastered and re-ordered by Mark Brown P & C Hyperion Records Limited, London, 2005 This book available separately as BKS44201/40 Printed in England by Caligraving Ltd Introduction and Schubert calendar by Graham Johnson C 2005 Translations by Richard Wigmore C 2005 Design, indexes and typesetting by Nick Flower, Hyperion Records Ltd C 2005 Illustrations, except for accredited photographs, provided by Graham Johnson Illustrations by Martha Griebler reprinted by kind permission of the artist Martha Griebler, Manhartstrasse 5, A2000 Stockerau, Austria

HYPERION RECORDS LIMITED PO BOX 25, LONDON SE9 1AX info@hyperion-records.co.uk www.hyperion-records.co.uk

ii

CONTENTS
The Hyperion Schubert Edition: An accompanists memories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page iv en franais . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page xi auf Deutsch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page xix

The Complete Songs of Franz Schubert


A Schubert Calendar 17971811 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 1 A Schubert Calendar 18121813 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 8 A Schubert Calendar 1814 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 30 A Schubert Calendar 1815 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 38 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 42 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 52 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 63 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 74 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 85 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 95 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 105 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 114 A Schubert Calendar 1816 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 116 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 127 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 140 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 160 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 170 A Schubert Calendar 1817 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 172 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 188 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 199 A Schubert Calendar 1818 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 201 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 208 A Schubert Calendar 1819 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 210 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 217 A Schubert Calendar 1820 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 224 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 227 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 234 A Schubert Calendar 1821 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 235 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 242 A Schubert Calendar 1822 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 244 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 251 A Schubert Calendar 1823 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 258 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 260 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 28 Die schne Mllerin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 268 A Schubert Calendar 1824 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 29 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 281 A Schubert Calendar 1825 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 285 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 291 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 298 A Schubert Calendar 1826 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 32 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 306 A Schubert Calendar 1827 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 313 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 33 Winterreise part 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 317 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 34 Winterreise part 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 325 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 333 A Schubert Calendar 1828 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 339 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 36 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 343 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 37 Schwanengesang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 349

Songs by Schuberts friends and contemporaries


Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Haydn (b1732) to Unger (b1774) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 38 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tomaek (b1774) to Sechter (b1788) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 39 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meyerbeer (b1791) to Liszt (b1811) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disc 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 355 page 359 page 370 page 382

Indexes
Index of titles with cross-references to The Hyperion Schubert Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 393 Index of poets, composers and translators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 405 Index of performers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 422

iii

THE HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: AN ACCOMPANISTS MEMORIES The Hyperion Schubert Edition: An accompanists memories It took Franz Schubert eighteen years (18101828) to write his lieder. It has taken Hyperion Records exactly the same amount of time (19872005) to record all the songs, to issue them on thirty-seven separate discs (with over sixty solo singers), and now to re-issue the vocal music with piano in an edition remastered in the order of their composition. Otto Erich Deutsch established a chronology in his catalogue (1951); this was superseded by a posthumous second edition (1978) that re-dated many compositions while retaining Deutschs numerical sequence. This catalogue is now in itself out of date. Despite advances in Schubertian scholarship (paper tests and so on) work-order is a problem that will neither be solved entirely nor to everyones satisfaction. (Putting the songs in alphabetical order by title, as in John Reeds indispensable Schubert Song Companion, is a solution that is not possible on disc.) Some of the compositions dates are very precise (day, month and year), but sometimes only a month is known (which year?) or a year (which month?), and autographs are sometimes undated. Nevertheless, this is the first time in the history of the gramophone that the entire body of Schubert songs has been available to the listener in a chronological sequence. Included with the lieder are all the vocal quartets and other part songs with piano indeed a more accurate description of the set would be The Complete Vocal Music with Piano, although even this does not take into account a number of unaccompanied items that were included because they throw light on the accompanied settings of the same poem. There are forty discs in this new collection; thirty-seven of these feature the material already issued, and an extra three, more recently recorded, offer music by Schuberts friends and contemporaries. Some of these are songs he knew, music that inspired him; others are songs (often to texts which Schubert was later to set, or had already set) created by people whose lives in one way or another touched his own even if at a distance. Every composer on these three supplementary discs was working during some part of Schuberts lifetime. The Hyperion Schubert Edition came into being because of the daring and initiative of the late Ted Perry, founder of the label that contains his own name in its second and third syllables. In the middle to late 1980s it was a particular joy to be caught up in the orbit of Teds confidence, his optimism and generosity of spirit, and his unswerving belief in his chosen artists. Although he was a businessman, he trusted his own ears more than the critics, and he was not afraid to listen to his heart. At that happy time a favourable climate in the classical music industry provided strong winds in the sails of his enterprise. But this is to rush forward in the story. I had first met Mr Perry in 1978 when I accompanied the tenor Martyn Hill in a recording for another company he had not yet founded his own. Fortunately Ted took a liking to my work and I was among the earlier artists to appear on his new label. The founder singers of The Songmakers Almanac featured in a series of Hyperion LPs: Voices of the Night, Venezia, Voyage Paris, Espaa and Le Bestiaire. I then proposed an album of two LPs, a Schubertiade featuring these same four singers Felicity Lott, Ann Murray, Anthony Rolfe Johnson and Richard Jackson in four, differently themed programmes, one per side, that combined well known and rarely heard Schubert lieder. Our Schubertiade was very well received in early 1985 (there was even a Gramophone cover), but what I did not realize was that these discs were an important audition for me, not only as far as Ted was concerned, but also Lucy, the ardent Schubertian who was the lady in his life at the time, and who had turned pages for me at the sessions. One night when the three of us were having dinner, Ted asked me what I would really like to do in terms of recording; I replied (as would most accompanists): All the Schubert songs, of course. In a few seconds the deal was done over a glass of wine, and a phone call the next morning proved Ted a man who meant to keep his word. This project was considered dotty by many connoisseurs at the time; the great critic Desmond Shawe-Taylor assured a colleague that it would never be completed, despite its promising beginnings. But that again rushes forward in the story; how to begin had been the big question. Ted and I knew that such a bold project needed the support of an auspicious singer to get it started. I had accompanied Dame Janet Baker in several recitals since 1978, and I knew that her Schubert iv

THE HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: AN ACCOMPANISTS MEMORIES

repertoire was extensive. In the late 1960s Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau had invited Dame Janet to record all the womens songs with him for DGG. On grounds of contractual exclusivity EMI refused her permission to do so; she told me she was devastated, and angry, to have to turn down such a splendid opportunity. The great baritone clearly saw her as his only possible female collaborator for Schubert, and embarked on his project (29 LPs) with Gerald Moore, and without a female colleague. The public was thus denied a Schubert song edition that would have filled in many of the gaps in those enormous light- and dark-blue boxed sets that Fischer-Dieskau made for DGG for issue in the early 1970s. I had first learned my Schubert, as everyone did of my generation, in listening to these ground-breakings sets, as well as earlier EMI recitals, although by the time I embarked on the Hyperion project I had an extensive collection of 78s covering the work of the earlier Schubert singers Karl Erb, Elena Gerhardt, Hans Hotter, Gerhard Hsch, Lotte Lehmann, Elisabeth Schumann, not to mention Fischer-Dieskaus own contemporaries Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Hermann Prey and so on. In a category on his own was Sir Peter Pears, whom I had been privileged to accompany from time to time since 1972 and who was my true master. His Winterreise, accompanied by Britten in Aldeburgh in 1971, had triggered my Damascene conversion, both to Schubert, and to the prospect of a life in accompanying. Dame Janet, no longer restricted by exclusivity, agreed to begin our series. I devised every programme in the series except that of Dame Janet. She came up with a list of songs which was a marvellous mix of the famous and the unknown, and it featured the two most famous poets of German literature, Goethe and Schiller. My only intervention was to suggest that we should drop Der Unglckliche (Pichler) because it did not fit into the GoetheSchiller theme. One of my regrets is that I did not press for all the strophes of D296 I was far too grateful to ask for anything extra. The recording sessions in February 1987 took place in Elstree two days of intense and concentrated work (sessions would eventually be allotted a more realistic three days). Dame Janets artistry ensured a prize-winning disc: her unique vocal colour, febrile yet vulnerable, and the magisterial conviction with which she governed subtleties of shape and rubato, launched the series with an appropriate mixture of gusto and dignity. It was agreed that I should provide the notes and commentaries. I remember how much I regretted that Gerald Moore (who had died the year before, as had Pears, and my own father) was not there to send his customary comments to his grandson-in-music, as he generously referred to me. At this time the horizons and the aspirations of the series were still local. Ted saw it as part of Hyperions brief to record fine British artists who had been unaccountably passed over by the bigger companies. After the Baker recording it was understood that we should continue the series with my own, more immediate, contemporaries. Stephen Varcoe, a great favourite of Teds and mine, recorded Volume 2 in October 1987. This included the first of Schuberts really long ballads (Der Taucher) but at under 60 minutes this was the shortest of the discs. I soon realized that if I was to include all of Schuberts songs I would have to be more careful to use the available time on the CDs to better advantage. There was a water theme to this disc poets are only one of many means to anthologize Schuberts lieder. Time seemed to stretch before us and a year passed before we continued with two further discs by artists whom I had long known and admired. Ann Murrays Volume 3 was recorded in November 1988; she is always the incomparable mistress of her material. The disc by her husband, the tenor Philip Langridge, also a mesmerizing artist, had actually been recorded in September. Because it seemed a good idea to alternate issues between male and female singers, Philips disc emerged after Anns, as Volume 4. These records (the theme of both is poetry by Schuberts Austrian friends) have been among the most admired in the series. The other disc made in September 1988 was the recital by Elizabeth Connell (Volume 5) Schubert and the Countryside, songs about nature. This opulent and exciting voice was ideal for the operatic breadth of the great Schiller ballad Klage der Ceres. It was impossible for me to plan out the allocation of songs for this series far in advance. Hyperion could not engage singers years ahead if we had had the clout of a great opera house v

THE HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: AN ACCOMPANISTS MEMORIES

vi

it would have been different but artists who were available would usually slip three days of recording into their timetable fairly late in the day, and in the absence of operatic or orchestral engagements. Who were to be my next singers? I did not really know, yet all the programmes had to be tailor-made with an actual voice and personality in mind. To avoid a pile-up at the end, it was a general rule never to allow any one singer too many well known songs. After more than a decade of Songmakers Almanac programmes, many of my closer colleagues trusted me to provide them with suitable material. For example, the night music for Volume 6, all lullabies and barcarolles (recorded in September 1989), was an exact fit for the seductive vocal talents of Anthony Rolfe Johnson who had already made a disc of Shakespeare settings for Hyperion, not to mention a distinguished Britten recital. The success of the series up to this point led to an important watershed. Why not, after all, ask artists from abroad to record for us? The redoubtable Elly Ameling came to Rosslyn Hill Chapel, Hampstead, in August 1989 to sing Schubert. Everything about these sessions was memorable, not least the consummate music-making of Ameling herself (who was reigning queen of European lieder singers) and the amazing working relationship between her own sharp ears and those of our producer Martin Compton. The songs were all from 1815 (the first disc in the series with a time-frame) and she had agreed to sing such unknown ballads as Minona in return for some of the really great songs (she called them plums) of the year. (I was delighted that in the end she liked Minona well enough to programme it in recitals with Rudolf Jansen.) After Amelings Volume 7 there was no longer any reason to be diffident about asking European singers to join us. More importantly, there was less reason for them to refuse. Of course the best British singers remained indispensable. Sarah Walkers recital (another record of nocturnal music) was issued as Volume 8; Stndchen was the first piece of extended choral music in the series so far. Sarah and I had worked together many times, in Britain, on tour in America, and also on a disc entitled Shakespeares Kingdom for Hyperion. Erlknig was recorded at the very last moment and in one take, with all the blazing imagination for which this singer is admired. In October 1989 Arleen Auger, an American resident in Europe, came to record Volume 9 (songs that had connections with plays and the theatre). She had trained as a violinist (I recall her in rehearsal deciding whether certain vocal phrases were up-bow or down) and her art was based on a musical schooling of the greatest purity and refinement. I had first accompanied Arleen in the late 1970s for a BBC broadcast when she was on the staff at the Frankfurt Conservatoire; I was now astonished by the transformation in her career and self-confidence. She is one of two star sopranos in our series (Lucia Popp is the other) who have died since their recordings. Arleens rendition of Schillers Thekla, a ghostly voice singing from the other side, was extremely moving at the time; it now seems to contain a heartbreaking prophecy. We continued on the basis of two to three recordings a year. This fitted Teds idea of how many new Schubert discs from Hyperion the record-buying public could cope with. There was still the ambition to finish by 1997, Schuberts bicentenary, which then seemed a long time ahead; some simple arithmetic at the time might have made us more realistic. In May 1990 Martyn Hill (that fine tenor to whom I owed my initial introduction to Ted) made another splendid record of 1815 songs, issued as Volume 10. A month later, Brigitte Fassbaender recorded Volume 11 Songs of Death. This great singer had suffered a personal bereavement just before the sessions and, not surprisingly, she approached this music with considerable angst. The intensity of her Ausstrahlung terrified all of us the atmosphere at Rosslyn Hill was highly charged as never before or since but subsequent recital encounters proved her an admirably warm-hearted friend. Right at the end of 1990 Marie McLaughlin came into the studio for a mixture of songs, both sacred and suggestive (Volume 13). The settings from Walter Scotts Lady of the Lake gave the programme an appropriately Scottish accent. These performances remain among my personal favourites of the series. When at the end of the sessions the beautiful (and happily married) Marie whispered that she needed a lift home (the microphone was still live), a phalanx of admirers materialized in seconds, competitively brandishing their car keys.

THE HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: AN ACCOMPANISTS MEMORIES

Some of Schuberts songs, particularly the earlier ones, require larger voices. The composer was not particularly kind to his singers in the rather impractical first phase of his song-writing career. The generously voiced Adrian Thompson, that most equable, kind-hearted and amusing of colleagues, undertook the demanding songs between 1812 and 1814 (The Younger Schubert, Volume 12). This was in February 1991, and I was already aware that I could not simply leave until last the considerable quantities of earlier music that showed the composers inexperience as well as his budding genius. There were two further recordings that year, back-to-back between 5 and 10 October. The first of these was Thomas Hampson, at the height of his considerable powers, singing texts inspired by Greek mythology. (Of Malcolm Crowthers many beautiful cover pictures for the series, the one for Volume 14 see disc 18 in this new set of Hampson in front of the Elgin marbles is particularly striking.) Hampson got so exasperated with himself during the recording of Amphiaraos that he threw a music stand from one end of the chapel to the other. A third, and final, programme of Schuberts nocturnal music was recorded by Dame Margaret Price, also temperamental in her Celtic way, but always the complete professional. One of the greatest British sopranos of all time, she was a singer I had accompanied in recitals all over the world for many years (at the time she lived just outside Munich). Her Volume 15 featured lieder that we had performed together for quite some time on the concert platform; the recording flew by in two days, considerably helped by the gin and tonics provided by Ted Perry (he thought Margaret had come to the end of her first session, but the proffered refreshment simply rekindled her energy for further work). The year 1992 was a glorious time for the project five discs with five star singers. Ted had clearly decided we had to get a move-on. This was also the last year that I could allow myself to draw on the ever-diminishing repertoire without giving serious thought to how I was going to shape the final product, the squaring of a seemingly impossible circle. April 1992 saw my first, and sadly only, encounter with Lucia Popp. This mesmerizing woman, dazzlingly intelligent, came briefly into my life, recorded happily, invited me to accompany some recitals the following year, and then died of a brain tumour eighteen months later. She shouldered some of the songs of 1816 (issued as Volume 17) with infinite grace and an amused nonchalance that was part of her Slovakian charm. If Arleens Thekla is haunting, brave Lucias Litanei is no less so (she knew she was ill at the time of the recording, we did not). One cannot go far in a Schubert song volume without confronting intimations of mortality. There were two recordings in May 1992: with Sir Thomas Allen in a programme of Schiller settings (Volume 16) which he undertook with his customary cheery energy and magical timbre (how well he copes with the heights of the inconsiderate young Schuberts tessitura), and with Peter Schreier (Volume 18, Schubert and the Strophic Song). I had first worked with Peter over a decade earlier in America. His arrival at Bristol for the recording was another turning point for the series; he seemed to bring with him the spirit of the age-old German lieder tradition and bestow its somewhat belated blessing on Hyperions enterprise. Even then he was no longer a young singer, but despite a lifelong problem with diabetes he showed unflagging vivacity and an artistic will-power that time and again allowed his performances to communicate the ageless enthusiasm of the young lover in the Schulze songs. At the end of June Felicity Lott (not yet a Dame), my colleague from Royal Academy of Music days and founder soprano of The Songmakers Almanac, recorded a programme of songs about flowers and nature (Volume 19). While it is always wonderful to meet new singers and tune in to new temperaments, my very special relationship with Flott allows me to draw on musical associations that go back for decades. I had reserved for this disc a handful of songs that we had often performed together, but as always she was eager to add to her vast repertoire. Music-making with this great artist (she has the most remarkable natural feeling for rhythm and tempo) has been at the core of my own development as a song accompanist. In October 1992 the Swiss soprano Edith Mathis (as it happens one of Schreiers favourite lieder-singing colleagues) contributed an anthology of songs from 1817 (Volume 21). This justly famous singer gave performances of unfailing style and

vii

THE HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: AN ACCOMPANISTS MEMORIES

judicious musicality she is a real Schubertian and I was heartbroken that her ill-health meant a last-minute cancellation of a Wigmore Hall recital some time later. The recordings of 1992 took care of the discs to be issued in 1993 and into 1994, but we were still only just over half-way. There was also a new generation of interesting and gifted singers who merited an appearance with the series. It is here that the concept of the Schubertiad, in effect the shared recital disc, was called into service. Because of the large backlog of recordings waiting to be issued we only recorded two discs in 1993. These were both Schubertiads (songs from 1815, supplementing Volumes 7 and 10) which were arranged into two different casts of four singers each. Volume 20 featured Patricia Rozario, the gifted Indian soprano with whom I had already worked for a long time; John Mark Ainsley, originally a pupil of Anthony Rolfe Johnson, with a glorious tenor voice; the sonorous and soulful bass Michael George; and a bespectacled young man who had impressed me mightily when I had been a judge at the Walter Grner lieder competition, another tenor, Ian Bostridge I remember thinking how well his voice suited the microphone during the first play-back sessions. Volume 22 featured the considerable liedersinging talents of the Scottish singers Lorna Anderson (soprano) and Jamie MacDougall (tenor); the distinguished Catherine Wyn-Rogers (mezzo) graces a cast rounded off by the young Simon Keenlyside (baritone), destined to become one of the countrys most exciting operatic singers, but devoted, by nature and temperament, to singing lieder (he was to record Volume 2 in our Schumann series in 1997). We must not forget the sensitive contributions of the mezzo Catherine Denley to a number of these ensembles. These concerted programmes became more and more the order of the day. A Goethe Schubertiad was recorded in May 1994 the first time since Volume 1 that the series had concentrated on this crucial poet in Schuberts life. Three of the singers, including Keenlyside, had already appeared on the Hyperion Edition, but this disc (Volume 24) also introduced the extraordinary German soprano, Christine Schfer. I had first worked with her in Songmakers recitals at the Wigmore Hall, and had been struck by her brilliant ability to colour and inflect words. She was to record the prize-winning first volume of The Hyperion Schumann Edition in 1995 but was snapped up by DGG for an exclusive contract soon afterwards. There was still room in September 1994 for a solo disc with that eloquent German tenor Christoph Prgardien, a master of contained style (Volume 23); his Harfner songs are superb, but he also undertook some of the more obscure songs of 1816 which required, and received, his great lieder-singing expertise. We also had sessions on Die schne Mllerin with Anthony Rolfe Johnson at about this time; we had worked many years together in The Songmakers Almanac and I had nearly made a disc of this cycle with him in Sweden; now seemed the time to make a permanent record of an interpretation that we had often given in the concert hall. In December 1994 the producer Mark Brown and I flew to Berlin to spend the day with Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau who recorded for us the poems by Wilhelm Mller that had not been set to music by Schubert. Once the spoken part of the disc was in the can there was a crisis. With the integrity and openness of the great artist that he is, Tony Rolfe Johnson pronounced himself dissatisfied by first edits of this Mllerin he had been fighting a cold at the sessions; we would have to do it over, but his tightly packed diary did not permit us to do this for some time. We already had the cover picture (here to be seen for the first time on disc 37), but Ted was understandably impatient to keep up the series impetus by issuing one of the long-awaited cycles with Fischer-Dieskaus participation. What were we to do? What about Ian Bostridge who could record it immediately? Well, Graham, said Ted, if you think he can do it, lets go with it ! The rest (after the rapturous reception of Volume 25, Die schne Mllerin, and Bostridges EMI contract) is gramophone history. By this point we had come to realize that completion by 1997 was going to be impossible. There were simply too many loose ends to tidy up. Volume 26 for example (An 1826 Schubertiad) contains recordings from four different dates in 1994, March 1995, and viii

THE HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: AN ACCOMPANISTS MEMORIES

February 1996 shortly before the discs release. Christine Schfer makes another appearance (a transfigured So lasst mich scheinen), as does John Mark Ainsley in top form for Nachthelle with mens chorus, pronounced damnably high at the time of its composition. One of my closest colleagues from Songmakers days, the invaluable baritone Richard Jackson, also sings a number of songs on this disc. Hyperion had undertaken to record not just the solo songs but all the piano-accompanied vocal music; this meant the ever-increasing appearance of choral singers at the sessions, more often than not conducted by the brilliant and versatile Stephen Layton. 1993 marked my first meeting with the German baritone Matthias Goerne. His particular genius, apart from his uncanny command of mezza voce in the pasaggio of the voice (as in the Schlegel Die Sterne), lies in his awareness of the differing interpretative choices that are possible with the tiniest variations of tempo and emphasis. He came into Hyperions sights at exactly the right time for two important discs: Schubert and the Schlegels (together with Schfer, Volume 27) recorded in early 1995, and Winterreise (Volume 30) recorded in the summer of 1996. He too graduated to an exclusive recording contract, in his case with Decca. There was only to be one further solo record, or at least I had hoped it would be a solo disc! This featured the songs of 18191820, sung by the Slovenian mezzo-soprano Marjana Lipovek. On the day before the recording sessions in London she announced that the long Mayrhofer setting Einsamkeit did not, after all, suit her (she had had the music in a suitable key for a long time). At this late stage of the edition, when every allocation was being carefully measured, there was no scope simply to lose twenty minutes from a CD. With just under an hour of the disc recorded by Lipovek, its issue was delayed (it was eventually Volume 29) to allow the gifted Canadian baritone Nathan Berg time to record the missing Mayrhofer cantata. On reflection, it is amazing that there were not many more problems of this kind over the years. The remainder of the discs were Schubertiads with different time-frames. Many of the artists who had contributed to the earlier issues were re-called to appear in these closing discs Ann Murray and Philip Langridge, both as fresh as ever, Stephen Varcoe for the very first Schubert songs of all (Volume 33), an array of tenors our old friends Martyn Hill and Adrian Thompson as well as new blood in Paul Agnew, Daniel Norman, Toby Spence and James Gilchrist. Anthony Rolfe Johnson returned for the Heine settings from Schwanengesang on the last disc of all (Volume 37). Neal Davies sang some of the bass songs with skill and relish. On occasion important artists, such as Nancy Argenta and Lynne Dawson, played a smaller role than befitted their experience there were also a large number of fine artists who did not participate (such as that great Schubertian, Ian Partridge, a matter of personal regret) for no better reason than that life did not work out that way. Nevertheless this series had turned, without trying, into a kind of aural snapshot of the gifted lieder singers of an entire generation. This provided a growing incentive to include appearances, even if brief, by younger singers who had come to prominence since we had begun in 1987, provided they would not mind singing only a few songs. Thus in the final volumes of the series we find a line-up of international sopranos: the voluminously voiced Christine Brewer, an American star able to negotiate the roller-coasters of early Schubert with astonishing ease, the German Juliane Banse (Schumann Volume 3, 1998), the British Geraldine McGreevy (the latters Schwestergruss is a personal favourite, and we made a Wolf recital for Hyperion in 2000). Among the male singers there are the GermanCanadian tenor Michael Schade, the British baritone Christopher Maltman (Schumann Volume 5, 2001), the Dutch Maarten Koningsberger (the latter featured prominently in Volume 28), the German Stephan Loges, and the Canadian Gerald Finley who plays a large and distinguished role in Volume 36, as well as shouldering the supplementary baritone songs for Volumes 38 to 40. These latter three records (issued for the first time here) also feature the compelling artistry of the soprano Susan Gritton, the mezzo Stella Doufexis (Schumann Volume 4, 1998), the perennial Ann Murray, as well as one of the most compelling tenors of the new British wave, Mark Padmore. ix

THE HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: AN ACCOMPANISTS MEMORIES

Perhaps we have talked enough about the singers. Godfather to the series was the late Eric Sams, a beloved friend and simply the greatest authority on lieder in the world. He saw, and marked, every one of my essays for the series and painstakingly turned me into a more competent writer whilst always remaining encouraging. (With a book of this size the decision not to reprint nearly a million words of commentaries on the songs themselves was inevitable. These are being prepared for separate publication by the Yale University Press.) In musicological realms I am also indebted to that great American lieder scholar and good friend, Susan Youens. We must not forget four wonderful intrumentalists Thea King (clarinet, Volume 9), David Pyatt (horn, Volume 37), Marianne Thorsen (violin, Volume 39) and Sebastian Comberti (cello, Volume 40). Eugene Asti played a piano duet accompaniment with me on Volume 36, as well as being responsible for a remarkable completion of the choral version of Gesang der Geister with piano. The work of the late Reinhard van Hoorickx, fervent Schubertian and indefatigable editor of fragments, features on very many of these discs. The production teams were crucial: the gifted Martin Compton and Antony Howell in the earlier days, the ever-patient and genial Mark Brown and Julian Millard in the later, and on a few occasions, Tony Faulkner all great men in their field without whose work this series could never have been imagined. I have already mentioned the work of the series photographer, the enchanting Malcolm Crowthers, and there are also all the piano-tuners (will we ever forget the legendary Steinway No 340?), page-turners and the singers (here we go again!) who have sung with us in a choral capacity. The super-industrious Nick Flower at Hyperion Records is master of all things to do with editorial layout and printing; without him this handsome reissue, immeasurably beautified by the work of Martha Griebler (b1948), would not have been possible. Grieblers almost uncanny brush and pencil evocations of Schubert and his circle have delighted audiences at various exhibitions at the Schubertiade in Schwarzenberg. A book of her drawings entitled Franz Schubert Zeichnungen is in preparation; the publishers may be contacted at www.bibliothekderprovinz.at. Despite all manner of setbacks and difficulties Hyperion remains, under Simon Perrys direction, the human face of the record industry. This is to do with the hovering spirit of Ted. I can see him now in my mind during long sessions hunched over the poets texts and taking notes of the performers departures (for various editorial reasons) from the texts that were to be published in the booklets. He proofread everything personally, and edited all my notes himself. We both got better as we went along. But right from the beginning he was behind me every inch of the way: no pianist could have managed a project such as this without the support of powerful back-up the singers appeared as if by magic, their fees negotiated, their travel arranged. The discs appeared on time, bright, shiny, and perfectly packaged. All there was for me to do was to rehearse, play and write. And Ted allowed me to do just this without any fuss. The series really belongs to him after all he paid for it, and not only in terms of his money. Therefore I wish to dedicate this re-issue of Schuberts songs to the memory of Ted Perry whom many of us regarded as a mentor. Heres to you Ted, and heres to the great composer that brought us so close together. To say Hyperion has done him proud would be rash; let us simply say it has done its best, as has each and every artist involved in the project. And doing ones best is surely what defines the true Schubertian, the neophyte as well as the professional, at whatever level of their achievement. That Schubert himself understood this accounts for that unique musical phenomenon, the Schubertiad, where no one who had brought their best offering to the table was turned away, and where the composers genius always encouraged emerging talent. Graham Johnson 2005

LHYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION : SOUVENIRS DUN ACCOMPAGNATEUR LHyperion Schubert Edition : Souvenirs dun accompagnateur Franz Schubert mit dix-huit ans (18101828) crire ses lieder. Hyperion Records a mis exactement le mme nombre dannes (19872005) les enregistrer, les publier en trentesept volumes indpendantes (avec plus de soixante chanteurs solo) et republier aujourdhui cette musique vocale avec piano dans une dition respectant lordre de composition. Le formidable Otto Erich Deutsch tablit une chronologie dans son catalogue (1951), dont une seconde dition posthume (1978) redata maintes compositions tout en conservant lordre numrique du musicologue. Malgr les progrs survenus dans la science schubertienne (tests de papier, etc.), lordre des uvres est un problme qui ne sera jamais entirement rsolu, qui ne fera jamais lunanimit. Certaines compositions sont dates avec prcision (jour, mois, anne), dautres donnent seulement un mois (quelle anne ?) ou une anne (quel mois ?) ; quant aux manuscrits autographes, ils sont parfois non dats. Reste que, pour la premire fois dans lhistoire du disque, les auditeurs peuvent se procurer tous les lieder de Schubert avec ce qui ressemble un ordre chronologique. Pour dcrire ce corpus, mieux vaudrait dailleurs parler dIntgrale de la musique vocale avec piano tous les quatuors et toutes les mlodies plusieurs voix avec piano y ctoient les lieder , mme si cet intitul omettrait un certain nombre de pices sans accompagnement, incluses parce quelles clairaient les mises en musique avec accompagnement du mme pome. Ce nouvel ensemble comprend quarante disques : les trente-sept dj publis et trois autres, plus rcents, qui proposent de la musique des amis et des contemporains de Schubert. Ces pices sont tantt des mlodies quil connaissait, dont la musique linspira, tantt des lieder (souvent sur des textes quil avait dj mis ou quil devait mettre en musique) crs par des gens qui touchrent, dune manire ou dune autre, sa vie, ft-ce de loin. Tous les compositeurs de ces trois disque supplmentaires vcurent, en partie, du temps de Schubert. LHyperion Schubert Edition naquit grce au courage et linitiative de Ted Perry, le dfunt fondateur du label qui renferme son nom (deuxime et troisime syllabes). Du milieu la fin des annes 1980, ce fut une joie particulire dtre emport dans lorbite de sa confiance, de son optimisme, de sa gnrosit desprit et de sa foi inbranlable en ses artistes. Ctait un homme daffaires, certes, mais qui se fiait plus ses oreilles qu celles des critiques, sans jamais craindre dcouter son cur. En cet heureux temps, le climat propice qui rgnait sur lindustrie de la musique classique gonfla les voiles de son entreprise. Mais ne bousculons pas lhistoire. Javais rencontr Mr Perry pour la premire fois en 1978, alors que jaccompagnais le tnor Martyn Hill lors dun enregistrement pour une autre compagnie Ted navait pas encore fond la sienne. Par bonheur, il aima mon travail et je fus lun des premiers artistes de son nouveau label. Les chanteurs fondateurs de The Songmakers Almanac Felicity Lott, Ann Murray, Anthony Rolfe Johnson et Richard Jackson figurrent dans une srie de 33 tours Hyperion : Voices of the Night, Venezia, Voyage Paris, Espaa, Le Bestiaire. Je proposai alors un double 33 tours, une Schubertiade avec les quatre mmes chanteurs, dans quatre programmes thme (un par face) mlant des lieder de Schubert connus et rarement jous. Notre Schubertiade fut fort bien accueillie, au dbut de 1985 (il y eut mme une couverture de Gramophone), mais je ne ralisai pas combien elle avait t pour moi une audition importante, par rapport Ted, mais aussi Lucy, lardente schubertienne qui tait alors la femme de sa vie et qui mavait tourn les pages pendant les sances denregistrement. Un soir, alors que nous dnions tous les trois, Ted me demanda ce que jaimerais vraiment enregistrer ; Tous les lieder de Schubert, bien sr , rpondis-je (la plupart des accompagnateurs auraient rpondu la mme chose). En quelques secondes, laffaire fut conclue autour dun verre de vin et, le lendemain matin, un coup de fil me prouva que Ted tait un homme qui entendait bien tenir parole. lpoque, maints connaisseurs jugrent le projet fou, et le grand critique Desmond Shawe-Taylor affirma un confrre quil ne serait jamais termin, malgrs des dbuts prometteurs. xi

LHYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION : SOUVENIRS DUN ACCOMPAGNATEUR

Mais voil que nous bousculons de nouveau lhistoire. Comment commencer ? Telle avait t la grande question. Ted et moi savions quun projet aussi hardi ne pouvait dmarrer sans le soutien dun chanteur de bon augure. Javais accompagn Dame Janet Baker dans plusieurs rcitals depuis 1978 et je savais quelle possdait un vaste rpertoire schubertien. la fin des annes 1960, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau lavait invite enregistrer, avec lui, tous les lieder pour voix de femme, pour DGG. Mais EMI, avec qui elle avait un contrat dexclusivit, len empcha ; elle fut, me raconta-t-elle, anantie, et en colre, davoir d refuser une offre aussi splendide. lvidence, le grand baryton voyait en elle la seule collaboratrice possible pour Schubert car il se lana dans son projet (vingt-neuf 33 tours) avec Gerald Moore, mais sans partenaire fminine. Ainsi le public fut-il priv dune dition des lieder de Schubert qui naurait pas eu les nombreuses lacunes de ces normes coffrets bleu ciel et bleu fonc que Fischer-Dieskau ralisa pour DGG au dbut des annes 1970. Comme tous ceux de ma gnration, javais appris mon Schubert en coutant ces disques fondateurs, ainsi que des rcitals EMI antrieurs. Mais lorsque je me lanai dans le projet Hyperion, je disposais dune vaste collection de 78 tours des chanteurs schubertiens passs Karl Erb, Elena Gerhardt, Hans Hotter, Gerhard Hsch, Lotte Lehmann et Elisabeth Schumann, sans oublier les contemporains de Fischer-Dieskau (Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Hermann Prey, etc.). Je mettais part Sir Peter Pears, que je tenais pour mon vritable matre : sa Winterreise, accompagne par Britten Aldeburgh, en 1971, mavait fait trouver mon chemin de Damas et mavait converti Schubert, la perspective dune vie passe accompagner. Dame Janet, que ne liait plus aucune exclusivit, accepta dinaugurer notre srie, dont je conus tous les programmes, sauf le sien. Elle arriva avec une liste de lieder, merveilleux mlange de connu et dinconnu, centr sur les deux plus clbres potes de la littrature allemande : Goethe et Schiller. Je nintervins que pour suggrer labandon de Der Unglckliche (Pichler), qui ne sintgrait pas au thme GoetheSchiller. Lun de mes regrets est de navoir pas insist pour obtenir toutes les strophes de D296 jtais alors bien trop reconnaissant pour exiger quoi que ce soit. Les sances denregistrement de fvrier 1987 se droulrent Elstree deux jours de travail intense et acharn. Lart de Dame Janet nous assura un disque prim : sa couleur vocale unique, ardente mais vulnrable, et la conviction magistrale avec laquelle elle dominait les subtilits de la forme et du rubato, lancrent la srie avec un juste mlange denthousiasme et de dignit. Il fut convenu que je fournirais les notes et les commentaires. Je me rappelle combien je regrettai alors que Gerald Moore (mort lanne prcdente, comme Pears et mon pre) ne soit pas l pour adresser ses habituelles remarques son petit-fils en musique , comme il avait la gnrosit de mappeler. cette poque, la srie avait encore des ambitions et des perspectives nationales. Ted estimait quil tait de la mission dHyperion denregistrer de bons artistes britanniques que les grandes compagnies avaient, de manire inexplicable, laiss passer. Aprs lenregistrement de Baker, on comprit que la srie devait se poursuivre avec mes propres contemporains, plus immdiats. En octobre 1987, Stephen Varcoe, lun de nos interprtes favoris, Ted et moi, enregistra le volume 2, o figure la premire des ballades schubertiennes vraiment longues (Der Taucher), mme si ce disque est lun des plus courts de la srie (moins de 60 minutes). Je compris bientt que, si je voulais prsenter tous les lieder de Schubert, il me faudrait mieux utiliser le temps disponible sur un CD. Ce disque reposait sur un thme aquatique les potes ntant quun moyen parmi dautres de concevoir une anthologie des lieder de Schubert. Le temps sembla stirer devant nous et il se passa une anne avant lenregistrement de deux nouveaux disques raliss par des artistes que je connaissais et que jadmirais depuis longtemps. Ann Murray enregistra le volume 3 en novembre 1988 avec, comme toujours, une matrise ingale du matriau. Son mari, le tnor Philip Langridge, artiste tout aussi envotant, avait grav son disque en septembre. Mais comme alterner les disques de chanteurs et de chanteuses nous sembla une bonne ide, son enregistrement (vol. 4) parut aprs celui dAnn. Ces deux disques xii

LHYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION : SOUVENIRS DUN ACCOMPAGNATEUR

(fonds sur la posie damis autrichiens de Schubert) ont t parmi les plus admirs de la srie. Pour lautre disque ralis en septembre 1988 un rcital de lieder sur la nature intitul Schubert and the Countryside (vol. 5) , la voix opulente et passionnante dElizabeth Connell convint merveilleusement lampleur opratique de la grande ballade Klage der Ceres, sur un texte de Schiller. Impossible, pour moi, de prvoir longtemps lavance la rpartition des lieder : Hyperion ne pouvait engager les chanteurs des annes lavance si nous avions eu lappui dun grand opra, les choses auraient t diffrentes, mais les artistes disponibles glissaient gnralement trois jours denregistrement dans leur calendrier, plutt en fin de journe et en labsence dengagements opratiques ou orchestraux. Quels seraient mes prochains chanteurs ? Je ne le savais pas vraiment ; or, je devais tailler chaque programme sur mesure, en pensant une vraie voix, une vraie personnalit. Pour viter tout entassement final, la rgle fut de ne jamais laisser un chanteur trop de lieder clbres. Aprs plus dune dcennie de programmes pour les Songmakers Almanac, beaucoup de mes proches collgues me faisaient confiance ds quil sagissait de fournir un matriau adapt. Ainsi la musique nocturne du volume 6, uniquement constitue de berceuses et de barcarolles (enregistres en septembre 1989), fut-elle en parfaite adquation avec les sduisants talents vocaux dAnthony Rolfe Johnson, qui avait dj grav pour Hyperion un disque de mises en musique shakespeariennes. Le succs rencontr jusqualors par la srie dboucha sur un tournant important. Pourquoi, aprs tout, ne pas demander des artistes trangers denregistrer pour nous ? En aot 1989, la formidable Elly Ameling vint chanter Schubert Rosslyn Hill Chapel, Hampstead. Tout dans ces sances fut mmorable, commencer par la pratique musicale consomme dAmeling (qui tait alors la reine des chanteuses europennes de lieder) et par la surprenante relation de travail qui stablit entre son oue fine et celle de notre producteur Martin Compton. Les lieder dataient tous de 1815 (ce disque tait le premier de la srie avoir un cadre temporel) et, moyennent quelques pices vraiment grandioses de cette anne-l (des morceaux de choix , comme elle disait), elle accepta de chanter des ballades mconnues comme Minona. (Je fus dailleurs ravi de voir quelle finit par aimer Minona au point de la programmer dans ses rcitals avec Rudolf Jansen.) Aprs le volume 7 dAmeling, rien ne nous empchait plus de demander des chanteurs europens de se joindre nous. Surtout, ils avaient moins de raison de refuser. Bien sr, les meilleurs chanteurs britanniques demeuraient indispensables. Le rcital de Sarah Walker (lui aussi consacr de la musique nocturne) constitua le volume 8 et Stndchen fut la premire uvre chorale denvergure de la srie. Sarah et moi avions travaille ensemble maintes reprises en Grande-Bretagne, en tourne en Amrique et sur un disque Hyperion intitul Shakespeares Kingdom. Erlknig fut enregistr au tout dernier moment et en une seule prise, avec toute limagination flamboyante qui fait que lon admire cette chanteuse. En octobre 1989, Arleen Auger, une Amricaine installe en Europe, vint enregistrer le volume 9 (des lieder en rapport avec les pices de thtre et le thtre). Lart de cette violoniste de formation (je la revois, lors des rptitions, en train de se demander si certaines phrases vocales taient des pousss ou des tirs) reposait sur une ducation musicale extrmement pure et raffine. Je lavais accompagne pour la premire fois la fin des annes 1970, pour une mission de la BBC, alors quelle travaillait au Conservatoire de Francfort, et je fus stupfait par la manire dont sa carrire et son assurance staient transformes depuis. Elle est lune des deux sopranos vedettes de notre srie (lautre tant Lucia Popp) qui sont mortes depuis leurs enregistrements. La version quelle donna de Thekla (Schiller) une voix spectrale venue de l autre ct fut des plus mouvantes lpoque ; aujourdhui, elle semble renfermer une dchirante prophtie. Nous continumes sur la base de deux trois enregistrements par an, ce qui cadrait avec lide que Ted se faisait du nombre de nouveaux disques Hyperion consacrs Schubert que le public pouvait acheter. On avait encore lambition de terminer en 1997, pour le bicentenaire du compositeur, qui nous semblait alors bien loin ; lpoque, un simple calcul aurait suffi nous xiii

LHYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION : SOUVENIRS DUN ACCOMPAGNATEUR

rendre plus ralistes. En mai 1990, Martyn Hill (lexcellente tnor qui je devais davoir t prsent Ted) ralisa un nouvel enregistrement splendide de lieder de lanne 1815 : le volume 10. Un mois plus tard, Brigitte Fassbaender grava le volume 11 Songs of Death . Cette grande chanteuse avait subi un deuil juste avant les sances denregistrement et ce fut, bien sr, avec une immence angoisse quelle aborda cette musique. Lintensit de sa Ausstrahlung nous terrifia tous latmosphre Rosslyn Hill tait charge comme jamais auparavant, comme jamais depuis mais, par la suite, nos rencontres en rcitals montrrent quelle amie admirablement chaleureuse elle tait. la toute fin de 1990, Marie McLaughlin entra en studio pour un mlange de lieder sacrs et lgers (vol. 13). Les mises en musique de la Lady of the Lake de Walter Scott donnrent ce programme un accent cossais fort bienvenu et ces interprtations demeurent parmi mes prfres de la srie. Lorsque, la fin des sances, la belle Marie (pouse comble) murmura quil fallait la raccompagner chez elle (le microphone tait encore branch), une phalange dadmirateurs surgit en quelques secondes, brandissant qui mieux mieux des clefs de voiture. Certains lieder de Schubert, surtout parmi les premiers, ncessitent des voix amples. Le compositeur ne fut pas particulirement tendre avec ses chanteurs dans la premire phase, plutt infaisable, de sa carrire dauteur de lieder. Dou dune voix gnreuse, Adrian Thompson, confrre constant, bienveillant et drle entre tous, assuma les exigeants lieder des annes 18121814 ( The Younger Schubert , vol. 12). Nous tions en fvrier 1991 et, dj, je savais que je ne pourrais tout simplement pas garder pour la fin les considrables quantits de musiques de jeunesse, preuve tout la fois de linexprience et du gnie naissant de Schubert. Deux autres enregistrements suivirent cette anne-l, la file, entre les 5 et 10 octobre. Le premier fut celui de Thomas Hampson qui, au fate de ses immenses moyens, chanta des textes inspirs par la mythologie grecque. (Parmi les nombreuses belles photos de couverture ralises par Malcolm Crowthers pour cette srie, celle du volume 14 cf. le disque 18 du prsent coffret , avec Thomas Hampson devant les marbres dElgin, est particulirement saisissante.) Hampson sexaspra tant en enregistrant Amphiaraos quil lana un pupitre lautre bout de la chapelle. Elle aussi pleine de caractre, et celtique sa faon, tout en demeurant une professionnelle accomplie, Dame Margaret Price enregistra un troisime et dernier programme de musique nocturne schubertienne. Pendant de nombreuses annes, javais accompagn cette chanteuse, lune des plus grandes sopranos britanniques de tous les temps, en rcitals, dans le monde entier (elle vivait alors juste la sortie de Munich). Son volume 15 proposait des lieder que nous avions interprts ensemble pendant pas mal de temps, en concert ; lenregistrement dura deux jours, considrablement aid par les gin-tonics offerts par Ted Perry (il pensait que Margaret avait termin sa premire sance et ces rafrachissements ne firent que ranimer son nergie pour le travail venir). Cinq disques avec autant de chanteurs vedettes : lanne 1992 fut une heure glorieuse pour le projet. Ted avait manifestement dcid quil nous fallait avancer. Ce fut aussi la dernire anne o je me pus me permettre de puiser dans le rpertoire, de plus en plus restreint, sans envisager srieusement comment jallait faonner le produit final quadrature dun cercle apparemment impossible. Avril 1992 vit ma premire, et hls unique, rencontre avec Lucia Popp. Cette femme envotante, lintelligence poustouflante, entra brivement dans ma vie, enregistra avec bonheur, minvita laccompagner pour quelques rcitals lanne suivante, puis mourut dune tumeur au cerveau dix-huit mois plus tard. Elle assuma certains lieder de 1816 (vol. 17) avec une grce infinie et une nonchalance amuse qui faisaient partie de son charme slovaque. La Thekla dArleen est enttante, et la Litanei de la courageuse Lucia ne lest pas moins (elle se savait malade lors de lenregistrement, nous lignorions). On ne peut aller bien loin dans un volume de lieder schubertiens sans se confronter aux pressentiments de la mort. Deux enregistrements se droulrent en mai 1992 : un programme de mises en musique de textes de Schiller (vol. 16), que Sir Thomas Allen assuma avec son habituel entrain joyeux et xiv

LHYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION : SOUVENIRS DUN ACCOMPAGNATEUR

avec son timbre magique (comme il se tire bien des hauteurs de la tessiture irrflchie du jeune Schubert), et un disque avec Peter Schreier (vol. 18, Schubert and the Strophic Song ). Javais travaill pour la premire fois avec Peter dix ans auparavant, en Amrique. Sa venue Bristol, pour lenregistrement, marqua un nouveau tournant dans la srie : il sembla apporter avec lui lesprit de lantique tradition des lieder allemands, qui bnit ainsi, quelque peu tardivement, lentreprise dHyperion. Il ntait dj plus tout jeune mais, malgr toute une vie complique par le diabte, il fit preuve dune vivacit inlassable et dune volont artistique qui, maintes et maintes fois, firent que ses interprtations communiqurent lenthousiasme sans ge du jeune amant des lieder de Schulze. la fin du mois de juin, Felicity Lott (qui ntait pas encore Dame), ma consur depuis la Royal Academy of Music elle est aussi soprano fondatrice de The Songmakers Almanac , enregistra un programme de lieder sur les fleurs et la nature (vol. 19). Il est toujours merveilleux de rencontrer de nouveaux chanteurs et de saccorder de nouveaux tempraments, mais ma relation trs particulire avec Flott me permet de puiser dans des associations musicales vieilles de plusieurs dcennies. Javais rserv pour ce disque une poigne de lieder que nous avions souvent interprts ensemble mais, comme toujours, elle se montra impatiente daccrotre son vaste rpertoire. Faire de la musique avec cette grande artiste (son sens inn du rythme et du tempo est le plus remarquable qui soit) a t au cur de mon dveloppement personnel, en tant quaccompagnateur de lieder. En octobre 1992, la soprano suisse Edith Mathis (justement lune des partenaires de lieder prfres de Schreier) contribua la srie par une anthologie de lieder de 1817 (vol. 21). Cette chanteuse, la renomme mrite, donna des interprtations dun style sans faille et dune musicalit judicieuse cest une vraie schubertienne et jeus le cur bris en apprenant que sa mauvaise sant lobligea annuler la dernire minute le rcital quelle devait donner, quelques temps plus tard, au Wigmore Hall. Ces enregistrements de 1992 assurrent les disques publier en 1993 et en 1994, mais nous tions peine plus de la moiti du chemin. Il y avait, en outre, toute une nouvelle gnration de chanteurs intressants et dous qui mritaient, eux aussi, dapparatre dans notre srie. Cest alors que lon eut recours au concept de la Schubertiade , du rcital partag. Du fait des nombreux enregistrements en souffrance, seuls deux disques furent gravs en 1993, deux Schubertiades (des lieder de 1815, en complment des volumes 7 et 10) impliquant chacune quatre chanteurs. Les volume 20 mettait en scne Patricia Rozario, talentueuse soprano indienne avec qui javais dj longuement travaill ; John Mark Ainsley, un lve dAnthony Rolfe Johnson, dot dune glorieuse voix de tnor ; Michael George, basse sonore et mouvante ; et un jeune homme lunettes qui mavait fait forte impression lors du concours de lieder Walter Grner (o jtais juge) : le tnor Ian Bostridge. Je me rappelle comme sa voix mavait sembl taille pour le microphone pendant les premires sances denregistrement. Le volume 22 proposait les immenses talents dinterprtes de lieder des cossais Lorna Anderson (soprano) et Jamie MacDougall (tnor), lmrite Catherine Wyn-Rogers (mezzo) honorant galement cette distribution, que fermait le jeune Simon Keenlyside (baryton), vou devenir lun des plus passionnants chanteurs dopra du pays mais attach au lied, par nature comme par temprament (il enregistra le volume 2 de notre srie Schumann en 1997). Noublions pas, enfin, la mezzo Catherine Denley qui contribua, avec sensibilit, plusieurs de ces volumes. Ces programmes densemble devinrent de plus en plus frquents. En mai 1994, une Schubertiade fut consacre Goethe pour la premire fois depuis le volume 1, la srie se concentrait sur ce pote crucial dans la vie de Schubert. Trois des chanteurs, Keenlyside inclus, taient dj apparus dans lHyperion Edition, mais ce disque (vol. 24) marqua larrive de lextraordinaire soprano allemande, Christine Schfer. Javais travaill pour la premire fois avec elle lors de rcitals des Songmakers, au Wigmore Hall, et javais t frapp par son clatante aptitude colorer et inflchir les mots. En 1995, elle enregistra le premier volume prim de lHyperion Schumann Edition, mais fut happe, peu de temps aprs, par DGG qui lui fit signer xv

LHYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION : SOUVENIRS DUN ACCOMPAGNATEUR

un contrat dexclusivit. En septembre 1994, il y eut encore de la place pour un disque solo avec lloquent tnor Christoph Prgardien, matre du style retenu (vol. 23) ; ses lieder Harfner sont superbes, mais il assuma aussi certaines pices plus obscures de 1816 qui requiraient, et reurent, une grande habilet dans linterprtation du lied. Vers cette mme poque, nous fmes galement des sances pour Die schne Mllerin, avec Anthony Rolfe Johnson ; nous avions travaill de nombreuses annes ensemble au sein de The Songmakers Almanac et javais presque fait un disque de ce cycle avec lui, en Sude ; lheure semblait dsormais venue de graver pour de bon une interprtation que nous avions si souvent donne en concert. En dcembre 1994, le producteur Mark Brown et moi nous envolmes pour Berlin, afin de passer la journe avec Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, qui enregistrait pour nous les poms de Wilhelm Mller que Schubert navait pas mis en musique. Mais, une fois la partie rcite du disque termine, une crise clata. Avec lintgrit et la franchise du grand artiste quil est, Tony Rolfe Johnson se dclara mcontent des premires preuves de cette Mllerin il avait lutt contre un rhume pendant les sances denregistrement ; tout tait refaire, mais son agenda, serr, ne nous le permettait pas avant un certain temps. Ted, on le comprend, tait impatient de maintenir le rythme de la srie en publiant lun des cycles attendus de longue date, avec la participation de FischerDieskau. Que faire ? Et pourquoi pas Ian Bostridge, qui pouvait lenregistrer immdiatement ? Eh bien, Graham , me dit Ted, si tu penses quil peut le faire, allons-y ! Le reste (aprs laccueil enthousiaste du volume 25, Die schne Mllerin, et le contrat de Bostridge avec EMI) appartient lhistoire du disque. cette poque, nous avions compris que terminer en 1997 serait impossible : trop de dtails restaient rgler. Le volume 26 ( An 1826 Schubertiad ), par exemple, contient des enregistrements raliss en 1994 ( quatre dates diffrentes), en mars 1995 et en fvrier 1996, peu avant la parution du disque. Christine Schfer y fait une nouvelle apparition (un So lasst mich scheinen transfigur), tout comme John Mark Ainsley, au sommet de sa forme pour Nachthelle, avec un chur dhommes dclar rudement aigu au moment de sa composition. Lun de mes plus proches confrres du temps des Songmakers, linestimable baryton Richard Jackson, interprte aussi plusieurs lieder sur ce disque. Hyperion ayant entrepris denregistrer non seulement les lieder solo, mais toute la musique vocale avec accompagnement de piano, les chanteurs de chorales furent de plus en plus prsents lors des sances denregistrement, le plus souvent dirigs par Stephen Layton, brillant et dou en tout. Lanne 1993 marqua ma rencontre avec le baryton allemand Matthias Goerne. Son gnie particulier, sans parler de sa troublante matrise du mezza voce dans le pasaggio de la voix (comme dans Die Sterne de Schlegel), tient ce quil peroit les diffrentes possibilits interprtatives avec les plus infimes variations de tempo et daccentuation. Son arrive chez Hyperion concida avex deux disques importants : Schubert and the Schlegels (vol. 27, en collaboration avec Schfer) et Winterreise (vol. 30), enregistrs lun au dbut de 1995, lautre lt de 1996. Lui aussi est mont en grade et a obtenu un contrat dexclusivit, en loccurrence avec Decca. Il ne restait plus quun seul disque solo graver du moins avais-je espr quil serait solo ! Il proposait des lieder de 18191820, chants par la mezzo-soprano slovne Marjana Lipovek. La veille des sances denregistrement Londres, elle annona que, finalement, la longue mise en musique de lEinsamkeit de Mayrhofer ne lui allait pas (elle avait eu, pendant longtemps, la musique dans une tonalit idoine). ce stade tardif de ldition, toutes les rpartitions avaient t soigneusement mesures et on ne pouvait tout simplement perdre vingt minutes sur un CD. Avec un peu moins dune heure enregistre par Lipovek, la parution fut retarde (ce fut, en fin de compte, le vol. 29) pour donner au talentueux baryton canadien Nathan Berg le temps de graver la cantate manquante de Mayrhofer. bien y rflchir, il est surprenant que nous nayons pas rencontr plus souvent ce genre de problmes. Les disques restants furent des Schubertiades conues dans diffrents cadres temporels. Nombre des artistes qui avaient particip aux premiers volumes furent invits revenir pour les xvi

LHYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION : SOUVENIRS DUN ACCOMPAGNATEUR

derniers : Ann Murray et Philip Langridge, plus frais que jamais, Stephen Varcoe (tout premiers lieder de Schubert, vol. 33) et une pliade de tnors nos vieux amis Martyn Hill et Adrian Thompson, mais aussi du sang neuf avec Paul Agnew, Daniel Norman, Toby Spence et James Gilchrist. Anthony Rolfe Johnson revint pour les mises en musique du Schwanengesang de Heine sur le tout dernier disque (vol. 37). Neal Davies interprta quelques-uns des lieder pour basse avec art et got. Parfois, dimportants artistes, comme Nancy Argenta et Lynne Dawson, jourent un rle en de de leur exprience ; beaucoup dexcellents chanteurs, aussi, ne participrent pas cette srie (ainsi le grand schubertien Ian Partidge, ce que, personnellement, je regrette), tout simplement parce que la vie en a dcid autrement. Cette srie nen est pas mois devenue, sans quon ait cherch le faire, une manire dinstantan sonore de toute une gnration de talentueux interprtes de lieder. Ce qui nous incita de plus en plus recourir, mme brivement, de jeunes chanteurs qui avaient gagn en importance depuis les dbuts de la srie, en 1987, condition quils veuillent bien chanter juste quelques lieder. Ainsi les derniers volumes prsentent-ils tout un plateau de sopranos internationales : Christine Brewer, une vedette amricaine la voix volumineuse, capable de ngocier avec une aisance stupfiante ces montagnes russes que sont les lieder de jeunesse de Schubert, lAllemande Juliane Banse (Schumann, vol. 3, 1998), la Britannique Geraldine McGreevy (son Schwestergruss est lune de mes pices prfres, et nous avons grav ensemble un rcital Wolf pour Hyperion en 2000). Parmi les chanteurs, le tnor germanocanadien Michael Schade ctoie le baryton britannique Christopher Maltman (Schumann, vol. 5, 2001), le Hollandais Maarten Koningsberger (qui fit une importante apparition sur le volume 28), lAllemand Stephan Loges, et le Canadien Gerald Finley, qui joue un rle mrite dans le volume 36 et assume les lieder supplmentaires des albums 38 40. Ces trois derniers enregistrements (publis ici pour la premire fois) mettent galement en vedette lart irrsistible de la soprano Susan Gritton, de la mezzo la douce voix Stella Doufexis (Schumann, vol. 4, 1998), de lternelle Ann Murray et de lun des tnors les plus envotants de la nouvelle vague britannique, Mark Padmore. Assez parl, peut-tre, des chanteurs. Cette srie fut place sous le parrainage du dfunt Eric Sams, un ami trs cher et tout simplement la plus grande autorit mondiale en matire de lieder. Il vit, et corrigea , tous mes essais pour la srie (non rimprims ici) ; mticuleusement, il fit de moi un auteur plus comptent, sans jamais cesser de mencourager. Noublions pas non plus les contributions de quatre merveilleux instrumentistes : Thea King (clarinette, vol. 9), David Pyatt (cor, vol. 37), Marianne Thorsen (violon, vol. 39) et Sebastian Comberti (violoncelle, vol. 40). Eugene Asti a interprt mes cts un accompagnement pour duo pianistique (vol. 36) est sest charg, avec brio, dachever la version chorale de Gesang der Geister avec piano. Le travail du regrett Reinhard van Hoorickx, fervent schubertien et infatigable diteur de fragments, est prsent dans de trs nombreux volumes. Les quipes de production furent cruciales : les talentueux Martin Compton et Antony Howell, au dbut ; puis les patients et gniaux Mark Brown et Julian Millard et, parfois, Tony Faulkner tous de grands hommes, chacun dans leur domaine, sans lesquels cette srie naurait jamais pu tre conue. Jai dj voqu le travail du photographe de la srie, lenchanteur Malcolm Crowthers ; saluons galement les accordeurs de piano (oublierons-nous jamais le lgendaire Steinway no 340 ?), les tourneurs de pages et les chanteurs (nous y revoil) qui ont chant avec nous en chorale. Nick Flower, travailleur acharn chez Hyperion Records, est un matre pour tout ce qui concerne le travail ditorial et limpression ; sans lui, cette belle rdition naurait pu voir le jour. Malgr toutes sortes de revers et de difficults, cette maison demeure, sous la direction de Simon Perry, le visage humain de lindustrie du disque lesprit de Ted est l, qui plane. Je le revois lors des longues sances de travail : pench sur les pomes, il notait les dparts des interprtes (pour diverses raisons ditoriales) sur les textes qui allaient tre publis sous forme de livrets. Il relisait tout personnellement et dita chacun de mes textes. Nous nous sommes de mieux en mieux compris xvii

LHYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION : SOUVENIRS DUN ACCOMPAGNATEUR

au fil des ans mais, ds le dbut, il a t derrire moi chaque instant ; aucun pianiste naurait pu mener bien pareil projet sans un soutien puissant : les chanteurs apparaissaient comme par magie, leurs tarifs ngocis, leur voyage arrang. Les disques paraissaient en temps voulu brillants, clatants, dune fabrication parfaite. Tout ce que javais faire, ctait rpter, jouer et crire. Et Ted ma permis de ne faire que cela, sans membarrasser de quoi que ce soit. Cette srie est vraiment la sienne aprs tout, il la paye, et pas seulement en argent. Je souhaite donc ddier cette rdition des lieder de Schubert la mmoire de Ted Perry, que beaucoup dentre nous considraient comme un mentor. toi, Ted, et au grand compositeur qui nous a tant rapprochs ! Dire quHyperion la rendu fier serait imprudent ; disons juste que la maison a fait de son mieux, comme absolument tous les artistes impliqus dans ce projet. Et faire de son mieux, cest certainement ce qui dfinit le vrai schubertien, nophyte comme professionnel, quel que soit le niveau de sa prestation. Schubert lui-mme lavait bien compris, et cest ce qui explique la Schubertiade, ce phnomne musical unique, o le premier qui noffrait pas ce quil avait de meilleur tait renvoy et o le gnie du compositeur ne cessa dencourager le talent naissant. Graham Johnson 2005
Traduction: Hyperion

TED PERRY Malcolm Crowthers

xviii

HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: ERINNERUNGEN EINES BEGLEITERS Hyperion Schubert Edition: Erinnerungen eines Begleiters Franz Schubert brauchte achtzehn Jahre (18101828), um alle seine Lieder zu schreiben. Ebenso lange (19872005) hat es gedauert, bis Hyperion Records alle Lieder aufgenommen, sie auf siebenunddreiig CDs (mit mehr als sechzig Gesangssolisten) herauszubringen und nun die Vokalmusik mit Klavierbegleitung in einer Edition vorzustellen, deren Werke in die Reihenfolge ihrer Komposition gestellt wurden. Der Ehrfurcht gebietende Otto Erich Deutsch etablierte in seinem Katalog von 1951 eine Chronologie; diese wurde durch eine 1978 postum erschienene zweite Ausgabe ersetzt, die viele Kompositionen neu datierte, aber Deutschs numerische Abfolge beibehielt. Trotz Fortschritten in der Schubert-Forschung (Papiertests usw.) bleibt die Datierung der Werke problematisch und wird sich wohl nie vollstndig oder zu jedermanns Zufriedenheit aufklren lassen. Einige der Kompositionsdaten sind hchst przise festgehalten (auf Jahr, Monat und Tag), doch in einigen Fllen ist nur der Monat (welchen Jahres?) bekannt, oder das Jahr (welcher Monat?), und manche Autographen sind vllig undatiert. Nichtsdestoweniger ist dies das erste Mal in der Geschichte der Tonaufzeichnung, dass Schuberts gesamtes Liedschaffen dem Hrer in dieser annhernd chronologischen Abfolge vorliegt. Den Sololiedern beigefgt sind alle Quartette und anderen mehrstimmigen Lieder mit Klavierbegleitung, so dass die Zusammenstellung korrekter als Die vollstndige Vokalmusik mit Klavier beschrieben wre, obwohl selbst dieser Titel nicht die verschiedenen unbegleiteten Stcke bercksichtigt, die mit aufgenommen wurden, weil sie zum Verstndnis der begleiteten Vertonungen des gleichen Gedichts beitragen. Diese neue Sammlung umfasst vierzig CDs; davon enthalten siebenunddreiig das bereits verffentlichte Material, whrend drei weitere neuerdings eingespielte Werke von Schuberts Freunden und Zeitgenossen zu Gehr bringen. Bei einigen davon handelt es sich um Lieder, die er kannte, und um Musik, die ihn inspirierte; andere sind Lieder (oft mit Texten, die Schubert spter selbst vertonen wrde, oder die er bereits vertont hatte) von Leuten, deren Leben auf die eine oder andere Weise das seine berhrte und sei es nur aus einiger Distanz. Die Lebensdaten smtlicher Komponisten der Werke dieser drei zustzlichen CDs berschneiden sich mit denen von Schubert. Hyperions Schubert-Edition verdankt ihre Entstehung dem Mut und der Initiative des verstorbenen Ted Perry, des Begrnders der Firma, die in der zweiten und dritten Silbe ihres Namens den seinen enthlt. In der zweiten Hlfte der 1980er-Jahre war es eine besondere Freude, in die Sphre von Teds Selbstvertrauen, seinem Optimismus und Gromut, seinem unerschtterlichen Glauben an die von ihm auserwhlten Knstler aufgenommen zu werden. Er war zwar Geschftsmann, doch vertraute er seinen eigenen Ohren mehr als jenen der Kritiker und frchtete sich nicht davor, seinem Herzen zu folgen. Zu jener glcklichen Zeit fllte ein gnstiges Klima im Geschft mit klassischer Musik die Segel seines Unternehmens mit starkem Rckenwind. Aber ich eile der Geschichte voraus. Ich lernte Mr. Perry 1978 kennen, als ich den Tenor Martyn Hill bei Aufnahmen fr eine andere Firma begleitete er hatte seine eigene damals noch nicht gegrndet. Glcklicherweise fand Ted Gefallen an meiner Arbeit, und ich gehrte zu den ersten Knstlern, die auf seinem neuen Label erschienen. Wir Grndungsmitglieder des Gesangsensembles The Songmakers Almanac kamen in einer Serie von Hyperion-LPs zu Gehr: Voices of the Night, Venezia, Voyage Paris, Espaa und Le Bestiaire. Daraufhin schlug ich ein Album mit zwei LPs vor, eine Schubertiade unter Beteiligung der gleichen vier Sngerinnen und Snger Felicity Lott, Ann Murray, Anthony Rolfe Johnson und Richard Jackson in vier thematisch unterschiedlichen Programmen (eines pro Plattenseite), die bekannte und selten gehrte Schubert-Lieder miteinander kombinierten. Unsere Schubertiade wurde Anfang 1985 hchst positiv aufgenommen (sie fhrte sogar zu einem Titelbild der Zeitschrift Gramophone), doch war mir damals nicht klar, dass diese Platten ein wichtiges Vorspielen fr mich bedeuteten, nicht nur in Bezug auf Ted, sondern auch auf Lucy, die glhende Schubert-Verehrerin, mit der er damals sein Leben teilte und die bei den Aufnahmeterminen fr mich umgeblttert hatte. Eines Abends, als wir drei beim Essen zusammensaen, fragte mich Ted, was fr ein Aufnahmeprojekt mir denn wirklich vorschwebe; ich antwortete (wie wohl die meisten Klavierbegleiter es tun xix

HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: ERINNERUNGEN EINES BEGLEITERS

wrden): Natrlich smtliche Schubert-Lieder. Wenige Sekunden spter wurde die Abmachung mit einem Glas Wein besiegelt, und ein Telefonanruf am nchsten Morgen bewies, dass Ted ein Mann war, der seine Versprechen hielt. Das Vorhaben wurde damals von vielen Kennern fr verrckt erklrt; der groe Kritiker Desmond Shawe-Taylor versicherte einem Kollegen, es werde trotz des vielversprechenden Anfangs niemals zu Ende gefhrt werden. Aber das greift der Geschichte erneut voraus; die groe Frage war gewesen: Womit beginnen? Ted und ich wussten, dass ein solch khnes Projekt der Untersttzung einer glckbringenden Sngerin bedurfte, um den Start zu sichern. Ich hatte bei mehreren Recitals seit 1978 Dame Janet Baker begleitet und wusste, dass sie ber ein groes Schubert-Repertoire verfgte. Ende der 1960er-Jahre hatte Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau Dame Janet gebeten, smtliche Lieder fr Frauenstimme mit ihm fr die DGG einzuspielen. EMI verweigerte ihr auf Grund ihres Exklusivvertrags die Genehmigung dazu; sie teilte mir mit, sie sei erschttert und wtend gewesen, solch ein groartiges Angebot ausschlagen zu mssen. Der groe Bariton sah in ihr offenbar die einzig mgliche Mitarbeiterin fr ein Schubert-Projekt er nahm seines (das 29 LPs umfassen sollte) mit Gerald Moore als Begleiter und ohne Sngerin in Angriff. Der ffentlichkeit wurde folglich eine Edition der Schubert-Lieder vorenthalten, die viele der Lcken in jenen riesigen hell- und dunkelblauen Plattenkassetten gefllt htte, die Fischer-Dieskau fr die DGG zur Verffentlichung am Beginn der 70er-Jahre erstellt hatte. Ich lernte, wie meine ganze Generation, meinen Schubert durch diese bahnbrechenden Kassetten sowie vorhergehende EMIRecitals kennen, auch wenn ich zu dem Zeitpunkt, als ich das Hyperion-Projekt in Angriff nahm, bereits ber eine umfangreiche Sammlung von 78-U/min-Platten verfgte, die das Schaffen frherer Schubert-Sngerinnen und -Snger abdeckten Karl Erb, Elena Gerhardt, Hans Hotter, Gerhard Hsch, Lotte Lehmann, Elisabeth Schumann, ganz zu schweigen von Fischer-Dieskaus eigenen Zeitgenossen wie Elisabeth Schwarzkopf oder Hermann Prey. In eine Kategorie fr sich ist Peter Pears einzuordnen, den ich als mein wahres Vorbild ansah. Seine Winterreise, die er 1971 in Aldeburgh von Benjamin Britten begleitet sang, hatte meine Bekehrung sowohl zu Schubert als auch zur Aussicht auf ein Leben als Klavierbegleiter ausgelst. Dame Janet Baker, die inzwischen nicht mehr vertraglich gebunden war, willigte ein, unsere Serie einzuleiten. Ich entwarf smtliche Programme der Serie, bis auf das mit Dame Janet. Sie legte eine Liste von Liedern vor, die eine wunderbare Mischung von Bekanntem und Unbekanntem darstellte und Texte von den zwei berhmtesten deutschen Dichtern enthielt, nmlich Goethe und Schiller. Mein einziger Eingriff bestand in dem Vorschlag, wir sollten auf Der Unglckliche (Pichler) verzichten, weil das Stck nicht ins GoetheSchiller-Thema passte. Ich bedaure bis heute, dass ich nicht auf allen Strophen von D296 bestand damals war ich viel zu dankbar, um berhaupt auf irgendwas zu bestehen. Die Aufnahmetermine fanden im Februar 1987 in Elstree statt zwei Tage intensiver und konzentrierter Arbeit (normalerweise wurden pro Termin realistischerweise drei Tage angesetzt). Dame Janets Kunst sicherte uns eine preisgekrnte Platte: Ihre einzigartige Stimmfrbung, erregend und doch verletztlich, und die gebieterische berzeugungskraft, mit der sie alle Feinheiten von Gestaltung und Rubato beherrschte, leitete die Serie mit einer angemessenen Mischung von Gusto und Wrde in die Wege. Es wurde beschlossen, dass ich die Anmerkungen und Kommentare liefern sollte. Ich erinnere mich, wie sehr ich es bedauerte, dass Gerald Moore (der im Jahr zuvor verstorben war, ebenso wie Pears und mein Vater) nicht zugegen war, um seinem musikalischen Enkel, wie er mich grozgigerweise nannte, die blichen Hinweise zukommen zu lassen. Seinerzeit waren die Horizonte und Bestrebungen der Serie noch durchaus begrenzt. Ted betrachtete sie als Bestandteil von Hyperions Mission, erstklassige britische Knstler aufzunehmen, die von den greren Plattenfirmen unerklrlicherweise bersehen worden waren. Nach der Janet-Baker-Einspielung war vorgesehen, dass die Serie mit meinen Zeitgenossen im engeren Sinne fortgesetzt werden sollte. Stephen Varcoe, den Ted und ich besonders schtzten, nahm im Oktober 1987 den zweiten Teil auf. Der enthielt die erste von Schuberts wirklich langen Balladen (Der Taucher), doch mit unter sechzig Minuten Spieldauer ist dies die xx

HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: ERINNERUNGEN EINES BEGLEITERS

krzeste der Platten. Ich erkannte bald, dass ich, wollte ich wirklich alle Lieder Schuberts einspielen, die auf CD verfgbare Zeit besser nutzen musste. Das Thema dieser Scheibe hatte mit Wasser zu tun die Einteilung nach Dichtern ist nur eine von vielen Mglichkeiten, Schuberts Lieder einzuordnen. Die Zeit schien sich schier endlos vor uns zu erstrecken, und es verging ein Jahr, ehe wir mit zwei weiteren Platten von Knstlern fortfuhren, die ich seit langem kannte und schtzte. Ann Murrays Teil 3 wurde im November 1988 aufgenommen; sie beherrscht ihr Material stets meisterhaft. Die Platte ihres Mannes, des Tenors Philip Langridge, der ebenfalls ein faszinierender Interpret ist, war eigentlich schon im September fertig. Doch weil wir es fr eine gute Idee hielten, bei der Verffentlichung zwischen Sngern und Sngerinnen abzuwechseln, erschien Philips CD nach der von Ann, als Teil 4 der Reihe. Diese Aufnahmen (thematisch den Gedichten von Schuberts sterreichischen Freunden gewidmet) gehren zu den meistbewunderten der Serie. Die andere Platte, die im September 1988 entstand, war das Programm von Elizabeth Connell (Teil 5) Schubert und die Landschaft, Lieder ber die Natur. Ihre opulente und berauschende Stimme eignete sich ideal fr die opernhafte Breite der groen Schiller-Ballade Klage der Ceres. Es erwies sich fr mich als unmglich, die Zuteilung von Liedern fr diese Reihe weit in die Zukunft zu planen. Damals konnte Hyperion Snger nicht auf Jahre im Voraus engagieren htten wir ber den Einfluss eines groen Opernhauses verfgt, wre es anders gewesen, aber verfgbare Knstler pflegten drei Tage Aufnahmen erst im letzten Moment in ihren Terminkalender zu setzen, wenn keine Opern- oder Orchesterenggagements anstanden. Welche Sngerinnen oder Snger wrden mir als nchste zu Gebot stehen? Ich wusste es nicht wirklich, und alle Programme mussten auf eine bestimmte Stimme und Persnlichkeit zugeschnitten werden. Um eine Anhufung am Ende zu vermeiden, galt allgemein die Regel, keinem Interpreten zuviele bekannte Lieder zuzugestehen. Nachdem ich ber ein Jahrzehnt lang die Programme fr Songmakers Almanac gestaltet hatte, trauten mir viele meiner vertrauteren Kolleginnen und Kollegen zu, sie mit geeignetem Material zu versorgen. Beispielsweise passte die Nachtmusik der CD Nr. 6, ausschlielich Wiegenlieder und Barkarolen (im September 1989 aufgenommen), perfekt zur verfhrerischen Gesangskunst von Anthony Rolfe Johnson, der bereits eine Scheibe mit Shakespeare-Vertonungen fr Hyperion eingespielt hatte. Der Erfolg der Serie bis zu diesem Punkt fhrte zu einem bedeutenden Wendepunkt. Warum sollten wir nicht doch auslndische Knstlerinnen und Knstler zu unseren Aufnahmen bitten? Die Ehrfurcht gebietende Elly Ameling kam im August 1989 in die Kapelle von Rosslyn Hill in Hampstead, um Schubert zu singen. An diesen Terminen war alles denkwrdig, nicht zuletzt das vollendete Musikverstndnis von Elly Ameling selbst (damals die alles beherrschende Knigin europischer Liedersngerinnen) und das verblffende Einverstndnis, das sich zwischen ihren scharfen Ohren und denen unseren Produzenten Martin Compton entwickelte. Die Lieder stammten alle aus dem Jahr 1815 (dies war die erste Platte mit einem Zeitabschnitt als Thema), und sie hatte sich bereit erklrt, unbekannte Balladen wie Minona zu singen, um sich im Gegenzug einige der wahrhaft groen Lieder jenes Jahres zu sichern (sie nannte sie ihre Leckerbissen). (Ich habe mich sehr darber gefreut, dass ihr Minona schlielich so gut gefiel, dass sie es in Recitalprogramme mit Rudolf Jansen einbaute.) Nach Elly Amelings CD Nr. 7 gab es keinen Grund mehr, sich beim Engagement kontinentaleuropischer Sngerinnen und Snger zurckzuhalten. Und was noch wichtiger war: Sie hatten noch weniger Grund, abzulehnen. Natrlich blieben die besten britischen Interpreten unerlsslich. Sarah Walkers Recital (eine weitere Aufnahme mit Nachtmusik) kam als Nr. 8 heraus; Stndchen war bis dahin das erste Stck gro angelegter Chormusik in der Reihe. Sarah und ich hatten schon oft miteinander gearbeitet, in Grobritannien, auf Tournee in Amerika und bei einer Einspielung fr Hyperion mit dem Titel Shakespeares Kingdom. Erlknig wurde im allerletzen Moment und in einem Take aufgenommen, mit all dem lodernden Einfallsreichtum, fr den man diese Sngerin bewundert. Im Oktober 1989 kam Arleen Auger, eine in Europa ansssige Amerikanerin, um CD Nr. 9 aufzunehmen (Lieder mit Verbindungen zu Bhnenstcken und zum Theater). Sie war xxi

HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: ERINNERUNGEN EINES BEGLEITERS

xxii

ausgebildete Geigerin (ich erinnere mich, wie sie bei den Proben berlegte, ob bestimmte Gesangsphrasen als Aufstrich oder Abstrich anzusehen seien), und ihre Kunst beruhte auf einer hchst verfeinerten und kultivierten musikalischen Ausbildung. Ich hatte Arleen das erste Mal gegen Ende der 1970er-Jahre bei einer BBC-Sendung begleitet; damals gehrte sie dem Lehrkrper der Frankfurter Musikhochschule an. Nun war ich verblfft vom Wandel in ihrer Karriere und in ihrem Selbstbewusstsein. Sie ist eine von zwei berhmten Sopranistinnen in unserer Serie (die andere ist Lucia Popp), die seither verstorben sind. Arleens Vortrag von Schillers Thekla, einer gespenstischen Stimme aus dem Jenseits, war damals ausgesprochen ergreifend; von heute aus gesehen erscheint er herzzerreiend prophetisch. Wir fuhren mit zwei bis drei Einspielungen pro Jahr fort. Das passte zu Teds Vorstellung davon, wieviele Schubert-Aufnahmen von Hyperion die Schallplatten kaufende ffentlichkeit verkraften konnte. Das Ziel war immer noch, bis 1997, zu Schuberts zweihundertstem Geburtstag, fertig zu sein das Jubilum schien damals noch in weiter Zukunft zu liegen; eine schlichte Rechnung htte uns ein wenig mehr Realismus vermitteln knnen. Im Mai 1990 nahm Martyn Hill (der wunderbare Tenor, dem ich ursprnglich meine Bekanntschaft mit Ted verdanke) ein weiteres groartiges Programm von Liedern aus dem Jahr 1815 auf, das als Nr. 10 der Reihe herauskam. Im Monat darauf zeichnete Brigitte Fassbaender die Nr. 11 auf Lieder vom Tod. Die groe Sngerin hatte kurz vor dem Aufnahmetermin einen Trauerfall erlitten, und es kam nicht berraschend, dass sie an diese Musik mit erheblicher Beklemmung heranging. Die Intensitt ihrer Ausstrahlung machte uns allen Angst die Atmosphre in Rosslyn Hill war gespannt wie nie zuvor oder seither , doch erwies sie sich bei nachfolgenden Recitals als bewunderswert warmherzige Freundin. Am Ende des Jahres 1990 kam Marie McLaughlin ins Studio, um eine Mixtur aus sakralen und suggestiven Liedern zu singen (Nr. 13 der Reihe). Die Vertonungen aus Walter Scotts Lady of the Lake verliehen dem Programm einen angemessen schottischen Akzent. Diese Darbietungen mag ich persnlich bis heute besonders gern. Als die schne (und glcklich verheiratete) Marie am Ende des Termins flsterte, sie brauche eine Mitfahrgelegenheit nach Hause (das Mikrophon war noch eingeschaltet), erschien in Sekundenschnelle eine Phalanx von Bewunderern, die um die Wette mit ihren Autoschlsseln wedelten. Einige von Schuberts Liedern, insbesondere die frheren, bedrfen grerer Stimmen. Der Komponist ging in der eher praxisfernen Frhphase seines Werdegangs als Liedersetzer mit seinen Interpreten nicht besonders glimpflich um. Der mit grozgiger Stimme gesegnete Adrian Thompson, jener hchst ausgeglichene, liebenswrdige und amsante Kollege, nahm sich der anspruchsvollen Lieder aus der Zeit von 1812 bis 1814 an (Der jngere Schubert, Nr. 12). Dies geschah im Februar 1991, und mir war bereits klar geworden, dass ich die erheblichen Mengen frherer Musik, die einerseits die Unerfahrenheit des Komponisten, andererseits sein erblhendes Genie an den Tag brachten, nicht bis zuletzt liegen lassen konnte. In jenem Jahr fanden zwei weitere Aufnahmetermine statt, direkt aufeinander folgend vom 5. bis 10. Oktober. Beim ersten sang Thomas Hampson auf der Hhe seiner auerordentlichen Fhigkeiten Texte, die von der griechischen Sagenwelt inspiriert waren. (Von Malcolm Crowthers vielen schnen Fotos fr die Plattenhllen der Serie erwies sich das fr Nr. 14 siehe CD 18 der neuen Zusammenstellung , das Hampson vor den Parthenon-Skulpturen im Britischen Museum zeigt, als besonders eindrucksvoll.) Hampson rgerte sich bei den Aufnahmen zu Amphiaraos so sehr ber sich selbst, dass er einen Notenstnder vom einen Ende der Kapelle zum anderen warf. Ein drittes und letztes Programm mit Schuberts Nachtmusik wurde von Dame Margaret Price eingespielt, die auf ihre keltische Art ebenfalls temperamentvoll, doch stets ganz und gar professionell war. Sie ist eine der grten britischen Sopranistinnen aller Zeiten, eine Sngerin, die ich viele Jahre lang bei Recitals in aller Welt begleitet habe (zu jener Zeit lebte sie auerhalb Mnchens). Ihr Teil 15 der Reihe umfasste Lieder, die wir auf dem Konzertpodium bereits seit einiger Zeit zusammen aufgefhrt hatten; der zweitgige Aufnahmetermin verging wie im Fluge, mit einiger Untersttzung durch die von Ted Perry beigebrachten Gin Tonics (er dachte, Margaret habe das Ende ihrer ersten Session erreicht, aber die dargebotenen Erfrischungen weckten in ihr blo neue Energien fr die Weiterarbeit).

HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: ERINNERUNGEN EINES BEGLEITERS

1992 war ein groartiges Jahr fr das Projekt fnf Platten mit fnf Gesangsstars. Ted hatte eindeutig beschlossen, dass wir einen Zahn zulegen mussten. Dies war auch das letzte Jahr, in dem ich mir erlauben konnte, auf das stetig verminderte Repertoire zurckzugreifen, ohne mir Gedanken darber zu machen, welche Gestalt ich dem Produkt am Ende verleihen sollte die Quadratur eines scheinbar unmglichen Kreises. Im April 1992 erfolgte meine erste und traurigerweise einzige Begegnung mit Lucia Popp. Diese faszinierende, blendend intelligente Frau trat fr kurze Zeit in mein Leben, machte ihre vergnglichen Aufnahmen, lud mich ein, sie im folgenden Jahr bei einigen Recitals zu begleiten, und starb dann achtzehn Monate spter an einem Gehirntumor. Sie nahm sich einiger der Lieder von 1816 an (als Teil 17 der Reihe erschienen), mit unendlicher Grazie und einer amsierten Nonchalance, die zu ihrem slowakischen Charme gehrte. Wenn Arleens Thekla sehnsuchtsvoll klingt, dann gilt das gleiche fr die Litanei der tapferen Lucia (sie wusste zum Zeitpunkt der Aufnahmen bereits, dass sie krank war, wir nicht). Man kann in eine Auswahl von Schubert-Liedern nicht weit eindringen, ohne mit Hinweisen auf menschliche Sterblichkeit konfrontiert zu werden. Im Mai 1992 fanden zwei Aufnahmetermine statt: mit Sir Thomas Allen in einem Programm von Schiller-Vertonungen (Nr. 16), die er mit seiner gewohnten frhlichen Energie und zauberhaftem Timbre anging (wie gut er die hohen Tne der Tessitura des rcksichtslosen jungen Schubert bewltigt!), und mit Peter Schreier (Nr. 18, Schubert und das Strophenlied). Ich hatte ber ein Jahrzehnt zuvor erstmals mit Peter in Amerika zusammengearbeitet. Seine Ankunft in Bristol, um an den Aufnahmen teilzunehmen, war ein weiterer Angelpunkt fr die Serie; er schien den Geist der althergebrachten deutschen Liedtradition mitzubringen und mit einiger Versptung der Hyperion-Unternehmung deren Segen zu erteilen. Schon damals war er kein junger Snger mehr, doch trotz einem lebenslangen Problem mit Diabetes bewies er unermdliche Lebensfreude und eine knstlerische Willenskraft, die seine Darbietungen ein ums andere Mal den zeitlosen Enthusiasmus des jungen Liebenden in den Schulze-Liedern zum Ausdruck bringen lie. Ende Juni nahm Felicity Lott (damals noch nicht geadelt), meine Kollegin aus der Zeit an der Royal Academy of Music und mitbegrndende Sopranistin des Songmakers Almanac, ein Programm mit Liedern ber Blumen und die Natur auf (Nr. 19). Es mag immer wieder wunderbar sein, neue Interpreten kennenzulernen und sich mit neuen Temperamenten vertraut zu machen, doch mein ganz besonderes Verhltnis zu Flott gestattet mir, auf musikalische Assoziationen zurckzugreifen, die Jahrzehnte zurck reichen. Ich hatte fr diese CD eine Handvoll Lieder vorgesehen, die wir oft zusammen aufgefhrt hatten, aber wie immer war sie darauf bedacht, ihr riesiges Repertoire zu erweitern. Das Musizieren mit dieser groen Knstlerin (mit ihrem auerordentlichen natrlichen Gefhl fr Rhythmus und Tempo) hat im Mittelpunkt meiner eigenen Entwicklung als Liedbegleiter gestanden. Im Oktober 1992 trug die Schweizer Sopranistin Edith Mathis (brigens eine von Peter Schreiers liebsten Liederkolleginnen) eine Zusammenstellung von Liedern aus dem Jahr 1817 bei (Nr. 21). Diese zu Recht berhmte Sngerin lieferte unfehlbar stilvolle und musikalisch ausgewogene Darbietungen sie ist eine echte Schubert-Verehrerin, und es brach mir das Herz, dass ihre angegriffene Gesundheit einige Zeit spter in letzter Minute zur Absage eines Recitals in der Londoner Wigmore Hall fhrte. Mit den Einspielungen des Jahres 1992 waren die CDs erledigt, die 1993 und teilweise bis 1994 zur Verffentlichung anstanden, doch hatten wir immer noch erst gut die Hlfte der Strecke hinter uns. Auch bot sich eine neue Generation interessanter und begabter Sngerinnen und Snger an, die es verdienten, an der Serie beteiligt zu werden. In diesem Zusammenhang kam das Konzept der Schubertiade, im Endeffekt eine CD, die unter mehreren Interpreten aufgeteilt ist, zu seinem Recht. Wegen des langen Rckstaus von Aufnahmen, deren Herausgabe bevorstand, spielten wir 1993 nur zwei CDs ein. Beides waren Schubertiaden (Lieder aus dem Jahr 1815 als Ergnzung zu Nr. 7 und 10), die unter zwei verschiedenen Gruppen von je vier Interpreten verteilt wurden. Auf Nr. 20 hrt man Patricia Rozario, die begnadete indische Sopranistin, mit der ich seit langem zusammenarbeite, John Mark Ainsley, ursprnglich ein xxiii

HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: ERINNERUNGEN EINES BEGLEITERS

Schler von Anthony Rolfe Johnson, mit herrlicher Tenorstimme, den sonoren und gefhlvollen Bass Michael George sowie einen bebrillten jungen Mann, der mich zutiefst beeindruckt hatte, als ich Preisrichter beim Walter-Grner-Liederwettbewerb gewesen war, ein weiterer Tenor namens Ian Bostridge. Ich erinnere mich noch, dass ich bei den ersten Playback-Sessions dachte, seine Stimme sei besonders mikrophonfreundlich. Nr. 22 enthielt die betrchtlichen Liedertalente der schottischen Interpreten Lorna Anderson (Sopran) und Jamie MacDougall (Tenor); die renommierte Catherine Wyn-Rogers (Mezzosopran) ziert eine Besetzung, die durch den jungen Bariton Simon Keenlyside abgerundet wurde, der dazu ausersehen war, einer der aufregendsten Opernsnger des Landes zu werden, aber von seiner Natur und seinem Temperament her dem Liedergesang ergeben ist (er sollte 1997 die zweite Platte unserer Schumann-Reihe aufnehmen). Wir drfen auch die einfhlsamen Beitrge der Mezzosopranistin Catherine Denley zu einigen dieser Ensembles nicht vergessen. Diese gemeinschaftlichen Programme wurden nun immer hufiger. Im Mai 1994 entstand eine Goethe-Schubertiade das erste Mal seit der Platte Nr. 1, dass sich die Serie auf diesen fr Schuberts Leben entscheidenden Dichter konzentrierte. Drei der Snger, darunter Keenlyside, waren bereits in der Hyperion-Edition vertreten, doch stellte diese CD (Nr. 24) auch die einzigartige deutsche Sopranistin Christine Schfer vor. Ich hatte mit ihr erstmals bei Recitals des Songmakers Almanac in der Wigmore Hall zusammengearbietet und war begeistert von ihrer bestechenden Fhigkeit, Texte zu frben und zu modulieren. Sie sollte 1995 die preisgekrnte erste Platte von Hyperions Schumann-Edition einspielen, wurde jedoch bald darauf von der DGG unter Exklusivvertrag genommen. Im September 1994 war noch Zeit fr eine Soloplatte mit dem eloquenten deutschen Tenor Christoph Prgardien, einem Meister des zurckgenommenen Stils (Nr. 23); seine Harfner-Lieder sind superb, doch er machte sich auch an einige der weniger bekannten Lieder des Jahres 1816, die seines groartigen Liederknnens bedurften, das ihnen auch gebhrend zuteil wurde. Zu jener Zeit fanden auch Termine fr Die schne Mllerin mit Anthony Rolfe Johnson statt; wir hatten viele Jahre lang im Songmakers Almanac zusammengearbeitet, und ich war kurz davor gewesen, in Schweden eine CD dieses Zyklus mit ihm aufzunehmen; nun schien der richtige Zeitpunkt gekommen, ein bleibendes Dokument einer Interpretation aufzuzeichnen, die wir oft im Konzertsaal dargeboten hatten. Im Dezember 1994 flogen der Produzent Mark Brown und ich nach Berlin, um den Tag mit Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau zu verbringen, der fr uns die Gedichte von Wilhelm Mller aufnahm, die Schubert nicht vertont hatte. Als die gesprochenen Teile der Platte eingespielt waren, kam es zur Krise. Mit der Integritt und Offenheit des groen Knstlers, der er ist, erklrte sich Tony Rolfe Johnson unzufrieden mit den ersten Schnittfassungen unserer Mllerin er hatte bei den Aufnahmen mit einer Erkltung gekmpft; wir wrden erneute Termine ansetzen mssen, doch erlaubte sein bervoller Terminkalender uns das nicht in absehbarer Zukunft. Ted war verstndlicherweise ungeduldig und wollte den Impetus der Serie in Gang halten, indem er einen der lang erwarteten Zyklen unter Beteiligung von Fischer-Dieskau herausbrachte. Was war zu tun? Wie wre es mit Ian Bostridge, der sofort fr Aufnahmen zur Verfgung stand? Also, Graham, sagte Ted, wenn du meinst, dass ers kann, dann lass es uns in Angriff nehmen ! Der Rest (nach der begeisterten Aufnahme der CD Nr. 25, Die schne Mllerin, und Bostridges Vertrag mit EMI) ist Schallplattengeschichte. An diesem Punkt waren wir zu der Einsicht gekommen, dass die Fertigstellung der Serie bis 1997 unmglich sein wrde. Es gab einfach zu viele letzte Einzelheiten zu erledigen. Nr. 26 der Reihe (Eine Schubertiade des Jahres 1826) enthlt bespielsweise Aufnahmen von vier verschiedenen Terminen aus dem Jahr 1994, dem Mrz 1995 sowie aus dem Februar 1996 kurz vor der Verffentlichung der CD. Christine Schfer kommt ein weiteres Mal zum Zuge (mit einer verklrten Interpretation von So lasst mich scheinen), ebenso John Mark Ainsley in Topform bei Nachthelle mit Mnnerchor, ein Lied, das zum Zeitpunkt seiner Entstehung als verdammt hoch bezeichnet wurde. Einer meiner vertrautesten Kollegen aus den Tagen des Songmakers Almanac, der unersetzliche Bariton Richard Jackson, singt auf dieser Scheibe ebenfalls einige Lieder. Hyperion hatte beschlossen, nicht nur die Sololieder, sondern die gesamte Vokalmusik mit Klavierxxiv

HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: ERINNERUNGEN EINES BEGLEITERS

begleitung einzuspielen; das bedeutete, dass nun immer hufiger Chorsnger und -sngerinnen bei den Terminen zugegen waren, meist unter der Leitung des groartigen und vielseitigen Stephen Layton. 1993 traf ich erstmals mit dem deutschen Bariton Matthias Goerne zusammen. Sein besonderes Talent, abgesehen von seiner verblffenden Beherrschung der mezza voce im pasaggio der Stimme (wie z.B. in der Schlegel-Vertonung Die Sterne), ist sein Verstndnis der unterschiedlichen Interpretationsmglichkeiten, die sich aus winzigen Variationen von Tempo und Betonung ergeben. Er erregte gerade rechtzeitig fr zwei wichtige Platten die Aufmerksamkeit von Hyperion: fr Schubert und die Familie Schlegel (zusammen mit Chrstine Schfer, Nr. 27), aufgenommen Anfang 1995, und Winterreise (Nr. 30), aufgenommen im Sommer 1996. Auch ihm gelang der Aufstieg zu einem Exklusivvertrag, in seiunem Fall mit Decca. Es stand nur noch eine weitere Soloplatte aus jedenfalls hatte ich gehofft, das es eine Soloplatte werden wrde! Sie umfasste die Lieder von 1819/1820, gesungen von der slowenischen Mezzosopranistin Marjana Lipovek. Am Tag vor dem Aufnahmetermin in London verkndete sie, dass die lange Mayrhofer-Vertonung Einsamkeit ihr doch nicht liege (die Musik hatte ihr in geeigneter Tonart seit langer Zeit vorgelegen). In diesem spten Stadium der Edition, in dem jede Zuordnung sorgsam bemessen war, gab es keinen Spielraum, einfach zwanzig Minuten von einer CD zu streichen. Nachdem knapp eine Stunde der Platte von Lipovek eingespielt worden war, wurde ihre Herausgabe verzgert (sie erschien schlielich als Nr. 29), um dem begnadeten kanadischen Bariton Nathan Berg zu gestatten, die fehlende Mayrhofer-Kantate zu singen. Wenn man es recht bedenkt, ist es erstaunlich, dass ber all die Jahre hin nicht mehr derartige Probleme auftraten. Der Rest der CDs bestand aus Schubertiaden mit unterschiedlichem zeitlichem Rahmen. Viele der Knstler, die zu frheren Aufnahmen beigetragen hatten, wurden gebeten, an diesen letzen Einspielungen teilzunehmen Ann Murray und Philip Langridge, beide so frisch wie eh und je, Stephen Varcoe fr die allerersten Schubert-Lieder (Nr. 33 der Reihe), eine Anzahl von Tenren unsere alten Freunde Martyn Hill und Adrian Thompson, daneben frisches Blut in der Gestalt von Paul Agnew, Daniel Norman, Toby Spence und James Gilchrist. Anthony Rolfe Johnson kehrte fr die Heine-Vertonungen des Schwanengesang auf der allerletzten CD (Nr. 37) zurck. Neal Davies sang einige der Basslieder gekonnt und mit viel Freude. Gelegentlich spielten bedeutende Interpreten wie Nancy Argenta und Lynne Dawson eine kleinere Rolle, als sie ihrer Erfahrung zukam daneben gab es eine groe Zahl erstklassiger Knstler, die nicht beteiligt waren (darunter der groe Schubert-Snger Ian Partridge, was mir persnlich besonders leid tut), und zwar einfach deshalb, weil das Leben nun einmal so spielte. Nichtsdestoweniger hat sich diese Serie, ohne bewusst dazu anzusetzen, zu einer Art akustischer Momentaufnahme der begnadeten Liedersngerinnen und -snger einer ganzen Generation entwickelt. Das bot zunehmend Ansporn dazu, Beitrge von jngeren Interpreten zu erbitten, die sich ihren Ruf erst nach Beginn unserer Ttigkeit im Jahre 1987 erworben hatten, vorausgesetzt, es machte ihnen nichts aus, nur einige wenige Lieder zu singen. So stellen sich die letzten Teile der Serie als Aneinanderreihung internationaler Sopranistinnen dar: mit der voluminsen Stimme von Christine Brewer, einem amerikanischen Star, der die gewundene Melodik des frhen Schubert mit erstaunlicher Leichtigkeit bewltigt, der Deutschen Juliane Banse (Schumann-Edition 3, 1998), der Britin Geraldine McGreevy (deren Schwestergruss eine meiner Lieblingsinterpretationen ist, und mit der wir im Jahre 2000 ein Wolf-Programm fr Hyperion einspielten). Unter den Sngern finden sich der deutsch-kanadische Tenor Michael Schade, der britische Bariton Christopher Maltman (Schumann-Edition 5, 2001), der Niederlnder Maarten Koningsberger (der bei Nr. 28 der Reihe eine bedeutende Rolle spielte), der Deutsche Stephan Loges sowie der Kanadier Gerald Finley, der an den Aufnahmen zum Teil 36 einen groen und hervorragenden Anteil hat und auerdem die zustzlichen Lieder fr die CDs 38 bis 40 auf sich nahm. Auf diesen letzten drei Platten (die hier erstmals erscheinen) sind auch die bezwingende Kunst der Sopranistin Susan Gritton, die seidige Stimme der Mezzosopranistin Stella Doufexis (Schumann-Edition 4, 1998), die unermdliche Ann Murray sowie Mark Padmore, einer der berzeugendsten Tenre der neuen britischen Welle, zu hren. xxv

HYPERION SCHUBERT EDITION: ERINNERUNGEN EINES BEGLEITERS

Aber wir haben uns nun wohl lange genug mit den Gesangsknstlern befasst. Der verstorbene Eric Sams, ein lieber Freund und schlicht der Welt grte Autoritt in Sachen Lieder, stand Pate fr die Serie. Er sah und bewertete jeden meiner Artikel fr die Serie (die hier nicht wiedergegeben sind) und machte mich unter Mhen zu einem kompetenteren Autoren, wobei er mir nie den Mut nahm. Wir drfen auch unsere wunderbaren Instrumentalisten nicht vergessen Thea King (Klarinette, Nr. 9), David Pyatt (Horn, Nr. 37), Marianne Thorsen (Violine, Nr. 39) und Sebastian Comberti (Cello, Nr. 40). Eugene Asti spielte mit mir zusammen eine Begleitung fr Klavierduett auf der CD Nr. 36, auerdem zeichnete er fr eine bemerkenswerte Vervollstndigung der Chorfassung des Gesangs der Geister mit Klavier verantwortlich. Das Wirken des verstorbenen Reinhard van Hoorickx, der ein glhender Schubert-Verehrer und unermdlicher Bearbeiter von Fragmenten war, kommt auf vielen unserer Platten zum Tragen. Die Produktionsteams waren unersetzlich: die begnadeten Martin Compton und Antony Howell in der ersten Zeit, spter die stets geduldigen und liebenswrdigen Mark Brown und Julian Millard, auerdem in einigen Fllen Tony Faulkner alles bedeutende Mnner in ihrem Fach, ohne deren Beteiligung diese Serie niemals vorstellbar gewesen wre. Das Schaffen des bezaubernden Malcolm Crowthers, der fr die Serie fotografierte, habe ich bereits erwhnt, und dann sind da noch all die Klavierstimmer (werden wir jemals den legendren Steinway-Flgel Nr. 340 vergessen knnen?), die Umbltterer sowie die Sngerinnen und Snger (da geht es schon wieder los!), die in den Chren mit uns gesungen haben. Der oberfleiige Nick Flower bei Hyperion Records ist Meister aller Dinge, die mit Textgestaltung und Druck zu tun haben; ohne ihn wre diese stattliche Neuausgabe nicht mglich gewesen, die durch die Arbeiten von Martha Griebler (geb. 1948) noch ber die Maen verschnert wurde. Ihre fast unheimlichen Beschwrungen von Schubert und seinem Kreis mit Pinsel und Bleistift haben die ffentlichkeit bei diversen Ausstellungen aus Anlass der Schubertiade zu Schwarzenberg begeistert. Ein Band ihrer Werke mit dem Titel Franz Schubert Zeichnungen ist in Vorbereitung; der Verlag ist unter www.bibliothekderprovinz.at zu erreichen. Trotz aller Arten von Rckschlgen und Schwierigkeiten stellt die Firma unter der Leitung von Simon Perry nach wie vor das menschliche Gesicht der Schallplattenindustrie dar. Das hat auch mit dem ber allem schwebenden Geist von Ted zu tun. Ich sehe ihn whrend langer Sessions noch vor mir ber die Texte der Dichter gebeugt, notierte er die (aus unterschiedlichen editorischen Grnden notwendigen) Abweichungen der Interpreten von den Texten, die im Beiheft abgedruckt werden sollten. Er korrigierte alles persnlich und redigierte eigenhndig meine smtlichen Anmerkungen. Wir entwickelten uns beide mit der Zeit zum Besseren. Doch von Anfang an stand er stets voll und ganz hinter mir; kein Pianist htte ein Projekt wie dieses ohne machtvolle Untersttzung realisieren knnen die Interpreten erschienen wie durch Zauberei, mit ausgehandelten Gagen und arrangiertem Transport. Die CDs erschienen pnktlich hell, glnzend, perfekt verpackt. Alles, was ich tun musste, war proben, spielen und schreiben. Und Ted machte es mglich, das ich all das ohne Aufregung erledigen konnte. Die Serie gehrt in Wahrheit ihm er hat schlielich fr sie bezahlt, und nicht nur finanziell. Darum mchte ich diese Neuauflage der Lieder Schuberts dem Andenken an Ted Perry widmen, den viele von uns als Mentor betrachtet haben. Auf dein Wohl, Ted, und auf das Wohl des groen Komponisten, der uns so eng zusammengebracht hat. Zu behaupten, Hyperion sei ihm gerecht geworden, wre voreilig; wir wollen vielmehr sagen, dass die Firma ihr Bestes gegeben hat, ebenso wie smtliche Knstlerinnen und Knstler, die an dem Projekt beteiligt waren. Und sein Bestes zu geben, das ist es doch wohl, was den wahren Schubertianer auszeichnet, von Anfnger bis zum gesetzten Profi, was auch immer sie zu leisten vermgen. Dass Schubert selbst das begriff, geht aus jenem einzigartigen musikalischen Phnomen hervor, der Schubertiade, wo niemand abgewiesen wurde, der sein Bestes einbrachte, und wo das Genie des Komponisten neue Talente stets zu frdern wusste. Graham Johnson 2005 xxvi
bersetzung: Anne Steeb/Bernd Mller

17971811 A SCHUBERT CALENDAR A SCHUBERT CALENDAR 1797 31 January: Franz Peter Schubert is born in Vienna. His parents are Franz Theodor Schubert, a schoolmaster (17631830), and his wife, Elisabeth, ne Vietz (17561812). Both had been born in Silesia and moved to Vienna at different times to better their circumstances. Among Schuberts surviving siblings, Ignaz (17851844), the composers eldest brother and first piano teacher, is twelve years old; Ferdinand Schubert (17941859), Franzs favourite brother, is three. The cramped birth-house in Viennas ninth district is to become a museum (Nussdorferstrasse 54), although none of Schuberts music is actually written here. 18011804 aged 4 to 7 In 1801 the family moves to roomier quarters in the nearby Sulengasse (No 3), the site of a filling station (Schubertgarage) in present-day Vienna. This is the home in which Schubert composes his earlier works. In 1802 he begins to play the piano, but the little boy, while deeply musical, is no Mozartian prodigy. 18051807 aged 8 to 10 Violin studies (from his father) are now added to the curriculum. Amidst the political upheavals occasioned by Napoleons occupation of Vienna, Schubert begins to sing in the Liechtental parish church around the corner from his home. The choirmaster there, Michael Holzer (17721826), introduces the boy to the study of counterpoint and professes himself astonished by his students gifts. 18081809 aged 11 to 12 Against stiff competition Schubert wins a choral scholarship to the Imperial Konvikt (the audition panel is chaired by the famous Antonio Salieri, 17501825). The boy will receive his education in exchange for singing at the Hofburg he is in effect a member of the Vienna Boys Choir. His first term begins on 30 September 1808. There is a great deal of music-making at the Konvikt, including an orchestra in which Schubert plays the violin. 1810 aged 13 Schubert makes friends at the Konvikt, including his life-long supporter, the generous and protective Josef von Spaun (17881865). The earliest surviving songs (two versions of the same extended text by Gabriele von Baumberg) date from this year. The lifelong habit of depending on the artistic and spiritual nourishment of a group of sympathetic friends is established at this time, as well as the practice of borrowing books from those who have access to the kind of private libraries that are not to be found in the Sulengasse. 1811 aged 14 Schubert is now taking lessons with the court organist, Wenzel Ruzicka (17571823). His literary explorations broaden somewhat to include the larger-than-life, but outmoded, writings of Schcking and Pfeffel. In the ballads of Friedrich von Schiller he discovers his first great poet. The content of several of the texts set in this period would seem to mirror a teenagers conflict with an irascible father. The hardworking and religious milieu into which the composer was born is a strong contrast to the freethinking liberal background enjoyed by the more affluent students educated at the same school. Here is the source of a family conflict that is never to be satisfactorily resolved.
o
v v

Some other works of 18101811 Fantasy in G for piano duet (D1, May 1810); Overture in D and Symphony in D (both unfinished, D2a and 2b, 1811); Six Minuets for Winds (D2d); Overture in C minor for string quintet; Der Spiegelritter (Kotzebue), a Singspiel in 3 acts begun at the end of 1811.

SONG TEXTS 1810


Prefatory note: The word Gesamtausgabe throughout refers to the complete edition of Schuberts works by Breitkopf und Hrtel, Leipzig. The editor of the lieder series was Eusebius Mandyczewski. The editor of the Peters Edition of Schuberts songs was Max Friedlnder. The editor of the lieder series of the Neue Schubert Ausgabe is Walter Drr. The word Nachlass refers to a series of fifty books of posthumously published Schubert songs edited and issued by Anton Diabelli between 1830 and 1850.
Disc 1 Lebenstraum Gesang in c A dream of life Song Track 1 D1a. 1810; fragment, first published without the Baumberg underlay in 1969 in the Neue Schubert Ausgabe, Kassel
arranged and completed by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by Stephen Varcoe

Ich sass an einer Tempelhalle Am Musenhain, umrauscht vom nahen Wasserfalle, Im sanften Abendschein. Kein Lftchen wehte; und die Sonn im Scheiden Vergldete die matten Trauerweiden. Still sinnend sass ich lange, lange da, Das Haupt gesttzt auf meine Rechte. Ich dachte Zukunft und Vergangenheit, und sah Auf einem Berg, dem Tron der Gtter nah, Den Aufenthalt vom heiligen Geschlechte, Der Snger alt und neuer Zeit, An deren Liede sich die Nachwelt noch erfreut. Tot, unbemerkt, und lngst vergessen schliefen Fern in des Tales dunkeln Tiefen Die Gtzen ihrer Zeit, Im Riesenschatten der Vergnglichkeit. Und langsam schwebend kam aus jenem dunkeln Tale, Entstiegen einem morschen Heldenmahle, Jetzt eine dstere Gestalt daher, Und bot (in dem sie ungefhr vorberzog) In einer mohnbekrnzten Schale Aus Lethes Quelle mir Vergessenheit! Betroffen, wollt ich die Erscheinung fragen: Was dieser Trank mir ntzen soll? Doch schon war sie entflohn: ich sahs mit stillem Groll, Denn meinen Wnschen konnt ich nicht entsagen. Da kam in frohem Tanz, mit zephyrleichtem Schritt, Ein kleiner Genius gesprungen Und winkt und rief mir zu: Komm mit, Entreisse dich den bangen Dmmerungen Sie trben selbst der Wahrheit Sonnenschein! Komm mit! Ich fhre dich in jenen Lorbeerhain, Wohin kein Ungeweihter je gedrungen. Ein unverwelklich schner Dichterkranz Blht dort fr Dich im heitern Frhlingsglanz Mit einem Myrtenzweig umschlungen. Er sprachs, und ging mir schnell voran. Ich folgte, voll Vertrauen, dem holden Jungen, Beglckt in meinem sssen Wahn. Es herrschte jetzt die feierlichste Stille Im ganzen Hain. Das langersehnte Ziel, Hellschimmernd sah ichs schon in ferner Schattenhlle Und stand, verloren ganz im Lustgefhl. Nimm (sprach er jetzt) es ist Apollons Wille. Nimm hin dies goldne Saitenspiel!

In the soft light of evening, surrounded by cascading water, I sat at the portals of a temple in the grove of the Muses. No breeze stirred, and the sun in parting gilded the weary weeping willows. I sat there in long contemplation, resting my head in my right hand. I pondered the future and the past, and on a hill, close to the gods throne, I saw the abode of the holy race of singers, from times both old and new, in whose songs posterity still delights. Dead, unheeded, long forgotten, the idols of their day slept far away in the valleys dark depths, in the giant shadow of evanescence. Then from that dark valley, arising from a heroes rotten feast, a murky form came gliding slowly along, and as it vaguely passed me, in a chalice garlanded with poppies it offered me oblivion from Lethes stream. In my consternation I was about to ask the apparition how this draught could avail me, but it had already vanished: I contemplated it in silent anger for I could not renounce my longing. Then, blithely dancing with zephyr-light steps, a small spirit came bounding up, waving and calling to me: Come with me! Tear yourself from this fearful half-light which dulls even the sunlight of truth. Come with me; I will take you into yonder laurelgrove where the uninitiated have never entered. A poets lovely wreath that will not fade, blooms for you there in the bright spring radiance, entwined in a myrtle branch. Saying this, he quickly led the way. Full of trust I followed the kindly boy, happy in my sweet delusion. The most solemn silence now reigned throughout the grove. The prize I had long desired I saw, shimmering brightly in vague, distant outline, and stood, quite lost in rapture. He now spoke: Take it, for it is Apollos will; take this golden lyre.

18101811 SONG TEXTS


Es hat die Kraft in schwermutsvollen Stunden Durch seinen Zauberton zu heilen all die Wunden, Die Missgesschick und fremder Wahn dir schlug. Mit zrtlich rhrenden Akkorden, Tnt es vom Sd bis zum Norden, Und bereilt der Zeiten schnellen Flug Sei stolz, sei stolz auf dein Besitz! Und denke: Von Allem, was die Gtter sterblichen verleihen, Ist dies das hchste der Geschenke! Und du wirst es nicht entweihen. Noch nicht vertraut mit ihrer ganzen Macht, Sang ich zuerst nur kleine Lieder; Und Echo hallte laut und frhlich wieder.
GABRIELE VON BAUMBERG (17751839)

With its magic tones it has the power, in melancholy hours, to heal all the wounds that misfortune and the madness of others have inflicted on you. Its tender, touching chords resound from south to north more swiftly than times rapid flight. Be proud of your possession, and reflect: of all that the gods bestow on mortals, this is the highest gift. And you will not abuse it. Not yet familiar with its full power, at first I sang only small songs whose echo rang loudly and joyfully

Lebenstraum Ich sass an einer Tempelhalle


Ich sass an einer Tempelhalle Am Musenhain, umrauscht vom nahen Wasserfalle, Im sanften Abendschein. Kein Lftchen wehte; und die Sonn im Scheiden Vergldete die matten Trauerweiden. Still sinnend sass ich lange da, Das Haupt gesttzt auf meine Rechte. Ich dachte Zukunft und Vergangenheit, und sah Auf einem Berg, dem Tron der Gtter nah, Den Aufenthalt vom heiligen Geschlechte, Der Snger alt und neuer Zeit, An deren Liede sich die Nachwelt noch erfreut. Tot, unbemerkt, und lngst vergessen schliefen Fern in des Tales dunkeln Tiefen Die Gtzen ihrer Zeit, Im Riesenschatten der Vergnglichkeit. Und langsam schwebend kam aus jenem dunkeln Tale, Entstiegen einem morschen Heldenmahle, Jetzt eine dstere Gestalt daher, Und bot (in dem sie ungefhr vorberzog) In einer mohnbekrnzten Schale Aus Lethes Quelle mir Vergessenheit! Betroffen, wollt ich die Erscheinung fragen: Was dieser Trank mir ntzen soll? Doch schon war sie entflohn: ich sahs mit stillem Groll, Denn meinen Wnschen konnt ich nicht entsagen. Da kam in frohem Tanz, mit zephyrleichtem Schritt, Ein kleiner Genius
GABRIELE VON BAUMBERG (17751839)

A dream of life I sat at the portals of a temple


In the soft light of evening, surrounded by cascading water, I sat at the portals of a temple in the grove of the Muses. No breeze stirred, and the sun in parting gilded the weary weeping willows. I sat there in long contemplation, resting my head in my right hand. I pondered the future and the past, and on a hill, close to the gods throne, I saw the abode of the holy race of singers, from times both old and new, in whose songs posterity still delights. Dead, unheeded, long forgotten, the idols of their day slept far away in the valleys dark depths, in the giant shadow of evanescence. Then from that dark valley, arising from a heroes rotten feast, a murky form came gliding slowly along, and as it vaguely passed me, in a chalice garlanded with poppies it offered me oblivion from Lethes stream. In my consternation I was about to ask the apparition how this draught could avail me, but it had already vanished: I contemplated it in silent anger for I could not renounce my longing. Then, blithely dancing with zephyr-light steps, a small spirit

1 Disc
2 Track

D39. 1810; first published in 1969 (as Ich sass an einer Tempelhalle) in the Neue Schubert Ausgabe, Kassel sung by Stephen Varcoe

Hagars Klage
Hier am Hgel heissen Sandes Sitz ich, und mir gegenber Liegt mein sterbend Kind!

Hagars lament
Here I sit, on a mound of burning sand, and before me lies my dying child!

1 Disc
3 Track

D5. 30 March 1811; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Christine Brewer

SONG TEXTS 1811


Lechzt nach einem Tropfen Wasser, Lechzt und ringt schon mit dem Tode, Weint, und blickt mit stieren Augen Mich bedrngte Mutter an! Du musst sterben, armes Wrmchen, Ach, nicht eine Trne, Hab ich in den trocknen Augen, Wo ich dich mit stillen kann! Ha! sh ich eine Lwenmutter Ich wollte mit ihr kmpfen, Kmpfen mit ihr um die Eiter. Knnt ich aus dem drren Sande Nur ein Trpfchen Wasser saugen! Aber ach, ich muss dich sterben sehn! Kaum ein schwacher Strahl des Lebens Dmmert auf der bleichen Wange, Dmmert in den matten Augen, Deine Brust erhebt sich kaum. Hier am Busen komm und welke! Kmmt ein Mensch dann durch die Wste, So wird er in den Sand uns scharren, Sagen: Das ist Weib und Kind! Ich will mich von dir wenden, Dass ich dich nicht sterben seh, Und im Taumel der Verzweiflung Murre wider Gott! Ferne von dir will ich gehen, Und ein rhrend Klaglied singen, Dass du noch im Todeskampfe Trstung einer Stimme hrst. Noch zum letzten Klaggebete ffn ich meine drren Lippen, Und dann schliess ich sie auf immer, Und dann komme bald, o Tod! Jehova! blick auf uns herab, Jehova, erbarme dich des Knaben! Send aus einem Taugewlke Labung uns herab! Ist er nicht von Abrams Samen? Er weinte Freudentrnen, Als ich ihm dies Kind geboren, Und nun wird er ihm zum Fluch! Rette deines Lieblings Samen! Selbst sein Vater bat um Segen, Und du sprachst: Es komme Segen ber dieses Kindes Haupt. Hab ich wider dich gesndigt, Ha! so treffe mich die Rache, Aber, ach, was tat der Knabe, Dass er mit mir leiden muss? Wr ich doch in Sir gestorben, Als ich in der Wste irrte, Und das Kind noch ungeboren Unter meinem Herzen lag! Nein; da kam ein holder Fremdling, Hiess mich rck zu Abram gehen, Und des Mannes Haus betreten, Der uns grausam jetzt verstiess.
He thirsts for a drop of water; he thirsts, and already struggles with death; he weeps, and with vacant eyes looks upon me, his distressed mother. You must die, poor mite; alas, not a single tear do I have in my dry eyes to soothe you. If I saw a lioness I would fight with her, fight with her for her milk. If only I could suck but one drop of water from the parched sand! But alas, I must watch you die! Scarcely a feeble ray of life glimmers on your pale cheeks and in your dull eyes; your little chest scarcely rises. Come to my breast and perish there! If a man then comes through the wilderness he will bury us in the sand, saying: Here is a woman and her child! I shall turn away from you lest I see you die, and in the frenzy of despair cry out against God! I shall go far away from you and sing a touching lament, so that in your struggle with death you will still hear a comforting voice. I shall open my parched lips in one last grieving prayer; then I shall close them for ever, then death soon will come. Look down on us, Jehovah! Take pity on the child! From dewy clouds send us refreshing rain! Is he not of Abrahams seed? He wept tears of joy when I bore him this child, and now the child has become a curse to him! Save the seed of your chosen one! His father asked for your blessing, and you spoke: Let this childs head be blessed. If I have sinned against you may vengeance strike me! But what has the boy done that he must suffer with me? Would that I had died in Syria when I was walking in the wilderness, and the child lay unborn under my heart! No! A fair stranger came to me, bade me return to Abraham and enter the house of the man who now cruelly rejects us.

1811 SONG TEXTS


War der Fremdling nich dein Engel? Denn er sprach mit holder Miene: Ismael wird gross auf Erden, Sein Samen zahlreich sein! Nun liegen wir und welken, Unsre Leichen werden modern Wie die Leichen der Verfluchten, Die der Erde Schoss nicht birgt. Schrei zum Himmel, armer Knabe! ffne deine welken Lippen! Gott, sein Herr! verschmh das Flehen Des unschuldgen Knaben nicht.
CLEMENS AUGUST SCHCKING (17591790)

Was the stranger not your angel? For he spoke with gracious mien: Ishmael will be great on earth, and his seed will multiply! Now we lie dying, and our bodies will rot like the corpses of the accursed which the earths womb does not conceal. Cry unto heaven, my poor boy! Open your parched lips! God, his Lord, do not scorn the pleas of this innocent boy.

Leichenfantasie
Mit erstorbnem Scheinen Steht der Mond auf totenstillen Hainen; Seufzend streicht der Nachtgeist durch die Luft Nebelwolken trauern, Sterne trauern Bleich herab, wie Lampen in der Gruft. Gleich Gespenstern, stumm und hohl und hager, Zieht in schwarzem Totenpompe dort Ein Gewimmel nach dem Leichenlager Unterm Schauerflor der Grabnacht fort. Zitternd an der Krcke, Wer mit dsterm, rckgesunknem Blicke Ausgegossen in ein heulend Ach, Schwer geneckt vom eisernen Geschicke, Schwankt dem stummgetragnen Sarge nach? Floss es Vater von des Jnglings Lippe? Nasse Schauer schauern frchterlich Durch sein gramgeschmolzenes Gerippe, Seine Silberhaare bumen sich. Aufgerissen seine Feuerwunde! Durch die Seele Hllenschmerz! Vater floss es von des Jnglings Munde. Sohn gelispelt hat das Vaterherz. Eiskalt, eiskalt liegt er hier im Tuche. Und dein Traum, so golden einst, so sss, Sss und golden, Vater, dir zum Fluche! Eiskalt, eiskalt liegt er hier im Tuche, Deine Wonne und dein Paradies! Mild, wie umweht von Elysiumslften, Wie aus Auroras Umarmung geschlpft, Himmlisch umgrtet mit rosigten Dften, Florens Sohn ber das Blumenfeld hpft, Flog er einher auf den lachenden Wiesen, Nachgespiegelt von silberner Flut, Wollustflammen entsprhten den Kssen, Jagten die Mdchen in liebende Glut. Mutig sprang er im Gewhle der Menschen, Wie ein jugendlich Reh; Himmelum flog er in schweifenden Wnschen, Hoch wie der Adler in wolkigter Hh: Stolz wie die Rosse sich struben und schumen, Werfen im Sturme die Mhne umher, Kniglich wider den Zgel sich bumen, Trat er vor Sklaven und Frsten daher.

Funereal fantasy
With dim light the moon shines over the death-still groves; sighing, the night spirit skims through the air mist-clouds lament, pale stars shine down mournfully like lamps in a vault. Like ghosts silent, hollow, gaunt, in black funeral pomp a procession moves towards the graveyard beneath the dread veil of the burial night. Who is he who trembling on crutches with sombre, sunken gaze, pouring out his misery in a cry of pain, and harshly tormented by an iron fate totters behind the silently borne coffin? Did the boys lips say Father? Damp, fearful shudders run through his frame, racked with grief; his silver hair stands on end. His burning wound is torn open by the hellish pain of his soul! Father, uttered the boys lips. Son, whispered the fathers heart. Ice-cold, he lies here in his shroud, and your dream, once so golden, so sweet, sweet and golden, now a curse on you, father! Ice-cold, he lies here in his shroud, your joy and your paradise! Gently, as if stroked by Elysian breezes, as if slipping from Auroras embrace, wreathed in the heavenly fragrance of roses, it were Floras son dancing over the flowery fields, he flew across the smiling meadows, mirrored by the silver waters; flames of desire sprang from his kisses, driving maidens to burning passion.

1 Disc
4 Track

D7. c1811; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Sir Thomas Allen

Bravely he leapt amid the swarm of humanity, like a young deer; with his restless longings he flew around the heavens. As high as an eagle, soaring in the clouds; proud as the steeds as they rear, foaming, tossing their manes in the storm, and regally resisting the reins, did he walk before slaves and princes.

SONG TEXTS 1811


Heiter wie Frhlingstag schwand ihm das Leben, Floh ihm vorber in Hesperus Glanz, Klagen ertrnkt er im Golde der Reben, Schmerzen verhpft er im wirbelnden Tanz. Welten schliefen im herrlichen Jungen, Ha! wenn er einsten zum Manne gereift Freue dich, Vater, im herrlichen Jungen Wenn einst die schlafenden Keime gereift!
Track 5 Nein doch, Vater horch! die Kirchhoftre His life slipped by, as bright as a spring day, flying past him in the glow of Hesperus. He drowned his sorrows in the golden vine; he tripped away his grief in the whirling dance. Whole worlds lay dormant in the fine youth. Ah! When he matures into a man rejoice father, in the fine boy, when, one day, the latent seeds are ripened! But no, father hark! The churchyard gate is rattling, and the iron hinges are creaking open how terrifying it is to peer into the grave! But no, let the tears flow! So, gracious youth, in the suns path, joyfully onwards to perfection, quench your noble thirst for joy, released from pain, in the peace of Valhalla! To see him again heavenly thought! To see him again at the gates of Eden! Hark! The coffin sways and falls with a dull thud; the ropes whirr upwards with a whine! When we rolled drunkenly among one another our lips were silent, but our eyes spoke: Stop! Stop! when we grew angry but afterwards tears fell more warmly. With dim light the moon shines over the death-still groves; sighing, the night spirit skims through the air mist-clouds are shivering, pale stars shine down mournfully, like lamps in a vault. With a thud clods pile over the coffin. Oh, for just one more glimpse of the earths treasure! The graves bolts close, rigid and eternal; the thud of the clods grows duller as they pile over the coffin, the grave will never yield up!

brauset, Und die ehrnen Angel klirren auf Wies hinein ins Grabgewlbe grauset! Nein doch, lass den Trnen ihren Lauf! Geh, du Holder, geh im Pfade der Sonne Freudig weiter der Vollendung zu, Lsche nun den edlen Durst nach Wonne, Gramentbundner, in Walhallas Ruh! Wiedersehn himmlischer Gedanke! Wiedersehn dort an Edens Tor! Horch! der Sarg versinkt mit dumpfigem Geschwanke, Wimmernd schnurrt das Totenseil empor! Da wir trunken um einander rollten, Lippen schwiegen, und das Auge sprach Haltet! Haltet! da wir boshaft grollten Aber Trnen strzten wrmer nach. Mit erstorbnem Scheinen Steht der Mond auf totenstillen Hainen; Seufzend streicht der Nachtgeist durch die Luft Nebelwolken trauern, Sterne trauern Bleich herab, wie Lampen in der Gruft. Dumpfig schollerts berm Sarg zum Hgel, O um Erdballs Schtze nur noch einen Blick! Starr und ewig schliesst des Grabes Riegel, Dumpfer dumpfer schollerts berm Sarg zum Hgel, Nimmer gibt das Grab zurck.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Disc 1 Der Vatermrder The parricide Track 6 D10. 26 December 1811; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Adrian Thompson

Ein Vater starb von des Sohnes Hand. Kein Wolf, kein Tiger, nein, Der Mensch allein, der Tiere Frst, Erfand den Vatermord allein. Der Tter floh, um dem Gericht Sein Opfer zu entziehn, In einen Wald, doch konnt er nicht Den innern Richter fliehn. Verzehrt und hager, stumm und bleich Mit Lumpen angetan, Dem Dmon der Verzweiflung gleich, Traf ihn ein Hscher an.

A father died by his sons hand. No wolf, no tiger, but man alone, the prince of beasts, he alone invented parricide. To cheat the law of its victim, the murderer fled into a wood, yet he could not escape the inner judge. Consumed and haggard, silent and pale, dressed in rags, like the demon of despair he was found by a henchman.

18111812 SONG TEXTS


Voll Grimm zerstrte der Barbar Ein Nest mit einem Stein Und mordete die kleine Schar Der armen Vgelein. Halt ein! rief ihm der Scherge zu, Verruchter Bsewicht, Mit welchem Rechte marterst du Die frommen Tierchen so? Was fromm, sprach jener, den die Wut Kaum hrbar stammeln liess, Ich tat es, weil die Hllenbrut Mich Vatermrder hiess. Der Mann beschaut ihn, seine Tat Verrt sein irrer Blick. Er fasst den Mrder, und das Rad Bestraft sein Bubenstck. Du, heiliges Gewissen, bist Der Tugend letzter Freund; Ein schreckliches Triumphlied ist Dein Donner ihrem Feind.
GOTTLIEB CONRAD PFEFFEL (17361809)

Filled with rage, the savage man destroyed a nest with a stone and murdered the little brood of poor fledglings. Stop, cried the henchman, accursed murderer, what right do you have to torture these harmless creatures? Harmless? he replied, stammering, barely audible in his fury, I did it because this hellish brood called me a parricide. The henchman looked at him whose crazed look betrayed his deed. he seized the murderer, and the rack punished the evil man. You, sacred conscience, are virtues last friend; to her enemy your thunder is an awesome song of triumph.

Des Mdchens Klage

The maidens lament

1 Disc
7 Track

First version, D6. 1811 or 1812; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig cf Zumsteeg Thekla Des Mdchens Klage, disc 38 9 sung by Christine Brewer

Der Eichwald brauset, die Wolken ziehn, Das Mgdlein sitzt an Ufers Grn, Es bricht sich die Welle mit Macht, mit Macht, Und sie seufzt hinaus in die finstere Nacht, Das Auge vom Weinen getrbet. Das Herz ist gestorben, die Welt ist leer, Und weiter gibt sie dem Wunsche nichts mehr, Du Heilige, ruf dein Kind zurck, Ich habe genossen das irdische Glck, Ich habe gelebt und geliebet! Es rinnet der Trnen vergeblicher Lauf, Die Klage, sie wecket die Toten nicht auf; Doch nenne, was trstet und heilet die Brust Nach der sssen Liebe verschwundner Lust, Ich, die Himmlische, wills nicht versagen. Lass rinnen der Trnen vergeblichen Lauf, Es wecket die Klage die Toten nicht auf! Das ssseste Glck fr die traurernde Brust, Nach der schnen Liebe verschwundner Lust Sind der Liebe Schmerzen und Klagen.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

The oak-wood roars, the clouds scud by, the maiden sits on the verdant shore; the waves break with mighty force, and she sighs into the dark night, her eyes dimmed with weeping. My heart is dead, the world is empty, and no longer yields to my desire. Holy one, call back your child. I have enjoyed earthly happiness; I have lived and loved! Tears run their vain course; lamenting does not awaken the dead; but say, what can comfort and heal the heart when the joys of sweet love have vanished? I, the heavenly maiden, shall not deny it. Let my tears run their vain course; let my lament not awaken the dead! For the grieving heart the sweetest happiness, when the joys of fair love have vanished, is the sorrow and lament of love.

Des Mdchens Klage by C Jger

A SCHUBERT CALENDAR 18121813 A SCHUBERT CALENDAR 1812 aged 15 The first tragedy in the composers life is the death of his mother at the age of fifty-six on 28 May 1812. A short time afterwards (18 June) he begins composition lessons with Salieri, an entre that is granted to only the most talented of the Konvikts pupils. On 26 July he marks a choral score with the words Schubert, Franz crowed for the last time his voice had broken. Salieri proves a hard taskmaster and initiates the boy into the mysteries of Italian bel canto his teaching has an unashamed vocal bias, and he favours the texts of Metastasio as exercises. Schubert sets these for every possible vocal combination at the same time as pursuing a healthy interest in the literature of his own language Matthisson, Hlty and Rochlitz are not exactly new poets, but they are new discoveries for Schubert. This mixture is a compromise that perhaps only an education in Vienna of the time could provide. Far away from the rigours of the Berlin lieder school, Italianate sensuality is permitted to coexist with German depth and seriousness. 1813 aged 16 It is probably at the beginning of this year that Schubert visits the opera for the first time, at the invitation of Josef von Spaun. The opera is Glucks Iphignie en Tauride, and the principal singers are Johann Michael Vogl and Anna Milder, both artists who will play a part in Schuberts life. Gluck (of whom Schubert is a grand-pupil via Salieri) becomes a huge influence on the young composer. At the same time he meets the already famous young poet Theodor Krner who is passing through Vienna and who is soon to die a hero in one of the last battles against the French. Schubert confesses to Krner his hopes for becoming a composer and receives encouragement to follow his dream. His father marries Anna Kleyenbck who turns out to be a sympathetic step-mother, but it is clear that the youthful idyll at the Konvikt has come to an end. In the autumn Schubert renounces a scholarship that would have paid for extended musical studies. He is now an assistant schoolmaster who must work for the family firm an outcome that is at odds with his dreams of being an independent artist. The string quartets of this period are written for home performance. There is also some evidence of music-making with school friends: Die Advokaten is a reworking of a humorous piece by Anton Fischer, a local composer. At this stage of his career Schubert follows models by his elders as assiduously as a trainee painter makes copies of the old masters. Some other works of 18121813 Overture in D (D26); Salve regina in F (D27); Piano Trio in B flat (D28); String Quartet in C (D32); String Quartet in B flat (D36); String Quartet in C (D46); String Quartet in B flat (D68); Octet in F for winds (D72); String Quartet in D (D74); Symphony No 1 in D (D82).

Antonio Salieri (17501825)

Pietro Metastasio (16981782)

1812 SONG TEXTS Der Geistertanz


Die bretterne Kammer Der Toten erbebt, Wenn zwlfmal den Hammer Die Mitternacht hebt. Rasch tanzen um Grber Und morsches Gebein Die luftigen Schweber Den sausenden Reihn. Wir gaukeln und scherzen Hinab und empor
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Ghost dance
The boarded chamber of the dead trembles when midnight twelve times raises the hammer. Quickly we airy spirits strike up a whirling dance around graves and rotting bones. Jesting, we flit up and down

2 Disc
1 Track

First setting, D15. c1812; fragment published in the supplement to series 21 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Adrian Thompson

Der Geistertanz
Die bretterne Kammer Der Toten erbebt, Wenn zwlfmal den Hammer Die Mitternacht hebt. Rasch tanzen um Grber Und morsches Gebein Die luftigen Schweber Den sausenden Reihn. Was winseln die Hunde Beim schlafenden Herrn? Sie wittern die Runde Der Geister von fern.
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Ghost dance
The boarded chamber of the dead trembles when midnight twelve times raises the hammer. Quickly we airy spirits strike up a whirling dance around graves and rotting bones. Why do the dogs whine as their masters sleep? They scent from afar the spirits dance.

2 Disc
2 Track

Second setting, D15a. c1812; fragment published in the supplement of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzip sung by Adrian Thompson

Quell innocente figlio Aria dell angelo

The innocent son The angels song

2 Disc
3 Track 4 Track

D17 No 1 (for soprano) and No 2 (for two sopranos). Composition exercises, c1812; first printed in 1940 in Alfred Orels Der junge Schubert; additional piano accompaniments by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by Ann Murray (both voices)

Quell innocente figlio, Dono del ciel si raro, Quel figlio a te si caro Quello vuol Dio da te! Vuol che rimanga esangue Sotto al paterno ciglio; Vuol che ne sparga il sangue Chi vita gi gli di.
PIETRO METASTASIO (16981782)

This innocent son, such a rare gift from heaven, this son, so dear to you, God demands from you. He demands that he bleeds before his fathers eyes; he demands that he who once gave him life should shed his blood.

Viel tausend Sterne prangen


Viel tausend Sterne prangen Am Himmel still und schn Und wecken mein Verlangen Hinaus aufs Feld zu gehn. O ewig schne Sterne In ewig gleichem Lauf Wie blick ich stets so gerne Zu eurem Glanz hinauf.
AUGUST GOTTLOB EBERHARD (17691845)

Many thousand stars shine


Many thousand stars shine forth fair and silent in the heavens, and awaken my longing to go out into the fields. Eternally lovely stars on your eternally unchanging course, how I always love to gaze up at your radiance.

2 Disc
5 Track

D642. c1812; first published by Universal Edition in 1937 sung by The London Schubert Chorale (directed by Stephen Layton)

SONG TEXTS 1812


Disc 2 Klaglied Lament Track 6 D23. 1812; first published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1830 as Op posth 131
cf Neukomm Sehnsucht, disc 39 br sung by Marie McLaughlin

Meine Ruh ist dahin, Meine Freud ist entflohn, In dem Suseln der Lfte, In dem Murmeln des Bachs Hr ich bebend nur Klageton. Seinem schmeichelnden Wort, Und dem Druck seiner Hand, Seinem heissen Verlangen, Seinem glhenden Kuss, Weh mir, dass ich nicht widerstand!
JOHANN FRIEDRICH ROCHLITZ (17691842)

My peace is gone, my joy has fled; in the rustling of the breezes, in the murmuring of the brook I hear only the quivering plaint. His flattering words and the press of his hand, his ardent desire, his burning kisses alas, that I did not resist!

Disc 2 Der Jngling am Bache The youth by the brook Track 7 First setting, D30. 24 September 1812; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Dame Janet Baker

An der Quelle sass der Knabe, Blumen wand er sich zum Kranz, Und er sah sie fortgerissen, Treiben in der Wellen Tanz. Und so fliehen meine Tage Wie die Quelle rastlos hin! Und so bleichet meine Jugend, Wie die Krnze schnell verblhn! Fraget nicht, warum ich traure In des Lebens Bltenzeit! Alles freuet sich und hoffet, Wenn der Frhling sich erneut. Aber tausend Stimmen Der erwachenden Natur Wecken in dem tiefen Busen Mir den schweren Kummer nur. Was soll mir die Freude frommen, Die der schne Lenz mir beut? Eine nur ists, die ich suche, Sie ist nah und ewig weit. Sehnend breit ich meine Arme Nach dem teuren Schattenbild, Ach, ich kann es nicht erreichen, Und das Herz ist ungestillt! Komm herab, du schne Holde, Und verlass dein stolzes Schloss! Blumen, die der Lenz geboren, Streu ich dir in deinen Schoss. Horch, der Hain erschallt von Liedern, Und die Quelle rieselt klar! Raum ist in der kleinsten Htte Fr ein glcklich liebend Paar.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

By the stream sat a youth, weaving flowers into a wreath; he saw them carried off and swept along in the dancing waves. Thus my days speed by, relentlessly, like the stream! And my youth grows pale, as quickly as the wreaths wilt! Do not ask me why I mourn in lifes fullest bloom! All is filled with joy and hope when spring returns. But a thousand voices of burgeoning nature awaken deep in my heart only heavy grief. What good to me is the joy which the fair spring offers me? There is only one I seek; she is near and yet eternally distant. Yearningly I stretch out my arms towards that beloved shadowy image; ah, I cannot reach it, and my heart is unquiet. Come down, gracious beauty, and leave your proud castle! Flowers, which the spring has borne, I shall strew on your lap. Listen! The grove echoes with song and the brook ripples limpidly. There is room in the tiniest cottage for a happy, loving couple.

10

September December 1812 SONG TEXTS Entra luomo allor che nasce Aria di Abramo From the moment man is born Abrahams air

2 Disc
8 Track 9 Track

D33 No 1 (originally for soprano) and No 2 (for two sopranos). Composition exercises, September to October 1812 first printed in 1940 in Alfred Orels Der junge Schubert; additional piano accompaniments by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by Philip Langridge (No 1) and Ann Murray (both voices, No 2)

Entra luomo allor che nasce In un mar di tante pene, Che si avezza dalle fasce Ogni affanno a sostener. Ma per lui si raro il bene, Ma la gioia cos rara, Che a soffrir mai non impara Le sorprese del piacer.
PIETRO METASTASIO (16981782)

From the moment man is born he enters on a sea of so much pain that he is accustomed from the cradle to endure all suffering. But good comes so rarely to him, and so rare is joy, that he never learns how to bear the surprise of pleasure.

Serbate, o Dei custodi

Guard, O ye gods

2 Disc
bl Track

D35 No 3. Composition exercise, 10 December 1812 realized from the bass line by Alfred Orel and first printed in 1940 in his Der junge Schubert sung by Adrian Thompson

Serbate, o Dei custodi Della Romana sorte In Tito il Giusto, il forte, Lonor di nostra et. Voi glimmortali allori Su la Cesarea chioma Voi custodite a Roma La sua felicit. Fu vostro un s gran dono, Sia lungo il dono vostro. Linvidi al mondo nostro Il mondo che verr.
PIETRO METASTASIO (16981782)

Guard, O ye gods, custodians of Romes destiny, Titus, the just and the strong, the honour of our age. Guard for Romes sake the immortal laurels on the brow of Caesar; preserve for Romes sake his happiness. Yours was such a great gift; may it last long. May times to come envy our age because of him.

Die Advokaten
1. ADVOCAT Mein Herr, ich komm mich anzufragen, Ob denn der Herr Sempronius Schon die Expensen abgetragen, Die er an mich bezahlen muss. 2. ADVOCAT Noch hab ich nichts von ihm bekommen, Doch kommt er heute selbst zu mir, Da soll er uns nicht mehr entkommen, Ich bitt, erwarten sie ihn hier. 1. ADVOCAT Die Expensen zu saldiren Ist der Partheien erste Pflicht. 2. ADVOCAT Sonst geht es neu ans Prozessiren Und das behagt den meisten nicht. BEIDE ADVOCATEN O Justitia praestantissima, Die, wenn sie manchem bitter ist, Doch der Doktoren nie vergisst. 2. ADVOCAT Jetzt trinken wir ein Glschen Wein, Doch still, man klopft, Wer ists? herein!

The advocates
1ST LAWYER
Sir, Ive come to enquire whether Mr Sempronius has settled the costs which he must pay me.

2 Disc
bm Track

D37. 25 27 December 1812; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1827 as Op 74 sung by John Mark Ainsley, Richard Jackson and Adrian Thompson

2ND LAWYER
As yet Ive had nothing from him, but this very day hes coming to see me; hell not evade us any longer. I pray you, wait for him here.

1ST LAWYER To settle costs is the partys first obligation. 2ND LAWYER Otherwise it will go back to court,
and most people dont like that.

BOTH O Justice most excellent, who, if she is harsh to many, yet never forgets her initiates. 2ND LAWYER Lets drink a glass of wine now.
But hush, someones knocking who is it? Come in!

11

SONG TEXTS December 18121813


SEMPRONIUS Ich bin der Herr Sempronius, Komm grad vom Land herein, Die Reise machte ich zu Fuss, Ich muss wohl sparsam sein, Denn ich habs leider auch probirt, Und hab ein Weilchen prozessirt. BEIDE ADVOCATEN Mein Herr, wir suppliciren, Die Nota zu saldiren. SEMPRONIUS Ei, ei, Geduld, ich weiss es wohl, Dass ich die Zech bezahlen soll. Nur eine Auskunft mcht ich gern Von ihnen, meine Herrn. BEIDE ADVOCATEN Sehr wohl, sehr wohl, doch dies Colloquium Heisst bei uns ein Consilium Und kommt ins Expensarium. SEMPRONIUS Der Zucker und Kaffee, Die Lmmer und das Reh, Schmalz, Butter, Mehl und Eier, Rosoglio und Tokayer, Und was ich sonst darneben Ins Haus hab hergegeben, Das rechnet man doch auch mit ein. BEIDE ADVOCATEN Nein, nein, nein. Das ist ein Honorarium, Ghrt nicht ins Expensarium, Davon spricht uns der Richter frei, Motiva, Motiva sind bei der Kanzlei. SEMPRONIUS Ei, ei, ei. BEIDE ADVOCATEN Wir lassen keinen Groschen fahren, Der Himmel wolle uns bewahren, Denn unsre Mh ist nicht gering, Fiat Justitia. SEMPRONIUS Kling, kling, kling. ALLE O Justitia praestantissima, Kling, kling, kling, Welche schne Harmonie, Allgemein bezaubert sie. Von ihrem Reiz bleibt Niemand frei, Motiva sind bei der Kanzlei, Kling, kling, kling. SEMPRONIUS Im Mr Sempronius, just arrived from the country; I made the journey on foot. Ive got to be thrifty, you see, for unfortunately I have tried to take legal action. BOTH LAWYERS Sir, we beg you
to pay our fees.

SEMPRONIUS All right, have patience; I know well


that now I have to foot the bill. Id just like to know one thing, gentlemen.

BOTH LAWYERS
Very well, very well, but this colloquium is a consilium for us and goes into the expensarium.

SEMPRONIUS Sugar and coffee, lambs and deer, fat, butter, flour and eggs, Ros and Tokay and everything else Ive stocked up with at home should be counted in too. BOTH LAWYERS No, no, no. Thats an honorarium, and doesnt belong with the expensarium; the judge absolves us from that. In Chancery there must be cause. SEMPRONIUS Ei, ei, ei. BOTH LAWYERS
We let no farthing go may heaven preserve us for we take no little trouble; may Justice be done.

SEMPRONIUS Clink, clink, clink. ALL O Justice most excellent,


clink, clink, clink, what sweet harmony, bewitching everyone. From its charm none remains free. In Chancery there must be cause, clink, clink, clink.

EDUARD VON RUSTENFELD, BARON ENGELHART (dates unknown)

Disc 2 La serenata The serenade Track bn D990f. 1813 (?); song exercise without accompaniment, realized by Reinhard van Hoorickx
privately printed by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by Ann Murray

Ombre amene, amiche piante

Kind shades, friendly bushes

Ombre amene, amiche piante, Il mio bene, il caro Amante. Chi mi dice ove nando? Zeffiretto lusinghiero A lui vola messagiero di che torni E che mi renda quella pace che non ho.
PIETRO METASTASIO (16981782)

Kind shades, friendly bushes, my darling, my beloved! Who can tell me where I should go? Coaxing zephyr, fly to him as a messenger and restore to me the peace I lack.

12

1813 SONG TEXTS Misero pargoletto Unhappy child

2 Disc
bo Track

First setting, D42 No 1b. Composition exercise, 1813 (?); first printed in 1969 in the Neue Schubert Gesamtausgabe, Kassel; completed for performance by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by Ann Murray

Misero pargoletto, Il tuo destin non sai. Ah! non gli dite mai Qual era il genitor. Come in un punto, o Dio, Tutto cangi daspetto! Voi foste il mio diletto, Voi siete il mio terror.
PIETRO METASTASIO (16981782)

Unhappy child, you do not know your fate. Ah, never tell him who his father was. O God, how in one moment everything changed its aspect! You were my delight; now you make me afraid.

Lincanto degli occhi

The magic of eyes

2 Disc
bp Track

First setting, D990e. 1813 (?); song exercise without accompaniment, realized by Reinhard van Hoorickx the vocal line first printed in 1979 in the Neue Schubert Ausgabe, Kassel sung by Ann Murray

Da voi, cari lumi, Dipende il mio stato; Voi siete i miei Numi, Voi siete il mio fato. A vostro talento Mi sento cangiar, Ardir minspirate, Se lieti splendete; Se torbidi siete, Mi fate tremar.
PIETRO METASTASIO (16981782)

On you, beloved eyes, depends my life; you are my gods; you are my destiny. At your bidding my mood changes. You inspire me with daring if you shine joyfully; if you are overcast you make me tremble.

Misero pargoletto
Misero pargoletto, Il tuo destin non sai. Ah! non gli dite mai Qual era il genitor. Come in un punto, o Dio, Tutto cangi daspetto! Voi foste il mio diletto, Voi siete il mio terror.
PIETRO METASTASIO (16981782)

Unhappy child
Unhappy child, you do not know your fate. Ah, never tell him who his father was. O God, how in one moment everything changed its aspect! You were my delight; now you make me afraid.

2 Disc
bq Track

Second setting, D42 No 2. 1813 (?); first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Arleen Auger

Totengrberlied
Grabe, Spaten, grabe! Alles, was ich habe, Dank ich Spaten, dir! Reich und arme Leute Werden meine Beute, Kommen einst zu mir. Weiland gross und edel, Nickte dieser Schdel Keinem Grusse Dank. Dieses Beingerippe Ohne Wang und Lippe Hatte Gold und Rang.

Gravediggers song
Dig, spade, dig! All that I have I owe to you, spade! Both rich and poor become my prey, come to me in the end. Great and noble, this skull once acknowledged no greeting. This skeleton without cheeks or lips possessed gold and high rank.

2 Disc
br Track

D44. 19 January 1813; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Stephen Varcoe

13

SONG TEXTS March April 1813


Jener Kopf mit Haaren War vor wenig Jahren Schn, wie Engel sind. Tausend junge Fntchen Leckten ihm das Hndchen, Gafften sich halb blind.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Only a few years ago that head with hair was as lovely as the angels. A thousand young fops would lick her hands and grow half blind staring at her.

Disc 2 Dithyrambe Dithyramb Track bs First setting, D47. 29 March 1813; fragment for tenor, bass, chorus and piano completed and arranged by Reinhard van
Hoorickx from manuscripts in the Vienna Stadtsbibliothek; published privately by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by James Gilchrist, Brandon Velarde and The London Schubert Chorale (directed by Stephen Layton)

Nimmer, das glaubt mir, erscheinen die Gtter, Nimmer allein. Kaum dass ich Bacchus, den lustigen, habe, Kommt auch schon Amor, der lchelnde Knabe, Und Phbus der Herrliche findet sich ein. Sie nahen, sie kommen, die Himmlischen alle, Mit Gttern erfllt sich die irdische Halle. Sagt, wie bewirt ich, der Erdegeborne, Himmlischen Chor? Schenket mir euer unsterbliches Leben, Gtter! Was kann euch der Sterbliche geben? Hebet zu eurem Olymp mich empor! Die Freude, sie wohnt nur in Jupiters Saale, O fllet mit Nektar, o reicht mir die Schale!
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Never, believe me, do the gods appear alone. No sooner is jolly Bacchus with me than Cupid comes too, the smiling boy, and glorious Phoebus arrives. They approach, they are here, all the deities. This earthly abode is filled with gods. Tell me, how shall I, earth-born, entertain the heavenly choir? Bestow on me your immortal life, O gods! What can a mortal give you? Raise me up to your Olympus! Joy dwells only in the hall of Jupiter; fill the cup with nectar and pass it to me!

Disc 2 Die Schatten The shades Track bt D50. 12 April 1813; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Adrian Thompson

Freunde, deren Grfte sich schon bemoosten! Wann der Vollmond ber dem Walde dmmert, Schweben eure Schatten empor Vom stillen Ufer der Lethe. Seid mir, Unvergessliche, froh gesegnet! Du vor allen, welcher im Buch der Menschheit Mir der Hieroglyphen so viel gedeutet, Redlicher Bonnet! Lngst verschlrft im Strudel der Brandung Wre wohl mein Fahrzeug, Oder am Riff zerschmettert, httet ihr nicht, Genien gleich, im Sturme schirmend gewaltet! Wiedersehn, Wiedersehn der Liebenden! Wo der Heimat goldne Sterne leuchten, O du der armen Psyche, die gebunden Im Grabtal schmachtet, himmlische Sehnsucht!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Friends, whose graves are already mossy! When the full moon rises over the forest, your shades float up from the silent banks of Lethe. With joy I bless you, unforgotten creatures, and you above all, who in the book of life explained so many secrets to me, honest Bonnet. Long ago my vessel would have sunk in the swirling surf, or been wrecked on the reef, had you not, like guardian spirits, protected me in the storm. To see again those we love, where the golden stars of the homeland shine! O celestial longing of the poor soul which languishes, captive, in the grave.

Disc 2 Sehnsucht Longing Track bu First setting, D52. 1517 April 1813; first published by Wilhelm Mller in Berlin in 1868
sung by Sir Thomas Allen

Ach, aus dieses Tales Grnden, Die der kalte Nebel drckt, Knnt ich doch den Ausgang finden, Ach, wie fhlt ich mich beglckt! Dort erblick ich schne Hgel, Ewig jung und ewig grn! Htt ich Schwingen, htt ich Flgel, Nach den Hgeln zg ich hin.

Ah, if only I could find a way out from the depths of this valley, oppressed by cold mists, how happy I would feel! Yonder I see lovely hills, ever young and ever green! If I had pinions, if I had wings, I would fly to those hills.

14

April May 1813 SONG TEXTS


Harmonien hr ich klingen, Tne ssser Himmelsruh, Und die leichten Winde bringen Mir der Dfte Balsam zu, Goldne Frchte seh ich glhen, Winkend zwischen dunkelm Laub, Und die Blumen, die dort blhen, Werden keines Winters Raub. Ach wie schn muss sichs ergehen Dort im ewgen Sonnenschein, Und die Luft auf jenen Hhen, O wie labend muss sie sein! Doch mir wehrt des Stromes Toben, Der ergrimmt dazwischen braust, Seine Wellen sind gehoben, Dass die Seele mir ergraust. Einen Nachen seh ich schwanken, Aber ach! der Fhrmann fehlt. Frisch hinein und ohne Wanken, Seine Segel sind beseelt. Du musst glauben, du musst wagen, Denn die Gtter leihn kein Pfand, Nur ein Wunder kann dich tragen In das schne Wunderland.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

I hear harmonious sounds, notes of sweet, celestial peace, and the gentle breezes bring me the scent of balsam. I see the golden fruits glowing, beckoning amid dark leaves, and the flowers which bloom there will never be winters prey. Ah, how beautiful it must be to wander there in the eternal sunshine; and the air on those hills, how refreshing it must be. But I am barred by the raging torrent which foams angrily between us; its waves tower up, striking fear into my soul. I see a boat pitching, but, alas! There is no boatman. Jump in without hesitation! The sails are billowing. You must trust, and you must dare, for the gods grant no pledge; only a miracle can convey you to the miraculous land of beauty.

Verklrung
Lebensfunke, vom Himmel entglht, Der sich loszuwinden mht! Zitternd-khn, vor Sehnen leidend, Gern und doch mit Schmerzen scheidend End, o end den Kampf, Natur! Sanft ins Leben Aufwrts schweben Sanft hinschwinden lass mich nur. Horch! mir lispeln Geister zu: Schwester-Seele, komm zur Ruh! Ziehet was mich sanft von innen? Was ists, was mir meine Sinnen Mir den Hauch zu rauben droht? Seele, sprich, ist das der Tod? Die Welt entweicht! sie ist nicht mehr! Engel-Einklang um mich her! Ich schweb im Morgenrot! Leiht, o leiht mir eure Schwingen: Ihr Bruder-Geister, helft mir singen: O Grab, wo ist dein Sieg? Wo ist dein Pfeil, o Tod?

Transfiguration
Spark of life, kindled by heaven, that strives to twist itself free; bold yet trembling, aching with longing, parting gladly, yet with pain cease, O cease this struggle, Nature! Let me soar upwards gently into life, let me dwindle away gently. Hark! Spirits whisper to me: Sister-soul, come to rest! Am I drawn gently hence? What is this, that threatens to steal my senses and my breath? Speak, soul, is this death? The world recedes, it is no more! Angelic harmonies surround me. I float in the dawn. Lend, O lend me your wings; brother-spirits, help me sing: O grave, where is your victory? O death, where is your sting?

2 Disc
cl Track

D59. 4 May 1813; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1832 in volume 17 of the Nachlass sung by Brigitte Fassbaender

ALEXANDER POPE (16881744) translated by JOHANN GOTTFRIED HERDER (17441803)

Ein jgendlicher Maienschwung


Ein jugendlicher Maienschwung Durchwebt wie Morgendmmerung Auf das allmchtge Werde Luft, Himmel, Meer und Erde.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Mays youthful impulse


Mays youthful impulse as the light of dawn shines upon Creation, so Mays youthful impulse embraces the air, sky, sea and earth.

2 Disc
cm Track

D61. 8 May 1813; first published in 1897 in series 21 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Adrian Thompson, John Mark Ainsley and Richard Jackson, unaccompanied

15

SONG TEXTS August 1813


Disc 2 Thekla Eine Geisterstimme Thekla A phantom voice Track cn First setting, D73. 2223 August 1813; published by Wilhelm Mller in Berlin in 1868
sung by Dame Janet Baker

Wo ich sei, und wo mich hingewendet, Als mein flchtger Schatte dir entschwebt? Hab ich nicht beschlossen und geendet, Hab ich nicht geliebet und gelebt? Willst du nach den Nachtigallen fragen, Die mit seelenvoller Melodie Dich entzckten in des Lenzes Tagen? Nur so lang sie liebten, waren sie. Ob ich den Verlorenen gefunden? Glaube mir, ich bin mit ihm vereint, Wo sich nicht mehr trennt, was sich verbunden, Dort, wo keine Trne wird geweint. Dorten Wirst auch du uns wieder finden, Wenn dein Lieben unserm Lieben gleicht; Dort ist auch der Vater, frei von Snden, Den der blutge Mord nicht mehr erreicht. Und er fhlt, dass ihn kein Wahn betrogen, Als er aufwrts zu den Sternen sah; Den wie jeder wgt, wird ihm gewogen, Wer es glaubt, dem ist das Heilge nah. Dort gehalten wird in jenen Rumen Jedem schnen glubigen Gefhl; Wage du, zu irren und zu trumen: Hoher Sinn liegt oft im kindschen Spiel.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

You ask me where I am, where I turned to when my fleeting shadow vanished. Have I not finished, reached my end? Have I not loved and lived? Would you ask after the nightingales who, with soulful melodies, delighted you in the days of spring? They lived only as long as they loved. Did I find my lost beloved? Believe me, I am united with him in the place where those who have formed a bond are never separated, where no tears are shed. There you will also find us again, when your love is as our love; there too is our father, free from sin, whom bloody murder can no longer strike. And he senses that he was not deluded when he gazed up at the stars. For as a man judges so he shall be judged; whoever believes this is close to holiness. There, in space, every fine, deeply-felt belief will be consummated; dare to err and to dream: often a higher meaning lies behind childlike play.

Disc 2 Trinklied Drinking song Track co D75. 29 August 1813; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 45 of the Nachlass
sung by John Mark Ainsley, Jamie MacDougall, Simon Keenlyside and Michael George

Freunde, sammelt euch im Kreise, Freut euch nach der Vter Weise, Stimmt in lautem Jubel ein. Freundschaft reicht den Wonnebecher Zum Genuss dem frohen Zecher, Perlend blinkt der goldne Wein. Schliesst in dieser Feierstunde Hand in Hand zum trauten Bunde, Freunde, stimmet frhlich ein, Lasst uns alle Brder sein! Freunde, seht die Glser blinken, Knaben mgen Wasser trinken, Mnner trinken edlen Wein. Wie der goldne Saft der Reben Sei auch immer unser Leben, Stark und krftig, mild und rein. Unsern Freundesbund zu ehren Lasset uns die Glser leeren! Stark und krftig, mild und rein Sei das Leben, sei der Wein!
? FRIEDRICH SCHFFER (17721800)

Friends, gather in a circle. Rejoice in the manner of our fathers; join in loud jubilation. Friendship offers the cup of joy for the happy topers pleasure; the golden, sparkling wine beckons. In this hour of celebration join your hands in convivial union; friends, lend your joyful voices; let us all be brothers. Friends, behold the gleaming glasses. Let boys drink water; men drink noble wine. May our life always be strong and robust, gentle and pure. To honour our bond of friendship let us empty our glasses! May our life and our wine always be strong and robust, gentle and pure.

16

September November 1813 SONG TEXTS Pensa, che questo istante


Pensa, che questo istante Del tuo destin decide, Choggi rinasce Alcide Per la futura et. Pensa che a dulto sei, Che sei di Giove un figlio, Che merto e non consiglio La scelta tua sar.
PIETRO METASTASIO (16981782)

Consider that this moment


Consider that this moment in your destiny will decide whether Alcides is today reborn for future ages. Consider that you are an adult, that you are a son of Jove, and that your reward will depend on your merit, not on advice.

2 Disc
cp Track

D76. September 1813; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1871 sung by Stephen Varcoe

Son fra londe


Son fra londe in mezzo al mare, E al furor di doppio vento; Or resisto, or mi sgomento Fra la speme, e fra lorror. Per la f, per la tua vita Or pavento, or sono ardita, E ritrovo egual, martire Nell ardire e nel timor.
PIETRO METASTASIO (16981782)

I am among the waves


I am among the waves in the midst of the sea, a prey to the fury of fierce winds; now I am resolute, now I tremble, vacillating between hope and terror. Now I fear for your faith, for your life, now I am emboldened; and yet I find equal suffering in boldness and in fear.

2 Disc
cq Track

D78. 18 September 1813; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Ann Murray

Verschwunden sind die Schmerzen


Verschwunden sind die Schmerzen, Weil aus beklemmten Herzen Kein Seufzer wiederhallt. Drum jubelt hoch, ihr Deutsche, Denn die verruchte Peitsche Hat endlich ausgeknallt.
ANONYMOUS

Sorrow has vanished


Sorrow has vanished, for no sighs echo from oppressed hearts. Then rejoice, Germans, for the loathsome whip has finally cracked its last.

2 Disc
cr Track

D88. 15 November 1813; first published in 1892 in series 19 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Adrian Thompson, John Mark Ainsley and Richard Jackson, unaccompanied

Illustration by Hermann Plddemann for Schillers Der Taucher, from a book of German ballads, 1861

17

A SCHUBERT CALENDAR 1814 A SCHUBERT CALENDAR 1814 aged 17 In the beginning of the year Schubert enters a college for trainee teachers, passing the preliminary examination in August. Meanwhile events in the outside world are moving fast the surrender of Napoleon in Paris to the allies at the end of March is marked by a Schubert song, D104, his only musical response to a political event. As host of the subsequent Congress of Vienna the Austrian capital is also a focus of world attention; the decadence and extravagance surrounding the entourages of the delegations must have shocked Schubert pre and fascinated his son who, according to his school contemporary Josef Kenner, was always highly sexed. In May Schubert attends the first performance of Beethovens Fidelio; in September the performance of another work enormously influential on Schubert the seventh symphony reinforces a pecking order in Viennese musical life where Beethoven is cast as a god. With the exception of the final year of his life, the very existence of this overwhelming genius will remind the younger composer of his own shortcomings a perception that sometimes limits his own ability to rejoice in his achievements. At this time he has no other option but to live at home, but the composers imagination ranges far and wide. His musical activities reach a peak in the autumn: in September his Mass in F (D105) is performed in the Liechtental Church, the soprano solo sung by Therese Grob (17981875), the girl who is the focus of his futile romantic longings. A few days later, in the middle of a public holiday which celebrates the first anniversary of the victory over Napoleon of the united forces of Austria and Germany, he effects his own AustrianGerman synthesis: the poetry of Goethe inspires Gretchen am Spinnrade, D118, a song that marks the beginning of a new chapter in the lied, where voice and piano combine in a way that is completely new. The vocal line, thanks to Salieri, is sinuously operatic, a grateful song for any singer wishing to make an effect, but the psychological intention, intensified by the remarkable accompaniment, eschews Italianate virtuosity and is worthy of Goethes Germanic seriousness. An examination of the many songs of 1814 shows the painstaking preparation for this great moment with a long line of remarkable Matthisson settings, and a continuing fascination with Schiller, fixed in history as Goethes alter ego despite the two poets fundamental differences. It is Goethe who becomes a lodestar in the composers life, perhaps because, unlike Schiller, he is still very much alive. Schubert also meets the strangely magnetic Viennese poet Johann Mayrhofer and sets to music, for the first time (D124), the verses of an Austrian contemporary. For all its achievements in instrumental music, 1814, like 1815, is a year of song. Some other works of 1814 Des Teufels Lustchloss, a Singspiel in 3 acts (D84); String Quartet in E (D87); String Quartet in D (D94); Salve Regina in B flat (D106); String Quartet in B flat (D112); Symphony No 12 in B flat (D125).

Title pages to Gedichte von Schiller from the 1810 edition (Anton Doll, Vienna) used by Schubert The illustration depicts the last strophe of Die Erwartung

18

1814 SONG TEXTS Der Taucher The diver

3 Disc
1 Track

Second version, D111. 17 September 1813 5 April 1814; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1831 as volume 12 of the Nachlass sung by Stephen Varcoe

Wer wagt es, Rittersmann oder Knapp, Zu tauchen in diesen Schlund? Einen goldnen Becher werf ich hinab. Verschlungen schon hat ihn der schwarze Mund. Wer mir den Becher kann wieder zeigen, Er mag ihn behalten, er ist sein eigen. Der Knig spricht es und wirft von der Hh Der Klippe, die schroff und steil Hinaushngt in die unendliche See, Den Becher in der Charybde Geheul. Wer ist der Beherzte, ich frage wieder, Zu tauchen in diese Tiefe nieder? Und die Ritter und Knappen um ihn her Vernehmens und schweigen still, Sehen hinab in das wilde Meer, Und keiner den Becher gewinnen will. Und der Knig zum drittenmal wieder fraget: Ist keiner, der sich hinunter waget? Doch alles noch stumm bleibt wie zuvor, Und ein Edelknecht, sanft und keck, Tritt aus der Knappen zagendem Chor, Und den Grtel wirft er, den Mantel weg, Und alle die Mnner umher und Frauen Auf den herrlichen Jngling verwundert schauen. Und wie er tritt an des Felsen Hang Und blickt in den Schlund hinab Die Wasser, die sie hinunterschlang, Die Charybde jetzt brllend wiedergab, Und wie mit des Donners fernen Getose Entstrzen sie schumend dem finstern Schosse. Und es wallet und siedet und brauset und zischt, Wie wenn Wasser mit Feuer sich mengt, Bis zum Himmel spritzet der dampfende Gischt Und Flut auf Flut sich ohn Ende drngt, Und will sich nimmer erschpfen und leeren, Als wollte das Meer noch ein Meer gebren. Doch endlich, da legt sich die wilde Gewalt, Und schwarz aus dem weissen Schaum Klaft hinunter ein ghender Spalt, Grundlos, als gings in den Hllenraum, Und reissend sieht man die brandenden Wogen Hinab in den strudelnden Trichter gezogen. Jetzt schnell, eh die Brandung wiederkehrt, Der Jngling sich Gott befiehlt, Und ein Schrei des Entsetzens wird rings gehrt, Und schon hat ihn der Wirbel hinweggesplt. Und geheimnisvoll ber dem khnen Schwimmer Schliesst sich der Rachen, er zeigt sich nimmer. Und stille wirds ber dem Wasserschlund. In der Tiefe nur brauset es hohl, Und bebend hrt man von Mund zu Mund: Hochherziger Jngling, fahre wohl! Und hohler und hohler hrt mans heulen, Und es harrt noch mit bangem, mit schrecklichem Weilen.

Who will dare, knight or squire, to dive into this abyss? I hurl this golden goblet down, the black mouth has already devoured it. He who can show me the goblet again may keep it, it is his. Thus the king speaks, and from the top of the cliff, which juts abruptly and steeply into the infinite sea, he hurls the goblet into the howling Charybdis. Who is there brave enough, I ask once more, to dive down into the depths? And the knights and squires around him listen, and keep silent, looking down into the turbulent sea, and none desires to win the goblet. And the king asks a third time: Is there no one who will dare the depths? But all remain silent as before; then a young squire, gentle and bold, steps from the hesitant throng, throws off his belt and his cloak, and all the men and women around him gaze in astonishment at the fine youth. And as he steps to the cliffs edge and looks down into the abyss, the waters which Charybdis devoured she now regurgitates, roaring, and, as if with the rumbling of distant thunder, they rush foaming from the black womb. The waters seethe and boil, rage and hiss as if they were mixed with fire, the steaming spray gushes up to the heavens, and flood piles on flood, ceaselessly, never exhausting itself, never emptying, as if the sea would beget another sea. But at length the turbulent force abates, and black from the white foam a yawning rift gapes deep down, bottomless, as if it led to hells domain, and you see the tumultuous foaming waves, sucked down into the seething crater. Now swiftly, before the surge returns, the youth commends himself to God, and a cry of horror is heard all around the whirlpool has already borne him away. And over the bold swimmer mysteriously the gaping abyss closes; he will never be seen again. Calm descends over the watery abyss. Only in the depths is there a hollow roar, and the words falter from mouth to mouth. Valiant youth, farewell! The roar grows ever more hollow, and they wait, anxious and fearful.

19

SONG TEXTS 1814


Und wrfst du die Krone selbe hinein Und sprchst: wer mir bringet die Kron, Er soll sie tragen und Knig sein Mich gelstete nicht nach dem teuren Lohn. Was die heulende Tiefe da unten verhehle, Das erzhlt keine lebende glckliche Seele. Wohl manches Fahrzeug, vom Strudel gefasst, Schoss gh in die Tiefe hinab, Doch zerschmettert nur rangen sich Kiel und Mast Hervor aus dem alles verschlingenden Grab Und heller und heller, wie Sturmes Sausen, Hrt mans nher und immer nher brausen. Und es wallet und siedet und brauset und zischt, Wie wenn Wasser mit Feuer sich mengt, Bis zum Himmel spritzet der dampfende Gischt, Und Well auf Well sich ohn Ende drngt, Und wie mit des fernen Donners Getose Entstrzt es brllend dem finstern Schosse. Und sieh! aus dem finster flutenden Schoss Da hebet sichs schwanenweiss, Und ein Arm und ein glnzender Nacken wird bloss, Und es rudert mit Kraft und mit emsigem Fleiss, Und er ists, und hoch in seiner Linken Schwingt er den Becher mit freudigem Winken. Und atmete lang und atmete tief Und begrsste das himmlische Licht. Mit Frohlocken es einer dem andern rief: Er lebt! Er ist da! Es behielt ihn nicht! Aus dem Grab, aus der strudelnden Wasserhhle Hat der Brave gerettet die lebende Seele. Und er kommt, es umringt ihn die jubelnde Schar, Zu des Knigs Fssen er sinkt, Den Becher reicht er ihm knieend dar, Und der Knig der lieblichen Tochter winkt, Die fllt ihn mit funkelndem Wein bis zum Rande, Und der Jngling sich also zum Knig wandte: Lange lebe der Knig! Es freue sich, Wer da atmet im rosigten Licht! Aber da unten ists frchterlich, Und der Mensch versuche die Gtter nicht Und begehre nimmer und nimmer zu schauen, Was sie gndig bedecken mit Nacht und Grauen. Es riss mich hinunter blitzesschnell Da strzt mir aus felsigtem Schacht Entgegen ein reissender Quell: Mich packte des Doppelstroms wtende Macht, Und wie einen Kreisel mit schwindelndem Drehen Triebs mich um, ich konnte nicht widerstehen. Da zeigt mir Gott, zu dem ich rief In der hchste schrecklichen Not, Aus der Tiefe ragend ein Felsenriff, Das erfasst ich behend und entrann dem Tod Und da hing auch der Becher an spitzen Korallen, Sonst wrer ins Bodenlose gefallen. Denn unter mir lags noch, bergetief, In purpurner Finsternis da, Und obs hier dem Ohre gleich ewig schlief, Das Auge mit Schaudern hinuntersah, Wies von Salamandern und Molchen, Drachen Sich regte in dem furchtbaren Hllenrachen.
Even if you threw in the crown itself, and said: Whoever brings me this crown shall wear it and be king I would not covet the precious reward. What the howling depths may conceal no living soul will me tell. Many a vessel, caught by the whirlpool, has plunged sheer into the depths, yet only wrecked keels and masts have struggled out of the all-consuming grave like the rushing of a storm, the roaring grows ever closer and more vivid. The waters seethe and boil, rage and hiss, as if they were mixed with fire, the steaming spray gushes up to the heavens and flood piles on flood, ceaselessly, and, as if with the rumbling of distant thunder, the waters rush foaming from the black womb. But look! From the black watery womb a form rises, as white as a swan, an arm and a glistening neck are revealed, rowing powerfully, and with energetic zeal, it is he! And high in his left hand he joyfully waves the goblet. He breathes long, he breathes deeply, and greets the heavenly light. Rejoicing they call to each other: Hes alive! Hes here! The abyss did not keep him! From the grave, the swirling watery cavern, the brave man has saved his living soul. He approaches, the joyous throng surrounds him, and he falls down at the kings feet; kneeling, he hands him the goblet, and the king signals to his charming daughter, who fills it to the brim with sparkling wine; then the youth turns to the king: Long live the king! Rejoice, whoever breathes this rosy light! But down below it is terrible, and man should never tempt the gods nor ever desire to see what they graciously conceal in night and horror. It tore me down as fast as lightning then, from a rocky shaft a torrential flood poured towards me: I was seized by the double currents raging force, and, like the giddy whirling of a top, it hurled me round; I could not resist. Then God, to whom I cried, showed me, at the height of my dire distress, a rocky reef, rising from the depths; I swiftly gripped it and escaped death and there, too, the goblet hung on coral lips, or else it would have fallen into the bottomless ocean. For below me still it lay, fathomlessly deep, there in purple darkness. And even if, for the ear, there was eternal calm here, the eye looked down with dread, at the salamanders and dragons inhabiting the terrifying caverns of hell.

20

1814 SONG TEXTS


Schwarz wimmelten da, im grausen Gemisch, Zu scheusslichen Klumpen geballt, Der stachligte Roche, der Klippenfisch, Des Hammers greuliche Ungestalt, Und druend wies mir die grimmigen Zhne Der entsetzliche Hai, des Meeres Hyne. Und da hing ich und wars mir mit Grausen bewusst Von der menschlichen Hilfe so weit, Unter Larven die einzige fhlende Brust, Allein in der grsslichen Einsamkeit, Tief unter dem Schall der menschlichen Rede Bei den Ungeheuern der traurigen de. Und schaudernd dacht ichs, da krochs heran, Regte hundert Gelenke zugleich, Will schnappen nach mir in des Schreckens Wahn Lass ich los der Koralle umklammerten Zweig: Gleich fasst mich der Strudel mit rasendem Toben, Doch es war mir zum Heil, er riss mich nach oben. Der Knig darob sich verwundert schier Und spricht: Der Becher ist dein, Und diesen Ring noch bestimm ich dir, Geschmckt mit dem kstlichsten Edelgestein, Versuchst dus noch einmal und bringst mir Kunde, Was du sahst auf des Meers tiefunterstem Grunde. Das hrte die Tochter mit weichem Gefhl, Und mit schmeichelndem Munde sie fleht: Lasst, Vater, genug sein das grausame Spiel! Er hat Euch bestanden, was keiner besteht, Und knnt Ihr des Herzens Gelsten nicht zhmen, So mgen die Ritter den Knappen beschmen. Drauf der Knig greift nach dem Becher schnell, In den Strudel ihn schleudert hinein: Und schaffst du den Becher mir wieder zur Stell, So sollst du der trefflichste Ritter mir sein Und sollst sie als Ehgemahl heut noch umarmen, Die jetzt fr dich bittet mit zartem Erbarmen. Da ergreifts ihm die Seele mit Himmelsgewalt, Und es blitzt aus den Augen ihm khn, Und er siehet errten die holde Gestalt Und sieht sie erbleichen und sinken hin Da treibts ihn, den kstlichen Preis zu erwerben, Und strzt hinunter auf Leben und Sterben. Wohl hrt man die Brandung, wohl kehrt sie zurck, Sie verknder der donnernde Schall Da bckt sichs hinunter mit liebendem Blick: Es kommen, es kommen die Wasser all, Sie rauschen herauf, sie rauschen nieder, Doch den Jngling bringt keines wieder.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Black, in a ghastly melee, massed in horrifying clumps, teemed the stinging roach, the fish of the cliff, the hammer-head, hideously misshapen, and, threatening me with his wrathful teeth, the gruesome shark, the hyena of the sea. And there I hung, terrifyingly conscious how far I was from human help, among larvae the only living heart, alone in terrible solitude, deep beneath the sound of human speech with the monsters of that dismal wilderness. And, with a shudder, I thought it was creeping along, moving hundreds of limbs at once, it wanted to grab me in a terrifying frenzy I let go of the corals clinging branch: at once the whirlpool seized me with raging force, but it was my salvation, pulling me upwards. At this the king is greatly amazed, and says: The goblet is yours, and the ring, too, I will give you, adorned with the most precious stone, if you try once more, and bring me news of what you have seen on the deepest seas deepest bed. His daughter hears this with tenderness, and implores with coaxing words: Father, let the cruel game cease! He has endured for you what no other can endure, and if you cannot tame the desire of your heart, then let the knights shame the squire. Thereupon the king quickly seizes the goblet, and hurls it into the whirlpool: If you return the goblet to this spot, you shall be my noblest knight, and you shall embrace as a bride this very day the one who now pleads for you with tender pity. Now his soul is seized with heavenly power, and his eyes flash boldly, and he sees the fair creature blush, then grow pale and swoon this impels him to gain the precious prize, and he plunges down, to life or death. The foaming waves are heard, they return, heralded by the thunderous roar she leans over with loving gaze: the waves keep on returning, surging, they rise and fall, yet not one will bring back the youth.

21

SONG TEXTS 1814 DON GAYSEROS DON GAYSEROS


D93. c1814; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig

Disc 3 Don Gayseros I Don Gayseros I Track 2 No 1; sung by Nancy Argenta, John Mark Ainsley and Adrian Thompson Don Gayseros, Don Gayseros, Don Gayseros, Don Gayseros, Wunderlicher, schner Ritter, strange, fair knight, Hast mich aus der Burg beschworen, have you lured me from my castle Lieblicher, mit Deinen Bitten. with your entreaties?

Don Gayseros, Dir im Bndnis, Lockten Wald und Abendlichter. Sieh mich hier nun, sag nun weiter, Wohin wandeln wir, du Lieber? Donna Clara, Donna Clara, Du bist Herrin, ich der Diener, Du bist Lenkrin, ich Planet nur, Ssse Macht, o wollst gebieten! Gut, sowandeln wir den Berghang Dort zum Kruzifixe nieder; Wenden drauf an der Kapelle Heimwrts uns, entlngst den Wiesen. Ach, warum an der Kapelle, Ach, warum beim Kruzifixe; Sprich,was hast Du nun zu streiten? Meint ich ja, Du wrst mein Diener. Ja, ich wandle, ja ich schreite, Herrin ganz nach Deinem Willen. Und sie wandelten zusammen Sprachen viel von ssser Minne. Don Gayseros, Don Gayseros, Sieh, wir sind am Kruzifixe, Hast Du nicht Dein Haupt gebogen Vor dem Herrn, wie andre Christen? Donna Clara, Donna Clara, Konnt ich auf was anders schauen, Als auf Deine zarten Hnde, Wie sie mit den Blumen spielten? Don Gayseros, Don Gayseros, Konntest Du denn nichts erwidern, Als der fromme Mnch Dich grsste, Sprechend: Christus geb Dir Frieden? Donna Clara, Donna Clara, Durft ins Ohr ein Laut mir dringen Irgend noch ein Laut auf Erden, Als Du flsternd sprachst: Ich liebe? Don Gayseros, Don Gayseros, Sieh vor der Kapelle blinket Des geweihten Wassers Schale! Komm und tu wie ich, Geliebter. Donna Clara, Donna Clara, Gnzlich musst ich jetzt erblinden Denn ich schaut in Deine Augen, Konnt mich selbst nicht wiederfinden. Don Gayseros, Don Gayseros, Tu mirs nach, bist Du mein Diener, Tauch ins Wasser Deine Rechte, Zeichn ein Kreuz auf Deine Stirne.

Don Gayseros, the forest and the evening light, in league with you, enticed me. behold me here now, and tell me dearest, where we are to go. Donna Clara, Donna Clara, you are the mistress, I the servant. You guide my course, I am but your planet. Sweet ruler, give your command! Good, then let us walk down the mountainside to yonder crucifix. When we come to the chapel let us turn homewards, crossing the meadows. Ah, why to the chapel, why to the crucifix? Tell me, why do you argue now? I thought you were my servant. Yes, mistress, I shall walk there, just as you wish. And they strolled together talking much of sweet love. Don Gayseros, Don Gayseros, see, we have reached the crucifix. Have you not bowed your head before the Lord, like other Christians? Donna Clara, Donna Clara, how could I look at anything but your delicate hands, playing with the flowers? Don Gayseros, Don Gayseros, could you not reply then when the holy monk greeted you with the words May Christ bring you peace? Donna Clara, Donna Clara, how could any other sound on earth penetrate my ears, as you whispered: I love you? Don Gayseros, Don Gayseros, look, the basin of holy water glistens in front of the chapel! Come and do as I do, beloved. Donna Clara, Donna Clara, I must now be completely blind, for I gazed into your eyes, and could not find myself again. Don Gayseros, Don Gayseros, do as I do, you are my servant. Dip your right hand into the water and make the sign of the cross on your brow.

22

1814 SONG TEXTS


Don Gayseros schwieg erschrocken, Don Gayseros floh von hinnen; Donna Clara lenkte bebend Zu der Burg die scheuen Tritte.
Don Gayseros, in horror, kept silent; Don Gayseros fled from there; and Donna Clara, trembling, turned her timid steps back to the castle.

FRIEDRICH HEINRICH KARL, FREIHERR DE LA MOTTE FOUQU (17771843)

Don Gayseros II
Nchtens klang die ssse Laute Wo sie oft zu Nacht geklungen, Nchtens sang der schne Ritter, Wo er oft zu Nacht gesungen. Und das Fenster klirrte wieder, Donna Clara schaut herunter, Aber furchtsam ihre Blicke Schweiften durch das tauge Dunkel. Und statt ssser Minnelieder, Statt der Schmeichelworte Kunde Hub sie an ein streng Beschwren: Sag, wer bist Du, finstrer Buhle? Sag, bei Dein und meiner Liebe, Sag, bei Deiner Seelenruhe, Bist ein Christ Du, bist ein Spanier? Stehst Du in der Kirche Bunde? Herrin, hoch hast Du beschworen, Herrin, ja, Du sollsts erkunden. Herrin, ach, ich bin kein Spanier, Nicht in Deiner Kirche Bunde. Herrin, bin ein Mohrenknig, Glhnd in Deiner Liebe Gluten, Gross an Macht und reich an Schtzen, Sonder gleich an tapferm Mut. Rtlich blhn Granadas Grten, Golden stehn Alhambras Burgen, Mohren harren ihrer Knigin Fleuch mit mir durchs tauge Dunkel. Fort, Du falscher Seelenruber, Fort, Du Feind! Sie wollt es rufen, Doch bevor sie Feind gesprochen, Losch das Wort ihr aus im Munde. Ohnmacht hielt in dunkeln Netzen, Ihren schnen Leib umschlungen. Er alsbald trug sie zu Rosse, Rasch dann fort im mchtgen Flug.

Don Gayseros II
By night the sweet sound echoed where it had so often echoed; by night the fair knight sang, as he had so often sung. The window rattled once more and Donna Clara looked down. But her fearful gaze swept through the dewy darkness, And instead of sweet songs of love, instead of coaxing words, she solemnly conjured him: Say, who are you, dark lover? Say, by your love and mine, say, upon the peace of your soul, are you a Christian, are you a Spaniard? Do you stand within the family of the church? Mistress, you have conjured nobly; mistress, you shall indeed discover. Alas, mistress, I am no Spaniard, nor do I belong to your church. Mistress, I am a Moorish king, glowing with the fires of love for you; I am great in power, rich in treasures, and equally courageous. The gardens of Granada bloom red, the turrets of the Alhambra are golden, the Moors await their queen fly with me through the dewy darkness. Away with you, false plunderer of souls, away, Evil One! She tried to call out, but before she had uttered the words Evil one, they died on her lips. Powerless, her fair body, was held in his dark clutches. at once he bore her to his horse, and then swiftly away in powerful flight.

3 Disc
3 Track

No 2; sung by Adrian Thompson, Nancy Argenta and John Mark Ainsley

FRIEDRICH HEINRICH KARL, FREIHERR DE LA MOTTE FOUQU (17771843)

Don Gayseros III


No 3; sung by Adrian Thompson

Don Gayseros III


The sun shines pure and brightly in the youthful morning sky; but blood flows in the meadow, and a horse without its rider trots, frightened, in a circle. A band of mounted mercenaries stands motionless; Moorish king, you have been slain by the two brave brothers who observed your bold abduction in the green forest.

3 Disc
4 Track

An dem jungen Morgenhimmel Steht die reine Sonne klar, Aber Blut quillt auf der Wiese, Und ein Ross, des Reiters baar, Trabt verschchtert in der Runde, Starr steht eine reisge Schaar. Mohrenknig, bist erschlagen Von dem tapfern Brderpaar, Das Dein khnes Ruberwagnis Nahm im grnen Forste wahr!

23

SONG TEXTS 1814


Donna Clara kniet beim Leichnam Aufgelst ihr goldnes Haar, Sonder Scheue nun bekennend, Wie ihr lieb der Tote war, Brder bitten, Priester lehren, Eins nur bleibt ihr offenbar. Sonne geht, und Sterne kommen, Auf und nieder schwebt der Aar, Alles auf der Welt ist Wandel Sie allein unwandelbar. Endlich baun die treuen Brder Dort Kapell ihr und Altar, Betend nun verrinnt ihr Leben, Tag fr Tag und Jahr fr Jahr, Bringt verhauchend sich als Opfer Fr des Liebsten Seele dar.
Donna Clara kneels by the corpse, her golden hair undone, now confessing freely how dear the dead man was to her. Her brothers plead, the priests exhort; only one thing is apparent to her. The sun disappears, the stars come out, the eagle soars up and down. Everything in this world is in flux; she alone is unchanging. At length the faithful brothers build a chapel and an altar for her there; now her life passes in prayer; day after day, year after year, she pines away, offering herself as a sacrifice to the soul of her beloved.

FRIEDRICH HEINRICH KARL, FREIHERR DE LA MOTTE FOUQU (17771843)

Disc 3 Adelaide Adelaide Track 5 D95. 1814; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1848 in volume 42 of the Nachlass
sung by Adrian Thompson

Einsam wandelt dein Freund im Frhlingsgarten, Mild vom lieblichen Zauberlicht umflossen,
shimmers

In solitude your lover walks in the spring garden gently bathed in the lovely magic light that through the swaying branches in blossom, Adelaide! In the mirroring waters, in the Alpine snows, in the golden clouds of the dying day, in the meadows of stars your image shines, Adelaide! Evening breezes whisper in the tender leaves, silver bells of May rustle in the grass, waves plash and nightingales sing: Adelaide! One day, miraculously, a flower from the ashes of my heart shall bloom upon my grave; on every tiny purple leaf shall glimmer clearly: Adelaide!

Das durch wankende Bltenzweige zittert, Adelaide. In der spiegelnden Flut, im Schnee der Alpen, In des sinkenden Tages Goldgewlke, Im Gefilde der Sterne strahlt dein Bildnis, Adelaide! Abendlftchen im zarten Laube flstern, Silberglckchen des Mais im Grase suseln, Wellen rauschen und Nachtigallen flten: Adelaide! Einst, o Wunder! entblht auf meinem Grabe Eine Blume der Asche meines Herzens; Deutlich schimmert auf jedem Purpurblttchen: Adelaide!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Disc 3 Trost An Elisa Consolation For Elisa Track 6 D97. 1814; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Adrian Thompson

Lehnst du deine bleichgehrmte Wange Immer noch an diesen Aschenkrug? Weinend um den Toten, den schon lange Zu der Seraphim Triumphgesange Der Vollendung Flgel trug? Siehst du Gottes Sternenschrift dort flimmern, Die der bangen Schwermut Trost verheisst? Heller wird der Glaube dir nun schimmern, Dass hoch ber seiner Hlle Trmmern Walle des Geliebten Geist! Wohl, o wohl dem liebenden Gefhrten Deiner Sehnsucht, er ist ewig dein! Wiedersehn, im Lande der Verklrten, Wirst du, Dulderin, den Langentbehrten, Und wie er unsterblich sein!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Are you still resting your cheek, pale with grief, on this urn of ashes? Weeping for the dead man who, long since, on the wings of perfection soared up to the Seraphims triumphant song? Can you see Gods starry script shimmering, promising comfort for anxious sorrow? Your faith will now shine more brightly so that high above his mortal remains your beloveds spirit will live! Happy the loving companion of your longing, he is forever yours! Patient sufferer, in the land of the blessed you will see again the one you have long yearned for, and be immortal, as he is!

24

April 1814 SONG TEXTS Andenken Remembrance

3 Disc
7 Track

D99. April 1814; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig cf Salieri Ich denke dein, disc 38 7 sung by Adrian Thompson

Ich denke dein, Wenn durch den Hain Der Nachtigallen Akkorde schallen! Wann denkst du mein? Ich denke dein Im Dmmerschein Der Abendhelle Am Schattenquelle! Wo denkst du mein? Ich denke dein Mit ssser Pein Mit bangem Sehnen Und heissen Trnen! Wie denkst du mein? O denke mein, Bis zum Verein Auf besserm Sterne! In jeder Ferne Denk ich nur dein!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

I think of you when through the grove the nightingales harmonious song echoes! When do you think of me? I think of you in the twilight of evening at the shady spring! Where do you think of me? I think of you with sweet pain, with anxious longing, and burning tears! How do you think of me? Oh, think of me until we meet in a better world! However distant you are, I shall think only of you!

Erinnerung Totenopfer
Kein Rosenschimmer leuchtet dem Tag zur Ruh! Der Abendnebel schwillt am Gestad empor, Wo durch verdorrte Felsengrser Sterbender Lfte Gesusel wandelt. Nicht schwermutsvoller tnte des Herbstes Wehn Durchs tote Gras am sinkenden Rasenmal, Wo meines Jugendlieblings Asche Unter den trauernden Weiden schlummert. Ihm Trnen opfern werd ich beim Bltterfall, Ihm, wenn das Mailaub wieder den Hain umrauscht, Bis mir, vom schnern Stern, die Erde Freundlich im Reigen der Welten schimmert.
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Remembrance Sacrifice to the dead


No rosy shimmer lights the day to rest! The evening mist rises on the shore, where, through dried-up grasses on the cliff, dying breezes whisper.

3 Disc
8 Track

D101. April 1814; published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Elizabeth Connell

The breath of autumn was not more melancholy than this, quivering through the dead grass on the sinking sward, a memorial of where the ashes of my youthful lover slumber beneath weeping willows. I shall sacrifice tears to him when leaves fall and when Mays leaves again rustle in the grove, until, from a fairer star, the sweet earth shines upon me in the dance of the spheres.

Geisternhe
Der Dmmrung Schein Durchblinkt den Hain; Hier, beim Gerusch des Wasserfalles, Denk ich nur dich, o du mein Alles! Dein Zauberbild Erscheint, so mild Wie Hesperus im Abendgolde, Dem fernen Freund, geliebte Holde! Er sehnt wie hier Sich stets nach dir; Fest, wie den Stamm die Epheuranke Umschlingt dich liebend sein Gedanke.

Nearby spirits
The light of dusk glimmers through the grove; here, by the murmur of the waterfall, I think only of you, who are everything to me! Your magical image appears, so gentle, like Hesperus in the gold of evening, to your distant friend, my beloved! He yearns for you always, as he does here. His loving thoughts embrace you as tightly as the ivy embraces the tree-trunk.

3 Disc
9 Track

D100. April 1814; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Philip Langridge

25

SONG TEXTS April July 1814


Durchbebt dich auch Im Abendhauch Des Brudergeistes leises Wehn Mit Vorgefhl vom Wiedersehn? Er ists, der lind Dir, ssses Kind, Des Schleiers Silbernebel kruselt, Und in der Locken Flle suselt. Oft hrst du ihn, Wie Melodien Der Wehmut aus gedmpften Saiten In stiller Nacht vorbergleiten. Auch fesselfrei Wird er getreu, Dir ganz und einzig hingegeben, In allen Welten dich umschweben.
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Do you, too, quiver in the evening breeze with the faint breath of a kindred spirit, a presentiment of our reunion? It is this, sweet child, which gently weaves a silver veil of mist and ruffles your abundant curls. Often you hear it like wistful melodies from muted strings, wafting past in the silent night. Although unfettered, this spirit will faithfully devote himself to you alone, and hover over you throughout the universe.

Disc 3 Die Befreier Europas in Paris The liberators of Europe in Paris Track bl D104. May 1814; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Maarten Koningsberger

Sie sind in Paris! Die Helden! Europas Befreier! Der Vater von streich, der Herrscher der Reussen, Der Wiedererwecker der tapferen Preussen. Das Glck Ihrer Vlker es war ihnen teuer. Sie sind in Paris! Nun ist uns der Friede gewiss!
JOHANN CHRISTIAN MIKAN (17691844)

They are in Paris! The heroes! Europes liberators! The father of Austria, the ruler of the Russians, he who aroused once more the brave Prussians. The happiness of their nations was dear to them. They are in Paris! Now we are assured of peace!

Disc 3 Lied aus der Ferne Song from afar Track bm D107. July 1814; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Adrian Thompson

Wenn, in des Abends letztem Scheine, Dir eine lchelnde Gestalt, Am Rasensitz im Eichenhaine, Mit Wink und Gruss vorber wallt, Das ist des Freundes treuer Geist, Der Freud und Frieden dir verheisst. Wenn in des Mondes Dmmerlichte Sich deiner Liebe Traum verschnt, Durch Cytisus und Weimutsfichte Melodisches Gesusel tnt, Und Ahnung dir den Busen hebt: Das ist mein Geist, der dich umschwebt. Fhlst du, beim seligen Verlieren In des Vergangnen Zauberland, Ein lindes, geistiges Berhren, Wie Zephyrs Kuss an Lipp und Hand, Und wankt der Kerze flatternd Licht: Das ist mein Geist, o zweifle nicht! Hrst du, beim Silberglanz der Sterne, Leis im verschwiegnen Kmmerlein, Gleich Aeolsharfen aus der Ferne, Das Bundeswort: Auf ewig dein! Dann schlummre sanft; es ist mein Geist, Der Freud und Frieden dir verheisst.
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

When in the dying light of evening, as you sit on the sward in the oak grove, a smiling figure passes you, waving a greeting, that is the faithful spirit of your friend, promising you joy and peace. When in the moons dusky light your dream of love grows fairer, and a melodious rustling echoes through laburnum and pine, and your breast swells with a presentiment, it is my spirit which hovers about you. If, lost in blissful contemplation of the magic realm of the past, you feel a gentle, unearthly touch like the kiss of Zephyr on your lips and hands, and if the wavering candlelight flickers: that is my spirit, do not doubt it! If, by the silver light of the stars, in your secret chamber you hear, like soft, distant aeolian harps, the words of our bond: forever yours! Then sleep sweetly; it is my spirit that promises you joy and peace.

26

July 1814 SONG TEXTS Lied der Liebe


Durch Fichten am Hgel, durch Erlen am Bach, Folgt immer dein Bildnis, du Traute! mir nach; Es lchelt bald Liebe, es lchelt bald Ruh, Im freundlichen Schimmer des Mondes, mir zu. Den Rosengestruchen des Gartens entwallt Im Glanze der Frhe die holde Gestalt; Sie schwebt aus der Berge bepurpurtem Flor Gleich einem elysischen Schatten hervor. Oft hab ich, im Traume, die schnste der Feen, Auf goldenem Throne dich strahlen gesehn; Oft hab ich, zum hohen Olympus entzckt, Als Hebe dich unter den Gttern erblickt. Mir hallt aus den Tiefen, mir hallt von den Hhn, Dein himmlischer Name wie Sphrengetn. Ich whne den Hauch, der die Blten umwebt, Von deiner melodischen Stimme durchbebt. In heiliger Mitternachtstunde durchkreist Des thers Gefilde mein ahnender Geist. Geliebte! dort winkt uns ein Land, wo der Freund Auf ewig der Freundin sich wieder vereint. Die Freude, sie schwindet, es dauert kein Leid; Die Jahre verrauschen im Strome der Zeit; Die Sonne wird sterben, die Erde vergehn: Doch Liebe muss ewig und ewig bestehn.
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Song of love
Past spruces on hillsides, through alders by the brook your image, beloved, follows me always. To me it smiles now love, now peace in the kindly glimmer of the moon. In the brightness of early morning your fair form arises from the rose bushes in the garden; it floats from the crimson-flowering mountains like an Elysian shadow.

3 Disc
bn Track

D109. July 1814; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Adrian Thompson

Often in dreams I have seen you, the loveliest of fairies, radiant on your golden throne; often I have glimpsed you, spirited to lofty Olympus, as Hebe among the gods. From the depths, from the heights I hear your heavenly name echo like music of the spheres; I imagine the scent enveloping the blossom shot through with your melodious voice. At midnights holy hour my prescient mind floats through the realms of the ether. Beloved! There a land beckons where lover and beloved are forever reunited. Joy vanishes, no sorrow endures; the years flow away in the river of time; the sun will die, the earth perish: but love must last for ever and ever.

Der Abend
Purpur malt die Tannenhgel Nach der Sonne Scheideblick, Lieblich strahlt des Baches Spiegel Hespers Fackelglanz zurck. Wie in Totenhallen dster Wirds im Pappelweidenhain, Unter leisem Blattgeflster Schlummern alle Vgel ein. Nur dein Abendlied, o Grille! Tnt noch aus betautem Grn, Durch der Dmmrung Zauberhlle Ssse Trauermelodien. Tnst du einst im Abendhauche, Grillchen, auf mein frhes Grab, Aus der Freundschaft Rosenstrauche, Deinen Klaggesang herab: Wird noch stets mein Geist dir lauschen, Horchend wie er jetzt dir lauscht, Durch des Hgels Blumen rauschen, Wie dies Sommerlftchen rauscht!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

The evening
The pine-covered hills are painted with purple after the suns parting glance; the brooks mirror reflects the lovely gleaming torch of Hesperus. In the poplar grove it grows dark, as in the vaults of death. Beneath softly whispering leaves all the birds fall asleep. Only your evening song, O cricket, echoes from the dewy grass, wafting sweet, mournful melodies through the enchanted cloak of dusk. Cricket, if one day you sound your lament in the evening breeze over my early grave, from the rosebush planted by friends, My spirit will always listen to you as it listens to you now, and murmur through the flowers on the hillside as this summer breeze murmurs.

3 Disc
bo Track

D108. July 1814; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Daniel Norman

27

SONG TEXTS September 1814


Disc 3 An Emma To Emma Track bp D113. 17 September 1814; published by Thaddus Weigl in Vienna in April 1826 as Op 56 (later changed to Op 58) No 2
sung by Sir Thomas Allen

Weit in nebelgrauer Ferne Liegt mir das vergangne Glck, Nur an Einem schnen Sterne Weilt mit Liebe noch der Blick. Aber, wie des Sternes Pracht, Ist es nur ein Schein der Nacht. Deckte dir der lange Schlummer, Dir der Tod die Augen zu, Dich bessse doch mein Kummer, Meinem Herzen lebtest du. Aber ach! du lebst im Licht, Meiner Liebe lebst du nicht. Kann der Liebe sss Verlangen, Emma, kanns vergnglich sein? Was dahin ist und vergangen, Emma, kanns die Liebe sein? Ihrer Flamme Himmelsglut Stirbt sie, wie ein irdisch Gut?
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Far in the grey, misty distance lies my past happiness. My eyes still linger lovingly on one fair star alone. But, like that stars splendour, it is merely an illusion of the night. If the prolonged slumber of death closed your eyes my sorrow would still possess you; you would live in my heart. But, alas, you live in the light yet you do not live for my love. Emma, can loves sweet longing pass away? That which is over and past, Emma, can that be love? Does the celestial ardour of its flame perish like worldly goods?

Disc 3 Romanze Romance Track bq D114. 29 September 1814; published by Wilhelm Mller in Berlin in 1868
sung by Sarah Walker

Ein Frulein klagt im finstern Turm, Am Seegestad erbaut. Es rauscht und heulte Wog und Sturm In ihres Jammers Laut. Rosalie von Montanvert Hiess manchem Troubadour Und einem ganzen Ritterheer Dir Krone der Natur. Doch ehe noch ihr Herz die Macht Der sssen Minn empfand, Erlag der Vater in der Schlacht Am Sarazenenstrand. Der Ohm, ein Ritter Manfry, ward Zum Schirmvogt ihr bestellt; Dem lacht ins Herz, wie Felsen hart, Des Fruleins Gut und Geld. Bald berall im Lande ging Die Trauerkund umher: Des Todes kalte Nacht umfing Die Rose Montanvert. Ein schwarzes Totenfhnlein wallt Hoch auf des Fruleins Burg; Die dumpfe Leichenglocke schallt Drei Tag und Ncht hindurch. Auf ewig bin, auf ewig tot, O Rose Montanvert! Nun milderst du der Witwe Not, Der Waise Schmerz nicht mehr! So klagt einmtig alt und jung, Den Blick von Thrnen schwer, Von Frhrot bis zur Dmmerung, Die Rose Montanvert.

A maiden wept in a dark tower built on the sea shore. Waves and storm rushed and howled through her cries of grief. Rosalie of Montanvert was, for many a troubadour and a whole host of knights, the crown of nature. But before her heart had felt the power of sweet love, her father died in battle on the Saracen shore. Her uncle, a knight named Manfry, was appointed her guardian; in his rock hard heart he rejoiced at the maidens gold and wealth. Soon the sorrowful news spread throughout the land: The cold night of death has enveloped Rose Montanvert. A black flag of death flew high over the maidens castle; the muffled death-knell sounded for three days and three nights. Gone for ever, dead for ever, O Rose Montanvert! No longer will you soothe the widows distress, the orphans sorrow. Thus, from dawn till dusk, their eyes heavy with tears, young and old with one voice mourned Rose Montanvert.

28

September 1814 SONG TEXTS


Der Ohm in einem Turm sie barg, Erfllt mit Moderduft! Drauf senkte man den leeren Sarg Wohl in der Vter Gruft. Das Frulein horchte still und bang Der Priester Litanein, Trb in des Kerkers Gitter drang Der Fackeln roter Schein. Sie ahnte schaudernd ihr Geschick; Ihr ward so dumpf, ihr ward so schwer, In Todesnacht er starb ihr Blick; Sie sank und war nicht mehr. Des Turms Ruinen an der See Sind heute noch zu schaun; Den Wandrer fasst in ihrer Nh Ein wundersames Graun. Auch mancher Hirt verkndet euch, Dass er bei Nacht allda Oft, einer Silberwolke gleich, Das Frulein schweben sah.
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Her uncle hid her in a tower, filled with the stench of decay! Then the empty coffin was lowered into her ancestors vault. In fear and silence the maiden heard the priests litanies; the red gleam of the torches penetrated dimly through the prison bars. With foreboding she guessed her fate; her senses grew dull and heavy; her eyes faded in the darkness of death; she sank down, and was no more. The ruins of the tower by the sea are still to be seen today; as he draws near, the traveller is gripped by a strange dread. And many a shepherd will tell you how, at night, he has often seen the maiden hovering there like a silver cloud.

Erinnerungen
Am Seegestad, in lauen Vollmondnchten, Denk ich nur dich! Zu deines Namens goldnem Zug verflechten Die Sterne sich. Die Wildnis glnzt in ungewohnter Helle, Von dir erfllt; Auf jedes Blatt in jede Schattenquelle Malt sich dein Bild. Gern weil ich, Grazie, wo du den Hgel Hinabgeschwebt, Leicht, wie ein Rosenblatt auf Zephyrs Flgel Vorberbebt. Am Httchen dort bekrnzt ich dir, umflossen Von Abendglut, Mit Immergrn und jungen Bltensprossen Den Halmenhut. Bei jedem Lichtwurm in den Felsenstcken, Als ob die Feen Da Tnze webten, riefst du voll Entzcken: Wie schn! wie schn! Wohin ich blick und geh, erblick ich immer Den Wiesenplan, Wo wir der Berge Schnee mit Purpurschimmer Beleuchtet sahn. Ihr schmelzend Mailied weinte Philomele Im Uferhain; Da fleht ich dir, im Blick die ganze Seele: Gedenke mein!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831) END OF DISC 3

Memories
By the shores of the lake, on warm nights with full moon, I think only of you; the stars intertwine to spell your name in gold. The wilderness gleams with unwonted brightness, filled with you: on every leaf, in every shady spring, your image is painted. I gladly linger, fair one, as you glide down the hillside, light as a passing roseleaf quivering on the zephyrs wings. There, by the little hut bathed in evening light, I garlanded your straw hat with evergreens and fresh blossoms. Watching the glow-worms dance among the rocks like fairies, you would cry out with delight: How lovely! Wherever I look, wherever I go, I always see the meadow where we once saw the mountain snow tinged with crimson. Philomel sighed her melting May song in the grove by the shore. There I implored you, with my whole soul in my gaze: remember me!

3 Disc
br Track

D98. 29 September 1814; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Philip Langridge

29

SONG TEXTS September October 1814


Disc 4 Die Betende The maiden at prayer Track 1 D102. September (?) 1814; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1840 in volume 30 of the Nachlass
sung by Adrian Thompson

Laura betet! Engelharfen hallen Frieden Gottes in ihr krankes Herz, Und, wie Abels Opferdfte, wallen Ihre Seufzer himmelwrts. Wie sie kniet, in Andacht hingegossen, Schn, wie Raphael die Unschuld malt; Vom Verklrungsglanze schon umflossen, Der um Himmelswohner strahlt. O sie fhlt, im leisen, linden Wehen, Froh des Hocherhabnen Gegenwart, Sieht im Geiste schon die Palmenhhen, Wo der Lichtkranz ihrer harrt! So von Andacht, so von Gottvertrauen Ihre engelreine Brust geschwellt, Betend diese Heilige zu schauen, Ist ein Blick in jene Welt.
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Laura is praying! Angels harps sound, filling her sick heart with Gods peace, and, like the scents of Abels sacrifice, her sighs waft heavenwards. Kneeling, lost in prayer, she is as lovely as Innocence painted by Raphael; already bathed in that transfigured radiance which shines around those who dwell in heaven. In the soft, gentle breeze she feels with joy the presence of the Almighty; already she sees in her mind the palm-clad heights where the crown of light awaits her. Her angelically pure breast swells with devotion, with trust in God; to behold this saintly maiden at prayer is to look into the world beyond.

Disc 4 Auferstehungslied sang Ode on the Resurrection Track 2 D115. 27 October 1814; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1840 in volume 31 of the Nachlass
sung by Adrian Thompson

An Laura, als sie Klopstocks

To Laura, when singing Klopstocks

Herzen, die gen Himmel sich erheben, Trnen, die dem Auge still entbeben, Seufzer, die den Lippen leis entfliehn, Wangen, die mit Andachtsglut sich malen, Trunkne Blicke, die Entzckung strahlen, Danken dir, o Heilverknderin! Laura! Laura! Horchend diesen Tnen, Mssen Engelseelen sich verschnen, Heilige den Himmel offen sehn, Schwermutsvolle Zweifler sanfter klagen, Kalte Frevler an die Brust sich schlagen, Und wie Seraph Abbadona flehn! Mit den Tnen des Triumphgesanges Trank ich Vorgefhl des berganges Von der Grabnacht zum Verklrungsglanz! Als vernhm ich Engelmelodieen, Whnt ich dir, o Erde, zu entfliehen, Sah schon unter mir der Sterne Tanz! Schon umatmete mich des Himmels Milde, Schon begrsst ich jauchzend die Gefilde, Wo des Lebens Strom durch Palmen fleusst! Glnzend von der nhern Gottheit Strahle Wandelte durch Paradiesestale Wonneschauernd mein entschwebter Geist!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Hearts raised towards heaven, tears silently quivering from the eyes, sighs softly escaping from the lips, cheeks coloured with the fire of devotion, enraptured looks, radiant in bliss: all thank you, harbinger of salvation! Laura! Listening to these strains the souls of angels must grow more beautiful, saints behold the open gates of heaven, melancholy doubters lament more softly, heartless sinners beat their breasts and pray like the seraph Abbadona. With the strains of the triumphant song I drank a foretaste of that passage from the night of the grave to a transfigured radiance! It was as if I heard angels singing; I imagined I had escaped from you, earth, and already saw the stars dance below me. I was embraced by heavens gentleness, with joy I greeted the Elysian fields where the river of life flows through palm trees; glowing in the light of the Godhead close by my blissful, quivering spirit floated through the vales of Paradise.

Disc 4 Der Geistertanz Ghost dance Track 3 Third setting, D116. 14 October 1814; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1840 in volume 31 of the Nachlass
sung by Brigitte Fassbaender

Die bretterne Kammer Der Toten erbebt, Wenn zwlfmal den Hammer Die Mitternacht hebt.

The boarded chamber of the dead trembles when midnight twelve times raises the hammer.

30

October 1814 SONG TEXTS


Rasch tanzen um Grber Und morsches Gebein Wir luftigen Schweber Den sausenden Reihn. Was winseln die Hunde Beim schlafenden Herrn? Sie wittern die Runde Der Geister von fern. Die Raben entflattern Der wsten Abtei, Und fliehn an den Gattern Des Kirchhofs vorbei. Wir gaukeln und scherzen Hinab und empor Gleich irrenden Kerzen Im dunstigen Moor. O Herz, dessen Zauber Zur Marter uns ward, Du ruhst nun in tauber Verdumpfung erstarrt; Tief bargst du im dstern Gemach unser Weh; Wir Glcklichen flstern Dir frhlich: Ade!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Quickly we airy spirits strike up a whirling dance around graves and rotting bones. Why do the dogs whine as their masters sleep? They scent from afar the spirits dance. Ravens flutter up from the ruined abbey, and fly past the graveyard gates. Jesting, we flit up and down, like will-o-the-wisps over the misty moor. O heart, whose spell was our torment, you rest now, frozen in a numb stupor. You have buried our grief deep in the gloomy chamber; happy we, who whisper you a cheerful farewell!

Das Mdchen aus der Fremde


In einem Tal bei armen Hirten Erschien mit jedem jungen Jahr, Sobald die ersten Lerchen schwirrten, Ein Mdchen schn und wunderbar. Sie war nicht in dem Tal geboren, Man wusste nicht, woher sie kam, Doch schnell war ihre Spur verloren, Sobald das Mdchen Abschied nahm. Beseligend war ihre Nhe, Und alle Herzen wurden weit, Doch eine Wrde, eine Hhe Entfernte die Vertraulichkeit. Sie brachte Blumen mit und Frchte, Gereift auf einer andern Flur, In einem andern Sonnenlichte, In einer glcklichern Natur. Und teilte jedem eine Gabe, Dem Frchte, jenem Blumen aus, Der Jngling und der Greis am Stabe, Ein jeder ging beschenkt nach Haus. Willkommen waren alle Gste, Doch nahte sich ein liebend Paar, Dem reichte sie der Gabe beste, Der Blumen allerschnste dar.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

The maiden from strange parts


To poor shepherds in a valley appeared each spring with the first soaring larks, a strange and lovely maiden. She had not been born in the valley. No one knew from where she came. But when the maiden departed they soon lost trace of her. Her very presence was blissful and all hearts opened to her, yet her dignity, her loftiness, precluded familiarity. She brought flowers and fruit ripened in other fields, under another sun in a happier countryside. She bestowed her gifts on all, fruit on one, flowers on another; the youth, the old man with his stick, each one went home enriched. All guests were welcome, but if a loving couple approached she would give them her finest gifts, the fairest flowers of all.

4 Disc
4 Track

First setting, D117. 16 October 1814; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Sir Thomas Allen

31

SONG TEXTS October November 1814


Disc 4 Gretchen am Spinnrade Gretchen at the spinning-wheel Track 5 D118. 19 October 1814; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 2
sung by Marie McLaughlin

Meine Ruh ist hin, Mein Herz ist schwer, Ich finde sie nimmer Und nimmermehr. Wo ich ihn nicht hab Ist mir das Grab, Die ganze Welt Ist mir vergllt. Mein armer Kopf Ist mir verrckt Mein armer Sinn Ist mir zerstckt. Nach ihm nur schau ich Zum Fenster hinaus, Nach ihm nur geh ich Aus dem Haus. Sein hoher Gang, Sein edle Gestalt, Seines Mundes Lcheln, Seiner Augen Gewalt. Und seiner Rede Zauberfluss. Sein Hndedruck, Und ach, sein Kuss! Mein Busen drngt sich Nach ihm hin. Ach drft ich fassen Und halten ihn. Und kssen ihn So wie ich wollt An seinen Kssen Vergehen sollt!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

My peace is gone, my heart is heavy, I shall never, never again find peace. Wherever he is not with me is my grave, the whole world is turned to gall. My poor head is crazed, my poor mind is shattered. I look out of the window only to seek him, I leave the house only to seek him. His fine gait, his noble form, the smile of his lips, the power of his eyes. And the magic flow of his words, the pressure of his hand and, ah, his kiss! My bosom yearns for him. Ah, if only I could grasp him and hold him. And kiss him as I would like, I should die from his kisses!

Disc 4 Nachtgesang Night song Track 6 D119. 30 November 1814; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 47 of the Nachlass
sung by Adrian Thompson

O gib, vom weichen Pfhle, Trumend, ein halb Gehr! Bei meinem Saitenspiele Schlafe! was willst du mehr? Bei meinem Saitenspiele Segnet der Sterne Heer Die ewigen Gefhle; Schlafe! was willst du mehr? Die ewigen Gefhle Heben mich, hoch und hehr, Aus irdischem Gewhle; Schlafe! was willst du mehr? Vom irdischen Gewhle Trennst du mich nur zu sehr, Bannst mich in diese Khle; Schlafe! was willst du mehr?

O lend, from your soft pillow, dreaming, but half an ear! To the music of my strings sleep! What more can you wish? To the music of my strings the host of stars blesses eternal feelings; sleep! What more can you wish? These eternal feelings raise me high and glorious above the earthly throng; sleep! What more can you wish? From this earthly throng you separate me only too well, you spellbind me to this coolness, sleep! What more can you wish?

32

November 1814 SONG TEXTS


Bannst mich in diese Khle, Gibst nur im Traum Gehr. Ach, auf dem weichen Pfhle Schlafe! was willst du mehr?
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

You spellbind me to this coolness, giving ear only in your dream, ah, on your soft pillow sleep! What more can you wish?

Schfers Klagelied
Da droben auf jenem Berge, Da steh ich tausendmal, An meinem Stabe hingebogen, Und schaue hinab in das Tal. Dann folg ich der weidenden Herde, Mein Hndchen bewahret mir sie. Ich bin herunter gekommen Und weiss doch selber nicht wie. Da steht von schnen Blumen Da steht die ganze Wiese so voll. Ich breche sie, ohne zu wissen, Wem ich sie geben soll. Und Regen, Sturm und Gewitter Verpass ich unter dem Baum, Die Tre dort bleibet verschlossen; Doch alles ist leider ein Traum. Es stehet ein Regenbogen Wohl ber jenem Haus! Sie aber ist fortgezogen, Und weit in das Land hinaus. Hinaus in das Land und weiter, Vielleicht gar ber die See. Vorber, ihr Schafe, nur vorber! Dem Schfer ist gar so weh.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Shepherds lament
On yonder hill I have stood a thousand times, leaning on my staff and looking down into the valley. I have followed the grazing flocks, watched over by my dog, I have come down here and do not know how. The whole meadow is so full of lovely flowers; I pluck them, without knowing to whom I shall give them. From rain, storm and tempest I shelter under a tree. The door there remains locked; for, alas, it is all a dream. There is a rainbow above that house! But she has moved away, to distant regions. To distant regions and beyond, perhaps even over the sea. Move on, sheep, move on! Your shepherd is so wretched.

4 Disc
7 Track

First version, D121. 30 November 1814; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 3 No 1 sung by Dame Janet Baker

Trost in Trnen

Consolation in tears

4 Disc
8 Track

D120. 30 November 1814; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1835 in volume 25 of the Nachlass cf Neukomm Trost in Trnen, disc 39 bp sung by Adrian Thompson

Wie kommts, dass du so traurig bist, Da alles froh erscheint? Man sieht dirs an den Augen an, Gewiss, du hast geweint. Und hab ich einsam auch geweint, So ists mein eigen Schmerz, Und Trnen fliessen gar so sss, Erleichtern mir das Herz. Die frohen Freunde laden dich O komm an unsre Brust! Und was du auch verloren hast, Vertraue den Verlust. Ihr lrmt und rauscht und ahndet nicht, Was mich, den Armen, qult. Ach nein, verloren hab ichs nicht, So sehr es mir auch fehlt. So raffe denn dich eilig auf, Du bist ein junges Blut. In deinen Jahren hat man Kraft Und zum Erwerben Mut.

How come that you are so sad when everything appears so joyful? One can see from your eyes, for sure, you have been crying. And if, in solitude, I have been crying, it is my own sorrow, my tears flow so very sweetly, comforting my heart. Your joyful friends bid you, come to our hearts! and whatever you have lost, confide to us that loss. You revel and make merry, and cannot guess what torments this poor man. No, I have not lost what I grieve for, although I feel its absence sorely. Then quickly take heart. You are a young man. At your age men have strength and the courage to achieve.

33

SONG TEXTS November December 1814


Ach nein, erwerben kann ichs nicht, Es steht mir gar zu fern. Es weilt so hoch, es blinkt so schn, Wie droben jener Stern. Die Sterne, die begehrt man nicht, Man freut sich ihrer Pracht, Und mit Entzcken blickt man auf In jeder heitern Nacht. Und mit Entzcken blick ich auf, So manchen lieben Tag; Verweinen lasst die Nchte mich So lang ich weinen mag.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Alas, I cannot achieve what I desire, it lies too far away. It dwells high and shines as fair as yonder star. One does not covet the stars, but rejoices in their splendour, and gazes up in delight on each clear night. I do gaze up in delight on many a sweet day. Let me weep away my nights as long as I wish to weep.

Disc 4 Ammenlied The nurses song Track 9 D122. December 1814; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by Catherine Wyn-Rogers

Am hohen, hohen Turm, Da weht ein kalter Sturm: Geduld! die Glcklein luten, Die Sonne blinkt von weiten. Am hohen, hohen Turm, Da weht ein kalter Sturm. Im tiefen, tiefen Tal, Da rauscht ein Wasserfall: Geduld! ein bisschen weiter, Da rinnt das Bchlein heiter. Im tiefen, tiefen Tal, Da rauscht ein Wasserfall. Am kahlen, kahlen Baum, Deckt sich ein Tubchen kaum, Geduld! bald blhn die Auen, Dann wirds sein Nestchen bauen. Am kahlen, kahlen Baum, Deckt sich ein Tubchen kaum. Dich friert, mein Tchterlein! Kein Freund sagt: komm herein! Lass unser Stndchen schlagen, Dann werdens Englein sagen. Das beste Stbchen gibt Gott jenem, den er liebt.
MICHAEL LUBI (17571808)

Around the high tower a cold gale blows. Patience! The bells ring; the sun gleams from afar. Around the high tower a cold gale blows. In the deep valley a waterfall rushes. Patience! A little further on the brooklet flows merrily. In the deep valley a waterfall rushes. In the bare tree a dove scarcely finds shelter. Patience! Soon the meadows will bloom, and then it will build its nest. In the bare tree a dove scarcely finds shelter. You are frozen, my little daughter! No friend asks you to come in! Let our hour come. Then angels will invite you in. God gives his best room to those he loves.

Disc 4 Sehnsucht Longing Track bl D123. 3 December 1814; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1842 in volume 37 of the Nachlass
sung by Adrian Thompson

Was zieht mir das Herz so? Was zieht mich hinaus? Und windet und schraubt mich Aus Zimmer und Haus? Wie dort sich die Wolken Am Felsen verziehn! Da mcht ich hinber, Da mcht ich wohl hin! Nun wiegt sich der Raben Geselliger Flug; Ich mische mich drunter Und folge dem Zug. Und Berg und Gemuer Umfittigen wir; Sie weilet da drunten, Ich sphe nach ihr.

What is it that tugs at my heart so? What lures me outside, twisting and wrenching me out of my room and my home? Over there the clouds disperse around the rocks. I would like to cross over there, I would like to go there! Now the ravens hover in gregarious flight; I join them and follow their course. We fly above mountains and ruins; she dwells below; I look out for her.

34

December 1814 SONG TEXTS


Da kommt sie und wandelt; Ich eile sobald, Ein singender Vogel, Im buschigten Wald. Sie weilet und horchet Und lchelt mit sich: Er singet so lieblich Und singt es an mich. Die scheidende Sonne Vergldet die Hhn; Die sinnende Schne, Sie lsst es geschehen. Sie wandelt am Bache Die Wiesen entlang, Und finster und finstrer Umschlingt sich der Gang; Auf einmal erschein ich, Ein blinkender Stern. Was glnzet da droben, So nah und so fern? Und hast du mit Staunen Das Leuchten erblickt, Ich lieg dir zu Fssen, Da bin ich beglckt!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

There she comes, strolling along; I immediately hasten, like a singing bird, to the bushy wood. She lingers and listens, smiling to herself: He sings so charmingly, and sings to me! The departing sun gilds the hills; the musing beauty does not heed it. She strolls by the brook, through the meadows; darker and darker grows her winding path. Suddenly I appear, a shining star. What is that sparkling up there, so near and yet so far? And when, with astonishment, you catch sight of its light, I shall lie at your feet. There I shall be contented!

Am See

By the lake

4 Disc
bm Track

D124. 7 December 1814; published in 1885 (first 20 bars only) in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig published complete in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Philip Langridge

Sitz ich im Gras am glatten See, Beschleicht die Seele ssses Weh, Wie olsharfen klingt mich an Ein unnennbarer Zauberwahn. Das Schilfrohr neiget seufzend sich, Die Uferblumen grssen mich, Der Vogel klagt, die Lfte wehn, Vor Schmerzeslust mcht ich vergehn! Wie mir das Leben krftig quillt Und sich in raschen Strmen spielt. Wies bald in trben Massen grt Und bald zum Spiegel sich verklrt. Bewusstsein meiner tiefsten Kraft, Ein Wonnemeer in mir erschafft. Ich strze khn in seine Flut Und ringe um das hchste Gut. O Leben, bist so himmlisch schn, In deinen Tiefen, in deinen Hhn! Dein freundlich Licht soll ich nicht sehn, Den finstern Pfad des Orkus gehn? Doch bist du mir das Hchste nicht, Drum opfr ich freudig dich der Pflicht; Ein Strahlenbild schwebt mir voran, Und mutig wag ichs Leben dran! Das Strahlenbild ist oft betrnkt, Wenn es durch meinen Busen brennt, Die Trnen weg wom Wangenrot, Und dann in tausendfachem Tod.

When I sit in the grass by the smooth lake, sweet sorrow steals through my soul; as if by Aeolian harps, I am moved by nameless magical sounds. The bulrushes bow, sighing; the flowers on the bank greet me; a bird laments, breezes blow. I would die of sweet grief! How vigorously life flows around me, playing in rapid currents, now fermenting in a dark mass, and now as bright as a mirror. An awareness of my deepest powers creates waves of joy within me. I plunge boldly into the waters and strive for the highest good. O life, you are so celestially beautiful, in your depths and your peaks! Shall I not see your fair light; shall I follow the black course to Hades? Yet you are not my highest ideal, and I joyfully sacrifice you to duty. A radiant image draws me onwards; for it I will bravely risk my life. This radiant image is often moist, when through my heart it burns away the tears from my red cheeks, as I die a thousand deaths.

35

SONG TEXTS December 1814


Du warst so menschlich, warst so hold, O grosser deutscher Leopold, Die Menschheit fhlte dich so ganz Und reichte dir den Opferkranz. Und hehr geschmckt sprangst du hinab, Fr Menschen in das Wellengrab. Vor dir erbleicht, o Frstensohn, Thermopylae und Marathon. Das Schilfrohr neiget seufzend sich, Die Uferblumen grssen mich, Der Vogel klagt, die Lfte wehn, Vor Schmerzeslust mcht ich vergehn.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

You were so humane, so gracious, so great a German, Leopold; mankind felt your goodness to the full, and handed you the sacrificial wreath. Nobly adorned, you leapt down, for mens sake, to death in the waves. Son of princes, Thermopylae and Marathon pale before you. The bulrushes bow, sighing; the flowers on the bank greet me; a bird laments, breezes blow. I would die of sweet grief.

Disc 4 Szene aus Faust Scene from Faust Track bn Second version, D126. 12 December 1814; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1832 in volume 20 of the Nachlass
sung by Thomas Hampson, Marie McLaughlin and members of The New Company

BSER GEIST Wie anders, Gretchen, war dirs, Als du noch voll Unschuld Hier zum Altar tratst, Aus dem vergriffenen Bchelchen Gebete lalltest, Halb Kinderspiele, Halb Gott im Herzen! Gretchen! Wo steht dein Kopf? In deinem Herzen, welche Missethat? Betst du fr deiner Mutter Seele, Die durch dich zur langen, Langen Pein hinberschlief? Auf deiner Schwelle wessen Blut? Und unter deinem Herzen Regt sichs nicht quillend schon, Und ngstigt dich und sich Mit ahnungsvoller Gegenwart? GRETCHEN Weh! Weh! Wr ich der Gedanken los, Die mir herber und hinber gehen Wider mich! CHOR Dies irae, dies illa, Solvet saeclum in favilla. BSER GEIST Grimm fasst dich! Die Posaune tnt! Die Grber beben! Und dein Herz, aus Aschenruh Zu Flammenqualen wieder aufgeschaffen, Bebt auf! GRETCHEN Wr ich hier weg! Mir ist als ob die Orgel mir Den Athem versetzte, Gesang mein Herz Im Tiefsten lste. CHOR Judex ergo cum sedebit, Quidquid latet adparebit: Nil inultum remanebit.

EVIL SPIRIT How differently you felt, Gretchen, when, still full of innocence, you came to the altar here, mumbling prayers from your shabby little book, half playing childrens games, half with God in your heart. Gretchen! How is your head? What sin lies within your heart? Do you pray for the soul of your mother, who because of you overslept into a long, long agony? And whose blood lies on your threshold? And beneath your heart does not something already stir and swell, tormenting itself and you with its foreboding presence? GRETCHEN Alas! Alas!
If only I could be free of the thoughts which run to and fro in my mind, against my will.

CHORUS The day of wrath, that day


will dissolve the earth in ashes.

EVIL SPIRIT Anguish grips you! The trumpet sounds, the graves tremble! And your heart, stirred up again from ashen peace to blazing torment, trembles likewise! GRETCHEN If only I could escape from here!
I feel as if the organ were taking my breath away, and the singing dissolving my heart in its depths.

CHORUS When therefore the judge takes his seat,


whatever is hidden will reveal itself; nothing will remain unavenged.

36

December 1814 SONG TEXTS


GRETCHEN Mir wird so eng! Die Mauern-Pfeiler befangen mich! Das Gewlbe drngt mich! Luft! BSER GEIST Verbirg dich! Snd und Schande Bleibt nicht verborgen. Luft? Licht? Wehe dir! CHOR Quid sum miser tunc dicturus? Quem patronum rogaturus? Cum vix justus sit securus. BSER GEIST Ihr Antlitz wenden Verklrte von dir ab. Die Hnde dir zu reichen, Schauerts den Reinen. Weh! CHOR Quid sum miser tunc dicturus? Quem patronum rogaturus?
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

GRETCHEN I am so afraid!
The pillars of the walls are constricting me! The vault presses down on me! Air!

EVIL SPIRIT Hide yourself! Shame and sin


will not remain hidden. Air? Light? Woe upon you!

CHORUS What will I say then, wretch that I am?


What advocate entreat to speak for me? When even the righteous may hardly be secure.

EVIL SPIRIT The blessed turn their faces from you. The pure shudder to reach out their hands to you. Woe! CHORUS What will I say then, wretch that I am?
What advocate entreat to speak for me?

Marguerite lglise by E Delacroix (1826)

37

A SCHUBERT CALENDAR 1815 A SCHUBERT CALENDAR 1815 aged 18 The celebrated annus mirabilis of song represents an amazing musical journey in the context of the composers domestic stasis. For Schubert the year is poor in biographical events and rich in creativity. The alarming re-emergence of Napoleon and his defeat at Waterloo are played out while the composer attempts to reconcile himself to a life of teaching in the ninth Bezirk. Schubert is stuck at home in the Sulengasse, but he refuses to renounce his dreams. Domestic surroundings seem especially to favour the composition of lieder, the epitome of domestic music. In the white heat of inspiration he writes some 150 songs sometimes as many as nine in one day (D267275 on 25 August), particularly when he is spared his teaching duties on account of school holidays. The composers will-power enables him to spirit himself away from the dullness of his material circumstances. This god-like creativity occasions neither arrogance nor complacency: he continues his composition lessons with Salieri, and maintains links with his school friends. An increasing number of people are becoming his staunch admirers; a song like Erlknig (D328) is soon famous among all the members of the circle. Schuberts appetite for setable material is voracious from the older eighteenth-century poets (Klopstock, Hlty, Kosegarten, Stolberg, the supposedly ancient Ossian who inspires a modern cult that will appeal to Mendelssohn in the years to come) to the moderns like Krner (whom Schubert had actually met) and the perennial Goethe and Schiller who provide the template by which other poetry is judged. He already nurtures a special relationship with Johann Mayrhofer, ten years older, who has become a mentor, as well as the librettist of the Singspiel Die Freunde von Salamanka. The single Mayrhofer song setting of the year, Liane (D298), dates from October. Schuberts literary judgement is far more acute than one thinks, and he reads far more than he ever finds suitable for musical setting. In 1815 his taste is not yet infallible (the weird and wonderful ballads of Bertrand and Bernard) but it is a mistake to judge his indulgence of his friends poetry (Kenner, Schlechta, Stadler) as lapses. He is all too aware that they are not great writers, but he is willing to take seriously the efforts of those who have accorded him their support this applies to a number of other poets in the years to come. The gatherings of friends to listen to Schuberts songs, not yet officially known as Schubertiads, achieve their vitality by an exchange of artistic energy between the composer and the lesser mortals around him, often laudably creative by the standards of the time, who wish to contribute to the symposium. He is also acutely aware of the difference between German poets and his own countrymen (like the Viennese Stoll and the Styrians Fellinger and Kalchberg); he seems willing to admit Austrian provincials into the lieder fold precisely because he identifies with their home-grown qualities. Schubert is already able to control the means by which the ordinary text can become the extraordinary song. His willingness to work this alchemy in the case of poetry written by people of whom he is fond is an indication of his tact and his imaginative compassion. It was one of the few gifts that he was able to make in his straightened circumstances, but it was a priceless one. A number of people in his circle are immortal because he expressed his appreciation of them in the only way he knew how by setting their work to music. Some other works of 1815 Zwlf Walzer, siebzehn Lndler und neuen Ecossaisen fr Klavier (D145); Sonata in E major for piano (D157); Mass in G (D167); String Quartet in G (D173); Stabat mater in G minor (D175); Der vierjhrige Posten, a Singspiel with a text by Krner (D190); Symphony No 3 in D (D200); Fernando, a Singspiel with a text by Stadler (D220); Claudine von Villa Bella, a Singspiel with a text by Goethe (D239); Sonata in C for piano (D279); Mass in B flat major (D324); Die Freunde von Salamanka, a Singspiel with a text of Mayrhofer (D326).

38

1815 SONG TEXTS Ballade


Ein Frulein schaut vom hohen Turm Das weite Meer so bang; Zum trauerschweren Zitherschlag Hallt dster ihr Gesang: Mich halten Schloss und Riegel fest, Mein Retter weilt so lang. Sei wohl getrost, du edle Maid! Schau, hinterm Kreidenstein treibt In der Buchtung Dunkelheit Ein Kriegesboot herein: Der Aarenbusch, der Rosenschild, Das ist der Retter dein! Schon ruft des Hunen Horn Zum Streit hinab zum Muschelrain. Willkommen, schmucker Knabe, mir, Bist du zur Stelle kummen? Gar bald vom schwarzen Schilde dir Hau ich die goldnen Blumen. Die achtzehn Blumen blutbetaut, Les deine knigliche Braut Auf aus dem Sand der Wogen, Nur flink die Wehr gezogen! Zum Turm auf schallt das Schwertgeklirr! Wie harrt die Braut so bang! Der Kampf drhnt laut durchs Waldrevier, So heftig und so lang, Und endlich, endlich deucht es ihr, Erstirbt der Hiebe Klang. Es kracht das Schloss, die Tr klafft auf, Die ihren sieht sie wieder; Sie eilt im atemlosen Lauf Zum Muschelplane nieder. Da liegt der Peiniger zerschellt, Doch weh, dicht neben nieder, Ach! deckens blutbespritzte Feld Des Retters blasse Glieder. Still sammelt sie die Rosen auf In ihren keuschen Schoss Und bettet ihren Lieben drauf; Ein Trnchen stiehlt sich los Und taut die breiten Wunden an Und sagt: ich habe das getan! Da frass es einen Schandgesell Des Raubes im Gemt, Dass die, die seinen Herrn verdarb, Frei nach der Heimat zieht. Vom Busch, wo er verkrochen lag In wilder Todeslust, Pfeift schnell sein Bolzen durch die Luft, In ihre keusche Brust. Da ward ihr wohl im Brautgemach, Im Kiesgrund, still und klein; Sie senkten sie dem Lieben nach, Dort unter einem Stein, Den ihr von Disteln berweht. Noch nchst des Turmes Trmmern seht.
JOSEF KENNER (17941868)

Ballad
From the high tower a maiden looks anxiously down over the vast sea. To the heavy, mournful chords of her zither her gloomy song resounds: Lock and bolt keep me captive here, my saviour tarries so long. Take comfort, noble maid! Look, beyond the chalk cliff a warship approaches in the darkness of the bay; with eagle plumes, and rose-decked shield; behold your saviour! Already the heros horn calls to battle on the shell-covered shore. Welcome, fair youth, have you reached your destination? Soon I shall cut the golden flowers from your black shield. Let the eighteen flowers, stained with blood, be gathered by your royal bride from the sand washed by the waves. Quickly, draw your sword! The rattling of swords echoes up to the tower! How anxiously the bride waits! The clamour of battle resounded long and fiercely. Then at length, it seems to her, the clash of weapons ceases. The lock is burst, the door opens, she sees her people once more; in breathless haste she runs down to the shell-covered shore. There lies her tormentors mangled body. But alas! Close beside him her saviours pale limbs cover the blood-bespattered field. Silently she gathers the roses in her chaste lap, and on them she lays her beloved. A tear falls, bathing his gaping wounds and signifying: I have done the deed. But an evil accomplice in her abduction was tortured by the thought that she who destroyed his master would return home freed. From the bush where he lay hidden in frenzied blood lust, his arrow whistled rapidly through the air into her chaste heart. She was happy in her bridal chamber, deep among the pebbles, small and silent; they lowered her to join her beloved beneath a stone that, overgrown with thistles, you can still see beside the ruined tower.

4 Disc
bo Track

D134. c1815; first published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1830 as Op posth 126 sung by Adrian Thompson

39

SONG TEXTS 1815


Disc 4 Der Mondabend The moonlit evening Track bp D141. 1815; first published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1830 as Op posth 131 No 1
sung by Dame Margaret Price

Rein und freundlich lacht der Himmel Nieder auf die dunkle Erde; Tausend goldne Augen blinken Lieblich in die Brust der Menschen, Und des Mondes lichte Scheibe Segelt heiter durch die Blue. Auf den goldnen Strahlen zittern Ssser Wehmut Silbertropfen, Dringen sanft mit leisem Hauche In das stille Herz voll Liebe, Und befeuchten mir das Auge Mit der Sehnsucht zartem Taue. Funkelnd prangt der Stern des Abends In den lichtbesten Rumen, Spielt mit seinem Demantblitzen Durch der Lichte Duftgewebe, Und viel holde Engelsknaben Streuen Lilien um die Sterne. Schn und hehr ist wohl der Himmel In des Abends Wunderglanze, Aber meines Lebens Sterne Wohnen in dem kleinsten Kreise: In das Auge meiner Silli Sind sie alle hingezaubert.
JOHANN GOTTFRIED KUMPF ERMIN (17811862)

The heavens smile, pure and kindly, upon the dark earth below; a thousand golden eyes shine fondly into mens hearts, and the moons bright disc sails serenely through the blue. On the golden beams tremble the silver drops of sweet melancholy; gently, with soft breath, they penetrate the silent, loving heart and moisten my eyes with the tender dew of longing. The evening star sparkles resplendently in the light-strewn expanses of space, and with diamond flashes plays through the hazy web of light; and many a sweet cherub strews lilies around the stars. Fair and exalted are the heavens in the wondrous light of evening; but the stars of my life dwell within the smallest circle: they have all been charmed into the eyes of my Silli.

Disc 4 Geistes-Gruss A spirits greeting Track bq Third version, D142. 1815 or 1816; first published in 1985 in the Neue Schubert Ausgabe, Kassel
sung by Michael George

Hoch auf dem alten Turme steht Des Helden edler Geist, Der, wie das Schiff vorber geht, Es wohl zu fahren heisst. Sieh, diese Senne war so stark, Dies Herz so fest und wild, Die Knochen voll von Rittermark, Der Becher angefllt; Mein halbes Leben strmt ich fort, Verdehnt die Hlft in Ruh, Und du, du Menschenschifflein dort, Fahr immer, immer zu!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

High on the ancient tower stands the heros noble spirit; as the ship passes he bids it a safe voyage. See, these sinews were so strong, this heart so steadfast and bold, these bones full of knightly valour; my cup was overflowing. Half my life I sallied forth, half I spent in tranquillity; and you, little boat of mankind, sail ever onward!

Disc 4 Geistes-Gruss A spirits greeting Track br Sixth version, D142. 1815 or 1816; published by M J Leidesdorf in Vienna in 1828 as Op 87 (later Op 92)
sung by Michael George

see above, disc 4 track bq , for text and translation Disc 4 Gengsamkeit Simple needs Track bs D143. 1815; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in July 1829 as Op posth 109 No 2
sung by Catherine Wyn-Rogers

Dort raget ein Berg aus den Wolken her, Ihn erreicht wohl mein eilender Schritt. Doch ragen neue und immer mehr, Fort, da mich der Drang noch durchglht.

There a mountain rises nobly above the clouds; my rapid steps approach it. But new peaks, more and more, tower up as I am inspired to press onwards.

40

1815 SONG TEXTS


Es treibt ihn vom schwebenden Rosenlicht Aus dem ruhigen heitern Azur. Und endlich warens die Berge nicht Es war seine Sehnsucht nur. Doch nun wird es ringsum d und flach, Und doch kann er nimmer zurck. O Gtter, gebt mir ein Httendach Im Tal und ein friedliches Glck!
FRANZ VON SCHOBER (17981882)

He is urged on by the shimmering rosy light from the calm, serene azure. But in the end there were no mountains; it was only his longing. All around it is desolate and flat, and yet he can never turn back. Gods, give me a hut in the valley, and tranquil good fortune!

Der Snger
Was hr ich draussen vor dem Tor, Was auf der Brcke schallen? Lass den Gesang vor unserm Ohr Im Saale widerhallen! Der Knig sprachs, der Page lief, Der Page kam, der Konig rief: Lasst mir herein den Alten! Gegrsset seid mir, edle Herrn, Gegrsst ihr schnen Damen! Welch reicher Himmel! Stern bei Stern! Wer kennet ihre Namen? Im Saal voll Pracht und Herrlichkeit Schliesst, Augen, euch, hier ist nicht Zeit, Sich staunend zu ergtzen. Der Snger druckt die Augen ein Und schlug in vollen Tnen; Die Ritter schauten mutig drein, Und in den Schoss die Schnen. Der Knig, dem es wohlgefiel, Liess, ihn zu ehren fr sein Spiel, Eine goldne Kette holen. Die goldne Kette gib mir nicht, Die Kette gib den Rittern, Vor deren khnem Angesicht Der Feinde Lanzen splittern. Gib sie dem Kanzler, den du hast, Und lass ihn noch die goldne Last Zu andern Lasten tragen. Ich singe, wie der Vogel singt, Der in den Zweigen wohnet; Das Lied, das aus der Kehle dringt, Ist Lohn, der reichlich lohnet. Doch darf ich bitten, bitt ich eins: Lass mir den besten Becher Weins In purem Golde reichen. Er setzt ihn an, er trank ihn aus: O Trank voll ssser Labe! O, wohl dem hochbeglckten Haus, Wo das ist kleine Gabe! Ergehts euch wohl, so denkt an mich Und danket Gott so warm, als ich Fr diesen Trunk euch danke.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832) END OF DISC 4

The minstrel
What do I hear outside the gate, what sounds are those on the bridge? Let that gong echo in our ears throughout the hall! Thus spake the king, the page ran out; the page returned, the king cried: Let the old man enter! Greetings, noble lords, greetings, fair ladies! How rich is this galaxy! Star upon star! Who can know their names? In this hall of pomp and splendour close, eyes; now is not the time to feast yourselves in wonder. The minstrel closed his eyes and sang in resonant tones; resolutely the knights looked on, while the fair ladies looked down into their laps. The king, well pleased with the song, sent for a gold chain to reward him for his singing. Do not give the golden chain to me but to your knights, before whose bold countenance enemy lances shatter. Give it to your chancellor and let him bear its golden burden with his other burdens. I sing as the bird sings who lives among the branches; the song that pours from my throat is its own rich reward. But if I may, I will ask one thing: bring me your best wine in a chalice of pure gold. He raised it to his lips and drained it: O draught of sweet refreshment! Happy the blessed house where that is but a trifling gift! If you fare well, think of me, and thank God as warmly as I thank you for this drink.

4 Disc
bt Track

D149. 1815; published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 117 sung by Martyn Hill

41

SONG TEXTS January 1815


Disc 5 Der Liedler The minstrel Track 1 D209. January 1815; published by Cappi & Co in Vienna in 1825 as Op 38
sung by Philip Langridge

Gib, Schwester, mir die Harf herab, Gib mir Biret und Wanderstab, Kann hier nicht frder weilen! Bin ahnenlos, bin nur ein Knecht, Bin fr die edle Maid zu schlecht, Muss stracks von hinnen eilen. Still, Schwester, bist gottlob nun Braut, Wirst morgen Wilhelm angetraut, Soll mich nichts weiter halten. Nun ksse mich, leb, Trude, wohl! Dies Herze, schmerz- und liebevoll, Lass Gott den Herrn bewalten. Der Liedler zog durch manches Land Am alten Rhein- und Donaustrand, Wohl ber Berg und Flsse. Wie weit er flieht, wohin er zieht, Er trgt den Wurm im Herzen mit Und singt nur sie, die Ssse. Und ers nicht lnger tragen kann, Tt sich mit Schwert und Panzer an, Den Tod sich zu erstreiten. Im Tod ist Ruh, im Grab ist Ruh, Das Grab deckt Herz und Wnsche zu; Ein Grab will er erreiten. Der Tod ihn floh, und Ruh ihn floh! Des Herzogs Banner flattert froh Der Heimat Gruss entgegen, Entgegen wallt, entgegen schallt Der Freunde Gruss durch Saat und Wald Auf allen Weg und Stegen. Da ward ihm unterm Panzer weh! Im Frhrot glht der ferne Schnee Der heimischen Gebirge; Ihm war, als zgs mit Hnenkraft Dahin sein Herz, Der Brust entrafft, Als obs ihn hier erwrge. Da konnt ers frder nicht bestehn: Muss meine Heimat wiedersehn, Muss sie noch einmal schauen! Die mit der Minne Rosenhand Sein Herz an jene Berge band, Die herrlichen, die blauen! Da warf er Wehr und Waffe weg. Sein Rstzeug weg ins Dorngeheg; Die liederreichen Saiten, Die Harfe nur, der Sssen Ruhm, Sein Klagepsalm, sein Heiligtum, Soll ihn zurckbegleiten. Und als der Winter trat ins Land, Der Frost im Lauf die Strme band, Betrat er seine Berge. Da lags, ein Leichentuch von Eis, Lags vorn und neben totenweiss, Wie tausend Hnensrge!

Sister, pass down my harp, hand me my hat and staff, I can no longer tarry here. I am but a servant, without forebears, I am too humble for the noble maiden and must at once hasten from here. Be calm, sister, you are now, praise God, a bride. Tomorrow you will wed Wilhelm. There is nothing more to keep me here. So kiss me, Trude, farewell! This heart of mine, so full of pain and love let the Lord God guide it. The minstrel travelled through many a land, on the banks of the old Rhine and Danube, across mountains and rivers. However far he journeyed, wherever he wandered, he carried the worm in his heart, and sang only of her, his sweet love. And when he could bear it no longer he girded on sword and armour, to seek death in battle. In death is peace, in the grave is peace; the grave buries the heart and its desires. On horseback he sought a grave. Death eluded him; peace eluded him! The Dukes banner gaily waved a greeting from the homeland; his friends greetings resounded through field and wood, on every road and bridge. Then he grew melancholy in his armour. The distant snow on his native mountains glistened in the dawn. It seemed as if, with titanic force, his heart were being drawn there, wrenched from his breast; it was as if he were suffocating here. Then he could no longer resist: I must see my homeland again, I must behold it once more! With the rosy hand of love it bound his heart to those mountains, blue and glorious! He threw away his weapons, cast his armour into the thorny hedge; his melodious strings, his harp, his sweethearts eulogy, his threnody and his sacred hymn his harp alone would accompany him home. When winter came to the country, and frost congealed the flowing rivers, he reached his mountains. There lay his homeland, a shroud of ice, deathly white all around, like a thousand Titans coffins!

42

January February 1815 SONG TEXTS


Lags unter ihm, sein Muttertal, Das grflich Schloss im Abendstrahl, Wo Milla drin geborgen. Glck auf, der Alpe Pilgerruh Winkt heute Ruh dir rmster zu; Zur Feste, Liedler, morgen! Ich hab nicht Rast, ich hab nicht Ruh, Muss heute noch der Feste zu, Wo Milla drin geborgen. Bist starr, bist blass! Bin totenkrank, Heut ist noch mein! Tot, Gott sei Dank, Tot findt mich wohl der Morgen. Horch Maulgetrab, horch Schellenklang! Vom Schloss herab der Alpentlang Zogs unter Fackelhelle. Ein Ritter fhrt ihm angetraut, Fhrt Milla heim als seine Braut. Bist Liedler schon zur Stelle! Der Liedler schaut und sank in sich. Da bricht und schnaubet wtiglich Ein Werwolf durchs Gehege, Die Maule fliehn, kein Saum sie zwingt, Der Schecke strzt. Weh! Milla sinkt Ohnmchtig hin am Wege. Da riss er sich, ein Blitz, empor, Zum Hort der Heissgeminnten vor, Hoch auf des Untiers Nacken Schwang er sein teures Harfenspiel, Dass es zersplittert niederfiel, Und Nick und Rachen knacken. Und wenn er stark wie Simson wr, Erschpft mag er und sonder Wehr Den Grimmen nicht bestehen. Vom Busen, vom zerfleischten Arm Quillts Herzblut nieder, liebewarm, Schier denkt er zu vergehen. Ein Blick auf sie, und alle Kraft Mit einmal er zusammenrafft, Die noch verborgen schliefe! Ringt um den Werwolf Arm und Hand, Und strzt sich von der Felsenwand Mit ihm in schwindle Tiefe. Fahr, Liedler, fahr auf ewig wohl! Dein Herze schmerz- und liebevoll Hat Ruh im Grab gefunden! Das Grab ist aller Pilger Ruh, Das Grab deckt Herz und Wnsche zu, Macht alles Leids gesunden.
JOSEF KENNER (17941868)

Beneath him lay his native valley, and, in the suns dying rays, the Counts castle in which Milla was sheltered. Good luck! The Alpine pilgrims rest bids you pause today, poor boy; tomorrow, minstrel, to the castle. I know no peace, I know no repose; this very day I must reach the castle where Milla is sheltered. You are frozen, you are pale. I am sick unto death, today is still mine! Death, thank the Lord, death will strike me tomorrow! Hark mules hooves, hark the jingling of bells! Down from the castle, along the mountainside rode a torchlit procession. A knight led his bride, led Milla home as his wife. You are already here, minstrel! The minstrel watched, overcome with gloom. But then a werewolf broke through the wood, snorting with rage. The mules fled from the path; the dappled pony fell. Alas! Milla fainted by the wayside. Like lightning, he leapt forward to his beloveds aid. High against the monsters neck he hurled his cherished harp, so that it shattered and fell to the ground. But the monsters neck and jaw were crushed. Had he been as strong as Samson he could not, exhausted and unarmed, have resisted the raging beast. From his breast, from his lacerated arm, his hearts blood gushed down, hot with love; he thought he was near to death. One glance at her, and at once he summoned all the strength which lay hidden within him. He gripped the werewolf with arms and hands, and plunged with it from the rock face into the giddy depths. Farewell, minstrel, farewell for ever! Your heart, so full of pain and love, has found rest in the grave! The grave brings rest to all pilgrims; the grave buries the heart and its desires, and heals all sorrows.

Trinklied
Brder! unser Erdenwallen Ist ein ewges Steigen, Fallen, Bald hinauf, und bald hinab; In dem drngenden Gewhle Giebts der Gruben gar so viele, Und die letzte ist das Grab.

Drinking song
Brothers, our earthly wandering is eternal climbing and falling, now up, now down. Amid lifes teeming throng there are so many hollows, and the last one is the grave.

5 Disc
2 Track

D148. February 1815; first published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1830 as Op posth 130 No 2 (later Op 131) sung by Jamie MacDougall, with John Mark Ainsley, Simon Keenlyside and Michael George

43

SONG TEXTS February 1815


Darum, Brder! schenket ein, Muss es schon gesunken sein, Sinken wir berauscht vom Wein.
IGNAZ FRANZ CASTELLI (17811862)

So, brothers, fill your glasses. If were to go under soon, lets go under intoxicated by wine.

Disc 5 Auf einen Kirchhof To a churchyard Track 3 D151. 2 February 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna c1850 in volume 49 of the Nachlass
sung by Martyn Hill

Sei gegrsst, geweihte Stille Die mir sanfte Trauer weckt Wo Natur die bunte Hlle Freundlich ber Grber deckt. Leicht von Wolkenduft getragen Senkt die Sonne ihren Lauf Aus der finstern Erde schlagen Glhend rote Flammen auf! Ach, auch ihr, erstarrte Brder Habet sinkend ihn vollbracht; Sankt ihr auch so herrlich nieder In des Grabes Schauernacht? Schlummert sanft, ihr kalten Herzen In der dstern langen Ruh, Eure Wunden, eure Schmerzen Decket mild die Erde zu! Neu zerstren, neu erschaffen Treibt das Rad der Weltenuhr. Krfte, die am Fels erschlaffen Blhen wieder auf der Flur. Und auch du, geliebte Hlle, Sinkest zuckend einst hinab Und erblhst in schner Flle Neu, ein Blmchen auf dem Grab. Wankst, ein Flmmchen durch die Grfte Irrest flimmernd durch dies Moor; Schwingst, ein Strahl, dich durch die Lfte, Klingest hell, ein Ton, empor! Aber du, das in mir lebet, Wirst auch du des Wurmes Raub? Was entzckend mich erhebet, Bist auch du nur eitel Staub? Nein! Was ich im Innern fhle, Was entzckend mich erhebt Ist der Gottheit reine Hlle Ist ihr Hauch, der in mir lebt.
FRANZ XAVER VON SCHLECHTA (17961875)

I greet you, holy stillness, which awakens within me gentle sorrow, where kindly nature drapes her bright mantle over graves. Lightly borne by hazy clouds the sun sinks in its course. From the dark earth glowing red flames leap up! Ah, you too, lifeless brothers, have sunk down to fulfil your course; did you, too, sink so gloriously into the dread night of the grave? Slumber softly, cold hearts, in your long, sombre peace; your wounds, your pain, are gently covered by the earth! To destroy and to create anew the wheel of the worlds clock drives on; forces that languish in the rock blossom again in the meadows. And you too, beloved mortal frame, will one day sink down, quivering, and blossom anew in glorious fullness, as a flower on the grave. You will waver, as a flame through the graves. You will flicker, lost across this moor; as a shaft of light, you will pierce the air, as a resonant tone, you will soar upwards. But you, who live within me, will you, too, fall prey to the worm? You who exalt and delight me, are you, too, but vain dust? No! What I feel deep inside me, that exalts and delights me is the pure spirit of the Godhead, is his breath, which lives within me.

Disc 5 Minona oder die Kunde der Dogge Minona, or the mastiffs tidings Track 4 D152. 8 February 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Elly Ameling

Wie treiben die Wolken so finster und schwer ber die liebliche Leuchte daher! Wie rasseln die Tropfen auf Fenster und Dach! Wie treibets da draussen so wtig und jach, Als trieben sich Geister in Schlachten! Und Wunder! Wie pltzlich die Kmpfenden ruhn, Als bannten jetzt Grber ihr Treiben und Tun! Und ber die Haide, und ber den Wald Wie weht es so de, wie weht es so kalt! So schaurig vom schimmernden Felsen!

How the clouds, so dark and heavy, scud across the sweet sun! How the raindrops rattle on window and roof! How furious is the storm out there, as if spirits were locked in battle. And strange to tell! How suddenly the combatants cease, as if the grave now put an end to their conflict! And over the heath and the forest how desolate, how cold is the wind, blowing eerily from the shimmering rock!

44

February 1815 SONG TEXTS


O Edgar! wo schwirret dein Bogengeschoss? Wo flattert dein Haarbusch? wo tummelt dein Ross? Wo schnauben die schwrzlichen Doggen um dich? Wo sphst du am Felsen Beute fr mich? Dein harret das liebende Mdchen! Dein harret, o Jngling! im jeglichen Laut, Dein harret so schmachtend die zagende Braut; Es dnkt ihr zerrissen das liebliche Band, Es dnkt ihr so blutig das Jgergewand Wohl minnen die Toten uns nimmer! Noch hallet den moosigen Hgel entlang Wie Harfengelispel ihr Minnegesang. Was frommt es? Schon blicken die Sterne der Nacht Hinunter zum Bette von Erde gemacht, Wo eisern die Minnenden schlafen! So klagt sie; und leise tappts draussen umher, Es winselt so innig, so schaudernd und schwer; Es fasst sie Ensetzen, sie wanket zur Tr, Bald schmiegt sich die schnste der Doggen vor ihr, Der Liebling des harrenden Mdchens; Nicht, wie sie noch gestern mit kosendem Drang, Ein Bote des Lieben, zum Busen ihr sprang Kaum hebt sie vom Boden den trauernden Blick, Schleicht nieder zum Pfrtchen, und kehret zurck, Die schreckliche Kunde zu deuten. Minona folgt schweigend mit bleichem Gesicht, Als ruft es die Arme vors hohe Gericht Es leuchtet so dster der nchtliche Strahl Sie folgt ihr durch Moore, durch Haiden und Tal Zum Fusse des schimmernden Felsen. Wo weilet, o schimmernder Felsen, der Tod? Wo schlummert der Schlfer, vom Blute noch rot? Wohl war es zerrissen das liebliche Band, Wohl hatt ihm, geschleudert von tckischer Hand, Ein Mordpfeil den Busen durchschnitten. Und als sie nun nahet mit ngstlichem Schrei, Gewahrt sie den Bogen des Vaters dabei. O Vater, o Vater, verzeih es dir Gott! Wohl hast du mir heute mit frevelndem Spott So schrecklich den Druschwur erfllet! Doch soll ich zermalmet von hinnen nun gehn? Er schlft ja so lockend, so wonnig, so schn! Geknpft ist auf ewig das eherne Band; Und Geister der Vter im Nebelgewand Ergreifen die silbernen Harfen. Und pltzlich entreisst sie mit sehnender Eil Der Wunde des Lieben den ttenden Pfeil; Und stsst ihn, ergriffen von innigem Weh, Mit Hast in den Busen so blendend als Schnee, Und sinkt am schimmernden Felsen.
FRIEDRICH ANTON FRANZ BERTRAND (17871830)

O Edgar! Where is your whirring arrow? Where is your flowing mane of hair? Where is your steed? Where are the black mastiffs romping around you? Where among the rocks are you seeking game for me? Your loving maiden awaits you! Your anxious bride awaits you, young man, with every sound; she awaits you with such yearning. She imagines the bonds of love broken, she imagines your huntsmans clothes covered with blood. For the dead never love us! Their love song echoes like whispering harps over the mossy hillside. To what avail? Already the night stars gaze down upon the bed of earth where the lovers sleep unshakeably. Thus she laments; outside there is a soft tapping, and a low whine, urgent and fearful. Seized with horror she staggers to the door; the finest of the mastiffs, her favourite, nuzzles against the awaiting maiden. Not a messenger of love, as yesterday when it leapt at her breast with eager affection. It barely lifts its mournful eyes from the ground, creeps down to the door, and back again, to indicate its terrible tidings. Minona follows, pale-faced and silent, as if, poor girl, she were summoned before the high court. The night sky shines with sombre gleam. She follows the mastiff through bog, heath and valley to the foot of the shimmering rock. O shimmering rock, where does death lurk? Where does the sleeper slumber, still red with blood? The bonds of love were indeed broken: a fatal arrow, unleashed by an evil hand, had pierced his breast. And now, as she draws near with a fearful cry, she sees her fathers bow nearby. O father, father, may God forgive you! Today you have fulfilled your vow of vengeance so terribly, and with such cruel mockery! But am I now to leave here, crushed? He sleeps, so alluring, so happy, so handsome. The iron bond is tied for ever; in misty garments the spirits of our father strike the silver harps. And suddenly, with passionate haste, she rips the deathly arrow from her beloveds wound; overcome by intense grief, she plunges it swiftly into her breast, as dazzling white as snow, and sinks down upon the shimmering rock.

Als ich sie errten sah


All mein Wirken, all mein Leben Strebt nach dir, Verehrte, hin! Alle meine Sinne weben Mir dein Bild, o Zauberin!

When I saw her blush


All that I do, all that I am is for you, my adored one! All my senses weave an image of you, enchantress!

5 Disc
5 Track

D153. 10 February 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1845 in volume 39 of the Nachlass sung by Ian Bostridge

45

SONG TEXTS February 1815


Du entflammest meinen Busen Zu der Leier Harmonie, Du begeisterst mehr als Musen, Und entzckest mehr als sie. Ach, dein blaues Auge strahlet Durch den Sturm der Seele mild, Und dein ssses Lcheln mahlet Rosig mir der Zukunft Bild. Herrlich schmckt des Himmels Grnzen Zwar Auroras Purpurlicht, Aber lieblicheres Glnzen berdeckt dein Angesicht, Wenn mit wonnetrunknen Blicken Ach! und unaussprechlich schn, Meine Augen voll Entzcken Purpurn dich errten sehn.
BERNHARD AMBROS EHRLICH (?17651827)

You kindle within my heart the sweet sounds of the lyre; you inspire me more than the Muses, and, more than they, delight me! Your blue eyes shine tenderly through the tempest of the soul, and your sweet smile paints a rosy image of the future. Though the horizon is adorned by Auroras crimson glow, a still fairer radiance suffuses your countenance When, with ecstatic glances, my delighted eyes see the ineffable beauty of your crimson blush.

Disc 5 Das Bild The image Track 6 D155. 11 February 1815; first published by C A Spina in Vienna in 1852 as Op posth 165 No 3
sung by Jamie MacDougall

Ein Mdchen ists, das frh und spt Mir vor der Seele schwebet, Ein Mdchen, wie es steht und geht Aus Himmelsreiz gewebet. Ich sehs, wenn in mein Fenster mild Der junge Morgen blinket, Ich sehs, wenn lieblich wie das Bild Der Abendstern mir winket. Mir folgts, ein treuer Weggenoss, Zur Ruh und ins Getmmel; Ich fnd es in der Erde Schooss, Ich fnd es selbst im Himmel. Es schwebt vor mir in Feld und Wald, Prangt berm Blumenbeete, Und glnzt in Seraphims Gestalt Am Altar, wo ich bete. Allein das Bild, das spt und frh Mir vor der Seele schwebet, Ists nur Geschpf der Phantasie, Aus Luft und Traum gewebet? O nein, so warm auch Liebe mir Das Engelbildniss malet, Ists doch nur Schatten von der Zier, Die an dem Mdchen strahlet.
ANONYMOUS

Day and night I see a maiden in my minds eye; a maiden who stands and moves, woven from heavens charms. I see her when, through my window, the new morning shines gently; I see her when the evening star, as sweet as her image, beckons to me. She follows me, a faithful companion, through calm and turmoil; I would find her in the depths of the earth, or even in the sky. She hovers before me in the fields and the woods; she appears radiantly above the flower beds, and shines, in the form of a seraph, at the altar where I pray. But this image, which day and night hovers before my minds eye, is it only a figment of my imagination, woven from air and dreams? Oh no, fondly though my love paints this angelic vision, the vision is but a shadow of the beauty which irradiates the maiden.

Disc 5 Am Flusse By the river Track 7 First setting, D160. 27 February 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Martyn Hill

Verfliesset, vielgeliebte Lieder, Zum Meere der Vergessenheit! Kein Knabe sing entzckt euch wieder, Kein Mdchen in der Bltenzeit. Ihr sanget nur von meiner Lieben; Nun spricht sie meiner Treue Hohn. Ihr wart ins Wasser eingeschrieben; So fliesst denn auch mit ihm davon.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Flow away, beloved songs, into the sea of oblivion. No enraptured youth, no maiden in the springtime of life will you ever sing again. You told only of my beloved, now she pours scorn on my constancy. You were inscribed upon the water; then with the water flow away.

46

February 1815 SONG TEXTS An Mignon


ber Tal und Fluss getragen Ziehet rein der Sonne Wagen. Ach! sie regt in ihrem Lauf, So wie deine, meine Schmerzen, Tief im Herzen, Immer morgens wieder auf. Kaum will mir die Nacht noch frommen, Denn die Trume selber kommen Nun in trauriger Gestalt, Und ich fhle dieser Schmerzen, Still im Herzen, Heimlich bildende Gewalt.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

To Mignon
Borne over valley and river the suns pure chariot moves on. Ah, in its course it stirs your sorrows and mine, deep in our hearts, anew each morning. The night brings me scant comfort, for then my dreams themselves appear in mournful guise, and in my heart I feel the secret silent power of these sorrows grow.

5 Disc
8 Track

First version, D161. 27 February 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Christine Schfer

Nhe des Geliebten


Ich denke dein, wenn mir der Sonne Schimmer Vom Meere strahlt; Ich denke dein, wenn sich des Mondes Flimmer In Quellen malt. Ich sehe dich, wenn auf dem fernen Wege Der Staub sich hebt; In tiefer Nacht, wenn auf dem schmalen Stege Der Wandrer bebt. Ich hre dich, wenn dort mit dumpfem Rauschen Die Welle steigt. Im stillen Hain da geh ich oft zu lauschen, Wenn alles schweigt. Ich bin bei dir, du seist auch noch so ferne. Du bist mir nah! Die Sonne sinkt, bald leuchten mir die Sterne. O wrst du da!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Nearness of the beloved


I think of you when sunlight glints from the sea; I think of you when the moons glimmer is reflected in streams. I see you when, on distant roads, dust rises; in the depths of night, when on the narrow bridge the traveller trembles. I hear you when, with a dull roar, the waves surge up. I often go to listen in the tranquil grove when all is silent. I am with you, however far away you are. You are close to me! The sun sets, soon the stars will shine for me. Would that you were here!

5 Disc
9 Track

D162. 27 February 1815; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 5 No 2 sung by Dame Janet Baker

Sngers Morgenlied
Ssses Licht! Aus goldnen Pforten Brichst du siegend durch die Nacht. Schner Tag! Du bist erwacht. Mit geheimnisvollen Worten, In melodischen Akkorden Grss ich deine Rosenpracht! Ach! der Liebe sanftes Wehen Schwellt mir das bewegte Herz, Sanft, wie ein geliebter Schmerz. Drft ich nur auf goldnen Hhen Mich im Morgenduft ergehen! Sehnsucht zieht mich himmelwrts. Und der Seele khnes Streben Trgt im stolzen Riesenlauf Durch die Wolken mich hinauf. Doch mit sanftem Geisterbeben Dringt das Lied ins innre Leben, Lst den Sturm melodisch auf.

The minstrels morning song


Sweet light! Through golden portals you break victoriously through the night. Fairest day! You are awakened. With mysterious words and melodious strains I greet your roseate splendour! Ah, the soft breath of love swells my full heart, as softly as a beloved pain. If only I could wander on those golden heights in the fragrant morning! A yearning draws me heavenwards. And the souls bold striving draws me upwards through the clouds in its proud giants course. But with a soft, magical quivering the song penetrates the inner life, and with its melodies dispels the storm.

5 Disc
bl Track

First setting, D163. 27 February 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Philip Langridge

47

SONG TEXTS February March 1815


Vor den Augen wird es helle; Freundlich auf der zarten Spur Weht der Einklang der Natur, Und begeistert rauscht die Quelle, Munter tanzt die flchtge Welle Durch des Morgens stille Flur.
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

It grows bright before my eyes; in harmony nature wafts tenderly upon its gentle course, and the stream murmurs excitedly; the fleeting waves dance merrily through the silent morning meadows.

Disc 5 An Mignon To Mignon Track bm Second version, D161. 1815; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1821 as Op 19 No 2
sung by Martyn Hill

ber Tal und Fluss getragen Ziehet rein der Sonne Wagen. Ach! sie regt in ihrem Lauf, So wie deine, meine Schmerzen, Tief im Herzen, Immer morgens wieder auf. Kaum will mir die Nacht noch frommen, Denn die Trume selber kommen Nun in trauriger Gestalt, Und ich fhle dieser Schmerzen, Still im Herzen, Heimlich bildende Gewalt. Schon seit manchen schnen Jahren Seh ich unten Schiffe fahren; Jedes kommt an seinen Ort; Aber ach! die steten Schmerzen, Fest im Herzen, Schwimmen nicht im Strome fort. Schn in Kleidern muss ich kommen, Aus dem Schrank sind sie genommen, Weil es heute Festtag ist; Niemand ahnet, dass von Schmerzen Herz im Herzen Grimmig mir zerrissen ist. Heimlich muss ich immer weinen, Aber freundlich kann ich scheinen Und sogar gesund und rot; Wren tdlich diese Schmerzen Meinem Herzen, Ach! schon lange wr ich tot.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Borne over valley and river the suns pure chariot moves on. Ah, in its course it stirs your sorrows and mine, deep in our hearts, anew each morning. The night brings me scant comfort, for then my dreams themselves appear in mournful guise, and in my heart I feel the secret silent power of these sorrows grow. For many a long year I have watched the ships sail below. Each one reaches its destination; but alas, the sorrows that forever cling to my heart do not flow away in the torrent. I must come in fine clothes; they are taken from the closet because today is a holiday. No one guesses that in my heart of hearts I am racked by savage pain. Always I must weep in secret, yet I can appear happy, even glowing and healthy. If these sorrows could be fatal to my heart, ah, I would have died long ago.

Disc 5 Liebesrausch Loves intoxication Track bn First setting, fragment, D164. March 1815; completed by Reinhard van Hoorickx; facsimile of autograph first published in 1928
sung by Ian Bostridge

Dir, Mdchen, schlgt mit leisem Beben Mein Herz voll Treu und Liebe zu. In dir, in dir versinkt mein Streben, Mein schnstes Ziel bist du! Dein Name nur in heilgen Tnen Hat meine khne Brust gefllt; Im glanz des Guten und des Schnen Strahlt mir dein hohes Bild. Die Liebe sprosst aus zarten Keimen, Und ihre Blten welken nie! Du, Mdchen, lebst in meinen Trumen Mit ssser Harmonie. Begeistrung rauscht auf mich hernieder, Khn greif ich in die Saiten ein, Und alle meine schnsten Lieder, Sie nennen dich allein.

For you, maiden, my heart beats, gently trembling, filled with love and devotion. In you, in you, my striving ceases; you are my lifes fairest goal. Your name alone has filled my bold heart with sacred tones. In the radiance of goodness and beauty your noble image shines for me. Love burgeons from tender seeds, and its blossoms never wither. You, maiden, live in my dreams with sweet harmonies. I am fired with the rapture of inspiration; boldly I pluck the strings, and all my loveliest songs utter your name alone.

48

March 1815 SONG TEXTS


Mein Himmel glht in deinen Blicken, An deiner Brust mein Paradies. Ach! alle Reize, die dich schmcken, Sie sind so hold, so sss. Es wogt die Brust in Freud und Schmerzen, Nur eine Sehnsucht lebt in mir, Nur ein Gedanke hier im Herzen: Der ewge Drang nach dir.
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

My heaven glows in your eyes; my paradise is upon your breast. Ah, all the charms that adorn you are so fair, so sweet. My breast surges with joy and pain; one desire alone dwells within me, one thought alone lies here in my heart: eternal yearning for you!

Sngers Morgenlied
Ssses Licht! Aus goldnen Pforten Brichst du siegend durch die Nacht. Schner Tag! Du bist erwacht. Mit geheimnisvollen Worten, In melodischen Akkorden Grss ich deine Rosenpracht! Und von ssser Lust durchdrungen Webt sich zarte Harmonie Durch des Lebens Poesie. Was die Seele tief durchklungen, Was berauscht der Mund gesungen, Glht in hoher Melodie. Des Gesanges muntern Shnen Weicht im Leben jeder Schmerz, Und nur Liebe schwellt ihr Herz. In des Liedes Heilgen Tnen Und im Morgenglanz des Schnen Fliegt die Seele himmelwrts.
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

The minstrels morning song


Sweet light! Through golden portals you break victoriously through the night. Fairest day! You are awakened. With mysterious words, and melodious strains I greet your roseate splendour! Filled with sweet joy, tender harmonies weave through the poetry of life. The tones that deeply pierced the soul, that were sung by enraptured lips, glow in sublime melody. Every sorrow in this life fades before the cheerful sons of song; love alone swells their hearts. The soul soars heavenwards amid the songs holy strains and beautys morning radiance.

5 Disc
bo Track

Second setting, D165. 1 March 1815; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Philip Langridge

Amphiaraos
Vor Thebens siebenfach ghnenden Toren Lag im furchtbaren Brderstreit Das Heer der Frsten zum Schlagen bereit, Im heiligen Eide zum Morde verschworen. Und mit des Panzers blendendem Licht Gerstet, als glt es, die Welt zu bekriegen, Trumen sie jauchzend von Kmpfen und Siegen, Nur Amphiaraos, der Herrliche, nicht. Denn er liest in dem ewigen Kreise der Sterne, Wen die kommenden Stunden feindlich bedrohn. Des Sonnenlenkers gewaltiger Sohn Sieht klar in der Zukunft nebelnde Ferne. Er kennt des Schicksals verderblichen Bund Er weiss, wie die Wrfel, die eisernen, fallen, Er sieht die Mira mit blutigen Krallen; Doch die Helden verschmhen den heiligen Mund. Er sah des Mordes gewaltsame Taten, Er wusste, was ihm die Parze spann. So ging er zum Kampf, ein verlorner Mann, Von dem eignen Weibe schmhlich verraten. Er war sich der himmlischen Flamme bewusst, Die heiss die krftige Seele durchglhte; Der Stolze nannte sich Apolloide, Es schlug ihm ein gttliches Herz in der Brust.

Amphiaraos
Outside Thebes seven gaping gates lay, in grim fraternal strife, the princes armies, ready for battle, and pledged to murder in sacred oath. Clad in dazzling armour, as if intent on conquering the world, they dream joyfully of battle and victory. All but the noble Amphiaraos. For in the eternal course of stars he reads whom the coming hours threaten with a hostile fate. The mighty offspring of the suns master sees clearly into the mists of the distant future. He understands destinys pernicious bond; he knows how the iron dice fall; he beholds Fate with her bloody claws; yet the heroes scorn his sacred words. He saw monstrous deeds of murder; he knew what Fate was spinning for him. Thus he went to battle, a man doomed, shamefully betrayed by his own wife. He was aware of the heavenly flame which burned fiercely through his great soul; the proud man called himself the son of Apollo; a godlike heart beat in his breast.

5 Disc
bp Track

D166. 1 March 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Thomas Hampson

49

SONG TEXTS March 1815


Wie? ich, zu dem die Gtter geredet, Den der Wahrheit heilige Dfte umwehn, Ich soll in gemeiner Schlacht vergehn, Von Periklymenos Hand gettet? Verderben will ich durch eigene Macht, Und staunend vernehm es die kommende Stunde Aus knftiger Snger geheiligtem Munde, Wie ich khn mich gestrzt in die ewige Nacht. Und als der blutige Kampf begonnen, Und die Ebne vom Mordgeschrei widerhallt, So ruft er verzweifelnd: Es naht mit Gewalt, Was mir die untrgliche Parze gesponnen. Doch wogt in der Brust mir ein gttliches Blut, Drum will ich auch wert des Erzeugers verderben. Und wandte die Rosse auf Leben und Sterben, Und jagt zu des Stromes hochbrausender Flut. Wild schnauben die Rosse, laut rasselt der Wagen, Das Stampfen der Hufe zermalmet die Bahn. Und schneller und schneller noch rast es heran, Als glt es, die flchtige Zeit zu erjagen. Wie wenn er die Leuchte des Himmel geraubt, Kommt er in Wirbeln der Windsbraut geflogen; Erschrocken heben die Gtter der Wogen Aus schumenden Fluten das schilfichte Haupt. Und pltzlich, als wenn der Himmel erglhte, Strzt ein Blitz aus der heitern Luft, Und die Erde zerreisst sich zur furchtbaren Kluft; Da rief laut jauchzend der Apolloide: Dank dir, Gewaltiger! fest steht mir der Bund. Dein Blitz ist mir der Unsterblichkeit Siegel; Ich folge dir, Zeus! und er fasste die Zgel Und jagte die Rosse hinab in den Schlund.
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

What? I, whom the gods have addressed, bathed in the holy scent of truth, am to perish in mean battle, slain by Periclymenos hand? I wish to die by the power of my own hand. Future ages will hear, amazed, from the sacred lips of minstrels how I plunged boldly into eternal night. And when the bloody fight commenced, and the plain echoed with murderous cries, he called in despair: What unerring Fate has spun for me now approaches with mighty force. But divine blood flows in my breast, thus will my death be worthy of my progenitor. And he turned his horses, for life or for death, and sped to the rivers surging flood. The stallions snort fiercely, the chariot rattles loudly, stamping hooves pound the track. Faster and faster they approach, as if striving to catch fleeting Time itself. As if he had stolen the torch of heaven he rushes onwards in a seething whirlwind. Horrified, the gods of the waves raise their reed-covered heads from the foaming floods. But suddenly, as if the heavens were ablaze, a thunderbolt falls from the clear air, the earth is ripped open, a terrifying chasm appears. Then, in jubilation, the son of Apollo cried aloud: I thank you, mighty one! My covenant stands firm. Your thunderbolt is my seal of immortality. I follow you, Zeus! And he seized the reins and spurred his horses down into the abyss.

Disc 5 Nun lasst uns den Leib begraben Let us now bury the body Track bq D168. 9 March 1815; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by Patricia Rozario, Catherine Denley, Ian Bostridge and Michael George

Begrabt den Leib in seiner Gruft, Bis ihn des Richters Stimme ruft. Wir sen ihn, einst blht er auf, Und steigt verklrt zu Gott hinauf. Grabt mein verwesliches Gebein, O ihr noch Sterblichen nur ein, Es bleibt, es bleibt im Grabe nicht, Denn Jesus kommt und hlt Gericht. Ach, Gott, Geopferter! Dein Tod Strk uns in unsrer letzten Noth, Lass unsre ganze Seele dein, Und freudig unser Ende sein.
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803) adapted from the hymn Nun lasst uns den Leib begraben

Bury the body in its grave until the voice of the Supreme Judge summons it; we sow it; one day it will blossom forth, and rise up, transfigured, to God. Bury my decaying bones, you who have yet to die; they will not remain in the grave, for Jesus will come, and pronounce judgment. O Lord, whose life was sacrificed! May your death strengthen us in our last agony; may our soul be wholly yours, and our end be joyful!

Disc 5 Osterlied Jesus Christus unser Heiland Easter song Jesus Christ our saviour Track br D168a. 9 March 1815; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by Patricia Rozario, Catherine Denley, Ian Bostridge and Michael George

berwunden hat der Herr den Tod! Des Menschen Sohn und Gott ist auferstanden, Ein Sieger auferstanden. Halleluja!
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

The Lord has vanquished death! The son and God of man is arisen, arisen and victorious. Alleluja!

50

March 1815 SONG TEXTS Trinklied vor der Schlacht


Schlacht, du brichst an! Grsst sie in freudigem Kreise, Laut nach germanischer Weise. Brder, heran! Noch perlt der Wein; Eh die Posaunen erdrhnen, Lasst uns das Leben vershnen. Brder, schenkt ein! Schlacht ruft! Hinaus! Horch, die Trompeten werben. Vorwrts, auf Leben und Sterben! Brder, trinkt aus!
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

Drinking song before battle


The battle commences! Greet it in joyful company, heartily, in true German style. Come, brothers! The wine still sparkles; before the trumpets resound let us appease life. Brothers, fill your glasses! The battle calls! Away! Hark, the trumpet enlists us. Forward march for life or death! Brothers, drink up!

5 Disc
bs Track

D169. 9 March 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by The London Schubert Chorale (directed by Stephen Layton)

Schwertlied
Du Schwert an meiner Linken, Was soll dein heitres Blinken? Schaust mich so freundlich an, Hab meine Freude dran. Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! Mich trgt ein wackrer Reiter, Drum blink ich auch so heiter, Bin freien Mannes Wehr, Das freut dem Schwerte sehr. Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! Nun lasst das Liebchen singen, Dass helle Funken springen! Der Hochzeitmorgen graut Hurrah, du Eisenbraut! Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah!
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

Song of the sword


Sword at my left side, why do you shine so brightly? Your friendly gaze brings me joy. Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! I am worn by a valiant knight, that is why I shine so brightly. I defend a free man, which is a swords great joy. Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! Now let my beloved sing so that bright sparks fly! The wedding morning dawns; hurrah, you bride of iron! Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah!

5 Disc
bt Track

D170. 12 March 1815; first published in Reismanns Schubert biography in Berlin in 1873 sung by John Mark Ainsley and The London Schubert Chorale (directed by Stephen Layton)

Gebet whrend der Schlacht

Prayer during battle

5 Disc
bu Track

D171. 12 March 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1831 in volume 10 of the Nachlass cf Weber Gebet whrend der Schlacht, disc 39 cs sung by Simon Keenlyside

Vater, ich rufe dich! Brllend umwlkt mich der Dampf der Geschtze, Sprhend umzucken mich rasselnde Blitze. Lenker der Schlachten, ich rufe dich! Vater du, fhre mich! Vater du, fhre mich! Fhr mich zum Siege, fhr mich zum Tode: O Herr, ich erkenne deine Gebote; Herr, wie du willst, so fhre mich. Gott, ich erkenne dich! Gott, ich erkenne dich! So im herbstlichen Rauschen der Bltter, Als im Schlachtendonnerwetter, Urquell der Gnade, erkenn ich dich! Vater du, segne mich! Vater du, segne mich! In deine Hand befehl ich mein Leben, Du kannst es nehmen, du hast es gegeben; Zum Leben, zum Sterben segne mich! Vater, ich preise dich!

Father, I cry unto you! The smoke of roaring guns envelops me; explosive flashes dart all around me. Lord of battles, I cry unto you! Father, guide me! Father, guide me! Lead me to victory; lead me to death. Lord, I acknowledge your commands; lead me, Lord, where you will. God, I acknowledge you! God, I acknowledge you! In the autumnal rustling of leaves, as in the thunder of battle; source of grace, I acknowledge you! Father, grant me your blessing! Father, grant me your blessing! Into your hands I commend my life; you may take it, for you gave it. Whether for life or death, grant me your blessing! Father, I praise you!

51

SONG TEXTS March April 1815


Vater, ich preise dich! Sist ja kein Kampf fr die Gter der Erde; Das Heiligste schtzen wir mit dem Schwerte: Drum, fallend und siegend, preis ich dich! Gott, dir ergeb ich mich! Gott, dir ergeb ich mich! Wenn mich die Donner des Todes begrssen, Wenn meine Adern geffnet fliessen: Dir, mein Gott, dir ergeb ich mich! Vater, ich rufe dich!
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

Father, I praise you! This is no battle for the riches of this earth; with the sword we defend that which is most sacred; therefore, whether dying or victorious, I praise you. God, I surrender myself to you! God, I surrender myself to you! If the thunder of death greets me, if my open veins flow, to you, my God, I surrender myself! Father, I cry unto you!

Disc 5 Der Morgenstern The morning star Track cl D172. 12 March 1815; fragment completed by Reinhard van Hoorickx
sung by John Mark Ainsley

Stern der Liebe, Glanzgebilde, Glhend wie die Himmelsbraut Wanderst durch die Lichtgefilde, Kndend, dass der Morgen graut. Freundlich kommst du angezogen, Freundlich schwebst du himmelwrts, Glitzernd durch des thers Wogen, Strahlst du Hoffnung in das Herz.
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

Star of love, radiant image, glowing like the bride of heaven, you move through the field of light to herald the grey dawn. You come in kindly guise, kindly you hover in the heavens; twinkling through the ethers waves you light mens hearts with hope.

Disc 5 Das war ich That was I Track cm D174. 26 March 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1845 in volume 39 of the Nachlass
sung by Philip Langridge

Jngst trumte mir, ich sah auf lichten Hhen Ein Mdchen sich im jungen Tag ergehen, So hold, so sss, dass es dir vllig glich. Und vor ihr lag ein Jngling auf den Knien, Er schien sie sanft an seine Brust zu ziehen, Und das war ich. Doch bald verndert hatte sich die Szene, In tiefen Fluten sah ich jetzt die Schne, Wie ihr die letzte, schwache Kraft entwich, Da kam ein Jngling hlfreich ihr geflogen, Er sprang ihr nach und trug sie aus den Wogen, Und das war ich! So malte sich der Traum in bunten Zgen, Und berall sah ich die Liebe siegen, Und alles, alles drehte sich um dich! Du flogst voran in ungebundner Freie, Der Jngling zog dir nach mit stiller Treue, Und das war ich! Und als ich endlich aus dem Traum erwachte, Der neue Tag die neue Sehnsucht brachte, Da blieb dein liebes, ssses Bild um mich. Ich sah dich von der Ksse Glut erwarmen, Ich sah dich selig in des Jnglings Armen, Und das war ich!
THEODOR KRNER (17911813) END OF DISC 5

Recently I dreamt I saw on sunlit hills a maiden wandering in the early morning, so fair, so sweet, that she resembled you. Before her knelt a youth. He seemed to draw her gently to his breast; and that was I. But soon the scene had changed. I now saw that fair maiden in the deep flood; her frail strength was deserting her. Then a youth rushed to her aid; he plunged after her and bore her from the waves; And that was I. The dream was painted in bright colours; everywhere I saw love victorious, and everything was centred on you! You sailed on, free and unfettered. The faithful youth followed you, silently, and that was I. And when at length I awoke from my dream, the new day brought new longing. Your dear, sweet image was still with me. I saw you warmed by the fire of his kisses; I saw you blissful in that youths arms. And that was I.

Disc 6 Die Sterne The stars Track 1 D176. 6 April 1815; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by Dame Felicity Lott

52

Was funkelt ihr so mild mich an? Ihr Sterne, hold und hehr! Was treibet euch auf dunkler Bahn Im therblauen Meer?

Why do you sparkle so gently at me, you stars, so noble and so fair; what drives you on your dark course through the blue ocean of the ether?

April 1815 SONG TEXTS


Wie Gottes Augen schaut ihr dort, Aus Ost und West, aus Sd und Nord, So freundlich auf mich her. Und berall umblinkt ihr mich Mit sanftem Dmmerlicht, Die Sonne hebt im Morgen sich, Doch ihr verlasst mich nicht, Wenn kaum der Abend wieder graut So blickt ihr mir, so fromm und traut, Schon wieder ins Gesicht. O lchelt nur, o winket nur, Mir still zu euch hinan! Mich fhret Mutter Allnatur Nach ihrem grossen Plan; Mich kmmert nicht der Welten Fall, Wenn ich nur dort die Lieben all Vereinet finden kann.
JOHANN GEORG FELLINGER (17811816)

Like the eyes of God, from east and west, north and south, you gaze kindly down on me. Everywhere you bathe me in soft, dusky light. The run rises in the morning, but you never forsake me. Evening hardly darkens before you shine, so pure and tender, once more upon my face. O smile! O beckon me silently towards you! Mother Nature guides me according to her great plan; the end of the world does not trouble me, if only I can find all my loved ones united there.

Vergebliche Liebe
Ja, ich weiss es, diese treue Liebe Hegt unsonst mein wundes Herz! Wenn mir nur die kleinste Hoffnung bliebe, Reich belohnet wr mein Schmerz! Aber auch die Hoffnung ist vergebens, Kenn ich doch ihr grausam Spiel! Trotz der Treue meines Strebens Fliehet ewig mich das Ziel! Dennoch lieb ich, dennoch hoff ich, immer Ohne Liebe, ohne Hoffnung treu; Lassen kann ich diese Liebe nimmer! Mit ihr bricht das Herz entzwei!
JOSEF KARL BERNARD (17801850)

Futile love
Yes, I know, my wounded heart harbours this true love in vain. If only the slightest hope remained for me my sorrow would be richly rewarded. But even hope is in vain, for I know her cruel game! Despite my constant endeavour my goal forever eludes me! Yet I love, yet I hope unceasingly, faithful, even without love or hope; I can never forsake this love, yet with it my heart breaks in two!

6 Disc
2 Track

D177. 6 April 1815; first published by C A Spina in Vienna in 1867 as Op posth 173 No 3 sung by Martyn Hill

Liebesrausch
Dir, Mdchen, schlgt mit leisem Beben Mein Herz voll Treu und Liebe zu. In dir, in dir versinkt mein Streben, Mein schnstes Ziel bist du! Dein Name nur in heilgen Tnen Hat meine khne Brust gefllt; Im Glanz des Guten und des Schnen Strahlt mir dein hohes Bild. Die Liebe sprosst aus zarten Keimen, Und ihre Blten welken nie! Du, Mdchen, lebst in meinen Trumen Mit ssser Harmonie. Begeistrung rauscht auf mich hernieder, Khn greif ich in die Saiten ein, Und alle meine schnsten Lieder, Sie nennen dich allein. Mein Himmel glht in deinen Blicken, An deiner Brust mein Paradies. Ach! alle Reize, die dich schmcken, Sie sind so hold, so sss.

Loves intoxication
For you, maiden, my heart beats, gently trembling, filled with love and devotion. In you, in you, my striving ceases; you are my lifes fairest goal. Your name alone has filled my bold heart with sacred tones. In the radiance of goodness and beauty your noble image shines for me. Love burgeons from tender seeds, and its blossoms never wither. You, maiden, live in my dreams with sweet harmonies. I am fired with the rapture of inspiration; boldly I pluck the strings, and all my loveliest songs utter your name alone. My heaven glows in your eyes; my paradise is upon your breast. Ah, all the charms that adorn you are so fair, so sweet.

6 Disc
3 Track

Second setting, D179. 8 April 1815; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Philip Langridge

53

SONG TEXTS April 1815


Es wogt die Brust in Freud und Schmerzen, Nur eine Sehnsucht lebt in mir, Nur ein Gedanke hier im Herzen: Der ewge Drang nach dir.
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

My breast surges with joy and pain; one desire alone dwells within me, one thought alone lies here in my heart: eternal yearning for you!

Disc 6 Sehnsucht der Liebe Loves yearning Track 4 D180. 8 April 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Philip Langridge

Wie die Nacht mit heilgem Beben Auf der stillen Erde liegt! Wie sie sanft der Seele Streben, ppge Kraft und volles Leben In den sssen Schlummer wiegt! Aber mit ewig neuen Schmerzen Regt sich die Sehnsucht in meiner Brust. Schlummern auch alle Gefhle im Herzen, Schweigt in der Seele Qual und Lust: Sehnsucht der Liebe schlummert nie, Sehnsucht der Liebe wacht spt und frh. Tief, im sssen, heilgen Schweigen, Ruht die Welt und atmet kaum, Und die schnsten Bilder steigen Aus des Lebens buntem Reigen, Und lebendig wird der Traum. Aber auch in des Traumes Gestalten Winkt mir die Sehnsucht, die schmerzliche, zu, Und ohn Erbarmen, mit tiefen Gewalten, Strt sie das Herz aus der wonnigen Ruh. Sehnsucht der Liebe schlummert nie, Sehnsucht der Liebe wacht spt und frh. So entschwebt der Kreis der Horen Bis der Tag im Osten graut. Da erhebt sich, neugeboren, Aus des Morgens Rosenthoren, Glhend hell die Himmelsbraut. Aber die Sehnsucht nach dir im Herzen Ist mit dem Morgen nur strker erwacht; Ewig verjngen sich meine Schmerzen, Qulen den Tag und qulen die Nacht: Sehnsucht der Liebe schlummert nie, Sehnsucht der Liebe wacht spt und frh.
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

Lo, how with solemn trembling night lies over the silent world. How gently it lulls the soul, its strivings, its abundant strength and rich life, to sweet slumber! But with ever-new pain yearning stirs within my breast. Though all feeling slumbers in my heart, though anguish and pleasure are silent in my soul, loves yearning never slumbers; loves yearning lies awake early and late. In sweet, holy silence the world rests deeply, scarcely breathing; the loveliest images rise from the brightly-coloured dance of life, and dreams come alive. But even amid the images of dreams painful yearning beckons to me, and without pity, with violent force, it wrenches the heart from blissful rest. Loves yearning never slumbers; loves yearning lies awake early and late. Thus the circle of the hours floats by until day dawns in the east. Then, new-born, the bride of heaven arises radiant and glowing from the rosy portals of morning. But the yearning for you within my heart is only awakened more strongly with the morning; my sorrows are forever made young. They torment me night and day. Loves yearning never slumbers; loves yearning lies awake early and late.

Disc 6 Die erste Liebe First love Track 5 D182. 12 April 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1842 in volume 35 of the Nachlass
sung by John Mark Ainsley

Die erste Liebe fllt das Herz mit Sehnen Nach einem unbekannten Geisterlande, Die Seele gaukelt an dem Lebensrande, Und ssse Wehmut letztet sich in Trnen. Da wacht es auf, das Vorgefhl des Schnen, Du schaust die Gttin in dem Lichtgewande, Geschlungen sind des Glaubens leise Bande, Und Tage rieseln hin auf Liebestnen.

First love fills the heart with longing for an unknown enchanted land. The soul flutters on the edge of life, and sweet melancholy dissolves in tears. Now dawns the intimation of beauty; you behold the goddess in her robe of light; the gentle bonds of faith are sealed, and the days flow by in songs of love.

54

April May 1815 SONG TEXTS


Du siehst nur sie allein im Widerscheine, Die Holde, der du ganz dich hingegeben, Nur sie durchschwebet deines Daseins Rume. Sie lchelt dir herab vom Goldgesume, Wenn stille Lichter an den Himmeln schweben, Der Erde jubelst du: Sie ist die Meine!
JOHANN GEORG FELLINGER (17811816)

Her alone you see reflected, the fair one to whom you have surrendered yourself; she alone pervades your whole being. She smiles down on you from heavens golden fringes when silent lights hover in the sky. Joyfully you cry to the world: She is mine!

Trinklied
Ihr Freunde und du, goldner Wein! Verssset mir das Leben: Ohn euch, Beglcker, wre fein Ich stets in Angst und Beben. Ohne Freunde, ohne Wein, Mchtich nicht im Leben sein. Wer Tausende in Kisten schliesst, Nach Mehrerem nur trachtet, Der Freunde Not und sich vergisst, Sei reich! von uns verachtet. Ohne Freunde, ohne Wein, Mag ein Andrer Reicher sein! Ohn allen Freund, was ist der Held? Was sind des Reichs Magnaten? Was ist ein Herr der ganzen Welt? Sind alle schlecht berathen! Ohne Freunde, ohne Wein, Mag ich selbst nicht Kaiser sein! Und muss einst an der Zukunft Port Dem Leib die Seel entschweben: So wink mir aus der Selgen Hort Ein Freund und Saft der Reben: Sonst mag ohne Freund und Wein Ich auch nicht in Himmel sein.
ALOIS ZETTLER (17781828)

Drinking song
You, friends, and you, golden wine, make my life sweeter. Without you, bestowers of joy, I would live in fear and trembling. Without friends, without wine, I should not wish to live! The man who locks thousands in his chest, who endeavours only to increase them, forgetting himself and the plight of his friends, let him be rich, despised by us! Without friends, without wine, let another man be rich! What is the hero without a friend? What are the great men of the realm? What is the master of the whole world? They are all poorly counselled! Without friends, without wine, I should not even wish to be Emperor! And if one day in the future my soul must leave my body, then let a friend and the juice of the vine greet me in the refuge of the blessed. Otherwise, without a friend and without wine I should not even wish to be in heaven!

6 Disc
6 Track

D183. 12 April 1815; first published in 1887 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by John Mark Ainsley, Jamie MacDougall, Simon Keenlyside and Michael George

Die Sterbende
Heil! dies ist die letzte Zhre, Die der Mden Aug entfllt! Schon entschattet sich die Sphre Ihrer heimatlichen Welt. Leicht, wie Frhlingsnebel schwinden, Ist des Lebens Traum entflohn, Paradiesesblumen winden Seraphim zum Kranze schon! Horch! im heilgen Hain der Palmen, Wo der Strom des Lebens fliesst, Tnt es in der Engel Psalmen: Schwester-seele, sei gegrsst! Die empor mit Adlerschnelle Zu des Lichtes Urquell stieg; Tod! wo ist dein Stachel? Hlle! Stolze Hlle! wo ist dein Sieg?
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

The dying girl


Hail! This is the last tear to fall from the weary girls eyes. Already the sphere of her familiar world is shadowed. The dream of life has fled as lightly as spring mists vanish; already seraphim are weaving flowers of paradise into a wreath. Hark! In the holy land of palms where the stream of life flows, the angels psalms resound: Greetings, sisterly soul! You have risen up, swift as an eagle, to the source of light. Death, where is your sting? Hell, proud hell, where is your victory?

6 Disc
7 Track

D186. May 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Elly Ameling

55

SONG TEXTS May 1815


Disc 6 Stimme der Liebe Voice of love Track 8 First setting, D187. May 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Elly Ameling

Abendgewlke schweben hell Am bepurpurten Himmel; Hesperus schaut, mit Liebesblick, Durch den blhenden Lindenhain, Und sein prophetisches Trauerlied Zirpt im Kraute das Heimchen. Freuden der Liebe harren dein! Flstern leise die Winde; Freuden der Liebe harren dein! Tnt die Kehle der Nachtigall; Hoch von dem Sternengewlb herab Hallt mir Stimme der Liebe. Aus der Platanen Labyrinth Wandelt Laura, die Holde! Blumen entspriessen dem Zephyrtritt, Und wie Sphrengesangeston Bebt von den Rosen der Lippe mir Ssse Stimme der Liebe!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Evening clouds float brightly through the crimson sky. Hesperus looks lovingly through the flowering lime grove, and in the grass the cricket chirps his prophetic threnody. The joys of love await you! The winds whisper softly; the joys of love await you! Thus sings the nightingale. From the high starry vaults the voice of love echoes down to me. From the labyrinth of plane trees comes fair Laura! Flowers bloom at her airy footsteps, and like the music of the spheres the sweet voice of love floats tremulously towards me from the roses of her lips.

Disc 6 Naturgenuss Delight in nature Track 9 D188. May 1815; first published in 1887 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Elly Ameling

Im Abendschimmer wallt der Quell Durch Wiesenblumen purpurhell; Der Pappelweide wechselnd Grn Weht ruhelispelnd drber hin. Im Lenzhauch webt der Geist des Herrn! Sieh! Auferstehung nah und fern, Sieh! Jugendflle, Schnheitsmeer, Und Wonnetaumel rings umher! Ich blicke her, ich blicke hin, Und immer hher schwebt mein Sinn. Nur Tand sind Pracht und Gold und Ruhm, Natur, in deinem Heiligtum. Des Himmels Ahnung den umweht, Der deinen Liebeston versteht, Doch, an dein Mutterherz gedrckt, Wird er zum Himmel selbst entzckt.
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

In the soft light of evening the brook flows through meadows of bright, purple flowers; the poplar, with its changing shades of green, whispers gently above them. Gods spirit stirs in the spring breeze; behold lifes resurrection, near and far, see, youths abundance, a sea of beauty and teeming joys lie all around. I look about me, close and far away, and my soul soars ever higher. Pomp, gold and fame are but dross in your sanctuary, Nature! Intimations of heaven envelop him who understands your music of love; for he, pressed to your maternal breast, will know the delight of heaven itself!

Disc 6 An die Freude Ode to joy Track bl D189. May 1815; published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 111 No 1
sung by Sir Thomas Allen

Freude, schner Gtterfunken, Tochter aus Elysium, Wir betreten feuertrunken, Himmlische, dein Heiligtum. Deine Zauber binden wieder, Was die Mode streng geteilt; Alle Menschen werden Brder, Wo dein sanfter Flgel weilt. Seid umschlungen, Millionen! Diesen Kuss der ganzen Welt! Brder, berm Sternenzelt Muss ein guter Vater wohnen.

Joy, fair divine spark, daughter of Elysium, we enter your sanctuary, heavenly one, drunk with ardour. Your magic will reunite what custom has harshly severed. All men become brothers where your gentle wings hover. Be embraced, ye millions! This kiss is for the whole world! Brothers, above the starry vaults a good father must dwell.

56

May 1815 SONG TEXTS


Freude trinken alle Wesen An den Brsten der Natur, Alle Guten, alle Bsen Folgen ihrer Rosenspur. Ksse gab sie uns und Reben, Einen Freund, geprft im Tod; Wollust ward dem Wurm gegeben Und der Cherub steht vor Gott. Ihr strzt nieder, Millionen? Ahnest du den Schpfer, Welt? Such ihn berm Sternenzelt! ber Sternen muss er wohnen.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

All creatures drink joy from natures breasts; all men, good and evil, follow her rosy trail. She gave us kisses, and the vine, and a friend, tried in death. Lust was granted to the worm and the cherub stands before God. Ye millions, do you bow down? World, do you sense your creator? Seek him beyond the starry vaults! He must dwell above the stars.

Gott, hre meine Stimme

God, hear my voice

6 Disc
bm Track

D190 No 5. 819 May 1815; first published in 1888 in series 15 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig aria of Ktchen from the Singspeil Der vierjhrige Posten sung by Arleen Auger

Gott, hre meine Stimme, Hre gndig auf mein Flehn! Sieh, ich liege hier im Staube. Soll die Hoffnung, soll der Glaube An dein Vaterherz vergehn? Er soll es bssen mit seinem Blute, Was er gewagt mit frohem Mute, Was er fr mich und die Liebe getan? Sind all die Wnsche nur eitel Trume, Zerknickt die Hoffnung die zarten Keime, Ist Lied und Seligkeit nur ein Wahn? Nein, nein, das kannst du nicht gebieten, Das wird dein Vaterherz verhten, Gott, du bist meine Zuversicht. Du wirst zwei Herzen so nicht trennen, Die nur vereinigt schlagen knnen, Nein, nein, nein, das kannst du nicht!
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

Hear my voice, O God; in mercy heed my entreaty. See, I lie here in the dust. Shall hope and faith die on your paternal heart? Shall he atone with his blood for what he dared with joyful spirit, for what he did for me and love? Are all wishes but vain dreams? Does hope crush the tender seeds? Are love and bliss but a delusion? No, no, you cannot allow it, your paternal heart will forbid it. God, you are my trust. You will not sunder two hearts which can only beat united. No, no, that you cannot do.

Des Mdchens Klage

The maidens lament

6 Disc
bn Track

Second setting, D191. 15 May 1815; published by Thaddus Weigl in Vienna in 1826 as Op 56 No 3, later changed to Op 58 No 3 cf Zumsteeg Thekla Des Mdchens Klage, disc 38 9 sung by Elly Ameling

Der Eichwald braust, die Wolken ziehn, Das Mgdlein sitzt an Ufers Grn, Es bricht sich die Welle mit Macht, mit Macht, Und sie seufzt hinaus in die finstere Nacht, Das Auge vom Weinen getrbet. Das Herz ist gestorben, die Welt ist leer, Und weiter gibt sie dem Wunsche nichts mehr, Du Heilige, rufe dein Kind zurck, Ich habe genossen das irdische Glck, Ich habe gelebt und geliebet! Es rinnet der Trnen vergeblicher Lauf, Die Klage, sie wecket die Toten nicht auf; Doch nenne, was trstet und heilet die Brust Nach der sssen Liebe verschwundener Lust, Ich, die Himmlische, wills nicht versagen. Lass rinnen der Trnen vergeblichen Lauf, Es wecke die Klage die Toten nicht auf! Das ssseste Glck fr die trauernde Brust, Nach der schnen Liebe verschwundener Lust, Sind der Liebe Schmerzen und Klagen.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

The oak-wood roars, the clouds scud by, the maiden sits on the verdant shore; the waves break with mighty force, and she sighs into the dark night, her eyes dimmed with weeping. My heart is dead, the world is empty and no longer yields to my desire. Holy one, call back your child. I have enjoyed earthly happiness; I have lived and loved! Her tears run their vain course; her lament does not awaken the dead; but say, what can comfort and heal the heart when the joys of sweet love have vanished? I, the heavenly maiden, shall not deny it. Let my tears run their vain course; let my lament not awaken the dead! For the grieving heart the sweetest happiness, when the joys of fair love have vanished, is the sorrow and lament of love.

57

SONG TEXTS May 1815


Disc 6 Der Jngling am Bache The youth by the brook Track bo Second setting, D192. 15 May 1815; first published in 1887 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Elly Ameling

An der Quelle sass der Knabe, Blumen wand er sich zum Kranz, Und er sah sie fortgerissen, Treiben in der Wellen Tanz. Und so fliehen meine Tage Wie die Quelle rastlos hin! Und so bleichet meine Jugend, Wie die Krnze schnell verblhn! Fraget nicht, warum ich traure In des Lebens Bltenzeit! Alles freuet sich und hoffet, Wenn der Frhling sich erneut. Aber diese tausend Stimmen Der erwachenden Natur Wecken in dem tiefen Busen Mir den schweren Kummer nur. Was soll mir die Freude frommen, Die der schne Lenz mir beut? Eine nur ists, die ich suche, Sie ist nah und ewig weit. Sehnend breit ich meine Arme Nach dem teuren Schattenbild, Ach, ich kann es nicht erreichen, Und das Herz bleibt ungestillt! Komm herab, du schne Holde, Und verlass dein stolzes Schloss! Blumen, die der Lenz geboren, Streu ich dir in deinen Schoss. Horch, der Hain erschallt von Liedern, Und die Quelle rieselt klar! Raum ist in der kleinsten Htte Fr ein glcklich liebend Paar.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

By the stream sat a youth, weaving flowers into a wreath; he saw them carried off and swept along in the dancing waves. Thus my days speed by, relentlessly, like the stream! And my youth grows pale, as quickly as the wreaths wilt! Do not ask me why I mourn in lifes fullest bloom! All is filled with joy and hope when spring returns. But a thousand voices of burgeoning nature awaken deep in my heart only heavy grief. What good to me is the joy which the fair spring offers me? There is only one I seek; she is near and yet eternally distant. Yearningly I stretch out my arms towards that beloved shadowy image; ah, I cannot reach it, and my heart is unquiet. Come down, gracious beauty, and leave your proud castle! Flowers, which the spring has borne, I shall strew on your lap. Listen! The grove echoes with song and the brook ripples limpidly. There is room in the tiniest cottage for a happy, loving couple.

Disc 6 An den Mond To the moon Track bp D193. 17 May 1815; published by Thaddus Weigl in Vienna in 1826 as Op 57 No 3
sung by Elly Ameling

Geuss, lieber Mond, geuss deine Silberflimmer Durch dieses Buchengrn, Wo Phantasien und Traumgestalten Immer vor mir vorberfliehn. Enthlle dich, dass ich die Sttte finde, Wo oft mein Mdchen sass, Und oft, im Wehn des Buchbaums und der Linde, Der goldnen Stadt vergass. Enthlle dich, dass ich des Strauchs mich freue, Der Khlung ihr gerauscht, Und einen Kranz auf jeden Anger streue, Wo sie den Bach belauscht. Dann, lieber Mond, dann nimm den Schleier wieder, Und traur um deinen Freund, Und weine durch den Wolkenflor hernieder, Wie dein Verlassner weint!
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Beloved moon, shed your silver radiance through these green beeches, where fancies and dreamlike images forever flit before me. Unveil yourself, that I may find the spot where my beloved sat, where often, in the swaying branches of the beech and lime, she forgot the gilded town. Unveil yourself, that I may delight in the whispering bushes that cooled her, and lay a wreath on that meadow where she listened to the brook. Then, beloved moon, take your veil once more, and mourn for your friend. Weep down through the hazy clouds, as the one you have forsaken weeps.

58

May 1815 SONG TEXTS Die Mainacht


Wann der silberne Mond durch die Gestruche blinkt, Und sein schlummerndes Licht ber den Rasen streut, Und die Nachtigall fltet, Wandl ich traurig von Busch zu Busch. Selig preis ich dich dann, fltende Nachtigall, Weil dein Weibchen mit dir wohnet in einem Nest, Ihrem singenden Gatten Tausend trauliche Ksse gibt. berhllet von Laub, girret ein Taubenpaar Sein Entzcken mir vor; aber ich wende mich, Suche dunklere Schatten, Und die einsame Trne rinnt. Wann, o lchelndes Bild, welches wie Morgenrot Durch die Seele mir strahlt, find ich auf Erden dich? Und die einsame Trne Bebt mir heisser die Wang herab.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

May night
When the silver moon shines through the shrubbery and casts its drowsy light over the grass; when the nightingale warbles, I wander mournfully from bush to bush. Then I deem you blessed, fluting nightingale, because your sweetheart dwells with you in a single nest, and gives a thousand loving kisses to her warbling mate. Concealed in foliage, a pair of doves coo to me in delight; but I turn away in search of deeper shadows, and shed a solitary tear. O smiling image, that shines like the dawn, through my soul, when shall I find you on this earth? And the solitary tear, glistening, flows more warmly down my cheek.

6 Disc
bq Track

D194. 17 May 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Dame Margaret Price

Rastlose Liebe

Restless love

6 Disc
br Track

D138. 19 May 1815; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 5 No 1 cf Johann Reichardt Rastlose Liebe, disc 38 3 & Zelter Rastlose Liebe, disc 38 bp & Eberwein Rastlose Liebe, disc 39 3 sung by John Mark Ainsley

Dem Schnee, dem Regen, Dem Wind entgegen, Im Dampf der Klfte, Durch Nebeldfte, Immer zu! Immer zu! Ohne Rast und Ruh! Lieber durch Leiden Wollt ich mich schlagen, Als so viel Freuden Des Lebens ertragen. Alle das Neigen Von Herzen zu Herzen, Ach, wie so eigen Schaffet es Schmerzen! Wie soll ich fliehn? Wlderwrts ziehn? Alles vergebens! Krone des Lebens, Glck ohne Ruh, Liebe, bist du!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Into the snow, the rain, and the wind, through steamy ravines, through mists, onwards, ever onwards! Without respite! I would sooner fight my way through suffering than endure so much of lifes joy. This affection of one heart for another, ah, how strangely it creates pain! How shall I flee? Into the forest? It is all in vain! Crown of life, happiness without peace this, O love, is you!

Amalia
Schn wie Engel voll Walhallas Wonne, Schn vor allen Jnglingen war er, Himmlisch mild sein Blick, wie Maiensonne, Rckgestrahlt vom blauen Spiegelmeer. Seine Ksse Paradiesisch Fhlen! Wie zwei Flammen sich ergreifen, wie Harfentne in einander spielen Zu der himmelvollen Harmonie

Amalia
Fair as angels filled with the bliss of Valhalla, he was fair above all other youths; his gaze had the gentleness of heaven, like the May sun reflected in the blue mirror of the sea. His kisses were the touch of paradise! As two flames engulf each other, as the sounds of the harp mingle in celestial harmony.

6 Disc
bs Track

D195. 19 May 1815; published by C A Spina in Vienna in 1867 as Op posth 173 No 1 sung by Dame Janet Baker

59

SONG TEXTS May 1815


Strzten, flogen, schmolzen Geist in Geist zusammen, Lippen, Wangen brannten, zitterten Seele rann in Seele Erd und Himmel schwammen Wie zerronnen um die Liebenden! Er ist hin vergebens, ach vergebens Sthnet ihm der bange Seufzer nach! Er ist hin, und alle Lust des Lebens Rinnet hin in ein verlornes Ach!
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

So our spirits rushed, flew and fused together; lips and cheeks burned, trembled, soul melted into sod, earth and heaven swam, as though dissolved, around the lovers! He is gone in vain, ah in vain my anxious sighs echo after him! He is gone, and all lifes joy ebbs away in one forlorn cry!

Disc 6 An die Nachtigall To the nightingale Track bt D196. 22 May 1815; first published by C A Spina in Vienna in 1865 as Op posth 172 No 3
sung by Elly Ameling

Geuss nicht so laut der liebentflammten Lieder Tonreichen Schall Vom Bltenast des Apfelbaums hernieder O Nachtigall! Du tnest mir mit deiner sssen Kehle Die Liebe wach; Denn schon durchbebt die Tiefen meiner Seele Dein schmelzend Ach. Dann flieht der Schlaf von neuem dieses Lager, Ich starre dann Mit nassem Blick und totenbleich und hager Den Himmel an. Fleuch, Nachtigall, in grne Finsternisse, Ins Haingestruch, Und spend im Nest der treuen Gattin Ksse; Entfleuch, entfleuch!
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Do not pour out so loudly the sonorous strains of passionate love-songs from the blossom-covered boughs of the apple tree, O nightingale! The singing from your sweet throat awakens love in me; for already your melting sighs pierce the depths of my soul. Then sleep once more shuns this bed, and I stare, moist-eyed, drawn and deathly pale, at the heavens. Fly away, nightingale, to the green darkness of the groves thickets, and in your nest bestow kisses on your faithful spouse. Fly away!

Disc 6 wo ich Julien erblickte where I caught sight of Julia Track bu D197. 22 May 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 50 of the Nachlass
sung by Martyn Hill

An die Apfelbume,

To the apple trees

Ein heilig Suseln und ein Gesangeston Durchzittre deine Wipfel, o Schattengang, Wo bang und wild der ersten Liebe Selige Taumel mein Herz berauschten. Die Abendsonne bebte wie lichtes Gold Durch Purpurblten, bebte wie lichtes Gold Um ihres Busens Silberschleier; Und ich zerfloss in Entzckungsschauer. Nach langer Trennung ksse mit Engelkuss Ein treuer Jngling hier das geliebte Weib, Und schwr in diesem Bltendunkel Ewge Treue der Auserkornen. Ein Blmchen sprosse, wenn wir gestorben sind, Aus jedem Rasen, welchen ihr Fuss berhrt, Und trag auf jedem seiner Bltter Meines verherrlichten Mdchens Namen.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Let solemn murmuring and the sound of singing vibrate through the tree-tops above you, O shaded walk, where, fearful and impassioned, the blissful frenzy of first love seized my heart. The evening sun shimmered like brilliant gold through purple blossoms; shimmered like brilliant gold around the silver veil on her breast. And I dissolved in a shudder of ecstasy. After long separation let a faithful youth kiss with an angels kiss his beloved wife, and in the darkness of this blossom pledge eternal constancy to his chosen one. May a flower bloom, when we are dead, from every lawn touched by her foot. And may each of its leaves bear the name of my exalted love.

60

May 1815 SONG TEXTS Seufzer


Die Nachtigall Singt berall Auf grnen Reisen Die besten Weisen, Dass ringsum Wald Und Ufer schallt. Manch junges Paar Geht dort, wo klar Das Bchlein rauschet Und steht, und lauschet Mit frohem Sinn Der Sngerin. Ich hre bang Im dstern Gang Der Nachtigallen Gesnge schallen; Denn ach! allein Irr ich im Hain.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Sighs
The nightingale sings everywhere on green boughs her loveliest songs that all around woods and river banks resound. Many young couples stroll where the limpid brook murmurs. They stop and listen joyfully to the songstress. But gloomily on the dark path I hear the nightingales echoing song. For alas, I wander alone in the grove.

6 Disc
cl Track

D198. 22 May 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Martyn Hill

Auf den Tod einer Nachtigall


Sie ist dahin, die Maienlieder tnte, Die Sngerin, Die durch ihr Lied den ganzen Hain verschnte, Sie ist dahin! Sie, deren Ton mir in die Seele hallte, Wenn ich am Bach, Der durch Gebsch im Abendgolde wallte Auf Blumen lag! Sie gurgelte, tief aus der vollen Kehle, Den Silberschlag: Der Widerhall in seiner Felsenhhle Schlug leis ihn nach. Die lndlichen Gesang und Feldschalmeien Erklangen drein; Es tanzeten die Jungfraun ihre Reihen Im Abendschein.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

On the death of a nightingale


She is no more, the songstress who warbled May songs, who adorned the whole grove with her singing. She is no more! She whose notes echoed in my soul, when I lay among flowers by the brook that flowed through the undergrowth in the golden light of evening. From the depths of her full throat she poured forth her silver notes; the echo answered softly in the rocky caves. Rustic melodies and pipers tunes mingled with her song, as maidens danced in the glow of evening.

6 Disc
cm Track

First setting, D201. 25 May 1815; first published in 1970 in the Revue belge de Musicologie sung by Martyn Hill

Liebestndelei
Ssses Liebchen! Komm zu mir! Tausend Ksse geb ich dir. Sieh mich hier zu deinen Fssen. Mdchen, deiner Lippen Glut Gibt mir Kraft und Lebensmut. Lass dich kssen! Mdchen, werde doch nicht rot! Wenns die Mutter auch verbot. Sollst du alle Freuden missen? Nur an des Geliebten Brust Blht des Lebens schnste Lust. Lass dich kssen!

Flirtation
My sweet love! Come to me! I will give you a thousand kisses. You behold me here at your feet. Fair maiden, the ardour of your lips gives me strength and the courage for life. Let me kiss you! Fair maiden, do not blush! Even though your mother has forbidden it, are you to forgo all pleasures? Only on your lovers breast does lifes fairest joy flower. Let me kiss you!

6 Disc
cn Track

D206. 26 May 1815; published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Philip Langridge

61

SONG TEXTS May June 1815


Liebchen, warum zierst du dich? Hre doch und ksse mich. Willst du nichts von Liebe wissen? Wogt dir nicht dein kleines Herz Bald in Freuden, bald in Schmerz? Lass dich kssen! Sieh, dein Struben hilft dir nicht; Schon hab ich nach Sngers Pflicht Dir den ersten Kuss entrissen! Und nun sinkst du, liebewarm, Willig selbst in meinen Arm. Lsst dich kssen!
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

My love, why are you so coy? Listen, and kiss me. Do you wish to know nothing of love? Does your little heart not surge, now with pleasure, now with pain? Let me kiss you! See, your reluctance is to no avail; already, my duty as a singer done, I have snatched the first kiss from you! And now, warm with love, you sink willingly into my arms. Let me kiss you!

Disc 6 Der Liebende The lover Track co D207. 29 May 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Martyn Hill

Beglckt, beglckt, Wer dich erblickt, Und deinen Himmel trinket; Wenn dein Gesicht Voll Engellicht Den Gruss des Friedens winket. Ein ssser Blick, Ein Wink, ein Nick, Glnzt mir wie Frhlingssonnen; Den ganzen Tag Sinn ich ihm nach, Und schwebt in Himmelswonnen. Dein holdes Bild Fhrt mich so mild An sanfter Blumenkette; In meinem Arm Erwacht es warm, Und geht mit mir zu Bette. Beglckt, beglckt, Wer dich erblickt Und deinen Himmel trinket; Wem ssser Blick Und Wink und Nick Zum sssern Kusse winket.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Blessed is he who beholds you, and drinks your heavenly beauty when your face, bathed in angelic light, bestows the greeting of peace. One sweet glance, a sign, a nod, shines upon me like the spring sun. The whole day long I think of it, and float in heavenly bliss. Your sweet image leads me so tenderly along by a gentle chain of flowers. In my arms it awakens warm, and goes with me to bed. Blessed is he who beholds you, and drinks your heavenly beauty, who is lured to sweeter kisses by a sweet glance, a sign, a nod.

Disc 6 Die Liebe Clrchens Lied Love Clrchens song Track cp D210. 3 June 1815; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1838 in volume 30 of the Nachlass
sung by Elly Ameling

Freudvoll Und leidvoll, Gedankenvoll sein; Langen Und bangen In schwebender Pein; Himmelhoch jauchzend Zum Tode betrbt; Glcklich allein Ist die Seele, die liebt.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832) END OF DISC 6

Joyful, sorrowful, thoughtful; yearning and grieving in lingering pain; touching the heavens in joy, despairing unto death; happy alone is the soul that loves.

62

June 1815 SONG TEXTS Adelwold und Emma


Hoch und ehern schier von Dauer, Ragt ein Ritterschloss empor; Bren lagen an dem Tor Beute schnaubend auf der Lauer, Trme zingelten die Mauer Gleich den Riesen bange Schauer Wehten brausend, wie ein Meer, Von den Tannenwipfeln her. Aber finstrer Kummer nagte Mutverzehrend um und an Hier am wackern deutschen Mann, Dem kein Feind zu trotzen wagte; Oft noch eh der Morgen tagte, Fuhr er auf vom Traum, und fragte Jetzt mit Seufzer jetzt mit Schrei, Wo sein teurer Letzter sei? Vater! Rufe nicht dem Lieben. Flstert einstens Emma drein Sieh, er schlft im Kmmerlein Sanft and stolz was kann ihn trben? Ich nicht rufen? sind nicht sieben Meiner Shn im Kampf geblieben? Weint ich nicht schon fnfzehn Jahr Um das Weib, das euch gebar? Emma hrts und schmiegt mit Beben Weinend sich an seine Brust. Vater! sieh dein Kind ach frh War dein Beifall mein Bestreben! Wie, wenn, Trosteswort zu geben, Boten Gottes niederschweben, Fhrt der Holden Red und Blick Neue Kraft in ihn zurck. Heiter presst er sie ans Herze: O vergib, dass ich vergass, Welchen Schatz ich noch besass, bermannt von meinem Schmerze! Aber sprachst du nicht im Scherze Wohl dann! bei dem Schein der Kerze Wandle mit mir einen Gang Stracks den dstern Weg entlang. Zitternd folgte sie, bald gelangen Sie zur Halle, graus und tief, Wo die Schar der Vter schlief; Rings im Kreis an Silberspangen Um ein achtes hergehangen, Leuchteten mit bleichem bangen Grabesschimmer fort und fort Sieben Lmplein diesem Ort. Untern Lmplein wars von Steinen Traun! erzhlen kann ichs nicht Wars so traurig zugericht, Wars so ladend ach zum Weinen. Bei den heiligen Gebeinen, Welchen diese Lampen scheinen, Ruft er laut beschwr ich dich Traute Tochter, hre mich.

Adelwold and Emma


A knights castle, ardent and lofty, towered up boldly; bears lay at the gate, snorting, awaiting their prey. Turrets arose from the walls like giants; eerily the wind gusted from the fir-tops like the roaring sea. But black care constantly gnawed away at the spirit of the valiant German knight whom no foe dared defy. Often, before the morning dawned, he would awaken from his dream and ask, now sighing, now crying out, Where is my beloved youngest boy? Father, do not call to the dear boy, Emma now whispers. See, he is asleep in his little room, gentle and proud what can trouble him? You ask me not to call? Have not seven of my sons died in battle? Have I not for fifteen years mourned the woman who bore you? Emma listens, and nestles, trembling and weeping, against his breast. Father, behold your child! Ah, since I was young I have sought to win your approval! And, as when Gods messengers gently descend to bring words of comfort, so the fair maidens words and look give him new strength. Cheered, he presses her to his heart: O forgive me, that I, overwhelmed by grief, forgot what treasure I still possessed! But you did not speak in jest. And now, by candlelight, walk with me straightway along the dark path. Trembling, she followed him; soon they reached the deep and terrible vault where their forefathers slept: arranged in a circle, seven lamps the eighth was lacking hanging on silver clasps illuminated this place constantly with pale, troubled, sepulchral gleam. Beneath the lamps were stones forsooth! I cannot relate it! It was so mournful in appearance, such an invitation to weeping. By the holy remains for which these lamps shine, he cries loudly, I entreat you to hear me, beloved daughter.

7 Disc
1 Track

D211. 514 June 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Martyn Hill

63

SONG TEXTS June 1815


Mein Geschlecht seit grauen Zeiten War wie Rittersmnnern ziemt Keck, gestreng und fast berhmt; In des Grabes Dunkelheit Sank die Reih von Biederleuten Sanken die, so mich erfreuten, Bis einst der Posaune Hall Sie wird wecken allzumal. Nie vergassen deine Brder Dieser grossen Ahnen Wert; Reich und Kaiser schzt ihr Schwert Wie ein deckendes Gefieder; Gib sie, Tochter, gib sie wieder Mir im wackern Brutigam, Dir erkiest aus Heldenstamm. Aber Fluch! Und mit dem Worte Gleich als jgt ihn Nacht und Graus Zog er pltzlich sie hinaus Aus dem schauervollen Orte Emma wankte durch die Pforte: Ende nicht die Schrecknensworte! Denk an Himmel und Gericht! O verwirf, verwirf mich nicht! Bleich, wie sie, mit bangem Zagen Lehnt des Ritters Knappe hier; Wie dem Snder wirds ihm schier, Den die Schrecken Gottes schlagen; Kaum zu atmen tt er wagen Kaum die Kerze vorzutragen Hatte, matt und fieberhaft, Seine Rechte noch die Kraft.
Track 2 Adelwolden bracht als Weise Since the misty past, men of my lineage have been bold, stern and renowned, as befits knights; honourable men, whom I cherished, have one by one descended into the graves darkness, until the day when the sound of the trumpet shall awaken them all. Your brothers never forgot the merit of these great forebears. Their swords, like protective plumage, revered the emperor and his realm; my daughter, restore them to me in the form of a valiant bridegroom chosen from a race of heroes. But a curse ! And with these words, as if stricken by darkness and horror, he suddenly dragged her out of the fearful place Emma staggered through the gate: Do not finish your terrible words! Think of heaven, of the Last Judgment! Do not, ah do not reject me! As pale as the maiden, fearful and apprehensive, the knights squire lurks here; he feels almost as a sinner struck by the terrors of God. He hardly dares breathe; his right hand, weak and feverish, scarcely has the strength to carry the candle. Adelwold the knight once took pity on him as an orphan, and brought him on his horse from distant parts home to his castle. He tended him with food and drink, and raised him among his own children; long and often did they romp about together. But Emma his whole tender soul wove around her; was it the first sign of love? In the tournament she gaily crowned his lance with a wreath, and then she would dance with the bold and true horseman more blithely than the wafting May breeze. Soon the boy of lowly birth blossomed into a fine young man; never did a vassal reward more nobly the paternal kindness of his guardian. But the feelings he sought to quell glowed more and more warmly; each day, alas, they bound him more to the maiden. And she, too, became more and more closely bound to her dear, sweet Adelwold. What do I care for a coat of arms, for land and gold, if I, poor maiden, should lose you? What do I care for the finery that adorns me,

Mitleidsvoll auf seinem Ross Einst der Ritter nach dem Schloss Heim von einer fernen Reise Pflegte sein mit Trank und Speise Tt ihn hegel in dem Kreise Seiner Kinder oft und viel War er tummelnd ihr Gespiel. Aber Emma seine ganze Zarte Seele webt um sie, War es frhe Sympathie? Froh umwand sie seine Lanze Im Turnier mit einem Kranze Schwebte leichter dann im Tanze Mit dem Ritter, keck und treu, Als das Lftchen schwebt im Mai. Rosig auf zum Jngling blhte Bald der Niedre von Geschlecht; Edler lohnte nie ein Knecht Seines Pflegers Vatergte; Aber heiss und heisser glhte Was zu dmpfen er sich mhte; Fester knpft ihn, fester ach! An das Frulein jeder Tag. Fest und fester sie an ihren Sssen trauten Adelwold. Was sind Wappen, Land, und Gold Sollt ich Arme dich verlieren? Was die Flitter, so mich zieren?

64

June 1815 SONG TEXTS


Was Bankete bei Turnieren? Wappen, Land, Geschmuck, und Gold Lohnt ein Traum von Adelwold! So das Frulein, wenn der Schleier Grauer Nchte sie umfing; Doch mit eins, als Emma heute Spt noch betet, weint, und wacht, Steht, gehllt in Pilgertracht, Adelwold an ihrer Seite: Zrne nicht, Gebenedeite! Denn mich treibts, mich treibts ins Weite! Frulein, dich befehl ich Gott! Dein im Leben und im Tod! Leiten soll mich dieser Stecken Hin in Zions heilges Land Wo vielleicht ein Huflein Sand Bald den Armen wird bedecken Meine Seele muss erschrecken, Durch Verrat sich zu beflecken An dem Mann, der, mild und gross, Er mich trug in seinen Schoss. Selig trumt ich einst als Knabe Engel ach vergib es mir! Denn ein Bettler bin ich schier; Nur dies Herz ist meine Habe. Jngling ach an diesem Stabe Fhrst du treulos mich zum Grabe, Du wrgest Gott verzeih es dir! Die dich liebte fr und fr! Und schon wankte der Entzckte Als des Fruleins keuscher Arm Ach so weiss, so weich und warm! Sanft sie hin zum Busen drckte Aber frcherterlicher blickte Was ihm schier ihr Kuss entrckte; Und vom Herzen, das ihm schlug, Riss ihn schnell des Vaters Fluch. Lindre, Vater, meine Wunde Keinen Laut aus deinem Munde! Keine Zhr in dieser Stunde! Keine Sonne die mir blickt! Keine Nacht die mich erquickt! Gold, Gestein, und Seide nimmer Schwrt sie, fort zu legen an; Keine Zofe darf ihr nahn Und kein Knappe jetzt und nimmer; Oft bei trautem Mondesschimmer Wallt sie barfuss ber Trmmer, Wild verwachsen, steil und rauh, Noch zur hochgelobten Frau. Ritter! ach schon weht vom Grabe Deiner Emma Todtenluft! Schon umschwrmt der Vter Gruft Ahnend Kuzlein, Eil und Rabe; Weh dir weh! an seinem Stabe Folgt sie willig ihm zum Grabe Hin, wo mehr denn Helm und Schild Liebe, Treu und Tugend gilt
for banquets at tournaments? One dream of Adelwold is worth a coat of arms, land, jewels and gold! So mused the maiden, when the veil of dark nights enveloped her. But this night as Emma stays awake, praying and weeping, Adelwold all of a sudden appears at her side dressed as a pilgrim. Do not be angry, blessed one, for I am driven far from here! Sweet maiden, God be with you! I am yours in life and in death! This staff shall lead me into the Holy Land of Zion, where, perhaps, a mound of sand will soon cover this poor man my soul recoils at the thought of being stained with the betrayal of the man who, in his kindness and greatness, took me to his bosom. As a boy I once dreamed blissfully my angel O forgive me, for I am almost a beggar; this heart is my only possession. Sweet youth, with this staff you would faithlessly lead me to the grave; you would kill her God forgive you! who would love you for ever! And already the enraptured youth wavered as the maidens chaste arm, so white, so soft, so warm, pressed him gently to her breast but the feelings aroused in him by her mere kiss seemed more terrible still; and swiftly her fathers curse tore him from the heart that beat for him. Father, ease my pain there is no sound from your lips, no tears at this hour, no sun to gaze upon me, no night to refresh me! She swears that henceforth she will never don gold, jewels or silk; neither maid nor squire may approach her, now and for evermore; often, by the moonlight she loved, she goes, barefoot, on a pilgrimage, through ruins that are wild and overgrown, steep and bleak, to the revered Lady. Knight! Ah, already the wind of death blows from your Emmas grave. Already screech owls and ravens flock around your forefathers tombs, sensing death; unhappy man! With his staff she follows him gladly to the grave, where, more than helmet and shield, love, constancy and virtue are prized.

3 Track

65

SONG TEXTS June 1815


Selbst dem Ritter tt sich senken Tief und tiefer jetzt das Haupt; Kaum dass er der Mhr noch glaubt; Seufzen tt er itzt itzt denken, Was den Jngling konnte krnken? Ob ein Spiel von Neid und Rnken? Ob? Wie ein Gespenst der Nacht Schreckt ihn was er jetzt gedacht. Hergefhrt auf schwlen Winden, Muss ein Strahl die Burg entznden. Tosend gleich den Wogen wallen Rings die Gluten krachend drun Sul und Wlbung, Balk und Stein, Stracks in Trmmern zu zerfallen; Angstruf und Verzweiflung schallen Grausend durch die weiten Hallen: Strmend drngt und atemlos Knecht und Junker aus dem Schloss. Richter! ach verschone! Ruft der Greis mit starrem Blick Gott! mein Kind! es bleibt zurck! Rettet dass euch Gott einst lohne! Gold und Silber, Land und Frohne, Jede Burg, die ich bewohne, Ihrem Retter zum Gewinn Selbst dies Leben geb ich hin fr sie. Gleiten ab von tauben Ohren Tt des Hochbedrngten Schrei; Aber pltzlich strzt herbei, Der ihr Treue zugeschworen Strzt nach den entflammten Toren Gibt mit Freuden sich verloren; Jeder staunend fern und nah Whnt ein Blendwerk, was er sah. Glut an Glut! und jedes Streben Schien vergebens! endlich fasst Er die teure, ssse Last, Kalt und sonder Spur von Leben; Doch beginnt ein leises Beben Herz und Busen jetzt zu heben Und durch Flamme, Dampf und Graus Trgt er glcklich sie hinaus. Purpur kehrt auf ihre Wangen, Wo der Traute sie geksst Jngling! sage, wer du bist Ich beschwre dich der Bangen; Hlt ein Engel mich umfangen, Der auf seinem Erdenflug Meines Lieben Bildnis trug? Starr zusammenschrickt der Blde Denn der Ritter noch am Tor Lauscht mit hingewandtem Ohr Jedem Laut der sssen Rede; Doch den Zweifler tt ermannen Bald des Ritters Gruss und Kuss Dem im sssesten Genuss Hell der Wonne Zhren rannen: Du es, du sag an, von wannen? Was dich konnt von mir verbannen? Was dich nimmer lohn ichs dir Emma wiedergab und mir?
Even the knight now bowed his head lower and lower; he scarcely had faith in his mare now; he sighed, and wondered what could be troubling the youth was it envy and intrigue, was it ? As from a nocturnal phantom he recoils in horror from the thought that now struck him. Borne on the sultry winds, a thunderbolt must have set fire to the castle. Roaring like the waves the flames rage all around pillars and arches, crossbeams and stones threaten straight away to crash down in ruins. Cries of terror and despair echo horribly through the vast halls: breathless, servant and squire rush out of the castle. Lord my Judge! Ah, spare me! calls the old man, staring fixedly Lord! My child she remains within! save her, may God reward you! Gold and silver, land and farm, every castle I possess all these shall be her rescuers reward. I would even sacrifice my life for her. His distressed cries fall on deaf ears; but suddenly he appears the man who has vowed to be faithful to her. He rushes to the flaming gates, and would gladly lose his life; all are astonished, near and far, believing what they see to be an illusion. Flame upon flame! All efforts seem in vain! Then, at last, he holds his dear, sweet burden, cold and without trace of life; but then, with a slight trembling, her heart and breast begin to rise, and through flames, smoke and terror he carries her safely out. Crimson returned to her cheeks where her beloved has kissed her Sweet youth! Tell me in my distress who you are, I entreat you; am I embraced by an angel who, on his flight to earth, has assumed the form of my love? The bashful youth is paralysed with fear, for at the gate the knight listens with attentive ears to every word of her sweet speech. But the doubting youths courage was quickly restored by the knights welcoming kiss; down the old mans cheeks streamed shining tears of joy and sweetest pleasure. Is it you? Tell me whence you have come. What could have driven you away from me? What has restored you to Emma and to me? For this I can never reward you.

66

June 1815 SONG TEXTS


Deines Fluchs mich zu entlasten War es Pflicht, dass ich entwich Eilig, wild und frchterlich Triebs mich sonder Ruh und Rasten; Dort im Kloster, wo sie prassten, Labten Trnen mich und Fasten, Bis der frommen Pilger Schar Voll zum Zug versammelt war. Doch mit unsichtbaren Ketten Zog mich pltzlich Gottes Hand Jetzt zurck von Land zu Land Her zur Burg, mein Teuerstes zu retten, Nimm sie, Ritter, nimm und sprich Das Urteil ber mich. Emma harrt, in dstres Schweigen, Wie in Mitternacht gehllt; Starrer denn ein Marmorbild, Harren furchterfllte Zeugen; Denn es zweifelten die Feigen, Ob den Ritterstolz zu beugen Je vermcht ein hoher Mut Sonder Ahnenglanz und Gut. Dein ist Emma! ewig dein! lngst entscheiden Tt der Himmel; rein wie Gold Bist du funden, Adelwold Gross in Edelmut und Leiden; Nimm! ich gebe sie mit Freuden; Nimm! der Himmel tt entscheiden Nannte selbst im Donnerlaut Sie vor Engeln deine Braut. Nimm sie hin mit Vatersegen; Ihn wird neben meine Schuld Ach mit Langmut und Geduld! Der einst kommt, Gericht zu hegen, Auf die Prfungswage legen Mir verzeihn um euretwegen Der von eitlem Stolz befleckt, Beid euch schier ins Grab gestreckt. Fest umschlungen itzt von ihnen, Blickt der Greis zum Himmel auf: Frhlich endet sich mein Lauf! Spuren der Verklrung schienen Aus des Hochentzckten Mienen Und auf dampfenden Ruinen Fgt er schweigend ihre Hand In das langersehnte Band.
FRIEDRICH ANTON FRANZ BERTRAND (17871830)

It was my duty to escape, in order to release myself from your curse. In fear I was driven onwards, swiftly, harshly and without respite. In the monastery, where they feasted, tears and fasting consoled me until the band of devout pilgrims was assembled for the journey. But, with invisible chains Gods hand suddenly drew me back through one land after another to this castle, to rescue my beloved! Take her now, noble knight, and pronounce judgment on me. Emma waits, shrouded in a silence as dark as midnight; more rigid than marble statues the fearful onlookers wait. For the fainthearted among them doubted that a noble heart alone, without wealth or ancestral glory, could ever bend the knights pride. Emma is yours, yours for ever! Thus heaven has long since decreed; you are deemed to be as pure as gold, Adelwold, and great in magnanimity and suffering; take her! With joy I give her to you; take her! Heaven has decreed it! In a peal of thunder, before angels, heaven itself named her as your bride. Take her with a fathers blessing; he who shall come one day to judge me will lay that blessing on the scales alongside my guilt may he show patience and forbearance! and forgive me for what I have done to you; for, sullied by vain pride, I all but drove you both to the grave. Warmly embraced by the pair, the old man now looks up to heaven: Thus my days end joyfully! Transfigured happiness shone from the youths enraptured features, and amid the smoking ruins he silently took her hand to seal the long-desired bond.

4 Track

Die Nonne
Es liebt in Welschland irgendwo Ein schner junger Ritter Ein Mdchen, das der Welt entfloh, Trotz Klosterthor und Gitter; Sprach viel von seiner Liebespein, Und schwur, auf seinen Knieen, Sie aus dem Kerker zu befreien, Und stets fr sie zu glhen.

The nun
Once upon a time, somewhere in Italy, a fair young knight loved a maiden who shunned this world, loved her despite convent gate and iron bars; he spoke much of his anguish in love and vowed, upon his knees, to free her from her prison, and to love her ardently for ever.

7 Disc
5 Track

D208. 16 June 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Sarah Walker

67

SONG TEXTS June 1815


Bei diesem Muttergottesbild, Bei diesem Jesuskinde, Das ihre Mutterarme fllt, Schwr ichs dir, o Belinde! Dir ist mein ganzes Herz geweiht, So lang ich Odem habe; Bei meiner Seelen Seligkeit! Dich lieb ich bis zum Grabe. Was glaubt ein armes Mdchen nicht, Zumal in einer Zelle? Ach! sie vergass der Nonnenpflicht, Des Himmels und der Hlle. Die, von den Engeln angeschaut, Sich ihrem Jesu weihte, Die reine schne Gottesbraut, Ward eines Frevlers Beute. Drauf wurde, wie die Mnner sind, Sein Herz von Stund an lauer, Er berliess das arme Kind Auf ewig ihrer Trauer. Vergass der alten Zrtlichkeit, Und aller seiner Eide, Und floh, im bunten Galakleid, Nach neuer Augenweide. Begann mit andern Weibern Reihn, Im kerzenhellen Saale, Gab andern Weibern Schmeichelein, Beim lauten Traubenmahle, Und rhmte sich des Minneglcks Bei seiner schnen Nonne, Und jedes Kusses, jedes Blicks, Und jeder andern Wonne. Die Nonne, voll von welscher Wut, Entglht in ihrem Mute, Und sann auf nichts als Dolch und Blut, Und trumte nur von Blute. Sie dingte pltzlich eine Schaar Von wilden Meuchelmrdern, Denn Mann, der treulos worden war, Ins Totenreich zu frdern. Die bohren manches Mrderschwert In seine schwarze Seele. Sein schwarzer, falscher Geist entfhrt, Wie Schwefeldampf der Hhle. Er wimmert durch die Luft, wo sein Ein Krallenteufel harret. Drauf ward sem blutendes Gebein In eine Gruft verscharret. Die Nonne flog, wie Nacht begann, Zur kleinen Dorfkapelle, Und riss den wunden Rittersmann Aus seiner Ruhestelle. Riss ihm das Bubenherz heraus, Und warfs, den Zorn zu bssen, Dass dumpf erscholl das Gotteshaus, Und trat es mit dem Fssen.
By this image of the Virgin, by this child Jesus that fills her maternal arms, I swear to you, Belinda: my whole heart is consecrated to you as long as I draw breath; by my souls salvation I will love you unto the grave. What will a poor maiden not believe, especially in a convent cell? Alas, she forgot her duty as a nun, forgot heaven and hell. She who, watched by the angels, had dedicated herself to Jesus, the fair, spotless bride of God, fell prey to a sinner. From this moment, as is the way of men, his heart grew more tepid; he abandoned the poor child for ever to her sorrow. Forgetting his former tenderness and all his vows, he went off, in resplendent ceremonial dress, to feast his eyes on new delights. He danced with other women in the candlelit ballroom, complimented other women at the noisy, drunken banquet, and boasted to his fair nun of his luck in love, boasted of every kiss, every glance, and every other delight. The nun, filled with Italian fury, blazed within her heart, and thought of nothing but dagger and blood, and dreamed only of blood. Then, with sudden resolve, she hired a band of wild assassins, to dispatch to the realm of the dead the man who had turned faithless. They plunged many a murderous sword into his black soul. His black treacherous spirit escaped, like a sulphurous mist from hell. It moaned through the air to a devils awaiting claws. Then his bleeding corpse was buried in a vault. As night fell the nun fled to the little village chapel, and seized the dead knight from his resting place. She tore out his wicked heart, and, to vent her fury, hurled it, so that the house of God resounded with a muffled thud, and trampled it under foot.

68

June 1815 SONG TEXTS


Ihr Geist soll, wie die Sagen gehn, In dieser Kirche weilen, Und, bis im Dorf die Hhne krhn, Bald wimmern, und bald heulen. Sobald der Hammer zwlfe schlgt, Rauscht sie, an Grabsteinwnden, Aus einer Gruft empor, und trgt Ein blutend Herz in Hnden. Die tiefen, hohlen Augen sprhn Ein dsterrotes Feuer, Und glhn, wie Schwefelflammen glhn, Durch ihren weissen Schleier. Sie gafft auf das zerrissne Herz, Mit wilder Rachgebrde, Und hebt es dreimal himmelwrts, Und wirft es auf die Erde; Und rollt die Augen voller Wut, Die eine Hlle blicken, Und schttelt aus der Schleier Blut, Und stampft das Herz in Stcken. Ein bleicher Totenflimmer macht Indess die Fenster helle. Der Wchter, der das Dorf bewacht, Sahs oft in der Kapelle.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

As legend has it, her spirit lingers in this church, now whimpering, now wailing until the cocks crow in the village. As soon as the hammer strikes twelve she rises up from a vault, past tombstones, bearing in her hands a bleeding heart. Her sunken, hollow eyes flash with sombre red fire, glowing like sulphurous flames through her white veil. She stares at the mutilated heart with a gesture of wild revenge, raises it three times towards heaven, and hurls it to the ground. Filled with rage, she rolls her eyes in which hell blazes, shakes blood from her veil and tramples the heart into pieces. Meanwhile a pallid, deathly gleam lights the windows. The watchman who guards the village has often seen her in the chapel.

Der Traum
Mir trumt, ich war ein Vgelein, Und flog auf ihren Schoss Und zupft ihr, um nicht lass zu sein, Die Busenschleifen los. Und flog, mit gaukelhaftem Flug, Dann auf die weisse Hand, Dann wieder auf das Busentuch, Und pickt am roten Band. Dann schwebt ich auf ihr blondes Haar, Und zwitscherte vor Lust, Und ruhte, wann ich mde war, An ihrer weissen Brust. Kein Veilchenbett im Paradies Geht diesem Lager vor. Wie schlief sichs da so sss, so sss An ihres Busens Flor! Sie spielte, wie ich tiefer sank, Mit leisem Fingerschlag, Der mir durch Leib und Leben drang, Mich frohen Schlummrer wach. Sah mich so wunderfreundlich an, Und bot den Mund mir dar, Dass ich es nicht beschreiben kann, Wie froh, wie froh ich war. Da trippelt ich auf einem Bein Und hatte so mein Spiel, Und spielt ihr mit dem Flgelein Die rote Wange khl. Doch, ach, kein Erdenglck besteht, Tag sei es oder Nacht! Schnell war mein ssser Traum verweht, Und ich war aufgewacht.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

The dream
I dreamt I was a little bird, and flew onto her lap, and, so as not to be idle, loosened the bows around her breast. Then I flitted playfully onto her white hand then back onto her bodice, and pecked at its red ribbon. Then I glided onto her fair hair and twittered with pleasure, and when I grew weary I rested on her white breast. There is no violet-bed in paradise which can surpass that resting place. How sweetly I would sleep on her beauteous breast. As I sank deeper she fondled me with a gentle touch of her fingers that ran through my body and soul, awakening me from my happy slumber. She gazed at me with such wondrous kindness, and offered me her lips that I cannot describe how happy I was. Then I tripped about on one leg as a game, and with my little wings playfully cooled her red cheeks. But, alas, no earthly happiness endures, whether it be day or night! Swiftly my dream vanished, and I awoke.

7 Disc
6 Track

D213. 17 June 1815; first published by C A Spina in Vienna in 1865 as Op posth 172 No 1 sung by Martyn Hill

69

SONG TEXTS June 1815


Disc 7 Die Laube The arbour Track 7 D214. 17 June 1815; first published by C A Spina in Vienna in 1865 as Op posth 172 No 2
sung by Martyn Hill

Nimmer werd ich, nimmer dein vergessen, Khle grne Dunkelheit, Wo mein liebes Mdchen oft gesessen, Und des Frhlings sich gefreut. Schauer wird durch meine Nerven beben, Werd ich deine Blten sehn, Und ihr Bildnis mir entgegenschweben, Ihre Gottheit mich umwehn. Wann ich auf der Bahn der Tugend wanke Weltvergngen mich bestrickt; Dann durchglhe mich der Feurgedanke, Was in dir ich einst erblickt. Und, als strmt aus Gottes offnem Himmel Tugendkraft auf mich herab, Werd ich fliehen, und vom Erdgewimmel Fernen meinen Pilgerstab.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Never shall I forget you, cool, green darkness, where my beloved often sat and delighted in the spring. My nerves will quiver when I see your blossoms, see her image float towards me, and her divine radince envelop me. When I totter on the path of virtue, lured by earthly pleasures, then let the thought burn through me of what I once beheld in you. And when virtue streams down upon me from Gods open heaven, I shall flee, and with my pilgrims staff leave this earthly throng.

Disc 7 Jgers Abendlied Huntsmans evening song Track 8 First setting, D215. 20 June 1815; first published in 1907 in Die Musik
sung by Simon Keenlyside

Im Felde schleich ich, still und wild, Gespannt mein Feuerrohr. Da schwebt so licht dein liebes Bild, Dein ssses Bild mir vor. Du wandelst jetzt wohl still und mild Durch Feld und liebes Tal, Und ach mein schnell verrauschend Bild, Stellt sich dirs nicht einmal?
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

I stalk through the fields, grim and silent, my gun at the ready. Then your beloved image, your sweet image hovers brightly before me. Perhaps you are now wandering, silent and gentle, through field and beloved valley; ah, does my fleeting image not even appear before you?

Disc 7 Meeres Stille Calm at sea Track 9 First version, D215a. 20 June 1815 ; first published in 1952 in Schweizerische Musikzeitung
cf Tomaek Meeres Stille, disc 39 1 sung by Elly Ameling

Tiefe Stille herrscht im Wasser, Ohne Regung ruht das Meer, Und bekmmert sieht der Schiffer Glatte Flche rings umher. Keine Luft von keiner Seite! Todesstille frchterlich! In der ungeheueren Weite Reget keine Welle sich.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Profound calm reigns over the waters, the sea lies motionless; anxiously the sailor beholds the glassy surface all around. No breeze from any quarter! A fearful, deathly calm! In the vast expanse no wave stirs.

Disc 7 Meeres Stille Calm at sea Track bl Second version, D216. 21 June 1815; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 3 No 2
sung by Dame Janet Baker

see above, disc 7 track 9 , for text and translation Disc 7 Kolmas Klage Colmas lament Track bm D217. 22 June 1815; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1830 in volume 2 of the Nachlass
sung by Dame Margaret Price

Rund um mich Nacht, Ich irr allein, Verloren am strmischen Hgel; Der Sturm braust vom Gebirg,

Around me is night. I wander alone, lost on the stormy hill; the storm roars from the mountains,

70

June 1815 SONG TEXTS


Der Strom die Felsen hinab, Mich schtzt kein Dach vor Regen, Verloren am strmischen Hgel, Irr ich allein. Erschein, o Mond, Dring durchs Gewlk; Erscheinet, ihr nchtlichen Sterne, Geleitet freundlich mich, Wo mein Geliebter ruht. Mit ihm flieh ich den Vater, Mit ihm meinen herrischen Bruder, Erschein, o Mond. Ihr Strme, schweigt, O schweige, Strom, Mich hre, mein liebender Wanderer, Salgar! ich bins, die ruft. Hier ist der Baum, hier der Fels, Warum verweilst du lnger? Wie, hr ich den Ruf seiner Stimme? Ihr Strme, schweigt! Doch, sieh, der Mond erscheint, Der Hgel Haupt erhellet, Die Flut im Tale glnzt, Im Mondlicht wallt die Heide. Ihn seh ich nicht im Tale, Ihn nicht am hellen Hgel, Kein Laut verkndet ihn, Ich wandle einsam hier. Doch wer sind jene dort, Gestreckt auf drrer Heide? Ists mein Geliebter, Er! Und neben ihm mein Bruder! Ach, beid in ihrem Blute, Entblsst die wilden Schwerter! Warum erschlugst du ihn? Und du, Salgar, warum? Geister meiner Toten, Sprecht vom Felsenhgel, Von des Berges Gipfel, Nimmer schreckt ihr mich! Wo gingt ihr zur Ruhe, Ach, in welcher Hhle Soll ich euch nun finden? Doch es tnt kein Hauch. Hier in tiefem Grame Wein ich bis am Morgen, Baut das Grab, ihr Freunde, Schliessts nicht ohne mich. Wie sollt ich hier weilen? An des Bergstroms Ufer Mit den lieben Freunden Will ich ewig ruhn.
the torrent pours down the rocks; no roof shelters me from the rain. Lost on the stormy hill, I wander alone. Appear, O moon! Pierce through the clouds! Appear, stars of the night! Lead me kindly to the place where my love rests. With him I would flee from my father; with him, from my overbearing brother. Appear, O moon! Be silent, storms; be silent, stream! Let my loving wanderer hear me! Salgar! It is I who call. Here is the tree, here the rock. Why do you tarry longer? Do I hear the cry of his voice? Be silent, storms! But lo, the moon appears, the tips of the hills are bright, the flood sparkles in the valley, the heath is bathed in moonlight. I do not see him in the valley, nor on the bright hillside; no sound announces his approach. Here I walk alone. But who are they, stretched out there on the barren heath? It is he, my love, and beside him my brother! Ah, both lie in their blood, their fierce swords drawn! Why have you slain him? And you, Salgar, why? Ghosts of my dead, speak from the rocky hillside, from the mountain top; you will never frighten me! Where are you gone to rest? Ah, in what cave shall I find you now? But there is no sound. Here, in deep grief, I shall weep until morning; build the tomb, friends; do not close it without me. Why should I remain here? On the banks of the mountain stream, with my dear friends I shall rest for ever.

JAMES MACPHERSON OSSIAN (17361796) translator unknown

Grablied
Er fiel den Tod frs Vaterland, Den sssen der Befreiungsschlacht; Wir graben ihm mit treuer Hand, Tief, tief den schwarzen Ruheschacht.

Song of the grave


He met his death for the Fatherland, a sweet death in the battle for freedom. With loyal hands we bury him deep in the dark tomb of peace.

7 Disc
bn Track

D218. 24 June 1815; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1848 in volume 42 of the Nachlass sung by Michael George

71

SONG TEXTS June July 1815


Da schlaf, zerhauenes Gebein! Wo Schmerzen einst gewhlt und Lust, Schlug wild ein ttend Blei hinein Und brach den Trotz der Heldenbrust. Da schlaf gestillt, zerrissnes Herz, So wunschreich einst, auf Blumen ein, Die wir im veilchenwollen Mrz Dir in die khle Grube streun.
JOSEF KENNER (17941868)

Sleep there, splintered bones! Where sorrows and desires once gnawed a deadly bullet struck savagely and broke the heros resistance. Shattered heart, once so rich in hopes, there may you sleep peacefully upon the flowers which we scatter on your cool grave in March, with its blooming violets.

Disc 7 Das Finden The find Track bo D219. 25 June 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1848 in volume 42 of the Nachlass
sung by Peter Schreier

Ich hab ein Mdchen funden, Sanft, edel, deutsch und gut, Ihr Blick ist mild und glnzend, Wie Abendsonnenglut, Ihr Haar wie Sommerweben, Ihr Auge veilchenblau; Dem Rosenkelch der Lippen Entquillt Gesang wie Tau. Sie wandte sich, sie sumte, Sie winkte freundlich mir; Froh ihres Blicks und Winkes, Flog ich entzckt zu ihr. Erhaben stand und heilig Vor mir das hohe Weib. Ich aber schlang vertraulich Den Arm um ihren Leib. Ich hab das edle Mdchen An meiner Hand gefhrt, Ich bin mit ihr am Staden Des Bachs hinabspaziert. Ich hab sie liebgewonnen, Ich weiss, sie ist mir gut, Drum sei mein Lied ihr eigen, Ihr eigen Gut und Blut.
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

I have found a maiden gentle, noble, kind and German. Her gaze is as tender and radiant as the glow of the evening sun. Her hair is like gossamer, her eyes are violet-blue. From the rosy chalice of her lips pours song like the dew. She turned and hesitated, then beckoned me sweetly. Gladdened by her gaze and her beckoning I flew to her in delight. Before me, sublime and saintly, stood the noble maiden. But I tenderly wrapped my arm around her waist. I took the noble maiden by the hand; I walked with her beside the brook. I fell in love with her. I know she is fond of me. Therefore let my song be hers, her very own.

Disc 7 Lieb Minna Darling Minna Track bp D222. 2 July 1815; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Ann Murray

Schwler Hauch weht mir herber, Welkt die Blum an meiner Brust. Ach, wo weilst du, Wilhelm, Lieber? Meiner Seele ssse Lust! Ewig Weinen, Nie Erscheinen! Schlfst wohl schon im khlen Schoosse, Denkst auch mein noch unterm Moose? Minna weinet, es verflogen Mhlig Wang- und Lippenrot. Wilhelm war hinausgezogen Mit den Reihn zum Schlachtentod. Von der Stunde Keine Kunde! Schlfst wohl lngst im khlen Schoosse, Denkt dein Minna, unterm Moose. Liebchen sitzt im stillen Harme, Sieht die goldnen Sternlein ziehn, Und der Mond schaut auf die Arme Mit leidsvollen Blickes hin.

A sultry breeze wafts across to me, the flower at my breast withers. Ah, where do you linger, Wilhelm dearest, my souls sweet delight? I weep eternally, you never appear! Perhaps you already sleep in the earths cool womb; do you still think of me beneath the moss? Minna wept; gradually the crimson drained from her cheeks and lips. Wilhelm had departed with the ranks to death in battle. From that hour there was no news. Your Minna thinks: perhaps you have long been sleeping beneath the cool moss. The sweet maiden sits in silent grief, watching the motion of the golden stars, and the moon looks upon the poor creature with compassionate gaze.

72

July 1815 SONG TEXTS


Horch, da wehen Aus den Hhen Abendlftchen ihr herber: Dort am Felsen harrt dein Lieber. Minna eilt im Mondenflimmer Bleich und ahnend durch die Flur, Findet ihren Wilhelm nimmer, Findet seinen Hgel nur. Bin bald drben Bei dir Lieben, Sagst mir aus dem khlen Schoosse: Denk dein, Minna, unterm Moose. Und viel tausen Blmchen steigen Freundlich aus dem Grab herauf. Minna kennt die Liebeszeugen, Bettet sich ein Pltzchen drauf. Bin gleich drben Bei dir Lieben! Legt sich auf die Blmchen nieder Findet ihren Wilhelm wieder.
ALBERT STADLER (17941888)

Hark, evening breezes waft across her from the heights: your beloved is waiting there by the cliff. Pale and filled with foreboding, Minna hastens across the meadows in the shimmering moonlight. But she does not find her Wilhelm; she finds only his grave. Soon I shall be there with you, beloved, if from the cool womb you tell me: I am thinking of you, Minna, beneath the moss. And many thousands of flowers spring tenderly from the grave. Minna understands this testimony of love, and makes a little bed upon them. Very soon I shall be there with you, beloved! She lies down upon the flowers and finds her Wilhelm again.

Wandrers Nachtlied I
Der du von dem Himmel bist, Alles Leid und Schmerzen stillst, Den, der doppelt elend ist, Doppelt mit Entzckung fllst, Ach, ich bin des Treibens mde! Was soll all der Schmerz und Lust? Ssser Friede, Komm, ach komm in meine Brust!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Wayfarers night song I


You who are from heaven, who assuage all grief and suffering, and fill him who is doubly wretched doubly with delight, ah! I am weary of striving! To what end is all this pain and joy? Sweet peace, enter my heart!

7 Disc
bq Track

D224. 5 July 1815; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 4 No 1 sung by Dame Janet Baker

Der Fischer

The fisherman

7 Disc
br Track

D225. 5 July 1815; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 5 No 3 cf Vesque von Pttlingen Der Fischer, disc 40 cl sung by Dame Janet Baker

Das Wasser rauscht, das Wasser schwoll, Ein Fischer sass daran, Sah nach dem Angel ruhevoll, Khl bis ans Herz hinan. Und wie er sitzt und wie er lauscht, Teilt sich die Flut empor; Aus dem bewegten Wasser rauscht Ein feuchtes Weib hervor. Sie sang zu ihm, sie sprach zu ihm: Was lockst du meine Brut Mit Menschenwitz und Menschenlist Hinauf in Todesglut? Ach wsstest du, wies Fischlein ist So wohlig auf dem Grund, Du stiegst herunter, wie du bist, Und wrdest erst gesund. Labt sich die liebe Sonne nicht, Der Mond sich nicht im Meer? Kehrt wellenatmend ihr Gesicht Nicht doppelt schner her? Lockt dich der tiefe Himmel nicht, Das feuchtverklrte Blau? Lockt dich dein eigen Angesicht Nicht her in ewgen Tau?

The waters murmured, the waters swelled, a fisherman sat on the bank; calmly he gazed at his rod, his heart was cold. And as he sat and listened the waters surged up and divided; from the turbulent flood a water nymph arose. She sang to him, she spoke to him: Why do you lure my brood with human wit and guile up into the fatal heat? Ah, if you only knew how contented the fish are in the depths, you would descend, just as you are, and at last be made whole. Do not the dear sun and moon refresh themselves in the ocean? Do not their countenances emerge doubly beautiful from breathing the waters? Are you not enticed by the heavenly deep, the transfigured, watery blue? Are you not lured by your own face into this eternal dew?

73

SONG TEXTS July 1815


Das Wasser rauscht, das Wasser schwoll, Netzt ihm den nackten Fuss; Sein Herz wuchs ihm so sehnsuchtsvoll, Wie bei der Liebsten Gruss. Sie sprach zu ihm, sie sang zu ihm; Da wars um ihn geschehn: Halb zog sie ihn, halb sank er hin, Und ward nicht mehr gesehn.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

The waters murmured, the waters swelled, moistening his bare foot; his heart surged with such yearning, as if his sweetheart had called him. She spoke to him, she sang to him, then it was all over; she half dragged him, he half sank down and was never seen again.

Disc 7 Erster Verlust First loss Track bs D226. 5 July 1815; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 5 No 4; cf Zelter Erster Verlust, disc 38 bm
sung by Dame Janet Baker

Ach, wer bringt die schnen Tage, Jene Tage der ersten Liebe, Ach, wer bringt nur eine Stunde Jener holden Zeit zurck! Einsam nhr ich meine Wunde, Und mit stets erneuter Klage Traur ich ums verlorne Glck, Ach, wer bringt die schnen Tage, Jene holde Zeit zurck!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832) END OF DISC 7

Ah, who will bring back those fair days, those days of first love? Ah, who will bring back but one hour of that sweet time? Alone I nurture my wound and, forever renewing my lament, mourn my lost happiness. Ah, who will bring back those fair days, that sweet time?

Disc 8 Idens Nachtgesang Idas song to the night Track 1 D227. 7 July 1815; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Elly Ameling

Vernimm es Nacht, was Ida dir vertrauet, Die satt des Tags in deine Arme flieht. Ihr Sterne, die ihr hold und liebend auf mich schauet, Vernehmt ssslauschend Idens Lied. Den ich geahnt in liebevollen Stunden, Dem sehnsuchtskrank mein Herz entgegenschlug, O Nacht, o Sterne, hrts ich habe ihn gefunden, Des Bild ich lngst im Busen trug. Freund, ich bin dein, nicht fr den Sand der Zeiten, Der schnellversiegend Chronos Uhr entfleusst, Dein fr den Riesenstrom heilvoller Ewigkeiten, Der aus des Ewgen Urne scheusst.
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

Hear, night, what Ida confides to you; sated with the day, I fly to your arms. Stars, gazing down sweetly and lovingly upon me, listen fondly to Idas song. O night, O stars, I have found him, whom I dreamed of in hours of bliss, for whom my yearning heart beat, and whose image I have long carried within me. My beloved, I am yours, not for the sands of time that swiftly run dry from Chronos hour-glass, but for the mighty river of sacred eternity that gushes from the urn of the Eternal One!

Disc 8 Von Ida Ida Track 2 D228. 7 July 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Elly Ameling

Der Morgen blht, Der Osten glht; Es lchelt aus dem dnnen Flor Die Sonne matt und krank hervor. Denn, ach, mein Liebling flieht! Auf welcher Flur, Auf wessen Spur, So fern von Iden wallst du itzt, O du, der ganz mein Herz besitzt, Du Liebling der Natur! O, kehre um! Kehr um, kehr um! Zu deiner Einsamtraurenden! Zu deiner Ahnungschaurenden! Mein Einziger, kehr um!

The morning blooms, the east glows; the sun smiles, weak and sickly, through a thin gauze of cloud. For, alas, my beloved has fled! On what meadows, on what track do you tarry now, so far from Ida? You, you possess my whole heart darling of nature. O return, return! To her who grieves alone, to her who shudders with foreboding! Return, my one and only love!

74

LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

July 1815 SONG TEXTS Die Erscheinung Erinnerung The apparition Remembrance

8 Disc
3 Track

D229. 7 July 1815 ; published by Sauer und Leidesdorf in Vienna in 1824 in an Album musicale and by M J Leidesdorf in Vienna in 1829 as Op 108 No 3 (with the title Erinnerung) sung by Jamie MacDougall

Ich lag auf grnen Matten, An klarer Quellen Rand. Mir khlten Erlenschatten Der Wangen heissen Brand. Ich dachte dies und jenes, Und trumte sanft betrbt, Viel Gutes und viel Schnes, Das diese Welt nicht giebt. Und sieh, dem Hain entschwebte Ein Mgdlein sonnenklar. Ein weisser Schleier webte Um ihr nussbraunes Haar. Ihr Auge feucht und schimmernd Umfloss therisch Blau. Die Wimper nsste flimmernd Der Wehmut Perlentau. Ich auf sie zu umfassen! Und ach, sie trat zurck. Ich sah sie schnell erblassen, Und trber ward ihr Blick. Sie sah mich an so innig, Sie wies mit ihrer Hand, Erhaben und tiefsinnig, Gen Himmel und verschwand. Fahr wohl, fahr wohl, Erscheinung! Fahr wohl, dich kenn ich wohl! Und deines Winkes Meinung Versteh ich, wie ich soll Wohl fr die Zeit geschieden, Eint uns ein schnres Band. Hoch droben, nicht hier nieden Hat Lieb ihr Vaterland!
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

I lay in green meadows by the edge of the clear spring; the shade of alders cooled the fire of my cheeks. I thought of this and that, and dreamed with gentle sorrows of many a good and lovely thing which this world does not yield. And lo, from the grove there arose a maiden, as bright as the sun. A white veil flowed around her nut-brown hair. Her moist, shining eyes were flooded with heavenly blue, and on her eyelashes glistened dewy pearls of sadness. I stood up to embrace her, and, alas, she receded; I saw her quickly pale, and her gaze grew more sorrowful. She looked upon me so fervently, and with her hand she gestured solemnly and pensively towards heaven, and vanished. Farewell, farewell, vision! Farewell, I know you well, and understand as I should the meaning of your sign. Though we are parted for a time, a fairer bond unites us; high above, not here below, love has its home!

Die Tuschung
Im Erlenbusch, im Tannenhain, Im Sonn- und Mond- und Sternenschein Umlchelt mich ein Bildniss. Vor seinem Lcheln klrt sich schnell Die Dmmerung in Himmelhell, In Paradies die Wildniss. Es suselt in der Abendluft, Es dmmert in dem Morgenduft, Es tanzet auf der Aue, Es fltet in der Wachtel Schlag, Und spiegelt sich im klaren Bach, Und badet sich im Taue. O fleuch voran! Ich folge dir. Bei dir ist Seligkeit, nicht hier! Sprich, wo ich dir erfasse, Und ewig aller Pein entrckt, Umstrickend dich, von dir umstrickt, Dich nimmer, nimmer lasse!
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

Deception
In the alder grove, in the pine wood, by the light of sun, moon and stars, an image smiles upon me. At that smile dusk quickly changes to celestial brightness, and the wilderness turns to paradise. It whispers in the evening air; it drowses in the morning fragrance; it dances in the meadow; it sings like the quail; it is reflected in the clear brook, and bathes in the dew. O flee hence! I shall follow you! Bliss is with you, not here! Tell me where I may hold you, and never, ever leave you, eternally freed from all pain, embracing and embraced by you!

8 Disc
4 Track

D230. 7 July 1815; first published by C A Spina in Viena in 1855 as a supplement, and then in 1862 as Op posth 165 No 4 sung by Patricia Rozario

75

SONG TEXTS July 1815


Disc 8 Das Sehnen Longing Track 5 D231. 8 July 1815; published by C A Spina in Vienna in 1866 as Op posth 172 No 4
sung by Elly Ameling

Wehmut, die mich hllt, Welche Gottheit stilt Mein unendlich Sehnen! Die ihr meine Wimper nsst, Namenlosen Gram entpresst, Fliesset, fliesset Trnen! Mond, der lieb und traut In mein Fenster schaut, Sage, was mir fehle! Sterne, die ihr droben blinkt, Holden Gruss mir freundlich winkt, Nennt mir, was mich qule! In die Ferne strebt, Wie auf Flgeln schwebt Mein erhhtes Wesen. Fremder Zug, geheime Kraft, Namenlose Leidenschaft, Lass, ach lass genesen!
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

Melancholy envelops me; what god can still my boundless longing? It moistens my eyelashes, and draws from me nameless grief. Flow, tears, flow! Moon, gazing fondly and tenderly through my window, say, what is the matter with me? Stars, shining up above, sending me your sweet, kindly greeting, tell me what torments me! As if on hovering wings, my uplifted being is drawn into the distance. Strange stirrings, secret power, nameless passion, O let me be well again!

Disc 8 Hymne an den Unendlichen Hymn to the eternal Track 6 D232. 11 July 1815; first published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 112 No 3
sung by Patricia Rozario, Catherine Denley, Jamie MacDougall and Michael George

Zwischen Himmel und Erd hoch in der Lfte Meer, In der Wiege des Sturms trgt mich ein Zackenfels; Wolken thrmen unter mir sich zu Strmen, Schwindelnd gaukelt der Blitz umher, Und ich denke dich, Ewiger! Deinen schauernden Pomp borge den Endlichen, Ungeheure Natur! du der Unendlichkeit Riesentochter! Sei mir Spiegel Jehovahs! Seinen Gott dem vernnftgen Wurm Orgle prchtig, Gewittersturm! Horch! er orgelt; den Fels wie er herunter drhnt! Brllend spricht der Orkan Zebaoths Namen aus, Hin geschrieben mit dem Griffel des Blitzes: Creaturen, erkennt ihr mich? Schone, Herr! wir erkennen dich!
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Between heaven and earth, high in the surging winds, in the cradle of the storm I stand upon a jagged rock; storm clouds bank below me, lightning darts around giddily, and I think of you, Eternal God! Lend your fearful splendour to all things finite, immense nature, mighty daughter of infinity! Hold a mirror to Jehovah! Tempest, in your majestic thunder may the decent common worm know its God. Hark! Thunder! How it rumbles down the rock! The hurricane roars Jehovahs name, engraved with the lighnings pencil: Creatures, do you know me? Protect us, Lord. We know you!

Disc 8 Geist der Liebe Spirit of love Track 7 D233. 15 July 1815; first published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 118 No 1
sung by Ian Bostridge

Wer bist du, Geist der Liebe, Der durch das Weltall webt? Den Schooss der Erde schwngert, Und den Atom belebt? Der Elemente bindet, Der Weltenkugeln ballt, Aus Engelharfen jubelt Und aus dem Sugling lallt? Nur der ist gut und edel, Dem du den Bogen spannst. Nur der ist gross und gttlich, Den du zum Mann ermannst.

Who are you, spirit of love, who are at work throughout the universe, sowing the seed in the earths womb, and giving life to the atom? Who are you, who bind the elements, fashion the spheres, rejoice with angels harps, and lisp from the infants mouth. He alone is good and noble whose bow is drawn by you; he alone is great and godlike who through you attains true manhood.

76

July 1815 SONG TEXTS


Sein Werk ist Pyramide, Sein Wort ist Machtgebot. Ein Spott ist ihm die Hlle. Ein Hohn ist ihm der Tod.
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

His work is a pyramid, his word a mighty command; he mocks hell and scorns death.

Der Abend
Der Abend blht, Temora glht Im Glanz der tiefgesunknen Sonne. Es ksst die See Die Sinkende, Von Ehrfurcht schaudernd und von Wonne. Ein grauer Duft Durchwebt die Luft, Umschleiert Dauras gldne Auen. Es rauscht umher Das dstre Meer, Und rings herrscht ahndungsreiches Grauen. Nacht hllt den Strand, Temora schwand. Verlodert sind des Sptrots Gluthen. Das Weltmeer grollt, Und glutrot rollt Der Vollmond aus den dstern Fluten.
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

The evening
The evening blossoms, Temora glows in the light of the setting sun. As it sinks it kisses the sea, which trembles in awe and ecstasy. A grey haze pervades the air, veiling Dauras golden meadows. Round about the sombre ocean roars, and a terrible foreboding hangs over all. Night shrouds the shore; Temora has vanished; the sunsets last glow has faded. The ocean roars, and gleaming red, the full moon rolls from the dark waves.

8 Disc
8 Track

D221. 15 July 1815; first published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 118 No 2 sung by Catherine Wyn-Rogers

Tischlied
Mich ergreift, ich weiss nicht wie, Himmlisches Behagen. Will michs etwa gar hinauf Zu den Sternen tragen? Doch ich bleibe lieber hier, Kann ich redlich sagen, Beim Gesang und Glase Wein Auf den Tisch zu schlagen. Wundert euch, ihr Freunde, nicht, Wie ich mich gebrde; Wirklich es ist allerliebst Auf der lieben Erde: Darum schwr ich feierlich Und ohn alle Fhrde, Dass ich mich nicht freventlich Wegbegeben werde.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Drinking song
I am overcome, I know not how, with a sense of heavenly well-being. Shall I perhaps be borne aloft to the stars? But, to be honest, I would rather stay here beating on the table, with a song and a glass of wine. Do not wonder, friends, at my behaviour; it is truly delightful on this dear earth. So I swear solemnly, and without risking my soul, that I shall not wantonly take my leave.

8 Disc
9 Track

D234. 15 July 1815; first published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 118 No 3 sung by Simon Keenlyside

Das Abendrot
Der Abend blht, Der Westen glht! Wo bist du, holdes Licht entglommen, Aus welchem Stern herab gekommen? Wie seht so hehr Das dstre Meer, Die Welle tanzt des Glanzes trunken, Und sprht lust taumelnd Feuerfunken.

Sunset
The evening blooms, the west glows! Fair light, whence your radiance? From which star have you fallen? How sublime the dark sea looks! The waves dance, drunk in the iridescence, spraying sparks of fire with giddy delight.

8 Disc
bl Track

D236. 20 July 1815; first published in 1892 in series 19 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Lorna Anderson, Catherine Denley and Michael George

77

SONG TEXTS July 1815


Viel schner blht, Viel wrmer glht Die blasse Rose ihrer Wangen, Und weckt in brnstiges Verlangen. Bewunderung Und Huldigung Heischt nur das Schn, das ewig lebet, Weil Huld und Heiligkeit es hebet.
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

The pale roses cheeks bloom much fairer, glow far warmer, arousing fervent longing. Veneration and homage are due to eternal beauty alone, for beauty enhances grace and holiness.

Disc 8 Abends unter der Linde Evening beneath the linden tree Track bm First setting, D235. 24 July 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Anthony Rolfe Johnson

Woher, o namenloses Sehnen, Das den beklemmten Busen presst? Woher, ihr bittersssen Trnen, Die ihr das Auge dmmernd nsst? O Abendrot, o Mondenblitz, Flimmt blasser um den Lindensitz. Es suselt in dem Laub der Linde; Es flstert im Akazienstrauch. Mir schmeichelt sss, mir schmeichelt linde Des grauen Abends lauer Hauch. Es spricht um mich wie Geistergruss; Es geht mich an wie Engelkuss.
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

Whence this nameless longing that oppresses my troubled heart? Whence these bittersweet tears that veil my eyes in moisture? O evening glow, O glittering moon, cast a paler light beneath the linden tree. The leaves of the linden tree rustle, the acacia whispers. Sweetly, gently, I am caressed by the warm evening breeze. All around it is as if spirits greet me, and I am touched by an angels kiss.

Disc 8 Abends unter der Linde Evening beneath the linden tree Track bn Second setting, D237. 25 July 1815; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by Anthony Rolfe Johnson

Woher, o namenloses Sehnen, Das den beklemmten Busen presst? Woher, ihr bittersssen Trnen, Die ihr das Auge dmmernd nsst? O Abendrot, o Mondenblitz, Flimmt blasser um den Lindensitz. Es glnzt, es glnzt im Nachtgefilde. Der Linde grauer Scheitel bebt Verklrte himmlische Gebilde, Seid ihr es, die ihr mich umschwebt? Ich fhle eures Atems Kuss, O Julie, o Emilius! Bleibt Selge, bleibt in eurem Eden! Des Lebens Hauch blst schwer und schwl Durch stumme leichenvolle den. Elysium ist mild und khl. Elysium ist wonnevoll Fahrt wohl, ihr Trauten! fahret wohl!
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

Whence this nameless longing that oppresses my troubled heart? Whence these bittersweet tears that veil my eyes in moisture? O evening glow, O glittering moon, cast a paler light beneath the linden tree. The nocturnal fields gleam; the grey locks of the linden tree quiver. Transfigured celestial forms, is it you who hover around me? I feel the kiss of your breath, O Julie, O Emilius! Stay, blessed ones, stay in your Eden! The breath of life blows heavy and sultry through these silent, corpse-laden wastes. Elysium is serene and cool. Elysium is blissful. Farewell, friends! Farewell!

Disc 8 Die Mondnacht The moonlit night Track bo D238. 25 July 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Sarah Walker

Siehe, wie die Mondenstrahlen Busch und Flur in Silber mahlen! Wie das Bchlein rollt und flimmt! Strahlen regnen, Funken schmettern Von den sanftgeregten Blttern, Und die Tauflur glnzt und glimmt. Glnzend erdmmern der Berge Gipfel, Glnzend der Pappeln wogende Wipfel.

See how the moonbeams paint bush and meadow silver, and how the brook ripples and sparkles. Rays of light pour down, sparks rain from the gently stirring leaves, and the dewy countryside glistens and shimmers. The darkening mountain peaks glimmer, the swaying tops of the poplars gleam.

78

July 1815 SONG TEXTS


Durch die glanzumrauschten Rume Flstern Stimmen, gaukeln Trume, Sprechen mir vertraulich zu. Seligkeit, die mich gemahnet, Hchste Lust, die sss mich schwanet, Sprich, wo blhst, wo zeitigst du? Sprenge die Brust nicht, mchtiges Sehnen! Lschet die Wehmut, labende Trnen! Wie, ach, wie der Qual genesen? Wo, ach, wo ein liebend Wesen, Das die sssen Qualen stillt? Eins ins andre gar versunken, Gar verloren, gar ertrunken, Bis sich jede de fllt Solches, ach, whn ich, khlte das Sehnen, Lschte die Wehmut mit kstlichen Trnen. Eine weiss ich, ach, nur eine, Dich nur weiss ich, dich o Reine, Die des Herzens Wehmut meint. Dich umringend, von dir umrungen, Dich umschlingend, von dir umschlungen, Gar in Eins mit dir geeint Schon, ach schone den Wonneversunknen! Himmel und Erde verschwinden dem Trunknen.
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

Through the luminous spaces, voices whisper, dreams hover, speaking confidingly to me. Remembered bliss, great joy that fills me with sweet intimations, tell me, where do you bloom, where do you bear fruit? Mighty longing, do not shatter my heart! Soothing tears, ease my melancholy! How, how shall I recover from my torment? Where, O where is there a loving soul to calm my sweet anguish? One absorbed in the other, quite lost, quite enraptured, until every wasteland is filled I sense that such a soul would cool my longing, and ease my sorrow with exquisite tears. I know one, ah, only one; I know only you, purest one, who understands the hearts sorrow. Enfolding you, enfolded by you, embracing you, embraced by you, joined in unity with you spare, oh spare me, sunk in bliss! For me, in my rapture, heaven and earth vanish.

Huldigung
Gar verloren, ganz versunken In dein Anschaun, Lieblingin, Wonnebebend, liebetrunken Schwingt zu dir der Geist sich hin. Nichts vermag ich zu beginnen, Nichts zu denken, dichten, sinnen Nichts ist, was das Herz mir fllt, Huldin, als dein holdes Bild. Ssse, Reine, Makellose, Edle, Theure, Treffliche, Ungeschminkte rote Rose, Unversehrte Lilie, Anmutreiche Anemone, Aller Schnen Preis und Krone, Weisst du auch Gebieterin, Wie ich ganz dein eigen bin? Und wie bald ist nicht verschwunden Jenes Schlummers kurze Nacht! Horch, es jubelt: berwunden! Schau, der ewge Tag erwacht! Dann du Theure, dann du Eine, Bist du ganz und ewig Meine! Trennung ist das Loos der Zeit! Ewig einigt Ewigkeit!
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

Homage
Lost and absorbed in contemplation of you, my darling, trembling with ecstasy, drunk with love, my spirit flies to you. I can do nothing, I cannot think, or write or plan. Nothing fills my heart, beloved lady, but your sweet image. You are sweet, pure and spotless, noble, beloved and sublime, unadorned red rose, unblemished lily, gracious anemone, prize and crown of all beauty. Do you know, fair lady, that I am utterly yours? And how soon does that brief night of slumber vanish! Hark, rejoicing! Victory! See, the eternal day awakens! Now, my one and only love, you are all mine, for ever! Separation is the lot of time; eternity unites eternally!

8 Disc
bp Track

D240. 27 July 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by John Mark Ainsley

Alles um Liebe
Was ist es, das die Seele fllt? Ach, Liebe fllt sie, Liebe! Sie fllt nicht Gold, noch Goldeswerth, Nicht was die schnde Welt begehrt; Sie fllt nur Liebe, Liebe!

All for love


What is it that fills the soul? Ah, it is love! Not gold, nor the worth of gold, nor the desires of this base world. Love alone fills the soul!

8 Disc
bq Track

D241. 27 July 1815; first published in 1894 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Patricia Rozario

79

SONG TEXTS July August 1815


Was ist es, das die Sehnsucht stillt? Ach Liebe stillt sie, Liebe! Sie stillt nicht Titel, Stand noch Rang, Und nicht des Ruhmes Schellenklang; Sie stillt nur Liebe, Liebe! Und wr ich in der Sclaverei, In freudeloser Wildniss, Und wre dein, nur dein Gewiss, So wre Sclaverei mir sss, Und Paradies die Wildniss.
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

What is it that stills our longing? Ah, it is love. Not titles, status or rank, nor sounding fame. Love alone stills our longing! If I were in slavery in some cheerless wilderness, yet were only sure of your constancy, slavery would be sweet to me, and the wilderness paradise!

Disc 8 Winterlied Winter song Track br Fragment, D242a. 27 July 1815; completed by Reinhard van Hoorickx
sung by John Mark Ainsley and The London Schubert Chorale (directed by Stephen Layton)

Das Glas gefllt! der Nordwind brllt; Die Sonn ist nieder gesunken! Der kalte Br blinkt Frost daher! Getrunken, Brder, getrunken! Die Tannen glhn hell im Kamin, Und knatternd fliegen die Funken! Der edle Rhein gab uns den Wein! Getrunken, Brder, getrunken! Der edle Most verscheucht den Frost Und zaubert Frhling hernieder: Der Trinker sieht den Hain entblht, Und Bsche wirbeln ihm Lieder!
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Fill your glasses! The north wind roars, the sun has gone down. The cold Bear glitters frost. Drink, brothers, drink! The pine logs glow brightly in the hearth, and crackling sparks fly. The noble Rhine has given us wine drink, brothers, drink! The noble must scares off the frost and conjures up spring. The drinker sees the grove in bloom, and songs swirl from the bushes!

Disc 8 Die Brgschaft The hostage Track bs D246. August 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1830 as volume 8 of the Nachlass
sung by Sir Thomas Allen

Zu Dionys dem Tyrannen, schlich Mros, den Dolch im Gewande; Ihn schlugen die Hscher in Bande. Was wolltest du mit dem Dolche, sprich! Entgegnet ihm finster der Wterich. Die Stadt vom Tyrannen befreien! Das sollst du am Kreuze bereuen. Ich bin, spricht jener, zu sterben bereit Und bitte nicht um mein Leben: Doch willst du Gnade mir geben, Ich flehe dich um drei Tage Zeit, Bis ich die Schwester dem Gatten gefreit; Ich lasse den Freund dir als Brgen, Ihn magst du, entrinn ich, erwrgen. Da lchelt der Knig mit arger List Und spricht nach kurzem Bedenken: Drei Tage will ich dir schenken; Doch wisse, wenn sie verstrichen, die Frist, Eh du zurck mir gegeben bist, So muss er statt deiner erblassen, Doch dir ist die Strafe erlassen. Und er kommt zum Freunde: Der Knig gebeut, Dass ich am Kreuz mit dem Leben Bezahle das frevelnde Streben. Doch will er mir gnnen drei Tage Zeit, Bis ich die Schwester dem Gatten gefreit; So bleibe du dem Knig zum Pfande, Bis ich komme zu lsen die Bande.

Moros, his dagger concealed in his cloak, stealthily approached the tyrant Dionysus. The henchman clapped him in irons. What did you intend with your dagger? Speak! the evil tyrant asked menacingly. To free this city from the tyrant. You shall rue this on the cross. I am, he said, ready to die, and do not beg for my life. But if you will show me clemency I ask from you three days grace until I have given my sister in marriage. As surety I will leave you my friend if I fail, then hang him. The king smiled with evil cunning, and after reflecting a while spoke: I will grant you three days, but know this: if the time runs out before you are returned to me he must die instead of you, but you will be spared punishment. He went to his friend. The king decrees that I am to pay on the cross with my life for my attempted crime. But he is willing to grant me three days grace until I have married my sister to her spouse. Stand surety with the king until I return to redeem the bond.

80

August 1815 SONG TEXTS


Und schweigend umarmt ihn der treue Freund Und liefert sich aus dem Tyrannen; Der andre ziehet von dannen. Und eh noch das dritte Morgenrot erscheint, Hat er schnell mit dem Gatten die Schwester vereint, Eilt heim mit sorgender Seele, Damit er die Frist nicht verfehle. Da giesst unendlicher Regen herab, Von den Bergen strzen die Quellen, Und die Bche, die Strme schwellen. Und er kommt ans Ufer mit wanderndem Stab, Da reisset die Brcke der Strudel hinab, Und donnernd sprengen die Wogen Dem Gewlbes krachenden Bogen. Und trostlos irrt er an Ufers Rand: Wie weit er auch sphet und blicket Und die Stimme, die rufende, schickt. Da stsset kein Nachen vom sichern Strand, Der ihn setze an das gewnschte Land, Kein Schiffer lenket die Fhre, Und der wilde Strom wird zum Meere. Da sinkt er ans Ufer und weint und fleht, Die Hnde zum Zeus erhoben: O hemme des Stromes Toben! Es eilen die Stunden, im Mittag steht Die Sonne, und wenn sie niedergeht Und ich kann die Stadt nicht erreichen, So muss der Freund mir erbleichen. Doch wachsend erneut sich des Stromes Toben, Und Welle auf Welle zerrinet, Und Stunde an Stunde entrinnet. Da treibt ihn die Angst, da fasst er sich Mut Und wirft sich hinein in die brausende Flut Und teilt mit gewaltigen Armen Den Strom, und ein Gott hat Erbarmen. Und gewinnt das Ufer und eilet fort Und danket dem rettenden Gotte; Da strzet die raubende Rotte Hervor aus des Waldes nchtlichem Ort, Den Pfad ihm sperrend, und schnaubert Mord Und hemmet des Wanderers Eile Mit drohend geschwungener Keule. Was wollt ihr? ruft er vor Schrecken bleich, Ich habe nichts als mein Leben, Das muss ich dem Knige geben! Und entreisst die Keule dem nchsten gleich: Um des Freundes willen erbarmt euch! Und drei mit gewaltigen Streichen Erlegt er, die andern entweichen. Und die Sonne versendet glhenden Brand, Und von der unendlichen Mhe Ermattet sinken die Knie. O hast du mich gndig aus Rubershand, Aus dem Strom mich gerettet ans heilige Land, Und soll hier verschmachtend verderben, Und der Freund mir, der liebende, sterben! Und horch! da sprudelt es silberhell, Ganz nahe, wie rieselndes Rauschen, Und stille hlt er, zu lauschen; Und sieh, aus dem Felsen, geschwtzig, schnell,
Silently his faithful friend embraced him, and gave himself up to the tyrant. Moros departed. Before the third day dawned he had quickly married his sister to her betrothed. He now hastened home with troubled soul lest he should fail to meet the appointed time. Then rain poured down ceaselessly; torrents streamed down the mountains; brooks and rivers swelled. When he came to the bank, staff in hand, the bridge was swept down by the whirlpool, and the thundering waves destroyed its crashing arches. Disconsolate, he trudged along the bank. However far his eyes travelled, and his shouts resounded, no boat left the safety of the banks to carry him to the shore he sought. No boatman steered his ferry, and the turbulent river became a sea. He fell on the bank, sobbing and imploring, he raised his hands to Zeus: O curb the raging torrent! The hours speed by, the sun stands at its zenith, and when it sets and I cannot reach the city, my friend will die for me. But the river grew ever more angry; wave upon wave broke, and hour upon hour flew by. Gripped by fear he took courage, and flung himself into the seething flood; with powerful arms he clove the waters, and a god had mercy on him. He reached the bank and hastened on, thanking the god that saved him. Then a band of robbers stormed from the dark recesses of the forest blocking his path and threatening death. They halted the travellers swift course with their menacing clubs. What do you want? he cried, pale with terror, I have nothing but my life, and that I must give to the king! He seized the club of the one nearest him: For the sake of my friend, have mercy! Then with mighty blows he felled three of them, and the others escaped. The sun shed its glowing fire and from their ceaseless exertion his weary knees gave way. You have mercifully saved me from the hands of robbers, you have saved me from the river and brought me to the sacred land. Am I to die of thirst here, and is my devoted friend to perish? But hark, a silvery bubbling sound close by, like rippling water. He stopped and listened quietly; and lo, bubbling from the rock,

bt Track

81

SONG TEXTS August 1815


Springt murmelnd hervor ein lebendiger Quell, Und freudig bckt er sich nieder Und erfrischet die brennenden Glieder. Und die Sonne blickt durch der Zweige Grn Und malt auf den glnzenden Matten Der Bume gigantische Schatten; Und zwei Wanderer sieht er die Strasse ziehn, Will eilenden Laufes vorber fliehn, Da hrt er die Worte sie sagen: Jetzt wird er ans Kreuz geschlagen. Und die Angst beflgelt den eilenden Fuss, Ihn jagen der Sorge Qualen; Da schimmern in Abendrots Strahlen Von ferne die Zinnen von Syrakus, Und entgegen kommt ihm Philostratus, Des Hauses redlicher Hter, Der erkennet entsetzt den Gebieter: Zurck! du rettest den Freund nicht mehr, So rette das eigene Leben! Den Tod erleidet er eben. Von Stunde zu Stunde gewartet er Mit hoffender Seele der Wiederkehr, Ihm konnte den mutigen Glauben Der Hohn des Tyrannen nicht rauben. Und ist es zu spt, und kann ich ihm nicht, Ein Retter, willkommen erscheinen, So soll mich der Tod ihm vereinen. Des rhme der blutge Tyrann sich nicht, Dass der Freund dem Freunde gebrochen die Pflicht, Er schlachte der Opfer zweie Und glaube an Liebe und Treue! Und die Sonne geht unter, da steht er am Tor, Und sieht das Kreuz schon erhhet, Das die Menge gaffend umstehet; An dem Seile schon zieht man den Freund empor, Da zertrennt er gewaltig den dichten Chor: Mich, Henker, ruft er, erwrget! Da bin ich, fr den er gebrget! Und Erstaunen ergreift das Volk umher, In den Armen liegen sich beide Und weinen vor Schmerzen und Freude. Da sieht man kein Auge trnenleer, Und zum Knige bringt man die Wundermr; Der fhlt ein menschlich Rhren, Lsst schnell vor den Thron sie fhren, Und blickt sie lange verwundert an. Drauf spricht er: Es ist euch gelungen, Ihr habt das Herz mir bezwungen; Und die Treue ist doch kein leerer Wahn So nehm auch mich zum Genossen an: Ich sei, gewhrt mir die Bitte, In eurem Bunde der dritte!
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

a living spring gushed forth. Joyfully he stopped to refresh his burning body. Now the sun shone through the green branches, and upon the radiant fields the trees gigantic shadows. He saw two travellers on the road and with rapid steps was about to overtake them when he heard them speak these words: Now he is being bound to the cross. Fear quickened his steps; he was driven on by torments of anxiety; then in the suns dying rays, the towers of Syracuse glinted from afar, and Philostratus, his households faithful steward, came towards him. With horror he recognized his master. Turn back! You will not save your friend now. So save your own life! At this moment he meets his death. From hour to hour he awaited your return with hope in his soul; the tyrants derision could not weaken his courageous faith. If it is too late, if I cannot appear before him as his welcome saviour, then let death unite us. The bloodthirsty tyrant shall never gloat that one friend broke his pledge to another let him slaughter two victims and believe in love and loyalty. The sun set as he reached the gate and saw the cross already raised, surrounded by a gaping throng. His friend was already being hoisted up by the ropes when he forced his way through the dense crowd. Kill me, hangman! he cried. It is I for whom he stood surety. The people standing by were seized with astonishment; the two friends were in each others arms, weeping with grief and joy. No eye was without tears; the wondrous tidings reached the king; he was stirred by humane feelings, and at once summoned the friends before his throne. He looked at them long, amazed, then he spoke: You have succeeded, you have conquered this heart of mine. Loyalty is no vain delusion then take me, too, as a friend. Grant me this request: admit me as the third in your fellowship.

Disc 8 Das Geheimnis The secret Track bu First setting, D250. 7 August 1815; published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by Dame Janet Baker

Sie konnte mir kein Wrtchen sagen, Zu viele Lauscher waren wach; Den Blick nur durft ich schchtern fragen, Und wohl verstand ich, was er sprach.

She could not speak one word to me, there were too many listening; I could only shyly question the look in her eyes, and well understood what it meant.

82

August 1815 SONG TEXTS


Leis komm ich her in deine Stille, Du schn belaubtes Buchenzelt, Verbirg in deiner grnen Hlle Die Liebenden dem Aug der Welt! Von ferne mit verworrnem Sausen Arbeitet der geschftge Tag, Und durch der Stimmen hohles Brausen Erkenn ich schwerer Hmmer Schlag. So sauer ringt die kargen Lose Der Mensch dem harten Himmel ab: Doch leicht erworben aus dem Schosse Der Gtter fllt das Glck herab.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Softly I approach your silence, leafy beech grove; beneath your green cloak conceal the lovers from the eyes of the world. Far away, in whirring confusion, the bustling day is at work, and through the empty buzz of voices I discern the beat of heavy hammers. Thus man toils to wrest his meagre lot from a cruel heaven. Yet happiness is easily won, falling from the lap of the gods.

Hoffnung
Es reden und trumen die Menschen viel Von bessern knftigen Tagen; Nach einem glcklichen goldenen Ziel Sieht man sie rennen und jagen. Die Welt wird alt und wird wieder jung, Doch der Mensch hofft immer Verbesserung! Die Hoffnung fhrt ihn ins Leben ein, Sie umflattert den frhlichen Knaben, Den Jngling lockt ihr Zauberschein, Sie wird mit dem Greis nicht begraben; Denn beschliesst er im Grabe den mden Lauf, Noch am Grabe pflanzt er die Hoffnung auf. Es ist kein leerer schmeichelnder Wahn, Erzeugt im Gehirne des Toren. Im Herzen kndet es laut sich an: Zu was Besserm sind wir geboren! Und was die innere Stimme spricht, Das tuscht die hoffende Seele nicht.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Hope
Men talk and dream of better days to come; you see them running and chasing after a happy, golden goal. The world grows old, and young again, but man forever hopes for better things. Hope leads man into life, it hovers around the happy boy; its magic radiance inspires the youth, nor is it buried with the old man. For though he ends his weary life in the grave yet on that grave he plants his hope. It is no vain, flattering illusion, born in the mind of a fool. Loudly it proclaims itself in mens hearts: we are born for better things. And what the inner voice tells us does not deceive the hopeful soul.

8 Disc
cl Track

First setting, D251. 7 August 1815; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Patricia Rozario

Das Mdchen aus der Fremde


In einem Tal bei armen Hirten Erschien mit jedem jungen Jahr, Sobald die ersten Lerchen schwirrten, Ein Mdchen schn und wunderbar. Sie war nicht in dem Tal geboren, Man wusste nicht woher sie kam, Doch schnell war ihre Spur verloren, Sobald das Mdchen Abschied nahm. Beseligend war ihre Nhe Und alle Herzen wurden weit, Doch eine Wrde, eine Hhe Entfernte die Vertraulichkeit.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

The maid from a strange land


To poor shepherds in a valley appeared each spring with the first soaring larks, a strange and lovely maiden. She had not been born in the valley. No one knew from where she came. But when the maiden departed they soon lost trace of her. Her very presence was blissful and all hearts opened to her, yet her dignity, her loftiness, precluded familiarity.

8 Disc
cm Track

Second setting, D252. 12 August 1815; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by Simon Keenlyside

Punschlied Im Norden zu singen


Auf der Berge freien Hhen, In der Mittagssonne Schein, An des warmen Strahles Krften Zeugt Natur den goldnen Wein.

On drinking punch To be sung in the north


On the free heights of the mountains, in the light of the midday sun, and by the power of its warm beams, nature produces the golden vine.

8 Disc
cn Track

D253. 18 August 1815; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by John Mark Ainsley and Jamie MacDougall

83

SONG TEXTS August 1815


Und noch niemand hats erkundet, Wie die grosse Mutter schafft, Unergrndlich ist das Wirken, Unerforschlich ist die Kraft. Funkelnd wie ein Sohn der Sonne, Wie des Lichtes Feuerquell, Springt er perlend aus der Tonne, Purpurn und kristallenhell.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

And no one has ever divined how the Great Mother creates; her work is unfathomable, her power inscrutable. Sparkling like a child of the sun, like the fiery source of light, it spurts, bubbling, from the barrel, crimson and crystal-bright.

Disc 8 Hin und wieder fliegen die Pfeile To and fro the arrows fly Track co D239 No 3. After 26 July 1815; first published in 1893 in series 15 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
arietta of Lucinde from the Singspiel Claudine von Villa Bella sung by Arleen Auger

Hin und wieder fliegen die Pfeile; Amors leichte Pfeile fliegen Von dem schlanken golden Bogen, Mdchen, seid ihr nicht getroffen? Es ist Glck! es ist nur Glck. Warum fliegt er so in Eile? Jene dort will er besiegen; Schon ist er vorbei geflogen; Sorglos bleibt der Busen offen, Gebet acht! er kommt zurck!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

To and fro the arrows fly; Cupids light arrows fly from the slender golden bow. Maidens, are you not smitten? It is chance! It is just chance! Why does he fly with such haste? He desires to conquer that maiden there; already he has flown by; the heart remains open and carefree; take heed! He will be back!

Disc 8 Liebe schwrmt auf allen Wegen Love roves everywhere Track cp D239 No 6. After 26 July 1815; first published in 1893 in series 15 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
arietta of Claudine from the Singspiel Claudine von Villa Bella sung by Arleen Auger

Liebe schwrmt auf allen Wegen; Treue wohnt fr sich allein. Liebe kommt euch rasch entgegen; Aufgesucht will Treue sein.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Love roves everywhere; constancy lives alone. Love comes rushing towards you; constancy must be sought.

Disc 8 Die Spinnerin The spinner Track cq D247. August 1815; published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 118 No 6
sung by Elly Ameling

Als ich still und ruhig spann, Ohne nur zu stocken, Trat ein schner junger Mann Nahe mir zum Rocken. Lobte, was zu loben war: Sollte das was schaden? Mein dem Flachse gleiches Haar, Und den gleichen Faden. Ruhig war er nicht dabei, Liess es nicht beim Alten; Und der Faden riss entzwei, Den ich lang erhalten. Und des Flachses Stein-Gewicht Gab noch viele Zahlen; Aber, ach! ich konnte nicht Mehr mit ihnen prahlen. Als ich sie zum Weber trug, Fhlt ich was sich regen, Und mein armes Herze schlug Mit geschwindern Schlgen.

As I span, silently and calmly, without stopping, a fair young man approached me at my distaff. He duly complimented me what harm could that do? on my flaxen hair and on the flaxen thread. But he was not content with that, and would not let things be. And the thread which I had long held snapped in two. And the flaxs stone-weight produced many more threads; but, alas, I could no longer boast about them. When I took them to the weaver I felt something stir, and my poor heart beat more quickly.

84

August 1815 SONG TEXTS


Nun, beim heissen Sonnenstich, Bring ichs auf die Bleiche, Und mit Mhe bck ich mich Nach dem nchsten Teiche. Was ich in dem Kmmerlein Still und fein gesponnen, Kommt wie kann es anders sein? Endlich an die Sonnen.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832) END OF DISC 8

Now, in the scorching sun, I take my work out to be bleached, and with great effort I bend over the nearest pool. What I span so quietly and finely in my little room will at length how can it be otherwise? come out into the light of day.

Der Gott und die Bajadere


Mahadh, der Herr der Erde, Kommt herab zum sechstenmal, Dass er unsres gleichen werde, Mit zu fhlen Freud und Qual. Er bequemt sich hier zu wohnen, Lsst sich alles selbst geschehn. Soll er strafen oder schonen, Muss er Menschen menschlich sehn. Und hat er die Stadt sich als Wandrer betrachtet, Die Grossen belauert, auf Kleine geachtet, Verlsst er sie Abends, um weiter zu gehn. Als er nun hinaus gegangen, Wo die letzten Huser sind, Sieht er, mit gemalten Wangen, Ein verlornes schnes Kind. Grss dich, Jungfrau! Dank der Ehre! Wart, ich komme gleich hinaus Und wer bist du? Bajadere, Und dies ist der Liebe Haus. Sie rhrt sich, die Cimbeln zum Tanze du schlagen; Sie weiss sich so lieblich im Kreise zu tragen, Sie neigt sich und biegt sich, und reicht ihm den Strauss. Schmeichelnd zieht sie ihn zur Schwelle, Lebhaft ihn ins Haus hinein. Schner Fremdling, lampenhelle Soll sogleich die Htte sein. Bist du md, ich will dich laben, Lindern deiner Fsse Schmerz. Was du willst, das sollst du haben, Ruhe, Freuden oder Scherz. Sie lindert geschftig geheuchelte Leiden. Der Gttliche lchelt; er siehet mit Freuden, Durch tiefes Verderben, ein menschliches Herz. Spt entschlummert, unter Scherzen, Frh erwacht, nach kurzer Rast, Findet sie an ihrem Herzen Tod den vielgeliebten Gast. Schreiend strzt sie auf ihn nieder; Aber nicht erweckt sie ihn, Und man trgt die starren Glieder Bald zur Flammengrube hin. Sie hret die Priester, die Totengesnge, Sie raset und rennet, und teilet die Menge. Wer bist du? was drngt zu der Grube dich hin?

The god and the dancing-girl


Mahadeva, Lord of the Earth, descends a sixth time that he might become one of us and with us feel joy and sorrow. He deigns to dwell here and experience all things himself. If he is to punish or forgive he must see mortals as a mortal. And having viewed the town in the guise of a traveller watching the great, observing the lowly, he leaves it in the evening to journey onwards. When he had walked out to where the last houses are, he encounters a lovely, forlorn girl with painted cheeks. Greetings to you, maiden! I thank you for this honour! Wait, I shall come straight out. And who are you? A dancing-girl, and this is the house of love. She hastens to begin the dance with a clash of cymbals. She knows how to circle round so charmingly; she dips and turns, and hands him a posy. She coaxes him to the threshold and vivaciously draws him into the house. Fair stranger, this humble abode shall at once be bright with lamplight. If you are weary, I shall refresh you, and soothe your sore feet. You shall have whatever you desire: rest, pleasure or play. Assiduously she soothes his feigned pains. The immortal smiles; joyfully he beholds, through her deep corruption, a human heart. Falling asleep late while dallying, waking early after brief rest, she finds the beloved guest dead at her side. Screaming, she falls upon him, but she cannot revive him. And soon his rigid limbs are borne to the funeral pyre. She hears the priests and the funeral chants; in her frenzy she rushes and pierces the crowd. Who are you? What drives you to this grave?

9 Disc
1 Track

D254. 18 August 1815; first published by Weinberger and Hofbauer in Vienna in 1887 sung by Christine Schfer, John Mark Ainsley and Michael George

85

SONG TEXTS August 1815


Bei der Bahre strzt sie nieder, Ihr Geschrei durchdringt die Luft: Meinen Gatten will ich wieder! Und ich such ihn in der Gruft. Soll zur Asche mir zerfallen Dieser Glieder Gtterpracht? Mein! er war es, mein vor allen! Ach, nur eine ssse Nacht! Es singen die Priester: Wir tragen die Alten, Nach langem Ermatten und sptem Erkalten, Wir tragen die Jugend, noch eh sies gedacht. Hre deiner Priester Lehre: Dieser war dein Gatte nicht. Lebst du doch als Bajadere, Und so hast du keine Pflicht. Nur dem Krper folgt der Schatten In das stille Totenreich; Nur die Gattin folgt dem Gatten: Das ist Pflicht und Ruhm zugleich. Ertne, Drommete, zu heiliger Klage! O, nehmet, ihr Gtter! die Zierde der Tage, O, nehmet den Jngling in Flammen zu euch! So das Chor, das ohn Erbarmen Mehret ihres Herzens Not; Und mit ausgestreckten Armen Springt sie in den heissen Tod. Doch der Gtter-Jngling hebet Aus der Flamme sich empor, Und in seinen Armen schwebet Die Geliebte mit hervor. Es freut sich die Gottheit der reuigen Snder; Unsterbliche heben verlorene Kinder Mit feurigen Armen zum Himmel empor.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

By the bier she throws herself down, and her cries echo through the air: I want my husband back! And I shall seek him in the tomb. Shall these limbs in their divine glory fall to ashes before me? He was mine, mine alone, alas, for but one sweet night! The priests chant: We bear away the old, for long exhausted, lately grown cold; we bear away the young sooner than they imagine. Hear the teaching of your priests: this man was not your husband. For you live as a dancing-girl, and thus you know no duty. The body is followed only by its shadow into the silent kingdom of death. Only the wife follows the husband; that is at once her duty and her glory. Sound, trumpet, in sacred mourning! Take, O gods, the flower of his days, take the youth to you in flames! Thus chants the choir, mercilessly deepening the pain within her heart. And with outstretched arms she leaps into the burning death. But the divine youth rises up from the pyre and his beloved soars aloft in his arms. The godhead rejoices in penitent sinners; with arms of fire immortals raise lost children up to heaven.

Disc 9 Der Rattenfnger The rat-catcher Track 2 D255. 19 August 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 47 of the Nachlass
sung by Simon Keenlyside

Ich bin der wohlbekannte Snger, Der vielgereiste Rattenfnger, Den diese altberhmte Stadt Gewiss besonders ntig hat. Und wrens Ratten noch so viele, Und wren Wiesel mit im Spiele, Von allen subr ich diesen Ort, Sie mssen miteinander fort. Dann ist der gutgelaunte Snger Mitunter auch ein Kinderfnger, Der selbst die wildesten bezwingt, Wenn er die goldnen Mrchen singt. Und wren Knaben noch so trutzig, Und wren Mdchen noch so stutzig, In meine Saiten greif ich ein, Sie mssen alle hinterdrein. Dann ist der vielgewandte Snger Gelegentlich ein Mdchenfnger; In keinem Stdtchen langt er an, Wo ers nicht mancher angetan. Und wren Mdchen noch so blde, Und wren Weiber noch so sprde, Doch allen wird so liebebang Bei Zaubersaiten und Gesang.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

I am the well-known singer, the much-travelled rat-catcher, of whom this famous old city certainly has special need. However many rats there are, and even if there are weasels too, Ill clear the place of them all; they must go, every single one. Now, this good-humoured singer is also occasionally a child-catcher, who can tame even the most unruly when he sings his golden tales. However defiant the boys, however suspicious the girls, when I pluck my strings they must all follow me. Now, this versatile singer is occasionally a catcher of girls. He never enters a town without captivating many. However shy the girls, and however aloof the ladies, they all become lovesick at the sound of his magic lute and his singing.

86

August 1815 SONG TEXTS Der Schatzgrber


Arm am Beutel, krank am Herzen, Schleppt ich meine langen Tage. Armut ist die grsste Plage, Reichtum ist das hchste Gut! Und zu enden meine Schmerzen, Ging ich einen Schatz zu graben. Meine Seele sollst du haben! Schrieb ich hin mit eignem Blut. Und so zog ich Kreis um Kreise, Stellte wunderbare Flammen, Kraut und Knochenwerk zusammen: Die Beschwrung war vollbracht. Und auf die gelernte Weise Grub ich nach dem alten Schatze, Auf dem angezeigten Platze; Schwarz und strmisch war die Nacht. Und ich sah ein Licht von weiten; Und es kam, gleich einem Sterne, Hinten aus der fernsten Ferne, Eben als es Zwlfe schlug. Und da galt kein Vorbereiten. Heller wards mit einemmale Von dem Glanz der vollen Schale, Die ein schner Knabe trug. Holde Augen sah ich blinken Unter dichtem Blumenkranze; In des Trankes Himmelsglanze Trat er in den Kreis herein. Und er hiess mich freundlich trinken; Und ich dacht: es kann der Knabe Mit der schnen lichten Gabe, Wahrlich nicht der Bse sein. Trinke Mut des reinen Lebens! Dann verstehst du die Belehrung, Kommst, mit ngstlicher Beschwrung, Nicht zurck an diesen Ort. Grabe hier nicht mehr vergebens: Tages Arbeit! Abends Gste! Saure Wochen! Frohe Feste! Sei dein knftig Zauberwort.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

The treasure-seeker
Empty of purse, sick of heart, I dragged out my long days. Poverty is the greatest ill, wealth the highest good. And to end my suffering I went to dig for treasure. You shall have my soul! I wrote in my own blood. I drew circle upon circle, and mixed herbs and bones in magic flames: the spell was cast. In the decreed manner and in the appointed place I dug for the old treasure; the night was black and stormy. I saw a far-off light; it came like a star from the remote distance on the stroke of twelve. Then, without warning, it suddenly grew brighter from the radiance of the filled cup borne by a fair youth. I saw his kindly eyes sparkling beneath a close-woven garland of flowers; in the potions celestial glow he stepped into the circle. Graciously he bade me drink; and I thought: that boy with his fair, shining gift can surely not be the Devil. Drink the courage of pure life! Then you will understand my words, and never, with anxious incantation, return to this place. Dig here no more in vain; work by day, conviviality in the evening, weeks of toil and joyous holidays! Let this from now on be your magic spell.

9 Disc
3 Track

D256. 19 August 1815; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by Michael George

Heidenrslein

Wild rose

9 Disc
4 Track

D257. 19 August 1815; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 3 No 2 cf Tomaek Heidenrslein, disc 39 2 sung by Patricia Rozario

Sah ein Knab ein Rslein stehn, Rslein auf der Heiden, War so jung und morgenschn, Lief er schnell, es nah zu sehn, Sahs mit vielen Freuden. Rslein, Rslein, Rslein rot, Rslein auf der Heiden. Knabe sprach: Ich breche dich, Rslein auf der Heiden! Rslein sprach: Ich steche dich, Dass du ewig denkst an mich, Und ich wills nicht leiden. Rslein, Rslein, Rslein rot, Rslein auf der Heiden.

A boy saw a wild rose growing in the heather; it was so young, and as lovely as the morning. He ran swiftly to look more closely, looked on it with great joy. Wild rose, wild rose, wild rose red, wild rose in the heather. Said the boy: I shall pluck you, wild rose in the heather! Said the rose: I shall prick you so that you will always remember me. And I will not suffer it. Wild rose, wild rose, wild rose red, wild rose in the heather.

87

SONG TEXTS August 1815


Und der wilde Knabe brach S Rslein auf der Heiden; Rslein wehrte sich und stach, Half ihm doch kein Weh und Ach, Musst es eben leiden. Rslein, Rslein, Rslein rot, Rslein auf der Heiden.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

And the impetuous boy plucked the wild rose from the heather; the rose defended herself and pricked him, but her cries of pain were to no avail; she simply had to suffer. Wild rose, wild rose, wild rose red, wild rose in the heather.

Disc 9 Bundeslied Song of fellowship Track 5 D258. 4 or 19 August 1815; first published by Weinberger & Hofbauer in Vienna in 1887
sung by John Mark Ainsley, Simon Keenlyside and Michael George

In allen guten Stunden, Erhht von Lieb und Wein, Soll dieses Lied verbunden Von uns gesungen sein! Uns hlt der Gott zusammen, Der uns hierher gebracht. Erneuert unsre Flammen, Er hat sie angefacht. So glhet frhlich heute, Seid recht von Herzen eins, Auf! trinkt erneuter Freude Dies Glas des echten Weins! Auf, in der holden Stunde Stosst an, und ksset treu, Bei jedem neuen Bunde, Die alten wieder neu! Wer lebt in unserm Kreise, Und lebt nicht selig drin? Geniesst die freie Weise Und treuen Brudersinn! So bleibt durch alle Zeiten Herz Herzen zugekehrt; Von keinen Kleinigkeiten Wird unser Bund gestrt. Mit jedem Schritt wird weiter Die rasche Lebensbahn, Und heiter, immer heiter Steigt unser Blick hinan. Uns wird es nimmer bange, Wenn alles steigt und fllt, Und bleiben lange! lange! Auf ewig so gesellt.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Whenever times are good, enhanced by love and wine, let us together sing this song. The god, who brought us here, binds us together, and rekindles the flames he first lit for us. Then glow with happiness today, be truly united in your hearts. Come, drink this glass of purest wine to our renewed joy. Come, at this sweet hour clink your glasses and, with a kiss, at each new meeting renew our old bonds. He who lives among us and merrily too enjoys our free and easy ways and a true sense of brotherhood. So for all time let our hearts be joined together, and let no pettiness disturb our fellowship. With each step we move further along lifes rapid course and, ever cheerful, our eyes are raised heavenwards. We shall never grow fearful, though all things rise and fall; and long may we remain thus, eternally united.

Disc 9 An den Mond To the moon Track 6 First setting, D259. 19 August 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 47 of the Nachlass
sung by Sarah Walker

Fllest wieder Busch und Tal Still mit Nebelglanz, Lsest endlich auch einmal Meine Seele ganz. Breitest ber mein Gefild Lindernd deinen Blick, Wie des Freundes Auge, mild ber mein Geschick. Jeden Nachklang fhlt mein Herz Froh- und trber Zeit, Wandle zwischen Freud and Schmerz In der Einsamkeit.

Once more you silently fill wood and vale with your hazy gleam and at last set my soul quite free. You cast your soothing gaze over my fields; with a friends gentle eye you watch over my fate. My heart feels every echo of times both glad and gloomy. I hover between joy and sorrow in my solitude.

88

August 1815 SONG TEXTS


Fliesse, fliesse, lieber Fluss! Nimmer werd ich froh; So verrauschte Scherz und Kuss, Und die Treue so. Rausche, Fluss, das Tal entlang, Ohne Rast und Ruh, Rausche, flstre meinem Sang Melodien zu, Wenn du in der Winternacht Wtend berschwillst, Oder um die Frhlingspracht Junger Knospen quillst. Selig, wer sich vor der Welt Ohne Hass verschliesst, Einen Freund am Busen hlt Und mit dem geniesst, Was, von Menschen nicht gewusst Oder nicht bedacht, Durch das Labyrinth der Brust Wandelt in der Nacht.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Flow on, beloved river! I shall never be happy: thus have laughter and kisses rippled away, and with them constancy. Murmur on, river, through the valley, without ceasing, murmur on, whispering melodies to my song, When on winter nights you angrily overflow, or when you bathe the springtime splendour of the young buds. Happy he who, without hatred, shuts himself off from the world, holds one friend to his heart, and with him enjoys That which, unknown to and undreamt of by men, wanders by night through the labyrinth of the heart.

Wonne der Wehmut

Delight in melancholy

9 Disc
7 Track

D260. 20 August 1815; published by M J Leidesdorf in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 115 No 2 cf Dietrichstein Wonne der Wehmut, disc 39 4 sung by Dame Janet Baker

Trocknet nicht, trocknet nicht, Trnen der ewigen Liebe! Ach, nur dem halbgetrockneten Auge Wie de, wie tot die Welt ihm erscheint! Trocknet nicht, trocknet nicht, Trnen unglcklicher Liebe!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Do not grow dry, do not grow dry, tears of eternal love! Ah, even when the eye is but half dry how desolate, how dead the world appears! Do not grow dry, do not grow dry, tears of unhappy love!

Wer kauft Liebesgtter?


Von allen schnen Waren, Zum Markte hergefahren, Wird keine mehr behagen Als die wir euch getragen Aus fremden Lndern bringen. O hret was wir singen! Und seht die schnen Vgel, Sie stehen zum Verkauf. Zuerst beseht den grossen, Den lustigen, den losen! Er hpfet leicht und munter Von Baum und Busch herunter; Gleich ist er wieder droben. Wir wollen ihn nicht loben. O seht den muntern Vogel! Er steht hier zum Verkauf. Betrachtet nun den kleinen, Er will bedchtig scheinen, Und doch ist er der lose, So gut als wie der grosse; Er zeiget meist im Stillen Den allerbesten Willen. Der lose kleine Vogel, Er steht hier zum Verkauf.

Who will buy these Cupids?


Of all the beautiful things brought here to market, none will please you more than those we bring you from foreign lands. Hear our song! See the fine birds! They are for sale. First look at this big one, this jolly, rakish fellow. Chirpily, lightly, he hops down from bush and tree, now he is up there again. We are not going to sing his praises. Look at the chirpy fellow! He is for sale. Now take a look at this little one. He pretends to be thoughtful, but hes every bit as rakish as the big fellow. In his quiet way he shows the best will in the world. This rakish little fellow is for sale.

9 Disc
8 Track

D261. 21 August 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 47 of the Nachlass sung by Elly Ameling

89

SONG TEXTS August 1815


O seht das kleine Tubchen, Das liebe Turtelweibchen! Die Mdchen sind so zierlich, Verstndig und manierlich; Sie mag sich gerne putzen Und eure Liebe nutzen. Der kleine, zarte Vogel, Er steht hier zum Verkauf. Wir wollen sie nicht loben, Sie stehn zu allen Proben. Sie lieben sich das Neue; Doch ber ihre treue Verlangt nicht Brief und Siegel; Sie haben alle Flgel. Wie artig sind die Vgel. Wie reizend ist der Kauf!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

See this little dove, this sweet turtle dove. Girls are so dainty, so understanding and well-mannered. She likes to spruce herself and to serve your love. This delicate little bird is for sale. We are not going to sing their praises, you can try them out as you wish. They love novelty, but as for their constancy, do not ask for any promises! They all have wings. What charming birds! What a delightful buy!

Disc 9 Die Frhlichkeit Gaiety Track 9 D262. 22 August 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Ian Bostridge

Wess Adern leichtes Blut durchspringt, Der ist ein reicher Mann; Auch keine goldnen Ketten zwingt Ihm Furcht und Hoffnung an. Denn Frhlichkeit geleitet ihn Bis an ein sanftes Grab Wohl durch ein langes Leben hin An ihrem Zauberstab. Wohin sein muntrer Blick sich kehrt, Ist alles schn und gut, Ist alles heil und liebenswert Und frhlich wie sein Mut. Fr ihn nur wird bei Sonnenschein Die Welt zum Paradies, Ist klar der Bach, die Quelle rein, Und ihr Gemurmel sss.
MARTIN JOSEF PRANDSTETTER (17601798)

The man whose blood surges lightly through his veins is rich. He is not fettered by the golden chains of fear and hope. For gaiety guides him with its magic wand through a long life to a gentle death. Wherever he turns his cheerful gaze all is fair and good. All is well, worthy of love and as blithe as his heart. For him alone sunshine makes the world a paradise; the brook is clear, the spring pure, and its murmur sweet.

Disc 9 Lob des Tokayers In praise of Tokay Track bl D248. August 1815; first published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 118 No 4
sung by John Mark Ainsley, Jamie MacDougall, Simon Keenlyside and Michael George

O kstlicher Tokayer, o kniglicher Wein, Du stimmest meine Leier zu seltnen Reime rein. Mit langentbehrter Wonne Und neuerwachtem Scherz Erwrmst du, gleich der Sonne, Mein halberstorbnes Herz. Du stimmest meine Leier zu seltnen Reime rein, O kstlicher Tokayer, o kniglicher Wein! O kstlicher Tokayer, o kniglicher Wein, Dir soll, als Gramzerstreuer, dies Lied geweihet sein! In schwermutsvollen Launen Beflgelst du das Blut, Bei Blonden und bei Braunen Giebst du dem Bldsinn Mut. Dir soll, als Gramzerstreuer, dies Lied geweihet sein, O kstlicher Tokayer, o kniglicher Wein!
GABRIELE VON BAUMBERG (17751839)

Exquisite Tokay, prince among wines! You inspire my lute to rare flights of poetry. With long-desired bliss and newly awakened gaiety you warm my half-frozen heart like the sun. You inspire my lute to rare flights of poetry. Exquisite Tokay, prince among wines! Exquisite Tokay, prince among wines! To you who allays sorrow this song is dedicated. In melancholy moods you fire the blood; you give courage to the bashful, to blonde and brunette alike. To you who allays sorrow this song is dedicated. Exquisite Tokay, prince among wines!

90

August 1815 SONG TEXTS Cora an die Sonne


Nach so vielen trben Tagen Send uns wiederum einmal, Mitleidsvoll fr unsre Klagen, Einen sanften milden Strahl. Liebe Sonne! trinkden Regen, Der herab zu strzen drut; Deine Strahlen sind uns Segen, Deine Blicke Seligkeit. Schein, ach, scheine, liebe Sonne! Jede Freude dank ich dir; Alle Geists- und Herzenswonne, Licht und Wrme kommt von dir.
GABRIELE VON BAUMBERG (17751839)

Cora to the sun


After so many gloomy days take pity on our plaint, and send us once more a soft, gentle ray of light. Dear sun, drink up the rain that threatens to pour down: your rays are a blessing to us; your glances bliss. Shine, ah, shine, dear sun! All delight I owe to you; every joy of the spirit and the heart, all light and warmth come from you.

9 Disc
bm Track

D263. 22 August 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1848 in volume 42 of the Nachlass sung by Catherine Wyn-Rogers

Der Morgenkuss
Durch eine ganze Nacht sich nah zu sein, So Hand in Hand, so Arm im Arme weilen, So viel empfinden, ohne mitzuteilen, Ist eine wonnevolle Pein. So immer Seelenblick im Seelenblick Auch den geheimsten Wunsch des Herzens sehen, So wenig sprechen, und sich doch verstehen Ist hohes martervolles Glck! Zum Lohn fr die im Zwang verschwundne Zeit Dann bei dem Morgenstrahl, warm, mit Entzcken Sich Mund an Mund, und Herz an Herz sich drcken O dies ist Engelseligkeit!
GABRIELE VON BAUMBERG (17751839)

The morning kiss


To be close the whole night long, to linger hand in hand, arm in arm, to feel so much, without revealing it in words, is blissful torment. To gaze constantly into each others soul, to see into the hearts most secret desire, to speak so little, and yet to understand each other, is sublime, anguished happiness. Then, in the morning light, as a reward for time of necessity wasted, warmly, rapturously to press mouth to mouth and heart to heart oh, that is angelic bliss!

9 Disc
bn Track

D264. 22 August 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 45 of the Nachlass sung by Dame Margaret Price

Abendstndchen. An Lina
Sei sanft, wie ihre Seele, Und heiter wie ihr Blick, O Abend! und vermhle Mit seltner Treu das Glck. Wenn alles schlft, und trbe Die stille Lampe scheint, Und hoffnungslose Liebe Oft helle Trnen weint: Vielleicht, dass Klagetne Von meinem Saitenspiel Mehr wirken auf die Schne, Mehr reizen ihr Gefhl; Vielleicht, dass meine Saiten Und meine Phantasien Ein Herz zur Liebe leiten, Das unempfindlich schien.

Evening serenade. To Lina


Be as gentle as her soul, and as serene as her gaze, O evening, and reward such rare constancy with happiness! When all sleep, the silent lamp burns dimly; only hopeless love often sheds its shining tears. Perhaps the sorrowful tones of my strings will touch the fair maiden more deeply, and stir her feelings. Perhaps my strings and my improvisations will awaken love in a heart that seemed unfeeling.

9 Disc
bo Track

D265. 23 August 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Ian Bostridge

GABRIELE VON BAUMBERG (17751839) after an unidentified French poem

91

SONG TEXTS August 1815


Disc 9 Morgenlied Morning song Track bp D266. 24 August 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Lorna Anderson

Willkommen, rotes Morgenlicht! Es grsset dich mein Geist, Der durch des Schlafes Hlle bricht, Und seinen Schpfer preist. Willkommen, goldner Morgenstrahl, Der schon den Berg begrsst, Und bald im stillen Quellental Die kleine Blume ksst!

Welcome, rosy light of morning! My spirit greets you, breaking through the veil of sleep to praise its Creator. Welcome, golden ray of morning, which already greets the mountains, and in the silent valley, by the stream, will soon kiss the little flowers.

FRIEDRICH LEOPOLD, GRAF ZU STOLBERG-STOLBERG (17501819)

Disc 9 Trinklied Drinking song Track bq D267. 25 August 1815; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by John Mark Ainsley, Jamie MacDougall, Simon Keenlyside and Michael George

Auf! Jeder sei nun froh und sorgenfrei! Ist noch Jemand, der mit Gram Schwer im Herzen zu uns kam: Auf! auf! er sei nun froh und sorgenfrei!
ANONYMOUS

Come! Let every man be glad and carefree! And if theres anyone who came to us With grief weighing on his heart, come, let him now be glad and carefree!

Disc 9 Bergknappenlied Miners song Track br D268. 25 August 1815; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by John Mark Ainsley, Jamie MacDougall, Simon Keenlyside and Michael George

Hinab, ihr Brder, in den Schacht! Hinab mit frohem Mut! Es ist ein Gott, der fr uns wacht, Ein Vater gross und gut!
ANONYMOUS

Down into the shaft, brothers, down with good cheer. There is a God who watches over us, a Father great and good!

Disc 9 An die Sonne To the sun Track bs D270. 25 August 1815; published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 118 No 5
sung by Dame Margaret Price

Sinke, liebe Sonne, sinke! Ende deinen trben Lauf, Und an deine Stelle winke Bald den Mond herauf. Herrlicher und schner dringe Aber Morgen dann herfr, Liebe Sonn! und mit dir bringe Meinen Lieben mir.
GABRIELE VON BAUMBERG (17751839)

Sink, dearest sun, sink! End your dusky course, and in your place quickly bid the moon rise. But tomorrow come forth more glorious and more beautiful, dearest sun! And with you bring my love.

Disc 9 Der Weiberfreund The philanderer Track bt D271. 25 August 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Martyn Hill

Noch fand von Evens Tchterschaaren Ich keine, die mir nicht gefiel. Von fnfzehn bis zu fnfzig Jahren Ist jede meiner Wnsche Ziel. Durch Farb und Form, durch Witz und Gte, Durch alles fhl ich mich entzckt; Ein Ebenbild der Aphrodite Ist jede, die mein Aug erblickt. Selbst die vermag mein Herz zu angeln, Bei der man jeden Reiz vermisst: Mag immerhin ihr alles mangeln, Wenns nur ein weiblich Wesen ist!

Among the daughters of Eve I have never yet found one that displeased me. From fifteen years to fifty each one is the object of my desires. Everything about them delights me colour and shape, wit and goodness; each one that my eyes behold is an image of Aphrodite. Even she in whom all charms are deemed lacking has the power to win my heart: it matters not that she lacks everything as long as she is a female creature!

ABRAHAM COWLEY (16181667) translated by JOSEF VON RATSCHKY (17571810)

92

August 1815 SONG TEXTS An die Sonne


Knigliche Morgensonne, Sei gegrsst in deiner Wonne, Hoch gegrsst in deiner Pracht! Golden fliesst schon um die Hgel Dein Gewand; und das Geflgel Eines jeden Waldes wacht. Alles fhlet deinen Segen; Fluren singen dir entgegen, Alles wird Zusammenklang: Und du hrest gern die Chre Froher Wlder, o so hre, Hr auch meinen Lobgesang.
CHRISTOPH AUGUST TIEDGE (17521841)

To the sun
Regal morning sun, I greet you in your rapture; I welcome you in your splendour! Already your golden raiment drapes the hills, and in every forest birds awaken. Your blessing is felt by all; the meadows sing to greet you; all becomes harmonious. And as you hear with delight the chorus of the happy forests, so too hear my song of praise.

9 Disc
bu Track

D272. 25 August 1815; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Lorna Anderson

Das Leben ist ein Traum


Das Leben ist ein Traum, Man merkt, man fhlt ihn kaum; Denn schnell wie Wolken ziehn, Ist dieser Traum dahin. Wohl dem, der gut getrumt, Wohl dem, dess Saat hier keimt Zur Ernte fr die Zeit Der Unvergnglichkeit. Das Leben ist der Blick Auf einer Zukunft Glck, Das jeder haben kann, Der hier es wohlgethan. Wohl dem, der nach der Nacht Des Grabes froh erwacht, Den nicht die Stimme schreckt, Die aus dem Schlummer weckt. Wer bei der Arbeit Schluss Die Rechnung frchten muss, Hat wahrlich keinen Blick Auf einer Zukunft Glck.
JOHANN CHRISTOPH WANNOVIUS (1753?)

Life is a dream
Life is a dream, hardly noticed, hardly felt; for swift as the clouds the dream is gone. Happy he who has dreamed well; happy he whose seed ripens here to harvest for eternity. Life is a glimpse of future bliss which everyone can attain who has here done good. Happy he who after the graves night wakens joyfully, who is not frightened by the voice that wakes him from his sleep. He who must fear the reckoning when his work is ended will in truth have no glimpse of future bliss.

9 Disc
cl Track

D269. 25 August 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in volume 44 of the Nachlass sung by Patricia Rozario, Lorna Anderson and Catherine Wyn-Rogers

Lilla an die Morgenrte


Wie schn bist du, du gldne Morgenrte, Wie feierlich bist du! Dir jauchzt im festlichen Gesang der Flte Der Schfer dankbar zu. Dich grsst des Waldes Chor, melodisch singet Die Lerch und Nachtigall, Und rings umher von Berg und Tal erklinget Der Freude Widerhall.
ANONYMOUS

Lilla to the dawn


How beautiful you are, golden dawn, how majestic! With his flutes festive song the shepherd offers you joyful thanks. The chorus of the woods greets you, lark and nightingale sing sweetly, and round about joys echo resounds.

9 Disc
cm Track

D273. 25 August 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Arleen Auger

93

SONG TEXTS August 1815


Disc 9 Tischlerlied Carpenters song Track cn D274. 25 August 1815; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 48 of the Nachlass
sung by Michael George

Mein Handwerk geht durch alle Welt Und bringt mir manchen Thaler Geld, Dess bin ich hoch vergngt. Den Tischler braucht ein jeder Stand. Schon wird das Kind durch meine Hand In sanften Schlaf gewiegt. Das Bette zu der Hochzeitnacht Wird auch durch meinen Fleiss gemacht Und knstlich angemalt. Ein Geizhals sei auch noch so karg, Er braucht am Ende einen Sarg, Und der wird gut bezahlt. Drum hab ich immer frohen Mut Und mache meine Arbeit gut, Es sei Tisch oder Schrank. Und wer bei mir brav viel bestellt Und zahlt mir immer bares Geld, Dem sag ich grossen Dank.
ANONYMOUS

My craftsmanship travels the world over and brings me many a thaler, which makes me very happy. Men of all ranks need a joiner. Even the baby is rocked to gentle sleep in my own handiwork. The bed for the wedding night is also built and finely painted by my hard work. However mean the miser may be he still needs a coffin in the end, and for it I am well paid. So I am always cheerful, and do my work well whether I am making a table or a cupboard. And to all those who place good orders with me and always pay in cash I am deeply grateful.

Disc 9 Totenkranz fr ein Kind Wreath for a dead child Track co D275. 25 August 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Patricia Rozario

Sanft wehn, im Hauch der Abendluft, Die Frhlingshalm auf deiner Gruft, Wo Sehnsuchttrnen fallen. Nie soll, bis uns der Tod befreit, Die Wolke der Vergessenheit Dein holdes Bild umwallen! Wohl dir, obgleich entknospet kaum, Von Erdenlust und Sinnentraum, Von Schmerz und Wahn geschieden! Du schlfst in Ruh; wir wanken irr Und unstt bang im Weltgewirr, Und haben selten Frieden.
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

In the evening breeze the spring grass waves gently upon your grave where tears of longing fall. Never, until death frees us, shall the mists of oblivion shroud your sweet image. Happy you, though your blossom was barely unfolded, for you left behind earthly pleasure and sensual dreams, sorrow and illusion. You sleep in peace; we stumble, confused and troubled, through the turmoil of this world, and seldom know peace.

Disc 9 Abendlied Evening song Track cp D276. 28 August 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Dame Felicity Lott

94

Gross und rotentflammet schwebet Noch die Sonn am Himmelsrand, Und auf blauen Wogen bebet Noch ihr Abglanz bis zum Strand; Aus dem Buchenwalde hebet Sich der Mond, und winket Ruh Seiner Schwester Erde zu. In geschwollnen Wolken ballet Dunkler sich die rote Glut, Zarter Farbenwechsel wallet Auf der Roggenblte Flut; Zwischen schwanken Halmen schallet Reger Wachteln heller Schlag, Und der Hirte pfeift ihm nach. Ihre Ringeltauben girren Noch die Tuber sanft in Ruh, Dstre Fledermuse schwirren Nun dem glatten Teiche zu, Und der Kfer Scharen irren, Und der Uhu, nun erwacht, Ziehet heulend auf die Wacht.

The sun hovers, massive and flaming red, on the skys edge, and upon the blue waves its reflection glistens, touching the shore. From the beechwood the moon rises, heralding peace to her sister earth. On the swollen clouds the red glow darkens; delicately changing colours play on the sea of burgeoning rye; among the slender blades of grass the lively quails bright call echoes, answered by the shepherds pipe. The pigeons coo their ring-doves gently to sleep; sombre bats whirr against the glassy pond. The swarming beetles rove, and the eagle-owl, now awake, hoots as it mounts its watch.

August September 1815 SONG TEXTS


Wenn die Nachtigallen flten, Hebe dich, mein Geist, empor! Bei des jungen Tags Errten Neig o Vater, mir dein Ohr! Von der Erd und ihren Nten Steig, o Geist! Wie Duft der Au, Send uns, Vater, deinen Tau!
When the nightingales warble soar aloft, my spirit! At the first flush of day hearken to me, O Father! Rise, O spirit, above the earth and its cares. As the meadows spread their fragrance, Father, bestow on us your dew!

FRIEDRICH LEOPOLD, GRAF ZU STOLBERG-STOLBERG (17501819)

Punschlied Vier Elemente


Vier Elemente, innig gesellt, Bilden das Leben, bauen die Welt. Presst der Citrone saftigen Stern! Herb ist das Lebens innerster Kern. Jetzt mit des Zuckers linderndem Saft Zhmet die herbe, brennende Kraft! Giesset des Wassers sprudelndem Schwall! Wasser umfnget ruhig das All. Tropfen des Geistes giesset hinein! Leben dem Leben giebt er allein. Eh es verdftet, schpfet es schnell! Nur wenn er glhet labet der Quell.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Punch song Four elements


Four elements, inwardly linked, make up life and fashion the world. Press the lemons juicy star! Bitter is lifes innermost core. Now with sugars sweetening juice tame its bitter, stinging power. Pour the waters bubbling torrent! Water calmly enfolds the universe. Pour in the drops of the spirit, for the spirit alone animates life! Take it in quickly, before its savour fades! Only when it glows does the stream refresh!

9 Disc
cq Track

D277. 29 August 1815; first published in 1892 in series 19 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by John Mark Ainsley, Jamie MacDougall, Simon Keenlyside and Michael George

Ossians Lied nach dem Falle Nathos


Beugt euch aus euren Wolken nieder, ihr Geister meiner Vter, beuget euch! Legt ab das rote Schrecken eures Laufs! Empfangt den fallenden Fhrer, er komme aus einem entfernten Land, oder er steig aus dem tobenden Meer! Sein Kleid von Nebel sei nah, sein Speer aus einer Wolke gestaltet, sein Schwert ein erloschnes Luftbild, und ach, sein Gesicht sei lieblich, dass seine Freunde frohlocken in seiner Gegenwart! O beugt euch aus euren Wolken nieder, ihr Geister meiner Vter, beuget euch!
BARON EDMUND VON HAROLD (17371808) END OF DISC 9

Ossians song after the death of Nathos


Bend forward from your clouds, ghosts of my fathers! Lay the red terror of your course. Receive the falling chief; whether he comes from a distant land or rises from the rolling sea. Let his robe of mist be near; his spear that is formed of a cloud. Place an halfextinguished meteor by his side in the form of the heros sword. And oh! let his countenance be lovely, that his friends may delight in his presence. Bend from your clouds, I said. Ghosts of my fathers! Bend!
JAMES MACPHERSON OSSIAN (17361796)

9 Disc
cr Track

D278. September (?) 1815; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1830 in volume 4 of the Nachlass sung by Michael George

Das Rosenband
Im Frhlingsgarten fand ich sie, Da band ich sie mit Rosenbndern: Sie fhlt es nicht und schlummerte. Ich sah sie an; mein Leben hing Mit diesem Blick an ihrem Leben: Ich fhlt es wohl und wusst es nicht. Doch lispelt ich ihr leise zu Und rauschte mit den Rosenbndern. Da wachte sie vom Schlummer auf. Sie sah mich an; ihr Leben hing Mit diesem Blick an meinem Leben, Und um uns ward Elysium.
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

The rosy ribbon


I found her in the spring garden, and bound her with rosy ribbons; oblivious, she slept on. I looked at her; with that gaze my life was bound to hers: this I felt, yet did not know. But I whispered softly to her and rustled the rosy ribbons. Then she woke from her slumber. She looked at me; with that gaze her life was bound to mine, and all around us was paradise.

bk Disc
1 Track

D280. September 1815; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1837 in volume 28 of the Nachlass sung by Elly Ameling

95

SONG TEXTS September 1815


Disc bk Das Mdchen von Inistore The maid of Inistore Track 2 D281. September 1815; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1830 in volume 4 of the Nachlass
sung by John Mark Ainsley

Mdchen Inistores, wein auf dem Felsen der strmischen Winde, neig ber Wellen dein zierliches Haupt, du, dem an Liebreiz der Geist der Hgel weicht; wenn er in einem Sonnenstrahl, des Mittags ber Morvens Schweigen hingleitet. Er ist gefallen! Der Jngling erliegt, bleich unter der Klinge Cuthullins! Nicht mehr wird der Mut deinen Lieben erheben, dem Blut der Gebieter zu gleichen. O Mdchen Inistores! Trenar, der zierliche Trenar ist tot! In seiner Heimat heulen seine Doggen, sie sehn seinen gleitenden Geist. In seiner Halle liegt sein Bogen ungespannt, man hrt auf dem Hgel seiner Hirsche keinen Schall, man hrt auf dem Hgel nun keinen Schall!
BARON EDMUND VON HAROLD (17371808)

Weep on the rocks of roaring winds, O maid of Inistore! Bend thy fair head over the waves, thou lovelier than the ghosts of the hills; when it moves, in a sunbeam, at noon, over the silence of Morven! He is fallen! Thy youth is low! Pale beneath the sword of Cuthullin! No more shall valour raise thy love to match the blood of kings. O maid of Inistore! Trenar, graceful Trenar died, his dogs are howling at home! They see his passing ghost. His bow is in the hall, unstrung. No sound is in the hills of his hinds. No sound is in the hills.
JAMES MACPHERSON OSSIAN (17361796)

Disc bk Cronnan Cronnan Track 3 D282. 5 September 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1830 in volume 2 of the Nachlass
sung by Simon Keenlyside and Lorna Anderson

SHILRIK Ich sitz bei der moosigten Quelle; am Gipfel des strmischen Hgels. ber mir braust ein Baum. Dunkle Wellen rollen ber die Heide. Die See ist strmisch darunter. Die Hirsche steigen vom Hgel herab. Kein Jger wird in der Ferne gesehn. Es ist Mittag, aber Alles ist still. Traurig sind meine einsamen Gedanken. Erschienst du aber, o meine Geliebte, wie ein Wandrer auf der Heide, dein Haar fliegend im Winde, dein Busen hoch aufwallend, deine Augen voll Trnen, fr deine Freunde, die der Nebel des Hgels verbarg: dich wollt ich trsten, o meine Geliebte, dich wollt ich fhren zum Hause meines Vaters! Aber ist sie es, die dort wie ein Strahl des Lichts auf der Heide erscheint? Kommst du, o Mdchen, ber Felsen, ber Berge zu mir, schimmernd, wie im Herbste der Mond, wie die Sonn in der Glut des Sommers? Sie spricht; aber wie schwach ist ihre Stimme! Wie das Lftchen im Schilfe der See. VINVELA Kehrst du vom Kriege schadlos zurck? Wo sind deine Freunde, mein Geliebter? Ich vernahm deinen Tod auf dem Hgel; ich vernahm ihn und beweinte dich! SHILRIK Ja, meine Schnste, ich kehre zurck, aber allein von meinem Geschlecht. Jene sollst du nicht mehr erblicken, ich hab ihre Grber auf der Flche errichtet. Aber warum bist du am Hgel der Wste? Warum allein auf der Heide? VINVELA O Shilrik, ich bin allein, allein in der Winterbehausung. Ich starb vor Schmerz wegen dir. Shilrik, ich lieg erblasst in dem Grab.

SHILRIC
I sit by the mossy fountain on the top of the hill of the winds. One tree is rustling above me. Dark waves roll over the heath. The lake is troubled below. The deer descend from the hill. No hunter at a distance is seen. It is mid-day, but all is silent. Sad are my thoughts alone. Didst thou but appear, O my love, a wanderer on the heath, thy hair floating on the wind before thee, thy bosom heaving on the height, thine eyes full of tears for thy friends whom the mist of the hill had concealed. Thee I would comfort my love, and bring thee to thy fathers house! But is it she that there appears, like a beam of light on the heath? Bright as the moon in autumn, as the sun in a summer storm, comest thou, O maid, over rocks, over mountains to me? She speaks: but how weak her voice! Like the breeze in the reeds of the lake.

VINVELA
Returnest thou safe from the war? Where are thy friends, my love? I heard of thy death on the hill. I heard and mourned thee, Shilric.

SHILRIC
Yes, my fair, I return, but I alone of my race. Thou shalt see them no more. Their graves I raised on the plain. But why art thou on the desert hill? Why on the heath alone?

VINVELA
Alone I am, O Shilric; alone in the winter house. With grief for thee I fell. Shilric; I am pale in the tomb.

96

September 1815 SONG TEXTS


SHILRIK Sie gleitet, sie durchsegelt die Luft wie Nebel vorm Wind. Und willst du nicht bleiben? bleib und schau meine Trnen! zierlich erscheinst du, im Leben warst du schn. Ich will sitzen bei der moosigten Quelle, am Gipfel des strmischen Hgels. Wenn Alles im Mittag herum schweigt, dann sprich mit mir, o Vinvela! komm auf dem leichtbeflgelten Hauche! auf dem Lftchen der Einde komm! lass mich, wenn du vorbeigehst, deine Stimme vernehmen, wenn Alles im Mittag herum schweigt!
BARON EDMUND VON HAROLD (17371808)

SHILRIC
She flees, she sails away as mist before the wind! And wilt thou not stay, Vinvela? Stay and behold my tears! Fair thou appearest, Vinvela! Fair thou wast, when alive! By the mossy fountain I will sit, on the top of the hill of winds. When mid-day is silent around, O talk with me, Vinvela! Come on the light-winged gale! On the breeze of the desert, come! Let me hear thy voice, as thou passest, when mid-day is silent around!
JAMES MACPHERSON OSSIAN (17361796)

An den Frhling
Willkommen, schner Jngling! Du Wonne der Natur! Mit deinem Blumenkrbchen Willkommen auf der Flur! Ei, ei! da bist du wieder! Und bist so lieb und schn! Und freun wir uns so herzlich, Entgegen dir zu gehn. Denkst auch noch an mein Mdchen? Ei, Lieber, denke doch! Dort liebte mich das Mdchen Unds Mdchen liebt mich noch! Frs Mdchen manches Blmchen Erbat ich mir von dir. Ich komm und bitte wieder, Und du? Du gibst es mir.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

To spring
Welcome, fair youth, natures delight! Welcome to the meadows with your basket of flowers! Ah, you are here again, so dear and lovely! We feel such joy as we come to meet you. Do you still think of my sweetheart? Ah, dear friend, think of her! There my girl loved me, and she loves me still! I asked you for many flowers for my sweetheart. I come and ask you once more, and you? You give them to me.

bk Disc
4 Track

D283. 6 September 1815; first published by C A Spina in Vienna in 1865 as Op posth 172 No 5 sung by Elly Ameling

Lied
Es ist so angenehm, so sss, Um einen lieben Mann zu spielen, Entzckend, wie ein Paradies, Des Mannes Feuerkuss zu fhlen. Jetzt weiss ich, was mein Taubenpaar Mit seinem sanften Girren sagte, Und was der Nachtigallen Schar So zrtlich sich in Liedern klagte.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Song
It is so pleasant and so sweet to dally with a man you love, and as delightful as paradise to feel the mans fiery kisses. Now I know what my pair of doves were saying with their soft cooing, and what the host of nightingales were lamenting so tenderly in their songs.

bk Disc
5 Track

D284. 6 September 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Dame Janet Baker

Furcht der Geliebten An Cidli


Cidli, du weinest, und ich schlummre sicher, Wo im Sande der Weg verzogen fortschleicht; Auch wenn stille Nacht ihn umschattend decket, Schlummr ich ihn sicher. Wo er sich endet, wo ein Strom das Meer wird, Gleit ich ber den Strom, der sanfter aufschwillt; Denn, der mich begleitet, der Gott gebots ihm! Weine nicht, Cidli.
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

The beloveds fear To Cidli


Cidli, you weep, and I slumber safely where the path winds through the sand; even when the silent night shrouds that path in shadow, I shall slumber safely. Where it ends, where the river becomes sea, I shall glide upon the current which flows more gently, for God, who accompanies me, bids it flow thus. Do not weep, Cidli.

bk Disc
6 Track

D285. 12 September 1815; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by Simon Keenlyside

97

SONG TEXTS September 1815


Disc bk Selma und Selmar Selma and Selmar Track 7 D286b. 14 September 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1837 in volume 28 of the Nachlass
sung by Jamie MacDougall and Lorna Anderson

SELMAR Weine du nicht, o die ich innig liebe, Dass ein trauriger Tag von dir mich scheidet! Wenn nun wieder Hesperus dir dort lchelt, Komm ich Glcklicher wieder! SELMA Aber in dunkler Nacht ersteigst du Felsen, Schwebst in tuschender dunkler Nacht auf Wassern! Theilt ich nur mit dir die Gefahr zu sterben; Wrd, ich Glckliche, weinen?
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

SELMAR
Do not weep, my most truly beloved, because a sad day separates you from me. When Hesperus once more smiles on you here I shall return in happiness.

SELMA
But in the dark night you climb the rocks; in nights deluding darkness you drift on the waters! If I could now share with you the danger of death, should I, in my happiness, weep?

Disc bk Vaterlandslied Song of the fatherland Track 8 D287. 14 September 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Lorna Anderson

Ich bin ein deutsches Mdchen! Mein Aug ist blau und sanft mein Blick, Ich hab ein Herz Das edel ist und stolz und gut. Ich bin ein deutsches Mdchen! Mein gutes, edles, stolzes Herz Schlgt laut empor. Beim sssen Namen: Vaterland!
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

I am a German girl! My eyes are blue, my gaze is soft, I have a heart that is noble, proud and good. I am a German girl! Surges and beats loud my good, noble, proud heart at the sweet name of the fatherland.

Disc bk An Sie To her Track 9 D288. 14 September 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Jamie MacDougall

Zeit, Verkndigerin der besten Freuden, Nahe selige Zeit, dich in der Ferne Auszuforschen, vergoss ich Trbender Trnen zu viel! Denn sie fhlet sich ganz und giesst Entzckung In dem Herzen empor die volle Seele, Wenn sie, dass sie geliebt wird, Trunken von Liebe sichs denkt!
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

Time, herald of the greatest joys, blissful Time, now so near, I have shed too many sorrowful tears seeking you in the far distance. For she feels that she is whole, and her overflowing soul exudes rapture within her heart when, drunk with love, she deems herself loved.

Disc bk Die Sommernacht The summer night Track bl D289. 14 September 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Sarah Walker

Wenn der Schimmer von dem Monde nun herab In die Wlder sich ergiesst, und Gerche Mit den Dften von der Linde In den Khlungen wehn: So umschatten mich Gedanken an das Grab Meiner Geliebten, und ich seh im Walde Nur es dmmern, und es weht mir Von der Blte nicht her. Ich genoss einst, o ihr Toten, es mit euch! Wie umwehten uns der Duft und die Khlung, Wie verschnt warst von dem Monde, Du, o schne Natur!
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

When the moons soft light shines into the woods, and the scent of the lime tree is wafted in the cool breezes: Then my mind is darkened by thoughts of my beloveds grave; this alone do I see growing dusky in the woods; and the blossoms fragrance does not reach me. Spirits of the dead, with you I once enjoyed it! How the fragrance and the cool breezes caressed us! Beautiful nature, how you were transfigured in the moonlight!

98

September 1815 SONG TEXTS Die frhen Grber The early graves

bk Disc
bm Track

D290. 14 September 1815; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1837 in volume 28 of the Nachlass cf Fanny Mendelssohn Die frhen Grber, disc 40 cm sung by Sarah Walker

Willkommen, o silberner Mond, Schner, stiller Gefhrte der Nacht! Du entfliehst? Eile nicht, bleib, Gedankenfreund! Sehet, er bleibt, das Gewlk wallte nur hin. Des Maies Erwachen ist nur Schner noch, wie die Sommernacht, Wenn ihm Tau, hell wie Licht, aus der Locke trut, Und zu dem Hugel herauf rtlich er kommt. Ihr Edleren, ach, es bewchst Eure Male schon ernstes Moos! O, wie war glcklich ich, als ich noch mit euch Sahe sich rten den Tag, schimmern die Nacht!
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

Welcome, silvery moon, fair, silent companion of the night! You flee? Do not hasten away, stay, friend of contemplation. See, she stays; it was only the clouds passing. Mays awakening is lovelier even than the summers night, when dew, glistening brightly, drips from his locks, and he rises red above the hills. Nobler spirits, alas, your tombstones are already overgrown with gloomy moss. Ah, how happy I was then, when with you I watched the day dawn and the night sky glitter.

Dem Unendlichen
Wie erhebt sich das Herz, wenn es dich, Unendlicher, denkt! wie sinkt es, Wenn es auf sich herunterschaut! Elend schauts wehklagend dann, und Nacht und Tod! Allein du rufst mich aus meiner Nacht, der im Elend, der im Tode hilft! Dann denk ich es ganz, dass du ewig mich schufst, Herrlicher! den kein Preis, unten am Grab, oben am Tron, Herr Gott! den dankend entflammt kein Jubel genug besingt! Weht, Bume des Lebens, ins Harfengetn! Rausche mit ihnen ins Harfengetn, kristallner Strom! Ihr lispelt, und rauscht, und Harfen, ihr tnt, Nie es ganz! Gott ist es, den ihr preist! Welten, donnert, in feierlichem Gang, Welten, donnert, in der Posaunen Chor! Tnt, all ihr Sonnen auf der Strasse voll Glanz, In der Posaunen Chor! Ihr Welten, ihr donnert, Du, der Posaunen Chor, hallest Nie es ganz: Gott nie es ganz: Gott, Gott, Gott ist es, den ihr preist!
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

To the Infinite One


How the heart surges when it thinks of you, Infinite One! How it sinks when it gazes down upon itself! Lamenting, it sees but misery, night and death. You alone call me from my night, you alone help me in misery and death! Then I know that you created me for eternity, Lord of Glory, for whom no praise is sufficient, in the grave below or by your throne above, Lord God, no paeans of thanks are worthy of you. Sway, trees of life, to the music of the harps! Murmur with them to the harps music, crystal streams! You whisper and murmur, and, harps, you play, but never fully enough; it is God whom you praise! Thunder, you spheres in solemn motion, to the choir of trumpets! Resound, all you suns on your shining course, to the choir of trumpets! You thunder, spheres, choir of trumpets, you blaze forth, but never fully enough; it is God, God whom you praise.

bk Disc
bn Track

First version, D291. 15 September 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Elizabeth Connell

Shilrik und Vinvela


VINVELA Mein Geliebter ist ein Sohn des Hgels; er verfolgt die fliehenden Hirsche; die Doggen schnauben um ihn; die Senn seines Bogens schwirrt in dem Wind. Ruhst du bei der Quelle des Felsen oder beim Rauschen des Bergstroms? Der Schilf neigt sich im Wind, der Nebel fliegt ber die Heide; ich will ihm ungesehn nahn; ich will ihn betrachten vom Felsen herab.

Shilric and Vinvela


VINVELA My love is a son of the hill. He pursues the fleeing deer. His dogs are panting around him; his bow-string sounds in the wind. Dost thou rest by the fountain of the rock, or by the noise of the mountain stream? The rushes are nodding to the wind, the mist flies over the heath. I will approach my love unseen; I will behold him from the rock.

bk Disc
bo Track

D293. 20 September 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1830 in volume 4 of the Nachlass sung by Marie McLaughlin and Thomas Hampson

99

SONG TEXTS September 1815


Ich sah dich zuerst liebreich bei der veralteten Eiche von Branno; schlank kehrtest du vom Jagen zurck, unter allen deinen Freunden der schnste. SHILRIK Was ists fr eine Stimme, die ich hre? Sie gleicht dem Hauche des Sommers! Ich sitz nicht beim neigenden Schilfe; ich hr nicht die Quelle des Felsen. Ferne, ferne o Vinvela, geh ich zu den Kriegen von Fingal: meine Doggen begleiten mich nicht; ich trete nicht mehr auf den Hgel. Ich seh dich nicht mehr von der Hhe, zierlich schreitend am Strome der Flche; schimmernd, wie der Bogen des Himmels; wie der Mond auf der westlichen Welle. VINVELA So bist du gegangen, o Shilrik! Ich bin allein auf dem Hgel! man sieht die Hirsche am Rande des Gipfels, sie grasen furchtlos hinweg; sie frchten die Winde nicht mehr; nicht mehr den brausenden Baum. Der Jger ist weit in der Ferne; er ist im Felde der Grber. Ihr Fremden! ihr Shne der Wellen! o schont meines liebreichen Shilrik! SHILRIK Wenn ich im Felde muss fallen, heb hoch, o Vinvela, mein Grab. Graue Steine und ein Hgel von Erde; sollen mich, bei der Nachwelt bezeichnen. Wenn der Jger beim Haufen wird sitzen, wenn er zu Mittag seine Speise geneusst, wird er sagen: Ein Krieger ruht hier, und mein Ruhm soll leben in seinem Lob. Erinnre dich meiner, o Vinvela, wenn ich auf Erden erlieg! VINVELA Ja! ich werd mich deiner erinnern; ach! mein Shilrik wird fallen! Mein Geliebter! Was soll ich tun, wenn du auf ewig vergingest? Ich werd diese Hgel am Mittag durchstreichen: die schweigende Heide durchziehn. Dort werd ich den Platz deiner Ruh, wenn du von der Jagd zurckkehrtest beschaun. Ach! mein Shilrik wird fallen; aber ich werd meines Shilriks gedenken.
Lovely I saw thee first by the aged oak of Branno; thou wert returning tall from the chase; the fairest among thy friends.

SHILRIC What voice is that I hear, that voice like the summer wind? I sit not by the nodding rushes; I hear not the sound of the rock. Afar Vinvela, afar, I go to the war of Fingal. My dogs attend me no more. No more I tread the hill. No more from on high I see thee, fair moving by the stream of the plain; bright as the bow of heaven; as the moon on the western wave. VINVELA
Then thou art gone, O Shilric! I am alone on the hill! The deer are seen on the brow; void of fear they graze along. No more they dread the wind, no more the rustling tree. The hunter is far removed; he is in the field of graves. Strangers! Sons of the waves! Spare my lovely Shilric!

SHILRIC
If fall I must in the field, raise high my grave, Vinvela. Grey stones and heaped-up earth shall mark me to future times. When the hunter shall sit by the mound, and produce his food at noon, Some warrior rests here, he will say; and my fame shall live in his praise. Remember me, Vinvela, when low on earth I lie!

VINVELA Yes! I will remember thee, alas! My Shilric will fall! What shall I do, my love, when thou art forever gone? Through these hills I will go at noon: I will go through the silent heath. There I will see the place of thy rest, returning from the chase. Alas! My Shilric will fall; but I will remember Shilric.

JAMES MACPHERSON OSSIAN (17361796) probably translated by BARON EDMUND VON HAROLD (17371808) adapted by FRANZ VON HUMMELAUER (dates unknown)

Disc bk Dem Unendlichen To the Infinite One Track bp Second version, D291. c1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in April 1831 in volume 10 of the Nachlass
sung by Christine Brewer

Wie erhebt sich das Herz, wenn es dich, Unendlicher, denkt! wie sinkt es, Wenn es auf sich herunterschaut! Elend schauts wehklagend dann, und Nacht und Tod! Allein du rufst mich aus meiner Nacht, der im Elend, der im Tode hilft! Dann denk ich es ganz, dass du ewig mich schufst, Herrlicher! den kein Preis, unten am Grab, oben am Tron, Herr Gott! den dankend entflammt kein Jubel genug besingt!

How the heart surges when it thinks of you, Infinite One! How it sinks when it gazes down upon itself! Lamenting, it sees but misery, night and death. You alone call me from my night, you alone help me in misery and death! Then I know that you created me for eternity, Lord of Glory, for whom no praise is sufficient, in the grave below or by your throne above, Lord God, no paeans of thanks are worthy of you.

100

September October 1815 SONG TEXTS


Weht, Bume des Lebens, ins Harfengetn! Rausche mit ihnen ins Harfengetn, kristallner Strom! Ihr lispelt, und rauscht, und Harfen, ihr tnt, Nie es ganz! Gott ist es, den ihr preist! Welten, donnert, in feierlichem Gang, Welten, donnert, in der Posaunen Chor! Tnt, all ihr Sonnen auf der Strasse voll Glanz, In der Posaunen Chor! Ihr Welten, ihr donnert, Du, der Posaunen Chor, hallest Nie es ganz: Gott nie es ganz: Gott, Gott, Gott ist es, den ihr preist!
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

Sway, trees of life, to the music of the harps! Murmur with them to the harps music, crystal streams! You whisper and murmur, and, harps, you play, but never fully enough; it is God whom you praise! Thunder, you spheres in solemn motion, to the choir of trumpets! Resound, all you suns on your shining course, to the choir of trumpets! You thunder, spheres, choir of trumpets, you blaze forth, but never fully enough; it is God, God whom you praise.

Erlknig

The Erlking

bk Disc
bq Track

D328. October (?) 1815; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 1 cf Johann Reichardt Erlknig, disc 38 4 & Zelter Erlknig, disc 38 bl & Spohr Erlknig, disc 39 cq & Loewe Erlknig, disc 40 8 sung by Christine Schfer, John Mark Ainsley and Michael George

Wer reitet so spt durch Nacht und Wind? Es ist der Vater mit seinem Kind: Er hat den Knaben wohl in dem Arm, Er fasst ihn sicher, er hlt ihn warm. Mein Sohn, was birgst du so bang dein Gesicht? Siehst, Vater, du den Erlknig nicht? Den Erlenknig mit Kron und Schweif? Mein Sohn, es ist ein Nebelstreif. Du liebes Kind, komm, geh mit mir! Gar schne Spiele spiel ich mit dir; Manch bunte Blumen sind an dem Strand, Meine Mutter hat manch glden Gewand. Mein Vater, mein Vater, und hrest du nicht, Was Erlenknig mir leise verspricht? Sei ruhig, bleibe ruhig, mein Kind: In drren Blttern suselt der Wind. Willst, feiner Knabe, du mit mir gehn? Meine Tchter sollen dich warten schn; Meine Tchter fhren den nchtlichen Reihn Und wiegen und tanzen und singen dich ein. Mein Vater, mein Vater, und siehst du nicht dort Erlknigs Tchter am dstern Ort? Mein Sohn, mein Sohn, ich seh es genau: Es scheinen die alten Weiden so grau. Ich liebe dich, mich reizt deine schne Gestalt; Und bist du nicht willig, so brauch ich Gewalt. Mein Vater, mein Vater, jetzt fasst er mich an! Erlknig hat mir ein Leids getan! Dem Vater grausets, er reitet geschwind, Er hlt in Armen das chzende Kind, Erreicht den Hof mit Mhe und Not: In seinen Armen das Kind war tot.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Who rides so late through the night and wind? It is the father with his child. He has the boy in his arms; he holds him safely, he keeps him warm. My son, why do you hide your face in fear? Father, can you not see the Erlking? The Erlking with his crown and tail? My son, it is a streak of mist. Sweet child, come with me. Ill play wonderful games with you. Many a pretty flower grows on the shore; my mother has many a golden robe. Father, father, do you not hear what the Erlking softly promises me? Calm, be calm, my child: the wind is rustling in the withered leaves. Wont you come with me, my fine lad? My daughters shall wait upon you; my daughters lead the nightly dance, and will rock you, and dance, and sing you to sleep. Father, father, can you not see Erlkings daughters there in the darkness? My son, my son, I can see clearly: it is the old grey willows gleaming. I love you, your fair form allures me, and if you dont come willingly, Ill use force. Father, father, now hes seizing me! The Erlking has hurt me! The father shudders, he rides swiftly, he holds the moaning child in his arms; with one last effort he reaches home; the child lay dead in his arms.

Liane
Hast du Lianen nicht gesehen? Ich sah sie zu dem Teiche gehn. Durch Busch und Hecke rennt er fort, Und kommt an ihren Lieblingsort.

Liane
Have you seen Liane? I saw her walking to the pond. He runs off, through bush and hedgerow, until he reaches her favourite spot.

bk Disc
br Track

D298. October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Elly Ameling

101

SONG TEXTS October 1815


Die Linde spannt ihr grnes Netz, Aus Rosen tnt des Bachs Geschwtz; Die Bltter rtet Sonnengold, Und alles ist der Freude hold. Liane fhrt auf einem Kahn, Vertraute Schwne nebenan. Sie spielt die Laute, singt ein Lied, Wie Liebe in ihr selig blht. Das Schifflein schwanket, wie es will, Sie senkt das Haupt und denket still An ihn, der im Gebsche ist, Sie bald in seine Arme schliesst.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

The lime tree stretches its green net, the brook babbles among the roses; golden sunlight tinges the leaves, and everything is touched with joy. Liane glides along in a boat, her beloved swans accompany her. She plays her lute, and sings of the blissful love that blossoms within her. The boat rocks as it pleases, she lets her head sink, and thinks silently of him who is in the bushes, and who will soon enfold her in his arms.

Disc bk Lambertine Lambertina Track bs D301. 12 October 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1842 in volume 36 of the Nachlass
sung by Arleen Auger

O Liebe, die mein Herz erfllet, Wie wonnevoll ist deine Seligkeit! Doch ach! wie grausam peinigend durchwhlet Mich Hoffnungslosigkeit. Er liebt mich nicht, er liebt mich nicht, verloren Ist ohne ihn des Lebens ssse Lust. Ich bin zu bittern Leiden nur geboren, Nur Schmerz drckt meine Brust. Doch nein, ich will nicht lnger trostlos klagen! Zu sehen ihn gnnt mir das Schicksal noch; Darf ich ihm auch nicht meine Liebe sagen, Gngt mir sein Anblick doch. Sein Bild ist Trost in meinem stillen Kummer, Hier hab ichs mir zur Wonne aufgestellt; Dies soll mich laben, bis dass ewger Schlummer Mein mattes Herz befllt.
JOSEF LUDWIG STOLL (17781815)

O love, that fills my heart, how sweet is your bliss! But ah, how cruelly, how painfully I am consumed by despair. He does not love me, he does not love me; without him lifes sweet pleasure has vanished. I am born only to bitter suffering; sorrow alone oppresses my heart. But no, I shall no longer lament inconsolably! Fate still permits me to see him. Though I may not declare my love to him, yet the very sight of him is enough for me. His image is a comfort in my silent grief, I have set it up here to bring me joy; this will console me until eternal slumber overcomes my weary heart.

Disc bk Labetrank der Liebe Loves reviving potion Track bt D302. 15 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Martyn Hill

Wenn im Spiele leiser Tne Meine kranke Seele schwebt, Und der Wehmut ssse Trne Deinem warmen Blick entschwebt: Sink ich dir bei sanftem Wallen Deines Busens sprachlos hin; Engelmelodien schallen, Und der Erde Schatten fliehn. So in Eden hingesunken, Lieb mit Liebe umgetauscht, Ksse lispelnd wonnetrunken, Wie von Seraphim umrauscht: Reichst du mir im Engelbilde Liebewarmen Labetrank, Wenn im schnden Staubgefilde Schmachtend meine Seele sank.
JOSEF LUDWIG STOLL (17781815)

When, amid the strains of soft music, my suffering soul hovers, and sweet tears of sadness flow from your warm gaze: I sink down silently on your gently heaving breast. Angelic melodies sound and the earths shadows take flight. Thus, immersed in paradise, exchanging love with love, whispering kisses, drunk with ecstasy, as if seraphim played about us: you gave me, in the form of an angel, a reviving potion, warm with love, as my languishing soul sank in the hateful, dusty wastes.

102

October 1815 SONG TEXTS An die Geliebte


O dass ich dir vom stillen Auge In seinem liebevollen Schein Die Trne von der Wange sauge, Eh sie die Erde trinket ein! Wohl hlt sie zgernd auf der Wange Und will sich heiss der Treue weihn. Nun ich sie so im Kuss empfange, Nun sind auch deine Schmerzen mein!
JOSEF LUDWIG STOLL (17781815)

To the beloved
Oh that from your silent eyes, in their loving radiance, I might drink the tears from your cheek before the earth absorbs them! They remain hesitantly on your cheek, which they dedicate warmly to constancy. Now, as I receive them in my kiss, your sorrows, too, are mine.

bk Disc
bu Track

D303. 15 October 1815; first published in 1887 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by Martyn Hill

Wiegenlied
Schlummre sanft! Noch an dem Mutterherzen Fhlst du nicht des Lebens Qual und Lust; Deine Trume kennen keine Schmerzen, Deine Welt ist deiner Mutter Brust. Ach! wie sss trumt man die frhen Stunden, Wo man von der Mutterliebe lebt; Die Erinnerung ist mir verschwunden, Ahnung bleibt es nur, die mich durchbebt.
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

Cradle song
Slumber softly! Still in your mothers arms you do not feel lifes joy and torment. Your dreams know no sorrows; your whole world is your mothers breast. Ah, how sweetly we dream in those early hours when we live by our mothers love; my memory of them has faded; just an impression remains to thrill through me.

bk Disc
cl Track

D304. 15 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by John Mark Ainsley

Mein Gruss an den Mai


Sie mir gegrst, o Mai! mit deinem Bltenhimmel, Mit deinem Lenz, mit deinem Freudenmeer; Sie mir gegrst, mit deinem Frhlichen gewimmel Der neubelebten Wesen um mich her.
JOHANN GOTTFRIED KUMPF ERMIN (17811862)

My greeting to May
Welcome, May, with your canopy of blossom, with your spring, with your ocean of joy. Welcome, with your happy swarm of newly awakened creatures around me.

bk Disc
cm Track

D305. 15 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Elly Ameling

Skolie
Lasst im Morgenstrahl des Main Uns der Blume Leben freun, Eh ihr Duft entweichet! Haucht er in der Busen Qual, Glht ein Dmon im Pokal, Der sie leicht verscheuchet. Schnell wie uns die Freude ksst, Winkt der Tod, und sie zerfliesst; Drfen wir ihn scheuen? Von den Mdchenlippen winkt Lebensathem, wer ihn trinkt, Lchelt seinem Druen.

Skolion
Let us in the light of the May morning enjoy lifes flower before its fragrance fades! If it should breathe sorrows into our hearts a spirit glows within the cup that will effortlessly banish them. No sooner does joy kiss us than death beckons; and it flees. Should we fear death? From maidens lips the breath of life entices us; he who drinks it can smile at deaths threats.

bk Disc
cn Track

D306. 15 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Jamie MacDougall

JOHANN LUDWIG FERDINAND VON DEINHARDSTEIN (17941859)

Die Sternenwelten
Oben drehen sich die grossen Unbekannten Welten dort, Und dem Sonnenlicht umflossen, Kreisen sie die Bahnen fort; Traulich reihet sich der Sterne Zahlenloses Heer ringsum, Sieht sich lchelnd durch die Ferne, Und verbreitet Gottes Ruhm.

The starry worlds


High above, the great unknown worlds revolve; bathed in the suns light they circle in their course. Around them, in harmonious array, spreads the numberless host of stars; smiling, they gaze at each other from afar and proclaim widely the glory of God.

bk Disc
co Track

D307. 15 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Elizabeth Connell

103

SONG TEXTS October 1815


Eine lichte Strasse gleitet Durch das weite Blau herauf, Und die Macht der Gottheit leitet Schwebend hier den Sternenlauf; Alles hat sich zugerndet, Alles wogt in Glanz und Brand, Und dies grosse All verkndet Eine hohe Bildnerhand.
JOHANN GEORG FELLINGER (17811816)

A path of light glides up through the vast blue firmament, and the power of God gently guides the course of the stars; everything has attained perfection, everything swirls in light and fire, and this great universe proclaims the hand of the sublime Architect.

Disc bk Die Macht der Liebe The power of love Track cp D308. 15 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Patricia Rozario

berall wohin mein Auge blicket, Herrschet Liebe, find ich ihre Spur, Jedem Strauch und Blmchen auf der Flur Hat sie tief ihr Siegel eingedrcket. Sie erfllt, durchglht, verjngt und schmcket Alles Lebende in der Natur; Erd und Himmel, jede Creatur, Leben nur durch sie, von ihr beglcket.
JOHANN NEPOMUK, RITTER VON KALCHBERG (17651827)

Wherever my eyes turn love reigns: everywhere I find its trace. On every bush and flower in the meadows it has deeply imprinted its seal. It pervades, warms, rejuvenates and adorns all that lives in nature. Heaven, earth, and all creatures live and find happiness through love alone.

Disc bk Das gestrte Glck Thwarted happiness Track cq D309. 15 October 1815; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by Philip Langridge

Ich hab ein heisses junges Blut, Wie ihr wohl alle wisst, Ich bin dem Kssen gar zu gut, Und hab noch nie geksst; Denn ist mir auch mein Liebchen hold, S war doch, als wenns nicht werden sollt: Trotz aller Mh und aller List, Hab ich doch niemals noch geksst. Des Nachbars Rschen ist mir gut: Sie ging zur Wiese frh, Ich lief ihr nach und fasste Mut, Und schlang den Arm um sie: Da stach ich an dem Miederband Mir eine Nadel in die Hand; Das Blut lief stark, ich sprang nach Haus, Und mit dem Kssen war es aus. Jngst ging ich so zum Zeitvertreib, Und traf sie dort am Fluss, Ich schlang dem Arm um ihren Leib, Und bat um einen Kuss; Sie spitzte schon den Rosenmund, Da kam der alte Kettenhund, Un biss mich wtend in das Bein! Da liess ich wohl das Kssen sein. Und allemal geht mirs nun so; O! dass ichs leiden muss! Mein Lebtag werd ich nimmer froh, Krieg ich nicht baldnen Kuss. Das Glck sieht mich so finster an, Was hab ich armer Wicht getan? Drum, wer es hrt, erbarme sich, Und sei so gut und ksse mich.
THEODOR KRNER (17911813) END OF DISC 10

Im young and hot-blooded, as you all know, and very fond of kissing, yet Ive never kissed; for although my maiden cares for me it seems as though it will not happen: in spite of all my efforts, all my cunning, I have never kissed her. Rosie, our neighbours daughter, is fond of me: one morning she went to the fields, I ran after her, took courage and put my arm around her; but then I pricked my hand on a pin in her bodice. The blood gushed out, I rushed home, and that was the end of kissing. The other day I was strolling to pass the time, and met her by the river; I slipped my arm around her and begged for a kiss; she quickly puckered her rosy lips, but along came her old watchdog and bit me angrily on the leg! So I let kissing alone. Every time its the same; how I suffer! I shall never in my life be happy if I dont get a kiss soon. Fate is so unkind to me. What have I, poor wretch, done? So whoever hears this, take pity on me; be kind and kiss me.

104

October 1815 SONG TEXTS Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt Sehnsucht Only he who knows longing Longing
First setting, first version, D310. 15 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Elly Ameling

bl Disc
1 Track

Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt Weiss, was ich leide! Allein und abgetrennt Von aller Freude, Seh ich ans Firmament Nach jener Seite. Ach! der mich liebt und kennt Ist in der Weite. Es schwindelt mir, es brennt Mein Eingeweide. Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt Weiss, was ich leide!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Only he who knows longing knows what I suffer. Alone, cut off from all joy, I gaze at the firmament in that direction. Ah, he who loves and knows me is far away. I feel giddy, my vitals are aflame. Only he who knows longing knows what I suffer.

Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt Sehnsucht Only he who knows longing Longing
First setting, second version, D310a. 15 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Elly Ameling

bl Disc
2 Track

see above, disc bl track 1 , for text and translation

Hektors Abschied
ANDROMACHE Will sich Hektor ewig von mir wenden, Wo Achill mit unnahbaren Hnden Dem Patroklus schrecklich Opfer bringt? Wer wird knftig deinen Kleinen lehren Speere werfen und die Gtter ehren, Wenn der finstre Orkus dich verschlingt? HEKTOR Teures Weib, gebiete deinen Trnen! Nach der Feldschlacht ist mein feurig Sehnen, Diese Arme schtzen Pergamus. Kmpfend fr den heilgen Herd der Gtter Fall ich, und des Vaterlandes Retter Steig ich nieder zu dem stygschen Fluss. ANDROMACHE Nimmer lausch ich deiner Waffen Schalle Mssig liegt das Eisen in der Halle, Priams grosser Heldenstamm verdirbt. Du wirst hingehn, wo kein Tag mehr scheinet, Der Cocytus durch die Wsten weinet, Deine Lieb im Lethe stirbt. HEKTOR All mein Sehnen will ich, all mein Denken, In des Lethe stillen Strom versenken, Aber meine Liebe nicht. Horch! der Wilde tobt schon an den Mauern Grte mir das Schwert um, lass das Trauern! Hektors Liebe stirbt im Lethe nicht.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Hectors farewell
ANDROMACHE
Will Hector forever turn away from me, while Achilles, with proud hands makes a terrible sacrifice for Patroclus? Who, in the future, will teach your son to hurl the javelin and revere the gods, when black Hades engulfs you?

bl Disc
3 Track

D312. 19 October 1815; published by Thaddus Weigl in Vienna in April 1826 as Op 58 No 1 sung by Marie McLaughlin and Thomas Hampson

HECTOR
Dear wife, stem your tears! I long ardently for battle; these arms shall protect Troy. I shall fall fighting for the sacred home of the gods, and descend to the Stygian river as the saviour of my fatherland.

ANDROMACHE
Never again shall I hear the clang of your arms; your sword will lie idle in the hall. Priams great heroic race will perish. You will go where no daylight shines, where Cocytus weeps through the wastelands; your love will die in the waters of Lethe.

HECTOR
I would drown all my longing, all my thoughts in the silent waters of Lethe, but not my love. Hark! The wild mob already rages at the walls. Gird on my sword, cease your grieving. Hectors love will not perish in Lethe.

Die Sterne
Wie wohl ist mir im Dunkeln! Wie weht die laue Nacht! Die Sterne Gottes funkeln In feierlicher Pracht.

The stars
How happy I am in the darkness! How warm the night breeze! Gods stars glitter in their solemn splendour.

bl Disc
4 Track

D313. 19 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Jamie MacDougall

105

SONG TEXTS October 1815


Komm, Ida, komm ins Freie, Und lass in jene Blue Und lass zu jenen Hhn Uns staunend aufwrts sehn. O Sterne Gottes, Zeugen Und Boten bessrer Welt, Ihr heisst den Aufruhr schweigen, Der unsern Busen schwellt. Ich seh hinauf, ihr Hehren, Zu euren lichten Sphren, Und Ahndung bessrer Lust Stillt die emprte Brust. O Sterne Gottes, Boten Und Brger bessrer Welt, Die ihr die Nacht der Toten Zu milder Dmmrung hellt; Umschimmert sanft die Sttte, Wo ich aus stillem Bette Und sssem Schlaf erwach Zu Edens schnerm Tag!
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

Come, Ida, into the open air and let us gaze up in wonder at the blue sky and at those peaks. Gods stars, witnesses and harbingers of a better world, you silence the tumult which fills our breast. I gaze up, lofty stars, to your shining spheres, and a presentiment of higher bliss calms my incensed heart. Gods stars, messengers and citizens of a better world, who brighten the night of the dead to a soft half-light. Cast your gentle radiance around me when I awaken from my silent bed and sweet slumber to a fairer day in Eden.

Disc bl Nachtgesang Night song Track 5 D314. 19 October 1815; first published in 1887 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Michael George

Tiefe Feier Schauert um die Welt! Braune Schleier Hllen Wald und Feld! Trb und matt und mde Nickt jedes Leben ein Und namenloser Friede Umsuselt alles Sein. Wacher Kummer, Verlass ein Weilchen mich! Goldner Schlummer, Komm und umflgle mich! Trockne meine Trnen Mit deines Schleiers Saum, Und tusche, Freund, mein Sehnen Mit deinem schnsten Traum!
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

Deep peace hovers over the world. A brown veil shrouds wood and field. Unhappy, listless and weary all living creatures drowse off to sleep, and ineffable peace envelops every being. Wakeful sorrow, leave me a while. Golden slumber, come, enfold me in your wings. Dry my tears with the hem of your veil, and delude my longing, friend, with your loveliest dream.

Disc bl An Rosa I To Rosa I Track 6 D315. 19 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Jamie MacDougall

Warum bist du nicht hier, meine Geliebteste Dass mich grte dein Arm, dass mich dein Hndedruck Labe, dass du mich pressest An dein schlagendes Schwesterherz. Warum bist du nicht hier, meine Vertrauteste, Dass dich grte mein Arm, dass ich dir sssen Gruss Lispl und feurig dich drcke An mein schlagendes Bruderherz.
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

When you are not here, my darling, that your arms may enfold me; that you may press my hand to comfort me; that you may clasp me to your tenderly beating heart. Why are you not here, my beloved, that my arm may embrace you, that I may whisper a sweet greeting and press you ardently to my tenderly beating heart?

106

October 1815 SONG TEXTS An Rosa II


Rosa, denkst du an mich? Innig gedenk ich dein. Durch den grnlichen Wald schimmert das Abendrot, Und die Wipfel der Tannen Regt das Suseln des Ewigen. Rosa, wrest du hier, sh ich ins Abendrot Deine Wangen getaucht, sh ich vom Abendhauch Deine Locken geringelt Edle Seele, mir wre wohl!
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

To Rosa II
Rosa, do you think of me? I think tenderly of you. The evening light glimmers through the green forest and the pine-tops are stirred by the whisper of eternity. Rosa, if you were here I should see your cheeks bathed in the evening glow, and your locks ruffled in the evening breeze. Dearest soul, how happy I should be!

bl Disc
7 Track

D316. 19 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Jamie MacDougall

Idens Schwanenlied
Wie schaust du aus dem Nebelflor O Sonne, bleich und mde! Es schwirrt der Heimchen heisrer Chor Zu meinem Schwanenliede. Ach, klagt um eure Schwester, klagt Ihr Rosen und ihr Nelken! Wie bald, und hin ist meine Pracht, Und meine Blthen welken. Der Wandrer, der in meiner Zier, In meiner Schnheit Schimmer Mich schaute, kommt und forscht nach mir, Und sieht mich nimmer, nimmer. Es kommt der Traute, den ich mir Erkoren einzig habe Ach fleuch, Geliebter, fleuch von hier! Dein Mdchen schlft im Grabe. Triumph! Auf Herbstesdmmerung Folgt milder Frhlingsschimmer. Auf Trennung folgt Vereinigung, Vereinigung auf immer!
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

Idas swan song


O sun, how pale and weary you gaze from your misty veil! The hoarse chorus of crickets chirrups to my swan song. Mourn for your sister, mourn, roses and carnations! How quickly my splendour is gone, and my blossoms fade. The wanderer who looked upon me in my finery, in my shimmering beauty, comes by and seeks me out; but he will never see me again. He comes, whom I have chosen as my only love. Fly, beloved, fly from here. Your sweetheart sleeps in the grave. Rejoice! After the dusk of autumn comes springs gentle radiance. After separation comes reunion, eternal reunion!

bl Disc
8 Track

D317. 19 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Elly Ameling

Schwangesang
Endlich stehn die Pforten offen, Endlich winkt das khle Grab, Und nach langem Frchten, Hoffen, Neig ich mich die Nacht hinab. Durchgewacht sind nun die Tage Meines Lebens, ssse Ruh Drckt nach ausgeweinter Klage Mir die mden Wimpern zu. Ewig wird die Nacht nicht dauern, Ewig dieser Schlummer nicht. Hinter jenen Grberschauern Dmmert unauslschlich Licht. Aber bis das Licht mir funkle, Bis ein schnrer Tag mir lacht, Sink ich ruhig in die dunkle, Stille, khle Schlummernacht!
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

Swan song
At last the gates are open; at last the cool grave beckons, and after long fears and hopes I drift down towards night. I have watched through the days of my life; after weeping in lamentation, sweet peace closes my weary eyelids. The night will not last for ever, nor will this sleep. Beyond the terror of the grave an eternal light dawns. But until that light shines for me, until a fairer day smiles upon me, I will sink peacefully into the cool, silent night of sleep.

bl Disc
9 Track

D318. 19 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Michael George

107

SONG TEXTS October 1815


Disc bl Luisens Antwort Louisas answer Track bl D319. 19 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Elly Ameling

Wohl weinen Gottes Engel, Wenn Liebende sich trennen. Wie werd ich leben knnen, Geliebter, ohne dich! Gestorben allen Freuden, Leb ich fortan den Leiden, Und nimmer, Wilhelm, nimmer Vergisst Luisa dich. Wie knnt ich dein vergessen! Vergessen jener Stunden, Wo ich, von dir umwunden, Umflechtend innig dich, An deine Brust mich lehnte, Ganz dein zu sein mich sehnte! Geliebter, nimmer, nimmer Vergisst Luisa dich. Verachtet und vergessen, Verloren und verlassen, Knnt ich dich doch nicht hassen; Still grmen wrd ich mich, Bis Tod sich mein erbarmte. Das Grab mich khl umarmte Doch auch im Grab, im Himmel, O Wilhelm, liebt ich dich! In mildem Engelglanze Wrd ich dein Bett umschimmern Und zrtlich dich um wimmern: Ich bin Luisa, ich: Luisa kann nicht hassen, Luisa dich nicht lassen, Luisa kommt zu segnen, Und liebt auch droben dich.
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

Gods angels weep when lovers part. How shall I be able to live without you, beloved? Dead to all joys I shall henceforth live for sorrow, and never, William, never shall Louisa forget you. How could I forget you, forget those hours when I was embraced by you, when, clasping you ardently, I leant upon your breast, longing to be wholly yours? Beloved, never, never shall Louisa forget you. If I were despised and forgotten, lost and forsaken, I still could not hate you; I should grieve silently until death took pity on me in the graves cool embrace. But even in the grave, even in heaven I should still love you, William! I would bathe your bed in a gentle, angelic radiance, and murmur tenderly into your ear: I am Louisa: Louisa cannot hate you, Louisa cannot leave you. Louisa comes to bless you, and still loves you up above.

Disc bl Der Zufriedene The contented man Track bm D320. 23 October 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by John Mark Ainsley

Zwar schuf das Glck hienieden Mich weder reich noch gross, Allein ich bin zufrieden Wie mit dem schnsten Loos. So ganz nach meinem Herzen Ward mir ein Freund vergnnt, Denn Kssen, Trinken, Scherzen Ist auch sein Element. Mit ihm wird froh und weise Manch Flschchen ausgeleert; Denn auf der Lebensreise Ist Wein das beste Pferd. Wenn mir bei diesem Loose Nun auch ein trbres fllt, So denk ich: keine Rose Blht dornlos in der Welt.
CHRISTIAN LUDWIG REISSIG (17831822)

Fortune here on earth has made me neither rich nor great, but I am contented as if with the finest of lots. A friend quite after my own heart has been granted me. For with kissing, drinking and jesting he too is in his element. With him, cheerfully and wisely, many a bottle is emptied! For on lifes journey wine is the best of steeds. If, amid this lot of mine, a gloomier fate should overtake me, I shall reflect that no rose blooms without thorns in this world.

108

October 1815 SONG TEXTS Mignons Gesang Kennst du das Land? Mignons song Do you know the land?

bl Disc
bn Track

D321. 23 October 1815; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1832 in volume 20 of the Nachlass cf Krufft Lied aus Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre, disc 39 5 & Spohr Mignons Lied Kennst du das Land?, disc 39 cp sung by Elly Ameling

Kennst du das Land, wo die Zitronen blhn, Im dunklen Laub die Gold-Orangen glhn, Ein sanfter Wind vom blauen Himmel weht, Die Myrte still und hoch der Lorbeer steht, Kennst du es wohl? Dahin! Dahin Mcht ich mit dir, o mein Geliebter, ziehn. Kennst du das Haus? Auf Sulen ruht sein Dach, Es glnzt der Saal, es schimmert das Gemach, Und Mamorbilder stehn und sehn mich an: Was hat man dir, du armes Kind, getan? Kennst du es wohl? Dahin! Dahin Mcht ich mit dir, o mein Beschtzer, ziehn. Kennst du den Berg und seinen Wolkensteg? Das Maultier sucht im Nebel seinen Weg; In Hhlen wohnt der Drachen alte Brut; Es strzt der Fels und ber ihn die Flut, Kennst du ihn wohl? Dahin! Dahin Geht unser Weg! o Vater, lass uns ziehn!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Do you know the land where lemon trees blossom; where golden oranges glow amid dark leaves? A gentle wind blows from the blue sky, the myrtle stands silent, the laurel tall: do you know it? There, O there I desire to go with you, my beloved! Do you know the house? Its roof rests on pillars, the hall gleams, the chamber shimmers, and marble statues stand and gaze at me: what have they done to you, poor child? Do you know it? There, O there I desire to go with you, my protector! Do you know the mountain and its clouded path? The mule seeks its way through the mist, in caves the ancient brood of dragons dwells; the rock falls steeply, and over it the torrent. Do you know it? There, O there lies our way. O father, let us go!

Hermann und Thusnelda


THUSNELDA Ha, dort kmmt er, mit Schweiss, mit Rmerblut, Mit dem Staube der Schlacht bedeckt! So schn war Hermann niemals! So hats ihm Nie von dem Auge geflammt. Komm, o komm, ich bebe vor Lust, reich mir den Adler Und das triefende Schwert! Komm, athm und ruh Hier aus in meiner Umarmung Von der zu schrecklichen Schlacht. Ruh hier, dass ich den Schweiss von der Stirn abtrockne Und der Wange das Blut! Wie glht die Wange! Hermann, Hermann, so hat dich Niemals Thusnelda geliebt! Selbst nicht, als du zuerst im Eichenschatten Mit dem brunlichen Arm mich wilder umfasstest! Fliehend blieb ich und sah dir Schon die Unsterblichkeit an, Die nun dein ist. Erzhlts in allen Hainen, Dass Augustus nun bang mit seinen Gttern Nektar trinket! Erzhlt es in allen Hainen, Dass Hermann unsterblicher ist! HERMANN Warum lockst du mein Haar? Liegt nicht der stumme Tote Vater vor uns? O, htt Augustus Seine Heere gefhrt, er Lge noch blutiger da!

Hermann and Thusnelda


THUSNELDA
Ah, there he comes, covered with sweat, with Roman blood and with the dust of battle. Never was Hermann so fair! Never did his eyes flame so!

bl Disc
bo Track

D322. 27 October 1815; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1837 in volume 28 of the Nachlass sung by Lorna Anderson and Simon Keenlyside

Come! I tremble with desire! Hand me the eagle and the dripping sword! Come, breathe and rest here in my embrace from the dread battle. Rest here that I may wipe the sweat from your brow and the blood from your cheeks! How your cheeks glow! Hermann! Hermann! Never has Thusnelda loved you so! Not even when in the shade of the oak tree your swarthy arms first embraced me wildly! As I fled I remained there, already glimpsing the immortality Which is now yours! Proclaim it in every grove that Augustus is now uneasy as he drinks nectar with his gods! That Hermann is more immortal than he!

HERMANN
Why do you coil my hair? Does not my father lie dead and silent before us! Oh, if only Augustus had led his armies, he would be lying there still more bloodied!

109

SONG TEXTS October November 1815


THUSNELDA Lass dein sinkendes Haar mich, Hermann, heben, Dass es ber dem Kranz in Locken drohe! Siegmar ist bei den Gttern! Folge du, und wein ihm nicht nach!
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

THUSNELDA
Let me gather up your lank hair, Hermann, that it may fall in menacing locks over the laurel wreath! Siegmar is with the gods! You shall be his successor, and not mourn him!

Disc bl Erlknig The Erlking Track bp D328. October (?) 1815; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 1
cf Johann Reichardt Erlknig, disc 38 4 & Zelter Erlknig, disc 38 bl & Spohr Erlknig, disc 39 cq & Loewe Erlknig, disc 40 8 sung by Sarah Walker

Wer reitet so spt durch Nacht und Wind? Es ist der Vater mit seinem Kind: Er hat den Knaben wohl in dem Arm, Er fasst ihn sicher, er hlt ihn warm. Mein Sohn, was birgst du so bang dein Gesicht? Siehst, Vater, du den Erlknig nicht? Den Erlenknig mit Kron und Schweif? Mein Sohn, es ist ein Nebelstreif. Du liebes Kind, komm, geh mit mir! Gar schne Spiele spiel ich mit dir; Manch bunte Blumen sind an dem Strand, Meine Mutter hat manch glden Gewand. Mein Vater, mein Vater, und hrest du nicht, Was Erlenknig mir leise verspricht? Sei ruhig, bleibe ruhig, mein Kind: In drren Blttern suselt der Wind. Willst, feiner Knabe, du mit mir gehn? Meine Tchter sollen dich warten schn; Meine Tchter fhren den nchtlichen Reihn Und wiegen und tanzen und singen dich ein. Mein Vater, mein Vater, und siehst du nicht dort Erlknigs Tchter am dstern Ort? Mein Sohn, mein Sohn, ich seh es genau: Es scheinen die alten Weiden so grau. Ich liebe dich, mich reizt deine schne Gestalt; Und bist du nicht willig, so brauch ich Gewalt. Mein Vater, mein Vater, jetzt fasst er mich an! Erlknig hat mir ein Leids getan! Dem Vater grausets, er reitet geschwind, Er hlt in Armen das chzende Kind, Erreicht den Hof mit Mhe und Not: In seinen Armen das Kind war tot.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Who rides so late through the night and wind? It is the father with his child. He has the boy in his arms; he holds him safely, he keeps him warm. My son, why do you hide your face in fear? Father, can you not see the Erlking? The Erlking with his crown and tail? My son, it is a streak of mist. Sweet child, come with me. Ill play wonderful games with you. Many a pretty flower grows on the shore; my mother has many a golden robe. Father, father, do you not hear what the Erlking softly promises me? Calm, be calm, my child: the wind is rustling in the withered leaves. Wont you come with me, my fine lad? My daughters shall wait upon you; my daughters lead the nightly dance, and will rock you, and dance, and sing you to sleep. Father, father, can you not see Erlkings daughters there in the darkness? My son, my son, I can see clearly: it is the old grey willows gleaming. I love you, your fair form allures me, and if you dont come willingly, Ill use force. Father, father, now hes seizing me! The Erlking has hurt me! The father shudders, he rides swiftly, he holds the moaning child in his arms; with one last effort he reaches home; the child lay dead in his arms.

Disc bl Klage der Ceres The lament of Ceres Track bq D323. 9 November 1815 June 1816; published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Elizabeth Connell

Ist der holde Lenz erschienen? Hat die Erde sich verjngt? Die besonnten Hgel grnen, Und des Eises Rinde springt. Aus der Strme blauem Spiegel Lacht der unbewlkte Zeus, Milder wehen Zephyrs Flgel, Augen treibt das junge Reis. In dem Hain erwachen Lieder. Und die Oreade spricht: Deine Blumen kehren wieder, Deine Tochter kehret nicht.

Has fair spring appeared? Has the earth grown young again? The sunny hills turn green, the ices crust cracks. From the blue mirror of the rivers cloudless Zeus laughs, the Zephyrs wings beat more gently, the young shoots push forth buds. Song awakens in the grove, and the Oread speaks: your flowers return but your daughter does not.

110

November 1815 SONG TEXTS


Ach, wie lang ists, dass ich walle Suchend durch der Erde Flur! Titan, deiner Strahlen alle Sandt ich nach der teuren Spur; Keiner hat mir noch verkndet Von dem lieben Angesicht, Und der Tag, der alles findet, Die Verlorne fand er nicht, Hast du, Zeus, sie mir entrissen? Hat, von ihrem Reiz gerhrt, Zu des Orkus schwarzen Flssen Pluto sie hinabgefhrt? Wer wird nach dem dstern Strande Meines Grames Bote sein? Ewig stsst der Kahn vom Lande, Doch nur Schatten nimmt er ein. Jedem selgen Aug verschlossen Bleibt das nchtliche Gefild, Und so lang der Styx geflossen, Trug er kein lebendig Bild. Nieder fhren tausend Steige, Keiner fhrt zum Tag zurck, Ihre Trnen bringt kein Zeuge Vor der bangen Mutter Blick. Mtter, die aus Pyrrhas Stamme Sterbliche geboren sind, Drfen durch des Grabes Flamme Folgen dem geliebten Kind; Nur was Jovis Haus bewohnet, Nahet nicht dem dunkeln Strand, Nur die Seligen verschonet, Parzen, eure strenge Hand. Strzt mich in die Nacht der Nchte Aus des Himmels goldnem Saal! Ehret nicht der Gttin Rechte. Ach! sie sind der Mutter Qual! Wo sie mit dem finstern Gatten Freudlos thronet, stieg ich hin, Und trte mit den leisen Schatten Leise vor die Herrscherin. Ach, ihr Auge, feucht von Zhren, Sucht umsonst das goldne Licht, Irret nach entfernten Sphren, Auf die Mutter fllt es nicht Bis die Freude sie entdecket, Bis sich Brust mit Brust vereint, Und, zum Mitgefhl erwecket, Selbst der rauhe Orkus weint. Eitler Wunsch! Verlorne Klagen! Ruhig in dem gleichen Gleis Rollt des Tages sichrer Wagen, Ewig steht der Schluss des Zeus. Weg von jenen Finsternissen Wandt er sein beglcktes Haupt; Einmal in die Nacht gerissen, Bleibt sie ewig mir geraubt, Bis des dunkeln Stromes Welle Von Aurorens Farben glht, Iris mitten durch die Hlle Ihren schnen Bogen zieht.
Ah, how long have I been wandering through the earths meadows, searching! Titan, I sent all your rays of light to seek out my dear one; no one has yet brought me word of her beloved countenance, and day, that finds all things, has not found my lost daughter. Have you, Zeus, snatched her from me? Has Pluto, touched by her charms, carried her down to the black rivers of Orcus? Who will convey the tidings of my grief to the sombre shore? The boat forever pulls away from land, but it takes only shades on board. The fields of night remain closed to the eyes of every immortal, and so long as the Styx has flowed it has borne no living creature. A thousand paths lead downwards, but none leads back to the light. No witness evokes the daughters tears before the eyes of the anxious mother. Mothers, born immortal of Pyrrhas race, may follow their beloved children through the flames of the grave. Only they that dwell in the house of Jove may not approach the dark shore. Your stern hand, O Fates, spares only the immortals. Plunge me from the golden halls of heaven into the night of nights! Do not respect the rights of the goddess; alas, they are a mothers torment! Where she is joylessly enthroned with her gloomy spouse, I would descend, and with the soft shadows tread softly before the queen. Ah, here eyes, moist with tears, seek in vain the golden light; they stray to far-off spheres, but do not alight on her mother until, to her joy, she discovers her, until their bosoms are united, and even harsh Orcus, aroused to pity, weeps. Vain wish! Forlorn laments! The trusty chariot of day rolls calmly on its even course; the decree of Zeus stands for ever. He has turned his august head away from those black realms. Snatched into the night, she remains forever lost to me, until the waves of the dark river glow with the colours of the dawn, and Iris draws her fair bow through the midst of hell.

111

SONG TEXTS November 1815


Ist mir nichts von ihr geblieben? Nicht ein sss erinnernd Pfand, Dass die Fernen sich noch lieben, Keine Spur der teuren Hand? Knpfet sich kein Liebesknoten Zwischen Kind und Mutter an? Zwischen Lebenden und Toten Ist kein Bndnis aufgetan? Nein, nicht ganz ist sie entflohen! Wir sind nicht ganz getrennt! Haben uns die ewig Hohen Eine Sprache doch vergnnt! Wenn des Frhlings Kinder sterben, Wenn von Nordes kaltem Hauch Blatt und Blume sich entfrben, Traurig steht der nackte Strauch, Nehm ich mir das hchste Leben Aus Vertumnus reichem Horn, Opfernd es dem Styx zu geben, Mir des Samens goldnes Korn. Trauernd senk ichs in die Erde, Leg es an des Kindes Herz, Dass es eine Sprache werde Meiner Liebe, meinem Schmerz. Fhrt der gleiche Tanz der Horen Freudig nun den Lenz zurck, Wird das Tote neu geboren Von der Sonne Lebensblick; Keime, die dem Auge starben In der Erde kaltem Schoss, In das heitre Reich der Farben Ringen sie sich freudig los. Wenn der Stamm zum Himmel eilet, Sucht die Wurzel scheu die Nacht, Gleich in ihre Pflege teilet Sich des Styx, des thers Macht. Halb berhren sie der Toten, Halb der Lebenden Gebiet Ach, sie sind mir teure Boten, Ssse Stimmen vom Cocyt! Hlt er gleich sie selbst verschlossen In dem schauervollen Schlund, Aus des Frhlings jungen Sprossen Redet mir der holde Mund; Dass auch fern vom goldnen Tage, Wo die Schatten traurig ziehn, Liebend noch der Busen schlage, Zrtlich noch die Herzen glhn. O, so lasst euch froh begrssen, Kinder der verjngten Au, Euer Kelch soll berfliessen Von des Nektars reinstem Tau. Tauchen will ich euch in Strahlen, Mit der Iris schnstem Licht Will ich eure Bltter malen Gleich Aurorens Angesicht. In des Lenzes heiterm Glanze Lese jede zarte Brust, In des Herbstes welkem Kranze Meinen Schmerz und meine Lust.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Is nothing of her left to me? No sweet pledge to remind me that, though far distant, we still love one another? No trace of her beloved hand? Is there no bond of love between mother and child? Is there no alliance between the living and the dead? No, she is not completely lost to me! We are not completely separated! For the eternal gods have granted us a language! When the children of spring die, when leaves and flowers fade at the north winds cold breath, and the bare bushes stand mournful, I take the highest life from Vertumnus cornucopia, and sacrifice the seeds golden corn to the Styx. Lamenting, I plant it in the earth, laying it on the heart of my child, that it may become a language of my love and my sorrow. Then, when the unchanging dance of the hours brings back joyous spring, what was dead is born anew under the suns life-giving gaze; seeds which the eye took for dead in the earths cold womb struggle joyfully free into the bright realm of colours. As stems surge towards the sky, roots shyly seek the night, the powers of the Styx and those of the ether are equally divided in their cultivation. They exist half in the regions of the dead and half in those of the living ah, to me they are dear messengers, sweet voices from Cocytus! Though it holds her captive in the gruesome abyss, her beloved mouth speaks to me through springs young shoots, it tells me that, though far from the golden day, where the shades wander mournfully, her breast still beats lovingly, and hearts still glow tenderly. O, let me greet you joyfully, children of the reborn meadows; your cup shall overflow with the purest dew of nectar. I shall bathe you in sunbeams, I shall paint your leaves with the rainbows fairest light, like Auroras countenance. In the serene radiance of spring, in the faded wreath of autumn, every tender heart may discern my sorrow and my joy.

112

November December 1815 SONG TEXTS Harfenspieler Wer sich der Einsamkeit ergibt
Wer sich der Einsamkeit ergibt, Ach! der ist bald allein Ein jeder lebt, ein jeder liebt Und lsst ihn seiner Pein. Ja! lasst mich meiner Qual! Und kann ich nur einmal Recht einsam sein, Dann bin ich nicht allein. Es schleicht ein Liebender lauschend sacht, Ob seine Freundin allein? So berschleicht bei Tag und Nacht Mich Einsamen die Pein, Mich Einsamen die Qual. Ach, werd ich erst einmal Einsam im Grabe sein, Da lsst sie mich allein!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

The harpers song He who gives himself up to solitude


He who gives himself up to solitude, ah, he is soon alone; one man lives, another loves and both leave him to his suffering. Yes, leave me to my suffering! And if I can just once be truly lonely, then I shall not be alone. A lover steals softly, listening: is his sweetheart alone? Thus, day and night, suffering steals upon me, torment steals upon me in my solitude. Ah, when I lie lonely in the grave, then they will leave me alone.

bl Disc
br Track

First setting, D325. 13 November 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Martyn Hill

Lorma
Lorma sass in der Halle von Aldo. Sie sass beim Licht einer flammenden Eiche. Die Nacht stieg herab, aber er kehrte nicht wieder zurck. Lormas Seele war trb! Was hlt dich, du Jger von Cona zurck? Du hast ja versprochen wieder zu kehren! Waren die Hirsche weit in der Ferne? Brausen an der Heide die dstern Winde um Dich? Ich bin im Lande der Fremden. Wer ist mein Freund, als Aldo? Komm von deinen erschallenden Hgeln, O mein bester Geliebter! Sie wandte ihre Augen gegen das Tor. Sie lauscht zum brausenden Wind. Sie denkt, es seien die Tritten von Aldo. Freud steigt in ihrem Antlitz, aber Wehmut kehrt wieder, wie am Mond eine dnne Wolke, zurck.
BARON EDMUND VON HAROLD (17371808)

Lorma
Lorma sat in Aldos hall. She sat at the light of a flaming oak. The night came down, but he did not return. The soul of Lorma is sad! What detains thee, hunter of Cona? Thou didst promise to return. Has the deer been distant far? Do the dark winds sigh round thee on the heath? I am in the land of strangers; who is my friend but Aldo? Come from thy sounding hills, O my best beloved! Her eyes are turned toward the gate. She listens to the rustling blast. She thinks it is Aldos tread. Joy rises in her face! But sorrow returns again, like a thin cloud on the moon.
JAMES MACPHERSON OSSIAN (17361796)

bl Disc
bs Track

First setting, D327. 28 November 1815; first published as a fragment in 1928; completed by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by Catherine Wyn-Rogers

Die drei Snger

The three minstrels

bl Disc
bt Track

D329. 23 December 1815; fragment first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig edited by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by Catherine Wyn-Rogers

Der Knig sass beim frohen Mahle, Die Fraun und Ritter um ihn her, Es kreisten frhlich die Pokale, Und manches Becken trank man leer. Da tnte Klang von goldnen Saiten, Der ssser labt als goldner Wein, Und sieh! drei fremde Snger schreiten, Sich neigend, in den Saal hinein. Seid mir gegrsst, ihr Liedershne! Beginnt der Knig wohlgemut, In deren Brust das Reich der Tne Und des Gesangs Geheimniss ruht!

The king sat at his merry banquet surrounded by knights and ladies; the goblets did their happy round, and many a glass was drained. Then came the sound of golden strings, sweeter than golden wine, and lo! Three strange minstrels entered the hall, bowing. Welcome, sons of song! begins the king cheerfully, in whose hearts dwell the realm of music and the secret of song.

113

SONG TEXTS December 1815


Wollt ihr den edlen Wettstreit wagen, So soll es hchlich uns erfreun, Und wer den Sieg davon getragen Mag unsres Hofes Zierde sein! Er sprichts der erste rhrt die Saiten, Die Vorwelt ffnet er dem Blick, Zum grauen Anfang aller Zeiten Lenkt er der Hrer Blick zurck. Er meldet, wie sich neugeboren Die Welt dem Chaos einst entwand. Sein Lied behagt den meisten Ohren Und willig folgt ihm der Verstand. Drauf mehr die Hrer zu ergetzen, Erklingt des Zweiten lustge Mhr: Von Gnomen fein und ihren Schtzen, Und von der grnen Zwerge Heer: Er singt von manchen Wunderdingen, Von manchem Schwanke schlau erdacht; Da regt der Scherz die losen Schwingen, Und jeder Mund im Saale lacht. Und an den Dritten kommt die Reih. Und sanft aus tief bewegter Brust Haucht er ein Lied von Lieb und Treu Und von der Sehnsucht Schmerz und Lust. Und kaum dass seine Saiten klingen, Schaut jedes Antlitz in den Schooss, Und Trnen des Gefhles ringen Sich aus verklrten Augen los. Und tiefes Schweigen herrscht im Saale, Als seines Liedes Ton entschwand Da steht der Knig auf vom Mahle, Und reicht dem dritten seine Hand: Bleib bei uns, Freund! dir ists gelungen, Du bist es, dem der Preis gebhrt; Das schnste Lied hat der gesungen, Der unser Herz zur Wehmut rhrt.
FRIEDRICH BOBRIK (17811844) END OF DISC 11

If you care to engage in noble contest that would delight us greatly. And whoever is victorious shall adorn our court. Thus he spoke. The first minstrel touched the strings and conjured up days past; he drew his listeners gaze back to the grey dawn of time. He told how the new-created world struggled free from chaos. His song pleased most ears, and the imagination willingly followed him. Then, to delight the listeners more, the second minstrel struck up a merry tale of cunning gnomes and their treasure, and a band of green dwarves. He sang of many a wondrous thing, and of many a sly prank. The fun was infectious, and everyone in the hall laughed loudly. Now it was the third ones turn. Softly, from the fullness of his heart, he breathed a song of love and constancy, of the pain and joy of longing. And hardly had his strings sounded than every gaze was lowered, and tears of emotion were wrung from transfigured eyes. Deep silence reigned in the hall when his song faded. Then the king stood up from the table and gave the third minstrel his hand. Stay with us, my friend! You have won; to you the prize is due. For he sang the most beautiful song who moved our hearts to melancholy.

Disc bm Das Grab The grave Track 1 Second setting, D330. 28 December 1815; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by John Mark Ainsley, Jamie MacDougall, Simon Keenlyside and Michael George

Das Grab ist tief und stille, Und schauderhaft sein Rand, Es deckt mit schwarzer Hlle Ein unbekanntes Land. Das Lied der Nachtigallen Tnt nicht in seinem Schooss. Der Freudschaft Rosen fallen Nur auf des Hgels Moos. Das arme Herz, hinieden Von manchem Sturm bewegt, Erlangt den wahren Frieden Nur wo es nicht mehr schlgt.

Deep and silent is the grave, terrible its brink; with its black shroud it covers an unknown land. The nightingales song does not sound in its depths. Only friendships roses fall on the mossy mound. Here below, the poor heart, tossed by many a storm, only attains a true peace when it beats no more.

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

114

December 1815 SONG TEXTS Zufriedenheit Lied


Ich bin vergngt, im Siegeston Verknd es mein Gedicht, Und mancher Mann mit seiner Kron Und Szepter ist es nicht. Und wrers auch; nun, immerhin! Mag ers doch! so ist er, was ich bin. Des Sultans Pracht, des Mogols Geld Des Glck, wie hiess er doch, Der, als er Herr war von der Welt, Zum Mond hinauf sah noch? Ich wnsche nichts von alle dem, Zu lcheln drob fllt mir bequem.
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

Contentment Song
I am happy, my verses proclaim it triumphantly, and many a man with his crown and sceptre is not. And even if he is, well, all the better! Let him be: he is as I am. The sultans splendour, the moguls wealth, the good fortune of what was his name? He who, when ruler of the world, still gazed up at the moon. I desire none of that; I prefer to smile at it.

bm Disc
2 Track

First setting, D362. 1815 or 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Christoph Prgardien

Klage um Ali Bey


Lasst mich! lasst mich! ich will klagen, Frhlich sein nicht mehr! Aboudahab hat geschlagen Ali und sein Heer. So ein muntrer, khner Krieger Wird nicht wieder sein, ber alles ward er Sieger, Hautes kurz und klein. Er verschmhte Wein und Weiber, Ging nur Kriegesbahn, Und war fr die Zeitungsschreiber Gar ein lieber Mann. Aber, nun ist er gefallen, Dass ers doch nicht wr! Ach, von allen Beys, von allen War kein Bey wie er. Jedermann in Syrus saget: Schade, dass er fiel! Und in ganz gypten klaget Mensch und Krokodil.
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

Lament for Ali Bey


Leave me! Leave me! I wish to lament and never again be joyful! Abu Dahab has slain Ali and his army! Such a bold and cheerful warrior there will never be again; he vanquished all, hacking them to pieces. He scorned wine and women, pursuing only the path of war, and was beloved by the newspapers. But now he is fallen. Would that he had not! Ah, among all the Beys there was no Bey like him! Everyone in Syria is saying: What a pity that he has fallen! And throughout all Egypt men and crocodiles lament.

bm Disc
3 Track

D140. 1815; published A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 45 of the Nachlass sung by John Mark Ainsley, Jamie MacDougall and Michael George

Gedichte von J G von Salis [-Seewis] Paperback edition published by Bauer in Vienna, 1815

115

A SCHUBERT CALENDAR 1816 A SCHUBERT CALENDAR 1816 aged 19 Schubert attempts to escape the drudgery of his fathers school by applying (unsuccessfully) for a job as a music teacher in Laibach, the present-day Ljubljana. An audacious project whereby Josef von Spaun envisages the publication of volumes of songs gathered together under their poets comes to nothing; Spauns request in April to Goethe that the great poet should be dedicatee of the projected first volume is ignored, as is the enclosure of a beautifully prepared autograph of sixteen Goethe settings. As Schubert writes in a rare diary entry of June 1816 ( propos something else): It is quite common to be disappointed by ones expectations. In the same month the composer takes part in the celebrations of the fiftieth anniversary of Salieris arrival in Vienna. His musical contribution, D407, is one of several heard on a long day where the old composer was surrounded by all his pupils. Schuberts first paid commission (to write the cantata Prometheus, D451, now lost) dates from the same time. By the end of the year much changes in Schuberts life: the love affair with Therese Grob (such as it was) is at an end, as is his regular association with Salieri; he finally takes the decision to leave the schoolhouse, give up teaching, and live in the rooms of his charismatic friend Franz von Schober (17981882) in the inner city (Tuchlauben 26). This assertion of independence is to last for about a year. Perhaps this is why the flood of songs, over one hundred in 1816, continues unabated. There is nothing as overtly dramatic as Gretchen am Spinnrade in the offing (although An Schwager Kronos is nearly as exciting and Der Wanderer nearly as famous), but Schubert turns his attention to the achievements of the German composers who are masters of the ballad (Zumsteeg in Stuttgart) and of the strophic song (Reichardt and Zelter in Berlin). In some cases he models his own compositions on their example, often bar by bar; as he goes along he outstrips the achievements of the older composers almost without trying (as in Die Erwartung, D159 Zumsteegs version is to be heard on disc 38). In 1816 Schubert tackles head-on the problem of the strophic song, the art that conceals art. Here are painstakingly laid the foundations of the effortless simplicity of later masterpieces such as the two Mller cycles where great emotion is expressed in a pithy, economical way. In 1816 there are fewer Klopstock songs, but ongoing work on Ossian, Hlty, Matthisson, Stolberg. Schubert intensifies his interest in Schiller and broadens his Goethean outlook to include the lyrics of Mignon and the Harper from Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre. There are some writers who are almost entirely linked with 1816: the Swiss Salis-Seewis in March; Uz in June; Jacobi in August and September. The composers enthusiasm for such older poets is often occasioned by recently published Viennese reprints of their work which makes them new arrivals on the scene as far as he is concerned. There are two Schubart settings in 1816, and a glut of Claudius settings in November, both enthusiasms that will spill into the following year. Significant on the home front are nine Mayrhofer songs, a kind of prelude to the outburst of great settings in 1817. There is a single setting of friend Schober, and a sign of the composers awakening awareness of the salon life of Vienna in two settings of the influential bluestocking Caroline Pichler. Some other works of 1816 String Quartet in E (D353); Deutsches Salve regina in F (D379); Stabat mater (Klopstock, D383); Sonatas (Sonatinas) in D major, A minor and G minor for violin and piano (D384, 385, 408); Salve regina in B flat (D386); Symphony No 4 in C minor (Tragic, D417); Der Brgschaft (fragment of opera seria, unknown author, D435); Rondo in A major for violin and orchestra (D438); Mass in C major (D452); Symphony No 5 in B flat major (D485); Magnificat in C major (D486).

116

1816 SONG TEXTS An Chloen


Die Munterkeit ist meinen Wangen, Den Augen Glut und Sprach entgangen; Der Mund will kaum ein Lcheln wagen; Kaum will der welke Leib sich tragen, Der Bluhmen am Mittage gleicht, Wann Flora lechzt und Zephyr weicht. Ich seh auf sie mit bangem Sehnen, Und kann den Blick nicht weggewhnen: Die Anmuth, die im Auge wachet Und um die jungen Wangen lachet, Zieht meinen weggewichnen Blick Mit gldnen Banden stets zurck. Mein Blut strmt mit geschwindern Gssen; Ich brenn, ich zittre, sie zu kssen; Ich suche sie mit wilden Blicken, Und Ungeduld will mich ersticken, Indem ich immer sehnsuchtsvoll Sie sehn und nicht umarmen soll.
JOHANN PETER UZ (17201796)

To Chloe
My cheeks have lost their brightness, my eyes their sparkle; my lips hardly dare smile; like flowers at midday when Flora thirsts and Zephyr dies, my wilting body can scarcely support itself. I look upon her with anxious longing, and cannot turn my gaze away. The grace that wakes in her eyes and laughs around her young cheeks always draws back my averted gaze with golden fetters. My blood flows faster; I burn, I tremble to kiss her; I seek her out with desperate looks, choked with impatience, for, in my longing I can always see her but never embrace her.

bm Disc
4 Track

D363. 1816; fragment first published in 1954 in the Music Review; completed by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by Christoph Prgardien

Die Nacht
Du verstrst uns nicht, o Nacht! Sieh! wir trinken im Gebsche; Und ein khler Wind erwacht, Dass er unsern Wein erfrische. Mutter holder Dunkelheit, Nacht! vertraute ssser Sorgen, Die betrogner Wachsamkeit Viele Ksse schon verborgen!
JOHANN PETER UZ (17201796)

The night
You do not disturb us, O night. See, we are drinking in the grove, and a refreshing breeze arises to cool our wine. Mother of gentle darkness, night, confidant of our sweet cares, you have already concealed many a kiss from cheated vigilance.

bm Disc
5 Track

D358. 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1849 in volume 44 of the Nachlass sung by Peter Schreier

Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt Sehnsucht Only he who knows longing Longing
Second setting, D359. 1816; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Christine Schfer

bm Disc
6 Track

Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt Weiss, was ich leide! Allein und abgetrennt Von aller Freude, Seh ich ans Firmament An jener Seite. Ach! der mich liebt und kennt Ist in der Weite. Es schwindelt mir, es brennt Mein Eingeweide. Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt Weiss, was ich leide!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Only he who knows longing knows what I suffer. Alone, cut off from all joy, I gaze at the firmament in that direction. Ah, he who loves and knows me is far away. I feel giddy, my vitals are aflame. Only he who knows longing knows what I suffer.

117

SONG TEXTS 1816


Disc bm Hoffnung Hope Track 7 D295. c1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Michael George

Schaff, das Tagwerk meiner Hnde, Hohes Glck, dass ichs vollende! Lass, o lass mich nicht ermatten! Nein es sind nicht leere Trume: Jetzt nur Stangen, diese Bume Geben einst noch Frucht und Schatten.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

O Fortune, let me complete my hands daily task! Let me not, O let me not grow weary! No, these are not vain dreams; though now but shoots, these trees will one day yield fruit and shade.

Disc bm An den Mond To the moon Track 8 Second setting, D296. c1816; first published by Wilhelm Mller in Berlin in 1868
sung by Dame Janet Baker

Fllest wieder Busch und Tal Still mit Nebelglanz, Lsest endlich auch einmal Meine Seele ganz. Breitest ber mein Gefild Lindernd deinen Blick, Wie des Freundes Auge, mild ber mein Geschick. Ich besass es doch einmal, Was so kstlich ist! Dass man doch zu seiner Qual Nimmer es vergisst. Rausche, Fluss, das Tal entlang, Ohne Rast und Ruh, Rausche, flstre meinem Sang Melodien zu, Wenn du in der Winternacht Wtend berschwillst, Oder um die Frhlingspracht Junger Knospen quillst. Selig, wer sich vor der Welt Ohne Hass verschliesst, Einen Freund am Busen hlt Und mit dem geniesst, Was, von Menschen nicht gewusst Oder nicht bedacht, Durch das Labyrinth der Brust Wandelt in der Nacht.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Once more you silently fill wood and vale with your hazy gleam and at last set my soul quite free. You cast your soothing gaze over my fields; with a friends gentle eye you watch over my fate. I possessed once something so precious that, to my torment, it can never now be forgotten. Murmur on, river, through the valley, without ceasing, murmur on, whispering melodies, to my song, When on winter nights you angrily overflow, or when you bathe the springtime splendour of the young buds. Happy he who, without hatred, shuts himself off from the world, holds one friend to his heart, and with him enjoys That which, unknown to and undreamt of by men, wanders by night through the labyrinth of the heart.

Disc bm An mein Klavier To my piano Track 9 D342. c1816; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Lucia Popp

Sanftes Klavier, Welche Entzckungen schaffest du mir, Sanftes Klavier! Wenn sich die Schnen Tndelnd verwhnen, Weih ich mich dir, Liebes Klavier! Bin ich allein, Hauch ich dir meine Empfindungen ein, Himmlisch und rein. Unschuld im Spiele, Tugendgefhle, Sprechen aus dir, Trautes Klavier!

Gentle piano, what delights you bring me, gentle piano! While the spoilt beauties dally, I devote myself to you, dear piano! When I am alone I whisper my feelings to you, pure and celestial. As I play, innocence and virtuous sentiments speak from you, beloved piano!

118

January 1816 SONG TEXTS


Sing ich dazu, Goldener Flgel, welch himmlische Ruh Lispelst mir du! Trnen der Freude Netzen die Saite! Silberner Klang Trgt den Gesang. Sanftes Klavier! Welche Entzckungen schaffest du mir, Goldnes Klavier! Wenn mich im Leben Sorgen umschweben, Tne du mir, Trautes Klavier!
CHRISTIAN FRIEDRICH DANIEL SCHUBART (17391791)

When I sing with you, golden keyboard, what heavenly peace you whisper to me! Tears of joy fall upon the strings. Silvery tone supports the song. Gentle piano, what delights you awaken within me, golden piano! When in this life cares beset me, sing to me, beloved piano!

Am ersten Maimorgen
D344. c1816; privately published by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by Christoph Prgardien

On the first May morning


Today I shall be merry, merry; I shall hear no wisdom and no moralizing. I shall run about and shout for joy; and even the king will not stop me. For today he comes with his retinue of joys from the halls of dawn, garlands around his head and breast, and nightingales on his shoulder.

bm Disc
bl Track

Heute will ich frhlich, frhlich sein, Keine Weis und keine Sitte hren; Will mich wlzen, und fr Freude schrein, Und der Knig soll mir das nicht wehren. Denn er kommt mit seiner Freuden Schaar Heute aus der Morgenrte Hallen, Einen Blumenkranz um Brust und Haar Und auf seiner Schulter Nachtigallen.
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

Klage
Trauer umfliesst mein Leben, Hoffnungslos mein Streben, Stets in Glut und Beben Schleicht mir hin das Leben; O nimmer trag ichs lnger! Leiden und Schmerzen whlen Mir in den Gefhlen, Keine Lfte khlen Banger Ahndung Schwlen; O nimmer trag ichs lnger! Nur ferner Tod kann heilen Solcher Schmerzen Weilen; Wo sich die Pforten teilen, Werd ich wieder heilen; O nimmer trag ichs lnger!
ANONYMOUS

Lament
Sorrow floods my life, my endeavours are in vain, in unremitting ardour and trembling my life slips by; I can endure it no longer! Grief and suffering gnaw away at my feelings; no breezes cool my feverish, anxious foreboding. I can endure it no longer! Only distant death can cure the presence of such suffering; when the gates open I shall be cured; I can endure it no longer!

bm Disc
bm Track

D371. January 1816; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Lucia Popp

An die Natur
Ssse, heilige Natur, Lass mich gehn auf deiner Spur, Leite mich an deiner Hand, Wie ein Kind am Gngelband! Wenn ich dann ermdet bin, Sink ich dir am Busen hin, Atme ssse Himmelslust Hangend an der Mutterbrust.

To nature
Sweet, holy nature, let me walk upon your pathway, lead me by the hand, like a child on the reins! Then, when I am weary, I shall sink down on your breast, and breathe the sweet joys of heaven suckling at your maternal breast.

bm Disc
bn Track

D372. 15 January 1816; published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Elizabeth Connell

119

SONG TEXTS January 1816


Ach! wie wohl ist mir bei dir! Will dich lieben fr und fr; Lass mich gehn auf deiner Spur, Ssse, heilige Natur!
Ah, how happy I am to be with you! I shall love you for ever; let me walk upon your pathway, sweet, holy nature!

FRIEDRICH LEOPOLD, GRAF ZU STOLBERG-STOLBERG (17501819)

Disc bm Lied Mutter geht durch ihre Kammern Song Mother goes through her rooms Track bo D373. 15 January (?) 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Lucia Popp

Mutter geht durch ihre Kammern, Rumt die Schrnke ein und aus, Sucht, und weiss nicht was, mit Jammern, Findet nichts als leeres Haus. Leeres Haus! O Wort der Klage, Dem, der einst ein holdes Kind Drin gegngelt hat am Tage, Drin gewiegt in Nchten lind. Wieder grnen wohl die Buchen, Wieder kommt der Sonne Licht, Aber, Mutter, lass dein Suchen, Wieder kommt dein Liebes nicht. Und wenn Abendlfte fcheln, Vater heim zum Herde kehrt, Regt sichs fast in ihm, wie Lcheln, Dran doch gleich die Trne zehrt. Vater weiss, in seinen Zimmern Findet er die Todesruh, Hrt nur bleicher Mutter Wimmern, Und kein Kindlein lacht ihm zu.

Mother goes through her rooms, filling and emptying the cupboards, seeking she knows not what, and with sorrow finding nothing but an empty house. Empty house! O words of grief for one who once cosseted there a sweet child in the daytime and gently rocked it to sleep at night. The beech trees will grow green again, the light of the sun will return, but, mother, cease your searching, your beloved child will not return. And when the evening breezes stir, and the father returns home to the fireside, there is a flicker of a smile within him which at once turns to tears. Father knows that in his rooms he will find a deathly peace. He will hear only the whimpering of the pale mother, and no little child will gurgle at him.

FRIEDRICH HEINRICH KARL, FREIHERR DE LA MOTTE FOUQU (17771843)

Disc bm Lodas Gespenst Lodas ghost Track bp D150. 17 January 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1830 as volume 3 of the Nachlass
sung by Lucia Popp

Der bleiche, kalte Mond erhob sich in Osten. Der Schlaf stieg auf die Jnglinge nieder! Ihre blauen Helme schimmern zum Strahl. Das sterbende Feuer vergeht. Der Schlaf aber ruhte nicht auf dem Knig: er hob sich mitten in seinen Waffen, und stieg langsam den Hgel hinauf, die Flamme des Turms von Sarno zu sehn. Die Flamme war dster und fern; der Mond verbarg in Osten sein rotes Gesicht; es stieg ein Windstoss vom Hgel herab, auf seinen Schwingen war Lodas Gespenst. Es kam zu seiner Heimat, umringt von seinen Schrecken, und schttelt seinen dstern Speer. In seinem dunklen Gesicht glhn seine Augen wie Flammen; seine Stimme gleicht entferntem Donner. Fingal stiess seinen Speer in die Nacht und hob seine mchtige Stimme. Zieh dich zurck, du Nachtsohn, ruf deine Winde und fleuch! Warum erscheinst du vor mir mit deinen schattigten Waffen? Frcht ich deine dstre Bildung, du Geist des leidigen Loda? Schwach ist dein Schild, kraftlos das Luftbild und dein Schwert. Der Windstoss rollt sie zusammen; und du

The wan, cold moon rose in the east. Sleep descended on the youths. Their blue helmets glitter to the beam; the fading fire decays. But sleep did not rest on the king: he rose in the midst of his arms, and slowly ascended the hill, to behold the flame of Sarnos tower. The flame was dim and distant; the moon hid her red face in the east. A blast came from the mountain, on its wings was the spirit of Loda. He came to his place in his terrors, and shook his dusky spear. His eyes appear like flames in his dark face; his voice is like distant thunder. Fingal advanced his spear in night and raised his voice on high. Son of night, retire: call thy winds, and fly! Why dost thou come to my presence, with thy shadowy arms? Do I fear thy gloomy form, spirit of dismal Loda? Weak is thy shield of clouds: feeble is that meteor, thy sword! The blast rolls them together and thou

120

January 1816 SONG TEXTS


selber bist verloren; fleuch von meinen Augen, du Nachtsohn! ruf deine Winde und fleuch! Mit hohler Stimme versetzte der Geist: Willst du aus meiner Heimat mich treiben? Vor mir beugt sich das Volk. Ich dreh die Schlacht im Felde der Tapfern. Auf Vlker werf ich den Blick, und sie verschwinden. Mein Odem verbreitet den Tod. Auf den Rcken der Winde schreit ich voran, vor meinem Gesichte brausen Orkane. Aber mein Sitz ist ber den Wolken, angenehm die Gefilde meiner Ruh. Bewohn deine angenehmen Gefilde, sagte der Knig: denk nicht an Comhals Erzeugten. Steigen meine Schritte aus meinen Hgeln in deine friedliche Ebne hinauf? Begegnet ich dir mit einem Speer, auf deiner Wolke, du Geist desleidigen Loda? Warum runzelst du denn deine Stirn auf mich? Warum schttelst du deinen luftigen Speer? Du runzelst deine Stirn vergebens, nie floh ich vor den Mchtigen im Krieg. Und sollen die Shne des Winds den Knig von Morven erschrecken? Nein, nein; er kennt die Schwche ihrer Waffen! Fleuch zu deinem Land, versetzte die Bildung, fass die Wunde, und fleuch! Ich halte die Winde in der Hhle meiner Hand; ich bestimm den Lauf des Sturms. Der Knig von Sora ist mein Sohn; er neigt sich vor dem Steine meiner Kraft. Sein Heer umringt Carric-Thura, und er wird siegen! Fleuch zu deinem Land, Erzeugter von Comhal, oder spre meine Wut, meine flammende Wut! Er hob seinen schattigten Speer in die Hhe, er neigte vorwrts seine schreckbare Lnge. Fingal ging ihm entgegen und zuckte sein Schwert. Der blitzende Pfad des Stahls durchdrang den dstern Geist. Die Bildung zerfloss gestaltlos in Luft, wie eine Sule von Rauch, welche der Stab des Jnglings berhrt, wie er aus der sterbenden Schmiede aufsteigt. Laut schrie Lodas Gespenst, als es, in sich selber gerollt, auf dem Winde sich hob. Inistore bebte beim Klang. Auf dem Abgrund hrtens die Wellen. Sie standen vor Schrecken in der Mitte ihres Laufs! Die Freunde von Fingal sprangen pltzlich empor. Sie griffen ihre gewichtigen Speere. Sie missten den Knig: zornig fuhren sie auf; all ihre Waffen erschollen! Der Mond rckt in Osten voran. Fingal kehrt im Klang seiner Waffen zurck. Gross war der Jnglinge Freude, ihre Seelen ruhig, wie das Meer nach dem Sturm. Ullin hob den Freudengesang. Die Hgel Inistores frohlockten. Hoch stieg die Flamme der Eiche; Heldengeschichten wurden erzhlt.
BARON EDMUND VON HAROLD (17371808)

thyself art lost. Fly from my presence, son of night! Call thy winds and fly! Dost thou force me from my place? replied the hollow voice. The people bend before me. I turn the battle in the field of the brave. I look on the nations, and they vanish: my nostrils pour the blast of death. I come abroad on the winds: the tempests are before my face. But my dwelling is calm, above the clouds; the fields of my rest are pleasant. Dwell in thy pleasant fields, said the king: let Comhals son be forgot. Do my steps ascend from my hills, into the peaceful plains? Do I meet thee, with a spear, on thy cloud, spirit of dismal Loda? Why then dost thou frown on me? Why shake thine airy spear? Thou frownest in vain. I never fled from the mighty in war. And shall the sons of the wind frighten the king of Morven? No; he knows the weakness of their arms! Fly to thy land, replied the form: receive the wind, and fly! The blasts are in the hollow of my hand: the course of the storm is mine. The king of Sora is my son, he bends at the stone of my power. His battle is around Carric-Thura; and he will prevail! Fly to thy land, son of Comhal, or feel my flaming wrath! He lifted high his shadowy spear! He bent forward his dreadful height. Fingal, advancing, drew his sword. The gleaming path of the steel winds through the gloomy ghost. The form fell shapeless into air, like a column of smoke, which the staff of the boy disturbs, as it rises from the half-extinguished furnace. The spirit of Loda shrieked, as, rolled into himself, he rose on the wind. Inistore shook at the sound. The waves heard it on the deep. The waves stopped in their course, with fear. The friends of Fingal started, at once; and took their heavy spears. They missed the king: they rose in rage; all their arms resound! The moon came forth in the east. Fingal returned in the gleam of his arms. The joy of his youth was great, their souls settled, as a sea from the storm. Ullin raised the song of gladness. The hills of Inistore rejoiced. The flame of the oak arose; and the tales of heroes are told.
JAMES MACPHERSON OSSIAN (17361796)

121

SONG TEXTS January 1816


Disc bm Der Knig in Thule The king of Thule Track bq D367. Early 1816; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in July 1821 as Op 5 No 5
sung by Brigitte Fassbaender

Es war ein Knig in Thule Gar treu bis an das Grab, Dem sterbend seine Buhle Einen goldnen Becher gab. Es ging ihm nichts darber, Er leert ihn jeden Schmaus; Die Augen gingen ihm ber, So oft er trank daraus. Und als er kam zu sterben, Zhlt er seine Stdt im Reich, Gnnt alles seinen Erben, Den Becher nicht zugleich. Er sass beim Knigsmahle, Die Ritter um ihn her, Auf hohem Vtersaale, Dort auf dem Schloss am Meer. Dort stand der alte Zecher, Trank letzte Lebensglut, Und warf den heilgen Becher Hinunter in die Flut. Er sah ihn strzen, trinken Und sinken tief ins Meer. Die Augen tten ihm sinken; Trank nie einen Tropfen mehr.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

There was a king in Thule faithful unto the grave, whose dying mistress gave him a golden goblet. Nothing was more precious to him; he drained it at every feast. His eyes filled with tears whenever he drank from it. And when he came to die he counted the towns in his realm, bequeathed all to his heirs, except for that goblet. He sat at the royal banquet, his knights around him in the lofty ancestral hall in his castle by the sea. The old toper stood there, drank lifes last glowing draught, and hurled the sacred goblet into the waves below. He watched it fall and drink and sink deep into the sea. His eyes, too, sank; he drank not one drop more.

Disc bm Jgers Abendlied Huntsmans evening song Track br Second setting, D368. Early 1816 (?); published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 3 No 4
sung by Simon Keenlyside

Im Felde schleich ich, still und wild, Gespannt mein Feuerrohr. Da schwebt so licht dein liebes Bild, Dein ssses Bild mir vor. Du wandelst jetzt wohl still und mild Durch Feld und liebes Tal, Und ach mein schnell verrauschend Bild, Stellt sich dirs nicht einmal? Mir ist es, denk ich nur an dich, Als in den Mond zu sehn; Ein stiller Friede kommt auf mich, Weiss nicht wie mir geschehn.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

I stalk through the fields, grim and silent, my gun at the ready. Then your beloved image, your sweet image hovers brightly before me. Perhaps you are now wandering, silent and gentle, through field and beloved valley; ah, does my fleeting image not even appear before you? Whenever I think of you it is as if I were gazing at the moon; a silent peace descends upon me, I know not how.

Disc bm An Schwager Kronos To coachman Chronos Track bs D369. 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1825 as Op 19 No 1
sung by Simon Keenlyside

Spute dich, Kronos! Fort den rasselnden Trott! Bergab gleitet der Weg: Ekles Schwindeln zgert Mir vor die Stirne dein Zaudern. Frisch, holpert es gleich, ber Stock und Steine den Trott Rasch ins Leben hinein!

Make haste, Chronos! Break into a rattling trot! The way runs downhill; I feel a sickening giddiness at your dallying. Quick, away, never mind the bumping, over sticks and stones, trot briskly into life!

122

February 1816 SONG TEXTS


Nun schon wieder Den eratmenden Schritt Mhsam berghinauf, Auf denn, nicht trge denn Strebend und hoffend hinan! Weit, hoch, herrlich Rings den Blick ins Leben hinein; Vom Gebirg zum Gebirg Schwebet der ewige Geist, Ewigen Lebens ahndevoll. Seitwrt des berdachs Schatten Zieht dich an Und ein Frischung verheissender Blick Auf der Schwelle des Mdchens da Labe dich! Mir auch, Mdchen, Diesen schumenden Trank, Diesen frischen Gesundheitsblick! Ab denn, rascher hinab! Sieh, die Sonne sinkt! Eh sie sinkt, eh mich Greisen Ergreift im Moore Nebelduft, Entzahnte Kiefer schnatter Und das schlotternde Gebein, Trunknen vom letzten Strahl Reiss mich, ein Feuermeer Mir im schumenden Aug Mich geblendeten Taumelnden In der Hlle nchtliches Tor. Tne, Schwager, ins Horn, Rassle den schallenden Trab, Dass der Orkus vernehme: wir kommen, Dass gleich an der Tr Der Wirt uns freundlich empfange.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Now once again breathless, at walking pace, struggling uphill; up then, dont be sluggish, onwards, striving and hoping. Wide, lofty and glorious is the view around into life; from mountain range to mountain range the eternal spirit glides, bringing promise of eternal life. A shady roof draws you aside and the gaze of a girl on the step, promising refreshment. Refresh yourself! For me too, girl, that foaming draught, that fresh, healthy look. Down then, down faster! Look, the sun is sinking! Before it sinks, before the mist seizes me, an old man, on the moor, toothless jaws chattering, limbs shaking, Snatch me, drunk with its last ray, a sea of fire foaming in my eyes, blinded, reeling through hells nocturnal gate. Coachman, sound your horn, rattle noisily on at a trot. Let Orcus know were coming. So that the innkeeper is at the door to give us a kind welcome.

Der Tod Oscars


Warum ffnest du wieder, Erzeugter von Alpin, die Quelle meiner Wehmut, da du mich fragst, wie Oscar erlag? Meine Augen sind von Trnen erblindet. Aber Erinnerung strahlt aus meinem Herzen. Wie kann ich den traurigen Tod des Fhrers der Krieger erzhlen! Fhrer der Helden, o Oscar, mein Sohn, soll ich dich nicht mehr erblicken! er fiel wie der Mond in einem Sturm, wie die Sonne in der Mitte ihres Laufs, wenn Wolken vom Schoose der Wogen sich heben; wenn das Dunkel des Sturms Ardanniders Felsen einhllt. Wie eine alte Eiche von Morven, vermodre ich einsam auf meiner Stelle. Der Windstoss hat mir die ste entrissen; mich schrecken die Flgel des Nordes. Fhrer der Helden, o Oscar, mein Sohn, soll ich dich nicht mehr erblicken! Der Held, o Alpins Erzeugter, fiel nicht friedlich, wie Gras auf dem Feld, der Mchtigen Blut befrbte sein Schwert, er riss sich, mit Tod, durch die Reihen ihres Stolzes, aber Oscar, Erzeugter von Caruth,

The death of Oscar


Why openest thou afresh the spring of my grief, O son of Alpin, inquiring how Oscar fell? My eyes are blind with tears, but memory beams on my heart. How can I relate the mournful death of the head of the people! Chief of the warriors, Oscar, my son, shall I see thee no more! He fell as the moon in a storm; as the sun from the midst of his course, when clouds rise from the waste of the waves, when the blackness of the storm wraps the rocks of Ardannider. Like an ancient oak on Morven, I moulder alone in my place. The blast hath lopped my branches away, and I tremble at the wings of the north. Chief of the warriors, Oscar, my son, shall I see thee no more! But, son of Alpin, the hero fell not harmless as the grass of the field: the blood of the mighty was on his sword, and he travelled with death through the ranks of their pride. But Oscar, thou son of Caruth,

bm Disc
bt Track

D375. February 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1830 as volume 5 of the Nachlass sung by Christoph Prgardien

123

SONG TEXTS February 1816


du bist unrhmlich gefallen! deine Rechte erschlug keinen Feind. Deinen Speer befleckte das Blut deines Freunds. Eins war Dermid und Oscar: sie mhten die Schlachten zusammen. Ihre Freundschaft war stark, wie ihr Eisen, und im Felde wandelte der Tod zwischen ihnen. Sie fuhren gegen den Feind, wie zwei Felsen die von Ardvens Stirne sich strzen. Ihr Schwert war vom Blute der Tapfern befrbt: Krieger erbebten bei ihrem Namen. Wer glich Oscarn, als Dermid? und wer Dermid als Oscar! Sie erlegten den mchtigen Dargo im Feld, Dargo, der nie aus dem Kampge entfloh. Seine Tochter war schn, wie der Morgen, sanft wie der Strahl des Abends. Ihre Augen glichen zwei Sternen im Regen: ihr Atem dem Hauche des Frhlings. Ihr Busen, wie neugefallner Schnee, der auf der wiegenden Heide sich wlzt. Sie ward von den Helden gesehn, und geliebt, ihre Seelen wurden ans Mdchen geheftet. Jeder liebte sie, gleich seinem Ruhm, sie wollte jeder besitzen, oder sterben. Aber ihr Herz whlte Oscarn; Caruths Erzeugter war der Jngling ihrer Liebe. Sie vergass das Blut ihres Vaters. Und liebte die Rechte, die ihn erschlug. Caruths Sohn, sprach Dermid, ich liebe, o Oscar! ich liebe dies Mdchen. Aber ihre Seele hngt an dir; und nichts kann Dermiden heilen. Hier durchdring diesen Busen, o Oscar; hilf deinem Freund mit deinem Schwert. Nie soll mein Schwert, Diarans Sohn! nie soll es mit Dermids Blute befleckt sein. Wer ist dann wrdig mich zu erlegen, O Oscar, Caruths Sohn! lass nicht mein Leben unrhmlich vergehen, lass niemand, als Oscar, mich tten. Schick mich mit Ehre zum Grab, und Ruhm begleite meinen Tod. Dermid, brauch deine Klinge; Diarans Erzeugter schwing deinen Stahl. O fiel ich mit dir! dass mein Tod von Dermids Rechte herrhre! Sie fochten beim Bache des Bergs, bei Brannos Strom. Blut frbte die fliessenden Fluten, und rann um die bemoosten Steine. Dermid der Stattliche fiel, er fiel, und lchelte im Tod! Und fllst du, Erzeugter Diarans, fllst du durch die Rechte von Oscar! Dermid, der nie im Kriege gewichen,
thou hast fallen low! No enemy fell by thy hand. Thy spear was stained with the blood of thy friend. Dermid and Oscar were one: they reaped the battle together. Their friendship was strong as their steel; and death walked between them to the field. They came on the foe like two rocks falling from the brows of Ardven. Their swords were stained with the blood of the valiant: warriors fainted at their names. Who was equal to Oscar but Dermid? And who to Dermid but Oscar! They killed mighty Dargo in the field: Dargo who never fled in war. His daughter was fair as the morn; mild as the beam of night. Her eyes, like two stars in a shower; her breath, the gale of spring; her breasts as the new-fallen snow floating on the moving heath. The warriors saw her, and loved; their souls were fixed on the maid. Each loved her as his fame; each must possess her or die. But her soul was fixed on Oscar; the son of Caruth was the youth of her love. She forgot the blood of her father; and loved the hand that slew him. Son of Caruth, said Dermid, I love; O Oscar, I love that maid. But her soul cleaveth unto thee; and nothing can heal Dermid. Here, pierce this bosom, Oscar; relieve me, my friend, with thy sword. My sword, son of Diaran, shall never be stained with the blood of Dermid. Who then is worthy to slay me, O Oscar, son of Caruth? Let not my life pass away unknown. Let none but Oscar slay me. Send me with honour to the grave, and let my death be renowned. Dermid, make use of thy sword; son of Diaran, wield thy steel. Would that I fell with thee, that my death came from the hand of Dermid! They fought by the brook of the mountain, by the streams of Branno. Blood tinged the running water, and curled round the mossy stones. The stately Dermid fell; he fell, and smiled in death. And fallest thou, son of Diaran, fallest thou by Oscars hand! Dermid who never yielded in war,

124

February 1816 SONG TEXTS


seh ich dich also erliegen? Er ging, und kehrte zum Mdchen seiner Liebe. Er kehrte, aber sie vernahm seinen Jammer. Warum dies Dunkel, Sohn von Caruth! was berschattet deine mchtige Seele? Einst war ich, o Mdchen, im Bogen berhmt, aber meinen Ruhm hab ich itzo verloren. Am Baum, beim Bache des Hgels, hngt der Schild des mutigen Gormurs, Gormurs, den ich im Kampfe erschlug. Ich habe den Tag vergebens verzehrt, und konnte ihn nicht mit meinem Pfeil durchdringen. Lass mich, Erzeugter von Caruth, die Kunst der Tochter von Dargo versuchen. Meine Rechte lernte den Bogen zu spannen, in meiner Kunst frohlockte mein Vater. Sie ging, er stand hinter dem Schild. Es zischte ihr Pfeil, er durchdrang seine Brust. Heil der schneeweissen Rechten; auch Heil diesem eibenen Bogen; wer, als Dargos Tochter war wert, Caruths Erzeugten zu tten? Leg mich ins Grab, meine Schnste; leg mich an Dermids Seite. Oscar, versetzte das Mdchen, meine Seel ist die Seele des mchtigen Dargo. Ich kann dem Tode mit Freude begegnen. Ich kann meine Traurigkeit enden. Sie durchstiess ihren weissen Busen mit Stahl. Sie fiel, bebte, und starb! Ihre Grber liegen beim Bache des Hgels; ihr Grabmal bedeckt der ungleiche Schatten einer Birke. Oft grasen die astigen Shne des Bergs an ihren grnenden Grbern. Wenn der Mittag seine glhenden Flammen ausstreut, und Schweigen alle die Hgel beherrscht.
BARON EDMUND VON HAROLD (17371808)

thus do l see thee fall! He went, and returned to the maid of his love; he returned, but she perceived his grief. Why that gloom, son of Caruth? What shades thy mighty soul? Though once renowned for the bow, O maid, I have lost my fame. Fixed on the tree by the brook of the hill is the shield of the valiant Gormur, whom I slew in battle. I have wasted the day in vain, nor could my arrow pierce it. Let me try, son of Caruth, the skill of Dargos daughter. My hands were taught the bow: my father delighted in my skill. She went. He stood behind the shield. Her arrow flew, and pierced his breast. Blessed be that hand of snow, and blessed that bow of yew! Who but the daughter of Dargo was worthy to slay the son of Caruth? Lay me in the earth, my fair one; lay me by the side of Dermid. Oscar! the maid replied, I have the soul of the mighty Dargo. Well pleased I can meet death. My sorrow I can end. She pierced her white bosom with the steel. She fell; she trembled, and died. By the brook of the hill their graves are laid; a birchs unequal shade covers their tomb. Often on their green earthen tombs the branchy sons of the mountain feed, when midday is all in flames, and silence over all the hills.
JAMES MACPHERSON OSSIAN (17361796)

Lorma
Lorma sass in der Halle von Aldo. Sie sass beim Licht einer flammenden Eiche. Die Nacht stieg herab, aber er kehrte nicht wieder zurck. Lormas Seele war trb! Was hlt dich, du Jger von Cona zurck? Du hast ja versprochen wieder zu kehren! Waren die Hirsche weit in der Ferne? Brausen an der Heide die dstern Winde um Dich? Ich bin im Lande der Fremden. Wer ist mein Freund, als Aldo? Komm von deinen erschallenden Hgeln, O mein bester Geliebter! Sie wandte ihre Augen gegen das Tor. Sie lauscht zum brausenden Wind. Sie denkt, es seien die Tritten von Aldo. Freud steigt in ihrem Antlitz, aber Wehmut kehrt wieder, wie am Mond eine dnne Wolke, zurck.
BARON EDMUND VON HAROLD (17371808)

Lorma
Lorma sat in Aldos hall. She sat at the light of a flaming oak. The night came down, but he did not return. The soul of Lorma is sad! What detains thee, hunter of Cona? Thou didst promise to return. Has the deer been distant far? Do the dark winds sigh round thee on the heath? I am in the land of strangers; who is my friend but Aldo? Come from thy sounding hills, O my best beloved! Her eyes are turned toward the gate. She listens to the rustling blast. She thinks it is Aldos tread. Joy rises in her face! But sorrow returns again, like a thin cloud on the moon.
JAMES MACPHERSON OSSIAN (17361796)

bm Disc
bu Track

Second setting, D376. 10 February 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Lucia Popp

125

SONG TEXTS February 1816


Disc bm Das Grab The grave Track cl Third setting, D377. 11 February 1816; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by The London Schubert Chorale (directed by Stephen Layton)

Das Grab ist tief und stille, Und schauderhaft sein Rand, Es deckt mit schwarzer Hlle Ein unbekanntes Land. Verlassne Brute ringen Umsonst die Hnde wund; Der Waise Klagen dringen Nicht in der Tiefe Grund. Doch sonst an keinem Orte Wohnt die ersehnte Ruh; Nur durch die dunkle Pforte Geht man der Heimat zu.

Deep and silent is the grave, terrible its brink; with its black shroud it covers an unknown land. In vain forsaken brides wring their hands sore; the orphans wailing does not reach its lowest depths. Yet in no other place does the longed-for peace dwell; only through those dark portals do men return home.

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

Disc bm Morgenlied Morning song Track cm D381. 24 February 1816; published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Elizabeth Connell

Die Frohe neubelebte Flur Singt ihrem Schpfer Dank. O Herr und Vater der Natur. Dir tn auch mein Gesang! Der Lebensfreuden schenkst du viel Dem, der sich weislich freut. Dies sei, o Vater, stets das Ziel Bei meiner Frhlichkeit. Ich kann mich noch des Lebens freun In dieser schnen Welt; Mein Herz soll dem geheiligt sein Der weislich sie erhlt.
ANONYMOUS

The newly awakened fields sing joyful thanks to their Creator. O Lord and Father of nature, let my song also resound for you! You bestow many of lifes pleasures on him who can enjoy them wisely. Let this, O Father, always be my aim in my happiness. I can still enjoy life in this beautiful world; my heart shall be consecrated to him who in his wisdom sustains the world.

Disc bm Abendlied Evening song Track cn D382. 24 February 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Christoph Prgardien

Sanft glnzt die Abendsonne Auf diese stille Flur Und strahlet Ruh und Wonne Auf jede Kreatur. Sie zeichnet Licht und Schatten Auf die beblmte Au, Und auf den grnen Matten Blitzt der kristallne Tau. Dir, der die Abendrte Am Himmel ausgespannt Und ssses Nachtgeflte Auf diese Flur gesandt, Dir sei dies Herz geweihet, Das reiner Dank durchglht, Es schlage noch erfreuet, Wenn einst das Leben flieht.
ANONYMOUS END OF DISC 12

The evening sun shines gently on these silent meadows, shedding peace and joy over every creature. It traces light and shadow upon the flower-decked pastures, and on the verdant fields the crystal dew sparkles. To you, who spread the red glow of evening over the heavens and brought the sweet song of the night to these meadows, to you I dedicate this heart glowing with pure gratitude; may it still beat joyfully when life ceases.

126

March 1816 SONG TEXTS Laura am Klavier


Wenn dein Finger durch die Saiten meistert, Laura, itzt zur Statue entgeistert, Itzt entkrpert steh ich da. Du gebietest ber Tod und Leben, Mchtig, wie von tausend Nervgeweben Seelen fordert Philadelphia. Ehrerbietig leiser rauschen Dann die Lfte, dir zu lauschen; Hingeschmiedet zum Gesang Stehn im ewgen Wirbelgang, Einzuziehn die Wonneflle, Lauschende Naturen stille. Zauberin! mit Tnen, wie Mich mit Blicken, zwingst du sie. Seelenvolle Harmonien wimmeln, Ein wollstig Ungestm, Aus ihren Saiten, wie aus ihren Himmeln Neugeborne Seraphim; Wie, des Chaos Riesenarm entronnen, Aufgejagt vom Schpfungssturm, die Sonnen Funkelnd fuhren aus der Nacht, Strmt der Tne Zaubermacht. Lieblich itzt, wie ber glatten Kieseln Silberhelle Fluten rieseln, Majesttisch prchtig nun, Wie des Donners Orgelton, Strmend von hinnen itzt, wie sich von Felsen Rauschende, schumende Giessbche wlzen, Holdes Gesusel bald, Schmeichlerisch linde, Wie durch den Espenwald Buhlende Winde, Schwerer nun und melancholisch dster Wie durch toter Wsten Schauernachtgeflster, Wo verlornes Heulen schweift, Trnenwellen der Cocytus schleift. Mdchen, sprich! ich frage, gib mir Kunde: Stehst mit hhern Geistern du im Bunde? Ists die Sprache, lg mir nicht, Die man in Elysen spricht?
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Laura at the piano


When your fingers hold sway over the strings, Laura, I stand there, now dumbfounded, as if turned into a statue, now disembodied. You have command over life and death as mighty as Philadelphia, drawing the souls from a thousand sensitive beings. In reverence the breezes whisper more softly, so as to listen to you; riveted by the music, nature, listening silently, stops in her whirling course to take in the abundant delights. Enchantress! With sounds you enthral her, as you enthral me with your eyes. Soulful harmonies, sensual and impetuous, teem from her strings, like new-born seraphim from their heaven. As the flashing suns shot from the night escaping the giant arm of Chaos, driven away by the storm of creation, so the magic power of music pours forth. Sweetly now, as clear, silvery water ripples over smooth pebbles; now with majestic splendour, like the thunders organ-tones; now raging forth, like rushing, foaming torrents surging from rocks; now sweetly murmuring, gently coaxing, like wooing breezes wafting through the aspen woods. Now heavier, dark with melancholy, like fearful nocturnal whisperings through dead wastes where the howls of lost, wandering souls echo, and Cocytus drags waves of tears. Maiden, speak! I beg you, tell me: are you in league with divine spirits? Do not lie to me: is this the language they speak in Elysium?

bn Disc
1 Track

D388. March 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Sir Thomas Allen

Des Mdchens Klage

The maidens lament

bn Disc
2 Track

Third setting, D389. March 1816; first published in 1873 in Berlin in Reissmanns biography of Schubert cf Zumsteeg Thekla Des Mdchens Klage, disc 38 9 sung by Lynne Dawson

Der Eichwald braust, die Wolken ziehn, Das Mgdlein sitzt an Ufers Grn, Es bricht sich die Welle mit Macht, mit Macht, Und sie seufzt hinaus in die finstere Nacht, Das Auge vom Weinen getrbet. Das Herz ist gestorben, die Welt ist leer, Und weiter gibt sie dem Wunsche nichts mehr, Du Heilige, rufe dein Kind zurck, Ich habe genossen das irdische Glck, Ich habe gelebt und geliebet!

The oak-wood roars, the clouds scud by, the maiden sits on the verdant shore; the waves break with mighty force, and she sighs into the dark night, her eyes dimmed with weeping. My heart is dead, the world is empty and no longer yields to my desire. Holy one, call back your child. I have enjoyed earthly happiness; I have lived and loved!

127

SONG TEXTS March 1816


Es rinnet der Trnen vergeblicher Lauf, Die Klage, sie wecket die Toten nicht auf; Doch nenne, was trstet und heilet die Brust Nach der sssen Liebe verschwundener Lust, Ich, die Himmlische, wills nicht versagen. Lass rinnen der Trnen vergeblichen Lauf, Es wecke die Klage die Toten nicht auf! Das ssseste Glck fr die trauernde Brust, Nach der schnen Liebe verschwundener Lust, Sind der Liebe Schmerzen und Klagen.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Her tears run their vain course; her lament does not awaken the dead; but say, what can comfort and heal the heart when the joys of sweet love have vanished? I, the heavenly maiden, shall not deny it. Let my tears run their vain course; let my lament not awaken the dead! For the grieving heart the sweetest happiness, when the joys of fair love have vanished, is the sorrow and lament of love.

Disc bn Die Entzckung an Laura Enchanted by Laura Track 3 First setting, D390. March 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Sir Thomas Allen

Laura, ber diese Welt zu flchten Whr ich, mich in Himmelsmaienglanz zu lichten, Wenn dein Blick in meine Blicke flimmt; therlfte trum ich einzusaugen, Wenn mein Bild in deiner sanften Augen Himmelblauem Spiegel schwimmt. Leierklang aus Paradieses Fernen, Harfenschwung aus angenehmem Sternen Ras ich, in mein trunknes Ohr zu ziehn; Meine Muse fhlt die Schferstunde, Wenn von deinem wollustheissen Munde Silbertne ungern fliehn. Amoretten seh ich Flgel schwingen, Hinter dir die trunknen Fichten springen Wie von Orpheus Saitenruf belebt; Rascher rollen um mich her die Pole, Wenn im Wirbeltanz deine Sohle Flchtig, wie die Welle, schwebt. Deine Blicke, wenn sie Liebe lcheln, Knnten Leben durch den Marmor fcheln, Felsenadern Pulse leihn; Trume werden um mich her zu Wesen, Kann ich nur in deinen Augen lesen, Laura, Laura mein!
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Laura, when your shimmering eyes are reflected in mine, I imagine I am fleeing this world to bathe in the light of some heavenly May. I dream I am breathing ethereal air when my image floats in the sky-blue mirror of your gentle eyes. I burn to draw to my intoxicated ears the sound of lyres from distant Paradise, the flourish of harps from more pleasurable stars; my muse senses the hour of love when from your warm, sensual lips silvery notes reluctantly escape. I see cupids flap their wings; behind you the drunken spruce trees dance as if brought to life at the call of Orpheus strings. The poles revolve more swiftly around me when in the whirling dance your feet slide, as fleeting as the waves. Your glances, when they smile love, could stir marble to life and make the veins of rocks pulsate. Around me dreams become reality; if I can only read in your eyes: Laura, my Laura!

Disc bn Die vier Weltalter The four ages of the world Track 4 D391. March 1816; first published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 111 No 3
sung by Sir Thomas Allen

Wohl perlet im Glase der purpurne Wein, Wohl glnzen die Augen der Gste, Es zeigt sich der Snger, er tritt herein, Zu dem Guten bringt er das Beste; Denn ohne die Leier im himmlischen Saal Ist die Freude gemein auch beim Nektarmahl. Erst regierte Saturnus schlicht und gerecht, Da war es heute wie morgen, Da lebten die Hirten, ein harmlos Geschlecht, Und brauchten fr gar nichts zu sorgen; Sie liebten, und taten weiter nichts mehr, Die Erde gab alles freiwillig her.

The crimson wine sparkles in the glass; the guests eyes shine; the minstrel appears and enters, to the good things he brings the best; for without the lyre joy is vulgar, even at a nectar banquet in the hall of the gods. First Saturn ruled, simply and justly, then one day was like the next; then shepherds lived, a harmless race; they did not need to worry about anything. They loved, and did nothing else, the earth yielded everything of its own accord.

128

March 1816 SONG TEXTS


Drauf kam die Arbeit, der Kampf begann Mit Ungeheuern und Drachen, Und die Helden fingen, die Herrscher an, Und den Mchtigen suchten die Schwachen; Und der Streit zog in des Skamanders Feld, Doch die Schnheit war immer der Gott der Welt. Aus dem Kampf ging endlich der Sieg hervor, Und der Kraft entblhte die Milde, Da sangen die Musen im himmlischen Chor, Da erhuben sich Gttergebilde; Das Alter der gttlichen Phantasie, Es ist verschwunden, es kehret nie.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Then came work, and the struggle began with monsters and dragons; heroes emerged, and rulers, and the weak sought the man of might; and the battle came to Scamanders fields, but Beauty was always the god of the world. At last the struggle yielded victory, and from force gentleness blossomed; then the muses sang in celestial choir; then images of gods arose! The age of divine imagination has vanished; it will never return.

Ritter Toggenburg
Ritter, treue Schwesterliebe Widmet euch dies Herz, Fordert keine andre Liebe, Denn es macht mir Schmerz. Ruhig mag ich euch erscheinen, Ruhig gehen sehn; Eurer Augen stilles Weinen Kann ich nicht verstehn. Und er hrts mit stummem Harme, Reisst sich blutend los, Presst sie heftig in die Arme, Schwingt sich auf sein Ross, Schickt zu seinen Mannen allen In dem Lande Schweiz; Nach dem heilgen Grab sie wallen, Auf der Brust das Kreuz. Grosse Taten dort geschehen Durch der Helden Arm, Ihres Helmes Bsche wehen In der Feinde Schwarm, Und des Toggenburgers Name Schreckt den Muselmann, Doch das Herz von seinem Grame Nicht genesen kann. Und ein Jahr hat ers ertragen, Trgts nicht lnger mehr, Ruhe kann er nicht erjagen Und verlsst das Heer, Sieht ein Schiff an Joppes Strande, Das die Segel blht, Schiffet heim zum teuren Lande, Wo ihr Atem weht. Und an ihres Schlosses Pforte Klopft der Pilger an, Ach! und mit dem Donnerworte Wird sie aufgetan: Die ihr suchet, trgt den Schleier, Ist des Himmels Braut, Gestern war des Tages Feier, Der sie Gott getraut.

The knight of Toggenburg


Knight, this heart dedicates to you true sisterly love; demand no other love, for that grieves me. Calmly I should like to see you appear and leave again. I cannot understand the silent tears in your eyes. And he listened with silent sorrow tore himself away in anguish, pressed her violently in his arms, jumped on his horse and sent word to all his men in the country of Switzerland. They made a pilgrimage to the holy sepulchre, the cross on their breasts. Great deeds were accomplished there by the heroes might; the plumes on their helmets fluttered amid the teeming foe, and the name of Toggenburg terrified the Mussulman, but his heart could not be cured of its grief. When he had endured it for one year he could endure it no longer; he could gain no peace, and left his army. He saw a ship on the shore at Joppa, its sails billowing, and sailed home to the beloved land where she breathed. And the pilgrim knocked at the gate of her castle. Alas, it was opened with these shattering words: She whom you seek wears the veil; she is a bride of heaven. Yesterday was the day of the ceremony that wedded her to God.

bn Disc
5 Track

D397. 13 March 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1832 in volume 19 of the Nachlass sung by Christoph Prgardien

129

SONG TEXTS March 1816


Da verlsset er auf immer Seiner Vter Schloss, Seine Waffen sieht er nimmer, Noch sein treues Ross, Von der Toggenburg hernieder Steigt er unbekannt, Denn es deckt die edeln Glieder Hrenes Gewand. Und erbaut sich eine Htte Jener Gegend nah, Wo das Kloster aus der Mitte Dstrer Linden sah; Harrend von des Morgens Lichte Bis zu Abends Schein, Stille Hoffnung im Gesichte, Sass er da allein. Blickte nach dem Kloster drben, Blickte stundenlang Nach dem Fenster seiner Lieben, Bis das Fenster klang, Bis die Liebliche sich zeigte, Bis das teure Bild Sich ins Tal herunter neigte, Ruhig, engelmild. Und dann legt er froh sich nieder, Schlief getrstet ein, Still sich freuend, wenn es wieder Morgen wrde sein. Und so sass er viele Tage, Sass viel Jahre lang, Harrend ohne Schmerz und Klage Bis das Fenster klang. Bis die Liebliche sich zeigte, Bis das teure Bild Sich ins Tal herunter neigte, Ruhig, engelmild, Und so sass er, eine Leiche, Eines Morgens da, Nach dem Fenster noch das bleiche Stille Antlitz sah.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Thereupon he left the castle of his fathers for ever. He never again saw his weapons or his trusty steed. He descended from Toggenburg unrecognized, for a hair shirt covered his noble limbs. And he built himself a hut near to the place where the convent looked out from amid sombre linden trees; waiting from the light of dawn to the glow of evening with silent hope on his face, he sat there alone. He gazed across at the convent gazed for hours on end at his beloveds window, until the window rattled, until his sweetheart appeared; until her dear form bent down towards the valley, tranquil and as gentle as an angel. And then he lay down happily and fell asleep, comforted, silently looking forward to when it would be morning again. Thus he sat for many days, for many long years, waiting without sorrow or complaint until the window rattled. Until his sweetheart appeared, until her dear form bent down towards the valley, tranquil and as gentle as an angel. And thus he sat there one morning, a corpse, his pale, silent face still gazing at the window.

Disc bn Gruppe aus dem Tartarus Group from Hades Track 6 D396. March 1816; fragment first published in 1975 in the Neue Schubert Ausgabe, Kassel
sung by Thomas Hampson

Horch wie Murmeln des emprten Meeres, Wie durch hohler Felsen Becken weint ein Bach, Ein dumpfigtiefes, schweres leeres, Qualerpresstes Ach! Schmerz verzerret
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Hark! Like the angry murmuring of the sea, or a brook sobbing through pools in hollow rocks, from the depths a muffled groan, heavy, empty and tormented! Pain distorts

130

March 1816 SONG TEXTS Der Flchtling


Frisch atmet des Morgens lebendiger Hauch; Purpurisch zuckt durch dstrer Tannen Ritzen Das junge Licht und ugelt aus dem Strauch; In goldnen Flammenblitzen Der Berge Wolkenspitzen. Mit freudig melodisch gewirbeltem Lied Begrssen erwachende Lerchen die Sonne, Die schon in lachender Wonne Jugendlich schn in Auroras Umarmungen glht. Sei, Licht, mir gesegnet! Dein Strahlenbruss regnet Erwrmend hernieder auf Anger und Au. Wie flittern die Wiesen, Wie silberfarb zittern Tausend Sonnen im perlenden Tau! In suselnder Khle Beginnen die Spiele Der jungen Natur. Die Zephyre kosen Und schmeicheln um Rosen, Und Dfte bestrmen die lachende Flur. Wie hoch aus den Stdten die Rauchwolken dampfen! Laut wiehern und schnauben und knirschen und strampfen Die Rosse, die Farren; Die Wagen erknarren Ins chzende Tal. Die Waldungen leben, Und Adler und Falken und Habichte schweben Und wiegen die Flgel im blendenden Strahl. Den Frieden zu finden, Wohin soll ich wenden Am elenden Stab? Die lachende Erde Mit Jnglingsgebrde, Fr mich nur ein Grab! Steig empor, o Morgenrot, und rte Mit purpurnem Ksse Hain und Feld! Susle nieder, o Abendrot, und flte In sanften Schlummer die tote Welt! Morgen, ach, du rtest Eine Totenflur; Ach! und du, o Abendrot! umfltest Meinen langen Schlummer nur.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

The fugitive
The lively morning breeze blows fresh; the young light flickers crimson between the dark pines and glints from the bushes; the cloud-capped mountain peaks blaze with golden flames. Warbling their happy, melodious song the awakening larks greet the sun which, with joyful laughter, glows young and fair in the dawns embrace. I bless you, light! Your rays stream down to warm meadow and pasture. See how the fields glitter, and a thousand silvery suns glisten in the pearly dew! In the whispering coolness young nature begins her games. The Zephyrs caress and fondle the roses, and sweet scents pervade the smiling meadows. How high the clouds of smoke rise from the town! Horses and bulls neigh loudly, snort, stamp and gnash their teeth; creaking carts roll along the valley. The woods are alive, eagles, falcons and hawks hover and move their wings in the dazzling light. To find peace where shall I turn with my wretched staff? The smiling earth, with youthful countenance, is but a grave for me! Rise up, O dawn, and with your crimson kiss tinge grove and field! Descend with a whisper, O sunset, and lull the dead world to gentle sleep. Morning, you tinge with red a land of death; ah, and you, O sunset, merely warble around my long sleep.

bn Disc
7 Track

D402. 18 March 1816; published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Dame Janet Baker

131

SONG TEXTS March 1816


Disc bn Der Entfernten To the distant beloved Track 8 D350. 1816 (?); first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Christoph Prgardien

Wohl denk ich allenthalben, O du Entfernte, dein! Frh, wenn die Wolken falben, Und spt im Sternenschein. Im Grund des Morgengoldes Im roten Abendlicht, Umschwebst du mich, o holdes, Geliebtes Traumgesicht! Es folgt in alle Weite Dein trautes Bild mir nach, Es wallt mir stets zur Seite, Im Trumen oder wach; Wenn Lfte sanft bestreichen Der See beschilften Strand, Umflstern mich die Schleifen Von seinem Busenband. Wo durch die Nacht der Fichten Ein Dmmrungs-Flimmer wallt, Seh ich dich zgernd flchten, Geliebte Luftgestalt! Wenn sanft dir nachzulangen, Der Sehnsucht Arm sich hebt, Ist dein Fantom zergangen, Wie Taugedft verschwebt.
Disc bn Der Entfernten Track 9 D331. c1816; first published by C A Spina in Vienna in 1866

Everywhere I think of you, beloved, so far away! Early in the morning, when the clouds grow pale, and late at night, by starlight; on the earth, gilded by the light of dawn, and in the red glow of evening, you haunt me, sweet, beloved vision. Your beloved image follows me far and wide. Whether I am dreaming or awake it is always beside me. When breezes gently brush the reeds on the seashore, the ribbons of your bodice flutter around me. Where the twilight gleam of the pines flickers through the night, I see your beloved, ethereal form skimming hesitantly through the air. When my longing arms are raised to touch you gently, your phantom image has dissolved, dispelled like the dewy mist.

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

To the distant beloved


Everywhere I think of you, beloved, so far away! Early in the morning, when the clouds grow pale, and late at night, by starlight. On the earth, gilded by the light of dawn, and in the red glow of evening, you haunt me, sweet, beloved vision. Your beloved image follows me far and wide. Whether I am dreaming or awake it is always beside me. When breezes gently caress the reeds on the seashore, the ribbons of your bodice whisper all around me.

sung by The London Schubert Chorale (directed by Stephen Layton), unaccompanied

Wohl denk ich allenthalben, O du Entfernte, dein! Frh, wenn die Wolken falben, Und spt im Sternenschein. Im Grund des Morgengoldes Im roten Abendlicht, Umschwebst du mich, o holdes, Geliebtes Traumgesicht! Es folgt in alle Weite Dein trautes Bild mir nach, Es wallt mir stets zur Seite, Im Trumen oder wach; Wenn Lfte sanft bestreifen Der See beschilften Strand, Umflstern mich die Streifen Von seinem Busenband.

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

Disc bn Fischerlied Fishermans song Track bl First version, D351. 1816 (?); published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Stephen Varcoe

Das Fischergewerbe Gibt rstigen Mut! Wir haben zum Erbe Die Gter der Flut. Wir graben nicht Schtze. Wir pflgen kein Feld; Wir ernten im Netze, Wir angeln uns Geld.

The fishermans trade gives us a cheerful heart. Our inheritance is the wealth of the waters. We dig for no treasure, we plough no fields; we harvest with our nets, we fish for money.

132

March 1816 SONG TEXTS


Im Antlitz der Buben Lacht mutiger Sinn, Sie meiden die Stuben Bei Tagesbeginn: Sie tauchen und schwimmen Im eisigen See, Und barfuss erklimmen Sie Klippen von Schnee. Oft rudern wir ferne Im wiegenden Kahn; Dann blinken die Sterne So freundlich uns an; Der Mond aus den Hhen, Der Mond aus dem Bach, So schnell wir entflhen, Sie gleiten uns nach. Wir trotzen dem Wetter, Das finster uns droht, Wenn schpfende Bretter Kaum hemmen den Tod. Wir trotzen auch Wogen Auf krachendem Schiff, In Tiefen gezogen, Geschleudert ans Riff!
On the boys faces a bold spirit laughs; they slip from their rooms at break of day. They dive and swim in the icy sea, and, barefoot, climb cliffs of snow. Often we row far in the rocking boat; then the stars shine so kindly upon us; the moon from the heights, the moon from the brook, no sooner have we escaped than they glide after us. We defy the storm that darkly threatens us when heaving timbers barely fend off death. We defy the waves too on the groaning ship, drawn into the depths, hurled against the reef!

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

Pflgerlied
Arbeitsam und wacker, Pflgen wir den Acker, Singend, auf und ab. Sorgsam trennen wollen Wir die lockern Schollen, Unsrer Saaten Grab. Auf- und abwrts ziehend Furchen wir, stets fliehend Das erreichte Ziel. Whl, o Pflugschaar, whle! Aussen drckt die Schwle; Tief im Grund ists khl. Set, froh im Hoffen; Grber harren offen, Fluren sind bebaut; Deckt mit Egg und Spaten Die versenkten Saaten, Und dankt Gott vertraut! Gottes Sonne leuchtet, Lauer Regen feuchtet Das entkeimte Grn. Flock, o Schnee und strecke Deine Silberdecke Schirmend drber hin!

Ploughmans song
Hardworking and stout-hearted we plough the fields, singing as we go. Carefully we separate the loose clods, the grave for our seeds. Moving up and down we make the furrows, always turning back from our achieved goal. Dig, O ploughshare, dig! Outside the sultriness is oppressive; deep in the earth it is cool. Sow in joyful hope; open graves lie waiting, fields are tilled. Cover the scattered seeds with harrow and spade, and give heartfelt thanks to God. Gods sun shines; warm rain moistens the burgeoning green shoots. Come, flaky snow, and drape over them your protecting silver blanket.

bn Disc
bm Track

D392. March 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Christoph Prgardien

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

133

SONG TEXTS March 1816


Disc bn Die Einsiedelei The hermitage Track bn First setting, D393. March 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1845 in volume 38 of the Nachlass
sung by Lucia Popp

Es rieselt, klar und wehend, Ein Quell im Eichenwald; Da whl ich, einsam gehend, Mir meinen Aufenthalt. Mir dienet zur Kapelle Ein Grttchen, duftig frisch; Zu meiner Klausnerzelle Verschlungenes Gebsch. Zwar dster ist und trber Die wahre Wstenei; Allein nur desto lieber Der stillen Fantasei. Da ruh ich oft im dichten, Beblmten Heidekraut; Hoch wehn die schwanken Fichten, Und sthnen Seufzerlaut. Nichts unterbricht das Schweigen Der Wildnis weit und breit, Als wenn auf drren Zweigen Ein Grnspecht hackt und schreit, Ein Rab auf hoher Spitze Bemooster Tannen krchzt, Und in der Felsenritze Ein Ringeltubchen chzt. Wie sich das Herz erweitert Im engen, dichten Wald! Den den Trbsinn heitert Der traute Schatten bald. Kein berlegner Spher Erforscht hier meine Spur; Ich bin hier frei und nher Der Einfalt und Natur.

In the oak wood flows a stream, clean and rippling. Wandering alone, I choose there my resting place. A grotto, cool and fragrant, serves as my chapel; entwined bushes are my hermits cell. This true wilderness is dark and gloomy, yet all the more welcome for silent musing. Often I lie there in the black heather; the tall, slender spruces sway, moaning and sighing. Nothing disturbs the silence of the woods far and wide, save when on dry branches a woodpecker pecks and shrieks, a raven caws high on the top of a mossy fir tree, and in the rocky crevice a ring-dove moans. How the heart is elated in the thick dense forest! Gloomy melancholy is soon cheered by its friendly shade. Here no disdainful eye spies on my steps. Here I am free, and closer to simplicity and to nature.

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

Disc bn An die Harmonie To harmony Track bo D394. March 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Peter Schreier

Schpferin beseelter Tne! Nachklang dem Olymp enthallt! Holde, krperlose Schne, Sanfte geistige Gewalt, Die das Herz der Erdenshne Khn erhebt und mild umwallt! Die in innrer Strme Drange Labt mit stillender Magie, Komm mit deinem Shngesange, Himmelstochter Harmonie! Seufzer, die das Herz erstickte, Das, misskannt, sich endlich schloss Trnen, die das Aug zerdrckte, Das einst viel umsonst vergoss, Dankt dir wieder der Entzckte Den dein Labequell umfloss. Der Empfindung zarte Blume, Die manch frostger Blick versengt, Blht erquickt im Heiligtume Einer Brust, die du getrnkt.

Creator of inspired music! Echo, sounding from Olympus! Gracious, disembodied beauty, gentle spiritual power who boldly uplifts and tenderly envelops the hearts of mortals; who with soothing magic quells the tempests within us, come with your comforting music, harmony, daughter of heaven. For sighs, suppressed by the heart that, misunderstood, at length became closed; for tears, forced back by eyes that had once wept so much in vain, I thank you again, enraptured, lapped by your healing stream. The tender flower of feeling blighted by many a frozen look, blossoms, refreshed in the shrine of a heart nurtured by you.

134

March 1816 SONG TEXTS


Tn in leisen Sterbechren Durch des Todes Nacht uns vor! Bei des ussern Sinns Zerstren Weile in des Geistes Ohr! Die der Erde nicht gehren, Heb mit Schwanensang empor! Lse sanft des Lebens Bande, Mildre Kampf und Agonie, Und empfang im Seelenlande Uns, o Seraph, Harmonie!
In soft funereal strains sing to us in the night of death. As our external senses are destroyed, linger in the spirits ear. Raise aloft with your swansong those who belong no more on earth. Gently loosen lifes bonds; ease the struggle of our death throes, and receive us in the land of bliss, Seraphic harmony!

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

Lied Ins stille Land


Ins stille Land! Wer leitet uns hinber? Schon wlkt sich uns der Abendhimmel trber, Und immer trmmervoller wird der Strand. Wer leitet uns mit sanfter Hand Hinber! ach! hinber, Ins stille Land? Ins stille Land! Zu euch, ihr freien Rume Fr die Veredlung! zarte Morgentrume Der schnen Seelen! knftgen Daseins Pfand. Wer treu des Lebens Kampf bestand, Trgt seiner Hoffnung Keime Ins stille Land. Ach Land! ach Land! Fr alle Sturmbedrohten. Der mildeste von unsers Schicksals Boten Winkt uns, die Fackel umgewandt, Und leitet uns mit sanfter Hand Ins Land der grossen Toten, Ins stille Land.

Song Into the land of rest


To the land of rest! Who will lead us there? Already the evening sky grows darker with cloud, and the shore is ever more strewn with flotsam. Who will lead us gently by the hand across, ah, across to the land of rest? To the land of rest! To the free, ennobling spaces! Tender morning dreams of fine souls! Pledge of a future life! He who faithfully won lifes battle carries the seeds of his hopes to the land of rest. O land for all those threatened by storms. The gentlest harbinger of our fate beckons us, brandishing a torch, and leads us gently by the hand to the land of the great dead, the land of rest.

bn Disc
bp Track

D403a/b. 27 March 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1845 in volume 39 of the Nachlass sung by Dame Margaret Price

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

Abschied von der Harfe


Noch einmal tn, o Harfe, Die nur Gefhle tnt! Verhalle zart und leise Noch jene Schwanenweise, Die auf der Flut des Lebens Uns mit der Not vershnt. Im Morgenschein des Lebens Erklangst du rein und hell! Wer kann den Klang verwahren? Durch Forschen und Erfahren Verhallet und versieget Des Liedes reiner Quell. O schlag im dunklen Busen Der ernsten Abendzeit! Will um das de Leben Des Schicksals Nacht sich weben, Dann schlag und wecke Sehnsucht Nach der Unsterblichkeit!

Farewell to the harp


Sound once more, O harp; you express only emotion! Softly, tenderly, let that swansong fade away which in the flood of life reconciles us to our misery. In the dawn of life you resounded, pure and bright! Who can preserve that sound? With our searchings, our experience, the pure source of your song fades and runs dry. O sound in the dark heart of solemn eventide! When the darkness of fate would spin its web around lifes barrenness, then sound forth, and awaken longing for immortality!

bn Disc
bq Track

D406. March 1816; first published in 1887 in the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by Christoph Prgardien

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

135

SONG TEXTS March 1816


Disc bn Die Herbstnacht Autumn night Track br D404. March 1816; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Lucia Popp

Mit leisen Harfentnen Sei, Wehmut, mir gegrsst! O Nymphe, die der Trnen Geweihten Quell verschliesst! Mich weht an deiner Schwelle Ein linder Schauer an, Und deines Zwielichts Helle Glimmt auf des Schicksals Bahn. Der Leidenschaften Horden, Der Sorgen Rabenzug, Entfliehn vor den Akkorden Die deine Harfe schlug; Du zauberst Alpenshnen, Verbannt auf Flanderns Moor, Mit Sennenreigentnen Der Heimat Bilder vor. In deinen Schattenhallen Weihst du die Snger ein; Lehrst junge Nachtigallen Die Trauermelodein; Du neigst, wo Grber grnen, Dein Ohr zu Hltys Ton; Pflckst Moos von Burgruinen Mit meinem Matthisson.

To the soft strains of a harp I greet you, Melancholy! O nymph, you who lock the hallowed source of tears on your threshold. I feel a gentle shudder, and your dusky light glimmers on the path of destiny. Thronging passions, black, teeming cares disperse at the chords from your harp. For the sons of the mountains, banished to Flanders plains, you conjure images of home with strains of Alpine dances. In your shadowy groves you reveal your secret to singers; you teach young nightingales their sorrowful melodies; where graves grow green you bend your ear to Hltys song; and with my Matthisson you gather moss from castle ruins.

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

Disc bn Lebensmelodien Melodies of life Track bs D395. March 1816; first published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in February 1829 as Op posth 111 No 2
sung by Matthias Goerne

DER SCHWAN Auf den Wassern wohnt mein stilles Leben, Zieht nur gleiche Kreise, die verschweben, Und mir schwindet nie im feuchten Spiegel Der gebogne Hals und die Gestalt. DER ADLER Ich haus in den felsigen Klften, Ich braus in den strmenden Lften, Vertrauend dem schlagenden Flgel Bei Jagd bei Kampf und Gewalt. DER SCHWAN Ahndevoll betracht ich oft die Sterne In der Flut die tiefgewlbte Ferne, Und mich zieht ein innig rhrend Sehnen Aus der Heimat in ein himmlisch Land. DER ADLER Ich wandte die Flgel mit Wonne Schon frh zur unsterblichen Sonne, Kann nie an dem Staub mich gewhnen, Ich bin mit den Gttern verwandt. DIE TAUBEN In der Myrten Schatten Gatte treu dem Gatten Flattern wir und tauschen Manchen langen Kuss. Suchen und irren, Finden und girren, Schmachten und lauschen, Wunsch und Genuss.

THE SWAN
My tranquil life is on the waters, drawing equal circles that ripple away to nothing; and in the damp mirror my curved neck and my figure never disappear.

THE EAGLE I dwell in the rocky crevasses;


I race in the stormy winds, trusting my beating wings in the hunt, in battle and in attack.

THE SWAN
Often, filled with intuition, I behold the stars in the deep-vaulted, distant flood, and I am drawn by a fervent longing from my home to a heavenly land.

THE EAGLE In early youth I turned my wings with joy towards the immortal sun; I can never accustom myself to the dust; I am related to the gods. THE DOVES In the shade of the myrtles, spouse true to spouse, we flutter, and exchange many a long kiss. We seek and rove, find and coo, languish and listen with desire and pleasure.

136

March April 1816 SONG TEXTS


Venus Wagen ziehen Schnbelnd wir im Fliehen, Unsre blauen Schwingen Sumt der Sonne Gold. O wie es fchelt, Wenn sie uns lchelt! Leichtes Gelingen! Lieblicher Sold! Wende denn die Strme, Schne Gttin! schirme Bei bescheidner Freude Deiner Tauben Paar! Lass uns beisammen! Oder in Flammen Opfre uns beide Deinem Altar.
AUGUST WILHELM VON SCHLEGEL (17671845)

We draw the chariot of Venus, billing in our flight; our blue wings are fringed by the gold of the sun. How we stir when she smiles upon us! Easy success, a charming reward! Then avert your storms, fair goddess! Shield your pair of doves in their modest pleasure! Let us be together, or sacrifice us both in flames upon your altar!

Rien de la nature

Nothing in all nature

bn Disc
bt Track

D Anhang IIa. March 1816; aria from Echo et Narcisse by Christoph Willibald, Ritter von Gluck (17141787) arranged for voice and piano; accompaniment by Franz Schubert sung by Ann Murray

Rien de la nature nchappe mes traits ; ni le guerrier, couvert de son armure, ni le chasseur lger qui fuit dans les forts.
LOUIS-THODORE, BARON DE TSCHUDI (17341784)

Nothing in all nature escapes my arrows: not the warrior, clad in armour, nor the fleet-footed huntsman darting through the forests.

combats, dsordre extrme !

What conflict, what extreme confusion!

bn Disc
bu Track

D Anhang IIb. March 1816; aria from Echo et Narcisse by Christoph Willibald, Ritter von Gluck (17141787) arranged for voice and piano; accompaniment by Franz Schubert sung by Ann Murray

combats, dsordre extrme, trouble affraux et confus ! Hlas! je ne sais plus ce que je hais ou ce que jaime, je sens au dedans de moi un long frmissement qui me glace deffroi. Je ne me connais plus moi-mme ; mon ami, je mabandonne toi !
LOUIS-THODORE, BARON DE TSCHUDI (17341784)

What conflict, what extreme confusion, what dreadful, chaotic turmoil! Alas, I no longer know what I hate or what I love; I feel within me a prolonged shivering which fills me with chill dread. I no longer know myself; my friend, I abandon myself to you!

Die verfehlte Stunde


Qulend ungestilltes Sehnen Pocht mir in emprter Brust. Liebe, die mir Seel und Sinnen Schmeichelnd wusste zu gewinnen, Wiegt dein zauberisches Whnen Nur in Trume kurzer Lust, Und erweckt zu Trnen? Sss berauscht in Trnen An des Lieben Brust mich lehnen, Arm um Arm gestrickt, Mund auf Mund gedrckt, Das nur stillt mein Sehnen! Ach, ich gab ihm keine Kunde, Wusst es selber nicht zuvor; Und nun beb ich so beklommen: Wird der Traute, wird er kommen?

The unsuccessful hour


The torment of unquiet longing beats within my raging breast. Love, you knew how to win my soul and my senses with your flattery; does your magic illusion lull me to dreams of fleeting pleasure, only to awaken me to tears? O to be drunk with sweet tears, leaning on my beloveds breast, my arms entwined in his arms, my lips pressed to his lips this alone will still my longing! Ah, I gave him no indication, I myself did not know beforehand and now I tremble so anxiously: will my beloved come?

bn Disc
cl Track

D409. April 1816; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Christine Schfer

137

SONG TEXTS April 1816


Still und gnstig ist die Stunde, Nirgends droht ein horchend Ohr Dem geheimen Bunde. Treu im selgen Bunde An des Lieben Brust mich lehnen Hr ich leise Tritte rauschen, Denk ich: ah, da ist er schon! Ahndung hat ihm wohl verkndet, Dass die schne Zeit sich findet, Wonn um Wonne frei zu tauschen Doch sie ist schon halb entflohn Bei vergebnem Lauschen. Mit entzcktem Lauschen An des Lieben Brust mich lehnen Tuschen wird vielleicht mein Sehnen, Hofft ich, des Gesanges Lust. Ungestmer Wnsche Glhen Lindern sanfte Melodien Doch das Lied enthob mit Sthnen Tief eratmend sich der Brust, Und erstarb in Trnen. Sss berauscht in Trnen An des Lieben Brust mich lehnen
AUGUST WILHELM VON SCHLEGEL (17671845)

The hour is silent and favourable; nowhere does an eavesdropper threaten our secret bond. O to lean on my beloveds breast in true, blissful union When I hear soft footsteps I think: ah, here it is! A presentiment must have told him that the fair hour is at hand, the hour to exchange joy freely. But already it is half gone, passed in vain waiting. O to lean on my beloveds breast in rapturous communion I had hoped that the joy of song might perhaps delude my longing, and that gentle melodies might quench the fire of impetuous desire. But the song escaped from my heart, groaning and panting, and died in tears. O to be drunk with sweet tears, leaning on my beloveds breast

Disc bn Sprache der Liebe Language of love Track cm D410. April 1816; first published by M J Leidesdorf in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 115 No 3
sung by Matthias Goerne

Lass mich mit gelinden Schlgen Rhren, meine zarte Laute! Da die Nacht hernieder taute, Mssen wir Gelispel pflegen. Wie sich deine Tne regen, Wie sie atmen, klagen, sthnen, Wallt das Herz zu meiner Schnen, Bringt ihr aus der Seele Tiefen Alle Schmerzen, welche schliefen; Liebe denkt in sssen Tnen.
AUGUST WILHELM VON SCHLEGEL (17671845)

Let me touch you with gentle strokes, my tender lute! Now that the dewy night has fallen we must talk in whispers. As your notes vibrate, as they breathe, lament, moan, so my heart flows to my beloved, and calls forth from her souls depths all the sorrows that were slumbering. Love thinks in sweet music.

Disc bn Der Herbstabend Autumn evening Track cn D405. April 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
cf Vesque von Pttlingen Der Herbstabend, disc 40 bt sung by Lucia Popp

Abendglockenhalle zittern Dumpf durch Moorgedfte hin; Hinter jenes Kirchhofs Gittern Blasst des Dmmerlichts Karmin. Aus umstrmten Lindenzweigen Rieselt welkes Laub herab, Und gebleichte Grser beugen Sich auf ihr bestimmtes Grab. Wenn schon meine Rasenstelle Nur dein welker Kranz noch ziert, Und auf Lethes leiser Welle Sich mein Nebelbild verliert: Lausche dann! Im Bltenschauer Wird es dir vernehmlich wehn: Jenseits schwindet jede Trauer; Treue wird sich wiedersehn!

Evening bells chime, dull and tremulous, in the marshland breeze; behind those churchyard railings the crimson glow of twilight fades. From storm-tossed linden branches withered leaves stream down, and blanched grasses bend over their appointed graves. When only your withered wreath still adorns the grass where I lie, and my misty image is lost on Lethes gentle waves: Listen then! In the shower of blossom this message shall be wafted to you: in the world beyond, all sorrow shall vanish; constant lovers shall be reunited!

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

138

April 1816 SONG TEXTS Daphne am Bach


Ich hab ein Bchlein funden Vom Stdtchen ziemlich weit, Da bin ich manche Stunden In stiller Einsamkeit. Ich tt mir gleich erkiesen, Ein Pltzchen khles Moos; Da sitz ich, und da fliessen Mir Trnen in den Schooss. Fr dich, fr dich nur wallet Mein jugendliches Blut; Doch leise nur erschallet Dein Nam an dieser Flut. Ich frchte, dass mich tusche Ein Lauscher aus der Stadt; Es schreckt mich das Gerusche Von jedem Pappelblatt. Ich wnsche mir zurcke Den flchtigsten Genuss; In jedem Augenblicke Fhl ich den Abschiedskuss. Es ward mir wohl und bange, Als mich dein Arm umschloss, Als noch auf meine Wange Dein letztes Trnchen floss! Von meinem Blumenhgel Sah ich dir lange nach; Ich wnschte mir die Flgel Der Tubchen auf dem Dach; Nun glaub ich zu vergehen Mit jedem Augenblick. Willst du dein Liebchen sehen, So komme bald zurck!

Daphne by the brook


I have found a little brook quite far from the town; there I pass many an hour in my quiet solitude. I immediately chose a patch of cool moss; there I sit, as my tears flow down into my lap. My young blood pulses for you, for you alone; yet your name echoes but softly by these waters. For I fear lest some eavesdropper from the town should betray me; I shudder at the rustling of every poplar leaf. I long for the return of the most fleeting pleasure; every moment I feel your parting kiss. I was happy and yet sad as your arms embraced me, as your last tears fell on my cheeks. Long did I gaze after you from my flower-decked hillside; I yearn for the wings of the doves on the roof; now I feel as if I am fading away with each moment. If you wish to see your beloved, come back soon!

bn Disc
co Track

D411. April 1816; first published in 1887 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by Arleen Auger

FRIEDRICH LEOPOLD, GRAF ZU STOLBERG-STOLBERG (17501819)

Stimme der Liebe


Meine Selinde! Denn mit Engelsstimme singt die Liebe mir zu: Sie wird die Deine! Sie wird die Meine! Himmel und Erde schwinden! Meine Selinde! Trnen der Sehnsucht, Die auf blassen Wangen bebten, Fallen herab als Freudentrnen! Denn mir tnt die himmlische Stimme: Deine wird sie, die Deine!

The voice of love


My Selinde! For love sings to me with an angels voice: she will be yours, she will be mine! Heaven and earth vanish! My Selinde! Tears of longing which quivered on pale cheeks fall as tears of joy! For the heavenly voice sings to me: she will be yours, yours!

bn Disc
cp Track

D412. April 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1838 in volume 29 of the Nachlass sung by Christoph Prgardien

FRIEDRICH LEOPOLD, GRAF ZU STOLBERG-STOLBERG (17501819)

139

SONG TEXTS April 1816


Disc bn Romanze Romance Track cq D144. April 1816; fragment first published in 1897 in the Revisions-Bericht of the Gesamtausgabe
completed by Reinhard van Hoorickx; Schubert set the first three lines only sung by Christoph Prgardien

In der Vter Hallen ruhte Ritter Rudolfs Heldenarm, Rudolfs, den die Schlacht erfreute, Rudolfs, welchen Frankreich scheute Und der Sarazenen Schwarm. Er, der Letzte seines Stammes, Weinte seiner Shne Fall; Zwischen Moosbewachsnen Mauern Tnte seiner Klage Trauern In der Zellen Wiederhall.
END OF DISC 13

In the halls of his fathers rested the heroic arm of Sir Rudolph; Rudolph, who delighted in battle; Rudolph, feared by France and the Saracen mob. He, the last of his line, wept for the fall of his sons. Between mossy walls his lament rang out in the echoing cells.

FRIEDRICH LEOPOLD, GRAF ZU STOLBERG-STOLBERG (17501819)

Disc bo Lied in der Abwesenheit Song of absence Track 1 D416. April 1816; fragment first published in 1925 and completed by Eusebius Mandyczewski and Otto Erich Deutsch
sung by Lucia Popp

Ach, mir ist das Herz so schwer! Traurig irr ich hin und her. Suche Ruhe, finde keine, Geh ans Fenster hin, und weine! Sssest du auf meinem Schoss, Wrd ich aller Sorgen los, Und aus deinen blauen Augen Wrd ich Lieb und Wonne saugen! Knnt ich doch, du ssses Kind, Fliegen hin zu dir geschwind! Knnt ich ewig dich umfangen, Und an deinen Lippen hangen!

Ah, my heart is so heavy! Sadly I wander to and fro. I seek peace, but find none. I go to the window and weep. If you were sitting on my lap all my cares would vanish; and from your blue eyes I would draw love and bliss. Sweet child, if only I could at once fly swiftly to you! If only I could embrace you for ever, and hang on your lips!

FRIEDRICH LEOPOLD, GRAF ZU STOLBERG-STOLBERG (17501819)

Disc bo Entzckung Rapture Track 2 D413. April 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Toby Spence

Tag voll Himmel! da aus Lauras Blicken Mir der Liebe heiligstes Entzcken In die wonnetrunkne Seele drang! Und, von ihrem Zauber hingerissen, Ich der Holden, unter Feuerkssen, An den sssbeklommnen Busen sank! Goldner sah ich Wolken sich besumen, Jedes Blttchen auf den Frhlingsbumen Schien zu flstern: Ewig, ewig dein! Glcklicher, in solcher Taumelflle, Werd ich, nach verstubter Erdenhlle, Kaum in Edens Myrthenlauben sein.
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Heavenly day! When from Lauras gaze loves most sacred rapture pierced my soul in its ecstasy and, carried away by her magic, I sank, amid ardent kisses, on my fair ones sweetly trembling breast! I saw the clouds fringed with a richer gold; every tiny leaf on the trees of springtime seemed to whisper: For ever yours! I shall scarcely be happier, or in such joyful delirium, in the myrtle groves of Eden, when this mortal frame has turned to dust.

Disc bo Geist der Liebe Spirit of love Track 3 D414. April 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Christoph Prgardien

Der Abend schleiert Flur und Hain In traulichholde Dmmrung ein; Hell flimmt, wo goldne Wlkchen ziehn, Der Stern der Liebesknigin. Der Geist der Liebe wirkt und strebt, Wo nur ein Puls der Schpfung bebt; Im Strom, wo Wog in Woge fliesst, Im Hain, wo Blatt an Blatt sich schliesst.

Evening veils meadow and grove in sweet, friendly dusk; brightly, amid passing golden clouds, the star of Venus shines. The spirit of love is busy at work wherever the pulse of creation beats; in the torrent, where wave flows into wave, in the grove, where leaf clings to leaf.

140

April 1816 SONG TEXTS


O Geist der Liebe! fhre du Dem Jngling die Erkorne zu! Ein Minneblick der Trauten hellt Mit Himmelsglanz die Erdenwelt!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

O spirit of love, lead the youth to his chosen one! One tender glance from his beloved will fill this world with heavenly radiance!

Klage
Die Sonne steigt, die Sonne sinkt, Des Mondes Wechselscheibe blinkt, Des thers Blau durchwebt mit Glanz Der Sterne goldner Reihentanz; Doch es durchstrmt der Sonne Licht, Des Mondes lchelndes Gesicht, Der Sterne Reigen, still und hehr, Mit Hochgefhl dies Herz nicht mehr! Die Wiese blht, der Bsche Grn Ertnt von Frhlingsmelodien, Es wallt der Bach im Abendstrahl Hinab ins hainumkrnzte Tal: Doch es erhebt der Haine Lied, Die Au, die tausendfarbig blht, Der Erlenbach im Abendlicht Wie vormals meine Seele nicht!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Lament
The sun rises, the sun sinks, the moons ever-changing disc gleams, the blue ether is shot through with the brilliant, golden dance of the stars. But the suns light, the moons smiling countenance, the dance of the stars, silent and sublime, no longer flood this heart with elation. The meadow blooms, the green bushes echo with spring melodies; in the evening sunlight the brook gushes down into the wooded valley. But the song of the woods, the meadow, blooming with a thousand colours, the alders by the brook in the twilight, do not uplift my soul as they once did.

bo Disc
4 Track

D415. April 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Christoph Prgardien

Stimme der Liebe


Abendgewlke schweben hell Am bepurpurten Himmel; Hesperus schaut, mit Liebesblick, Durch den blhenden Lindenhain, Und sein prophetisches Trauerlied Zirpt im Kraute das Heimchen. Freuden der Liebe harren dein! Flstern leise die Winde; Freuden der Liebe harren dein! Tnt die Kehle der Nachtigall; Hoch von dem Sternengewlb herab Hallt mir Stimme der Liebe. Aus der Platanen Labyrinth Wandelt Laura, die Holde! Blumen entspriessen dem Zephyrtritt, Und wie Sphrengesangeston Bebt von den Rosen der Lippe mir Ssse Stimme der Liebe!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Voice of love
Evening clouds float brightly through the crimson sky. Hesperus looks lovingly through the flowering lime grove, and in the grass the cricket chirps his prophetic threnody. The joys of love await you! The winds whisper softly; the joys of love await you! Thus sings the nightingale. From the high starry vaults the voice of love echoes down to me. From the labyrinth of plane trees comes fair Laura! Flowers bloom at her airy footsteps, and like the music of the spheres the sweet voice of love floats tremulously towards me from the roses of her lips.

bo Disc
5 Track

Second version, D418. 29 April 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Sarah Walker

Julius an Theone
Nimmer, nimmer darf ich dir gestehen, Was beim ersten Drucke deiner Hand, Ssse Zauberin, mein Herz empfand! Meiner Einsamkeit verborgnes Flehen, Meine Seufzer wird der Sturm verwehen, Meine Trnen werden ungesehen Deinem Bilde rinnen, bis die Gruft Mich in ihr verschwiegnes Dunkel ruft.

Julius to Theone
Never, never can I confess to you what my heart felt, sweet enchantress, when I first pressed your hand. My sighs, the hidden entreaties of my loneliness, will be blown away by the storm; my tears will flow unseen for the image of you, until the grave calls me to its secret darkness.

bo Disc
6 Track

D419. 30 April 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Christoph Prgardien

141

SONG TEXTS May 1816


Ach! du schautest mir so unbefangen, So voll Engelunschuld ins Gesicht, Whntest den Triumph der Schnheit nicht! O Theone! sahst du nicht den bangen Blick der Liebe an deinen Blicken hangen? Schimmerte die Rte meiner Wangen Dir nicht Ahnung der verlornen Ruh Meines hoffnungslosen Herzens zu? Dass uns Meere doch geschieden htten Nach dem ersten leisen Druck der Hand! Schaudernd wank ich nun am Rand Eines Abgrunds, wo auf Dornenbetten, Trnenlos, mit diamantnen Ketten, Die Verzweiflung lauscht! Mich zu retten Holde Feindin meines Friedens, Beut mir die Schale der Vergessenheit!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Ah! You gazed into my face so candidly, so full of angelic innocence, not suspecting the triumph of your beauty. O Theone! Did you not see the anxious loving glance hanging on your glances? Did not my flushed cheeks give a hint of the lost peace of my hopeless heart? Would that oceans had separated us after that first soft touch of hands! Shuddering, I now totter on the brink of an abyss where, on beds of thorns with diamond chains and without tears, despair lies in wait. To save me, fair enemy of my inner peace, hand me the cup of forgetfulness.

Disc bo Minnelied Love song Track 7 D429. May 1816; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
cf Felix Mendelssohn Minnelied, disc 40 cn sung by Lucia Popp

Holder klingt der Vogelsang, Wenn die Engelreine, Die mein Jnglingsherz bezwang Wandelt durch die Haine. Rter blhet Tal und Au, Grner wird der Wasen, Wo mir Blumen rot und blau Ihre Hnde lasen. Ohne sie ist alles tot, Welk sind Blt und Kruter; Und kein Frhlingsabendrot Dnkt mir schn und heiter. Traute, minnigliche Frau, Wollest nimmer fliehen; Dass mein Herz, gleich dieser Au, Mg in Wonne blhen!
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

The birdsong sounds sweeter when the pure angel who has conquered my youthful heart walks through the woods. Valley and meadow bloom with a redder hue, the grass grows greener where her hands have gathered red and blue flowers. Without her all is dead, flowers and herbs wilt; and no spring sunset seems beautiful or serene to me. Dear, lovely lady, never leave me; for then my heart, like this meadow, will bloom in joy!

Disc bo Die frhe Liebe Early love Track 8 D430. May 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Christoph Prgardien

Schon im bunten Knabenkleide, Pflegten hbsche Mgdelein Meine liebste Augenweide, Mehr als Pupp und Ball zu sein. Ich vergass der Vogelnester, Warf mein Steckenpferd ins Gras, Wenn am Baum bei meiner Schwester Eine schne Dirne sass. Freute mich der muntern Dirne, Ihres roten Wangenpaars, Ihres Mundes, ihrer Stirne, Ihres blonden Lockenhaars; Blickt auf Busentuch und Mieder, Hinterwrts gelehnt am Baum; Streckte dann im Gras mich nieder, Dicht an ihres Kleides Saum.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

When I was still a lad in bright clothes I would rather feast my eyes on pretty girls than on a doll or ball. I forgot about birds nests, and threw my hobby-horse on the grass when a pretty girl sat beside my sister under a tree. I delighted in the lively girl, her red cheeks, her mouth, her brow, her blond curly hair. I would gaze at her shawl and bodice as she leant against a tree; then I would stretch out in the grass close to the hem of her dress.

142

May 1816 SONG TEXTS Blumenlied


Es ist ein halbes Himmelreich, Wenn, Paradiesesblumen gleich, Aus Klee die Blumen dringen; Und wenn die Vgel silberhell Im Garten hier, und dort am Quell, Auf Bltenbumen singen. Doch holder blht ein edles Weib, Von Seele gut und schn von Leib, In frischer Jugendblte. Wir lassen alle Blumen stehn, Das liebe Weibchen anzusehn, Und freun uns ihrer Gte.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Flower song
It is almost heaven when, like blooms of paradise, the flowers spring up from the clover and when with silvery voice the birds sing on blossoming boughs here in the garden, and yonder by the stream. But lovelier still blooms a noble lady, sweet of soul and fair of form, in the freshness of youth. We leave all the flowers be to gaze at that beloved lady and to delight in her goodness.

bo Disc
9 Track

D431. May 1816; first published in 1887 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by Peter Schreier

Der Leidende Klage


Nimmer trag ich lnger dieser Leiden Last; Nimm den mden Pilger bald hinauf zu dir. Immer, immer enger wirds in meinem Busen, Immer, immer trber wird der Augen Blick. ffne mir den Himmel, milder, gtger Gott! Lass mich meine Schmerzen senken in das Grab! Allzu viele Qualen wten mir im Innren, Hin ist jede Hoffnung, hin des Herzens Glut.

The sufferer Lament


No longer can I bear the burden of this suffering; take this weary pilgrim to you soon. Ever more oppressed grows my heart; ever dimmer grows my gaze. Open your heaven for me, kind and merciful God! Let me bury my sorrows in the grave. All too many torments rage within me; gone is all hope, gone my hearts ardour.

bo Disc
bl Track

First version, D432. May 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 50 of the Nachlass sung by Christoph Prgardien

ANONYMOUS originally attributed to LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Der Leidende Klage

The sufferer Lament

bo Disc
bm Track

Second version, D432b. May 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Christoph Prgardien

see above, disc bo track bl , for text and translation

Seligkeit
Freuden sonder Zahl Blhn im Himmelssaal Engeln und Verklrten, Wie die Vter lehrten. Oh, da mcht ich sein Und mich ewig freun! Jedem lchelt traut Eine Himmelsbraut; Harf und Psalter klinget, Und man tanzt und singet. Oh, da mcht ich sein Und mich ewig freun! Lieber bleib ich hier, Lchelt Laura mir Einen Blick, der saget, Dass ich ausgeklaget. Selig dann mit ihr Bleib ich ewig hier!
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Bliss
Joys beyond number bloom in the vaults of heaven for angels and the transfigured, as our fathers taught. Ah, there I should like to be, forever rejoicing! Upon each a heavenly bride smiles tenderly; harp and psalter sound; there is dancing and singing. Oh, there I should like to be forever rejoicing! I would sooner stay here if Laura smiles on me with a look that says I have ceased grieving. Blissfully then with her I will remain forever here!

bo Disc
bn Track

D433. May 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Brigitte Fassbaender

143

SONG TEXTS May 1816


Disc bo Erntelied Harvest song Track bo D434. May 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 48 of the Nachlass
sung by Peter Schreier

Sicheln schallen, hren fallen Unter Sichelschall; Auf den Mdchenhten Zittern blaue Blten, Freud ist berall. Sicheln klingen, Mdchen singen Unter Sichelklang, Bis, vom Mond beschimmert, Rings die Stoppel flimmert, Tnt der Erntesang. Alles springet, Alles singet, Was nur lallen kann. Bei dem Erntemahle Isst aus einer Schale Knecht und Bauersmann. Jeder scherzet, Jeder herzet Dann sein Liebelein. Nach geleerten Kannen, Gehen sie von dannen, Singen und juchhein!
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Sickles echo, ears of corn fall to the sound of the sickles. On the girls bonnets blue flowers quiver; joy is everywhere. Sickles resound, girls sing to the sound of the sickles; until, bathed in moonlight, the stubble shimmers all around, and the harvest song rings out. All leap about, all who can utter a sound sing out. At the harvest feast the farmer and his labourer eat from the same bowl. Then every man teases and hugs his sweetheart. When the tankards are empty they go off, singing and shouting with joy.

Disc bo Klage an den Mond Lament To the moon Track bp D436. 12 May 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 48 of the Nachlass
cf Neukomm Klage an den Mond, disc 39 bq sung by Dame Margaret Price

Dein Silber schien Durch Eichengrn, Das Khlung gab, Auf mich herab, O Mond, und lachte Ruh Mir frohem Knaben zu. Wenn jetzt dein Licht Durchs Fenster bricht, Lachts keine Ruh Mir Jngling zu, Siehts meine Wange blass, Mein Auge trnennass. Bald, lieber Freund, Ach bald bescheint Dein Silberschein Den Leichenstein, Der meine Asche birgt, Des Jnglings Asche birgt!
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Your silver shone down on me through the green oaks that gave cool shade, O moon, and, smiling, shed peace on me, a happy youth. When now your light breaks through the window, no peace smiles on me, now a young man; it sees my cheeks pale, my eyes moist with tears. Soon, dear friend, soon your silver light will shine on the tombstone that hides my ashes, the young mans ashes.

Disc bo Frhlingslied Spring song Track bq D398. 13 May 1816; first published in 1887 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Lucia Popp

Die Luft ist blau, das Tal ist grn, Die kleinen Maienglocken blhn, Und Schlsselblumen drunter; Der Wiesengrund Ist schon so bunt Und malt sich tglich bunter.

The sky is blue, the valley green, the lilies of the valley are in bloom, with cowslips among them; the meadows are already so colourful, and grow more so each day.

144

May 1816 SONG TEXTS


Drum komme, wem der Mai gefllt, Und schaue froh die schne Welt Und Gottes Vatergte, Die solche Pracht Hervorgebracht, Den Baum und seine Blte.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Come, then, if you love May, behold with joy the beautiful world and Gods fatherly kindness that brought forth such splendour, the tree and its blossom.

Auf den Tod einer Nachtigall


Sie ist dahin, die Maienlieder tnte, Die Sngerin, Die durch ihr Lied den ganzen Hain verschnte, Sie ist dahin! Sie, deren Ton mir in die Seele hallte, Wenn ich am Bach, Der durch Gebsch im Abendgolde wallte Auf Blumen lag! Sie gurgelte, tief aus der vollen Kehle, Den Silberschlag: Der Widerhall in seiner Felsenhhle Schlug leis ihn nach. Die lndlichen Gesng und Feldschalmeien Erklangen drein; Es tanzeten die Jungfraun ihre Reihen Im Abendschein. Sie horchten dir, bis dumpf die Abendglocke Des Dorfes klang, Und Hesperus, gleich einer goldnen Flocke, Aus Wolken drang; Und gingen dann im Wehn der Maienkhle Der Htte zu, Mit einer Brust voll zrtlicher Gefhle, Voll ssser Ruh.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

On the death of a nightingale


She is no more, the songstress who warbled May songs, who adorned the whole grove with her singing. She is no more! She whose notes echoed in my soul, when I lay among flowers by the brook that flowed through the undergrowth in the golden light of evening. From the depths of her full throat she poured forth her silver notes; the echo answered softly in the rocky caves. Rustic melodies and pipers tunes mingled with her song, as maidens danced in the glow of evening. They listened until the village angelus tolled dully, and the evening star emerged from the clouds like a golden snowflake; then they went to their cottage in the cool May breeze, their hearts full of tender feeling and sweet peace.

bo Disc
br Track

Second setting, D399. 13 May 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Peter Schreier

Die Knabenzeit
Wie glcklich, wem das Knabenkleid Noch um die Schultern fliegt! Nie lstert er der bsen Zeit, Stets munter und vergngt. Das hlzerne Husarenschwert Belustiget ihn itzt, Der Kreisel, und das Steckenpferd, Auf dem er herrisch sitzt. O Knabe, spiel und laufe nur, Den lieben langen Tag, Durch Garten und durch grne Flur Den Schmetterlingen nach. Bald schwitzest du, nicht immer froh, Im engen Kmmerlein, Und lernst vom dicken Cicero Verschimmeltes Latein!
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Boyhood
Happy he around whose shoulders a boys coat still flaps. He never curses the bad times; he is always cheerful and content. The wooden hussars sword delights him now; the top, and the hobby-horse on which he sits proudly. Play, child, and run about the whole day long through garden and green meadow, chasing butterflies. Soon you will be sweating, not always happily, in the cramped classroom learning fusty Latin from a fat tome of Cicero.

bo Disc
bs Track

D400. 13 May 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Christoph Prgardien

145

SONG TEXTS May 1816


Disc bo Winterlied Winter song Track bt D401. 13 May 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Lucia Popp

Keine Blumen blhn, Nur das Wintergrn Blickt durch Silberhllen; Nur das Fenster fllen Blumen rot und weiss, Aufgeblht aus Eis. Ach, kein Vogelsang Tnt mit frohem Klang, Nur die Winterweise Jener kleinen Meise, Die am Fenster schwirrt, Und um Futter girrt. Minne flieht den Hain, Wo die Vgelein Sonst im grnen Schatten Ihre Nester hatten; Minne flieht den Hain, Kehrt ins Zimmer ein. Kalter Januar, Hier werd ich frwahr Unter Minnespielen Deinen Frost nicht fhlen; Walte immerdar, Kalter Januar!
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

No flowers bloom; only the winter green peeps through its silver mantle; the window is filled only with red and white flowers, blossoming from the ice. Ah, no birdsong rings out with joyous tones; only the wintry strains of the titmouse that flutters at the window chirping for food. Love flees the grove where the birds once made their nests in the green shade; love flees the grove and comes into this room. Cold January, here, in truth, among love games, I shall not feel your frost. Reign for ever, cold January!

Disc bo Die Erwartung Anticipation Track bu Second version, D159. May 1816; published by M J Leidesdorf in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 116
cf Zumsteeg Die Erwartung, disc 38 8 sung by Dame Janet Baker

Hr ich das Pfrtchen nicht gehen? Hat nicht der Riegel geklirrt? Nein, es war des Windes Wehen, Der durch die Pappeln schwirrt. O schmcke dich, du grnbelaubtes Dach, Du sollst die Anmutstrahlende empfangen! Ihr Zweige, baut ein schattendes Gemach, Mit holder Nacht sie heimlich zu umfangen, Und all ihr Schmeichellfte, werdet wach Und scherzt und spielt um ihre Rosenwangen, Wenn seine schne Brde, leicht bewegt, Der zarte Fuss zum Sitz der Liebe, trgt. Stille, was schlpft durch die Hecken Raschelnd mit eilendem Lauf? Nein, es scheuchte nur der Schrecken Aus dem Busch den Vogel auf. O lsche deine Fackel, Tag! Hervor, du geistge Nacht, mit deinem holden Schweigen! Breit um ans her den purpurroten Flor, Umspinne uns mit geheimnisvollen Zweigen! Der Liebe Wonne flieht des Lauschers Ohr, Sie flieht des Strahles unbescheidnen Zeugen! Nun Hesper, der Verschwiegene, allein Darf still herblickend ihr Vertrauter sein. Rief es von ferne nicht leise, Flsternden Stimmen gleich? Nein, der Schwan ists, der die Kreise Zieht durch den Silberteich.

Did I not hear the gate? Was that not the bolt creaking? No, it was the wind blowing through the poplars. Adorn yourself, leaf-clad roof, you are to receive her in all her radiant beauty! Branches, build a shady bower to envelop her secretly in sweet night, and all you caressing breezes, be awake, play and dally about her rosy cheeks when her delicate foot lightly bears its fair burden to the seat of love. Hush, what is that darting through the hedge, rustling and scurrying? No, it was only a startled bird frightened from the hedge. Extinguish your torch, day! Draw on, contemplative night, with your sweet silence! Spread your purple veil around us, enfold us with secret boughs! The rapture of love shuns both the listening ear and the immodest witness of the suns rays! Hesperus alone, the silent one, looking calmy on, may be its confidant. Was that not a faint, distant call, like whispering voices? No, it is the swan, tracing circles over the silvery lake.

146

May June 1816 SONG TEXTS


Mein Ohr umtnt ein Harmonienfluss, Der Springquell fllt mit angenehmem Rauschen, Die Blume neigt sich bei des Westes Kuss, Und alle Wesen seh ich Wonne tauschen, Die Traube winkt, die Pfirsche zum Genuss, Die ppig schwellend hinter Blttern lauschen, Die Luft, getaucht in der Gewrze Flut, Trinkt von der heissen Wange mir die Glut. Hr ich nicht Tritte erschallen? Rauschts nicht den Laubgang daher? Die Frucht ist dort gefallen, Von der eignen Flle schwer. Des Tages Flammenauge selber bricht In sssem Tod, und seine Farben blassen; Khn ffnen sich im holden Dmmerlicht Die Kelche schon, die seine Gluten hassen. Still hebt der Mond sein strahlend Angesicht, Die Welt zerschmilzt in ruhig grosse Massen. Der Grtel ist von jedem Reiz gelst, Und alles Schne zeigt sich mir entblsst. Seh ich nichts Weisses dort schimmern? Glnzts nicht wie seidnes Gewand? Nein, es ist der Sule Flimmern An der dunkel Taxuswand. O! sehnend Herz, ergtze dich nicht mehr, Mit sssen Bildern wesenlos zu spielen, Der Arm, der sie umfassen will, ist leer; Kein Schattenglck kann diesen Busen khlen, O! fhre mir die Liebende daher, Lass ihre Hand, die zrtliche, mich fhlen, Den Schatten nur von ihres Mantels Saum! Und in das Leben tritt der hohle Traum. Und leis, wie aus himmlischen Hhen Die Stunde des Glckes erscheint, So war sie genaht, ungesehen, Und weckte mit Kssen den Freund.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Flowing harmonies fill my ears, the spring murmurs sweetly, the flower bows at the west winds kiss, and I see all creatures united in bliss. The grape beckons, the peach is ripe to be relished, swelling lusciously, hidden among leaves. The air, bathed in spicy scents, drinks the glow from my burning cheeks. Do I not hear footsteps, something rustling in the leafy walk? A fruit has fallen there, heavy with its own ripeness. The flaming eye of day perishes in sweet death, and its colours fade. In the beauteous dusk the flower-bells, which loathe days fire, open boldly. Silently, the moon raises its radiant countenance, the world dissolves in vast, calm shapes. The girdle is released by that spell, and all beauty is revealed to me. Do I not see a shimmer of white, the glistening of a silver garment? No, it is the column gleaming against the row of dark yew trees. Yearning heart, delight no longer in toying with sweet, airy images, the arms that desire to embrace them are empty. No joy in shadows can cool this breast. O, bring my beloved to me, let me feel her delicate hand, the bare shadow of her mantles hem, and the hollow dream will come to life! And softly, as if from celestial heights, the hour of bliss arrives, thus she had come, unseen, waking her beloved with kisses.

Beitrag zur fnfzigjhrigen Jubelfeier des Herrn von Salieri, ersten k.k. Hofkapellmeister in Wien

Contribution to the 50th anniversary of Herr von Salieris appointment as Kapellmeister in Vienna

bo Disc

D407. By 16 June 1816; first published in 1891/2 in series 16 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by cl Daniel Norman, Philip Langridge and Maarten Koningsberger cm Toby Spence, Daniel Norman, Christopher Maltman and Neal Davies, unaccompanied cn Toby Spence; co Toby Spence, Daniel Norman and Christopher Maltman, unaccompanied

Gtigster, Bester! Weisester, Grsster! So lang ich Trnen habe Und an der Kunst mich labe Sei beides Dir geweiht Der beides mir verleiht. So Gt als Weisheit strmen mild, Von Dir, o Gottes Ebenbild, Engel bist du mir auf Erden Gern mcht ich Dir dankbar werden. Unser aller Grosspapa, Bleibe noch recht lange da!
FRANZ SCHUBERT (17971828)

Kindest and best of all! Wisest and greatest of all! As long as I have tears and refresh my spirit with art, both shall be dedicated to you, who bestowed both on me. Both goodness and wisdom flow benignly from you, Gods image; you are my angel here on earth; I long to show my gratitude. Grandfather to us all, stay with us a lot longer!

cl cm Track

cn Track

co Track

147

SONG TEXTS June 1816


Disc bo An die Sonne To the sun Track cp D439. June 1816; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by Patricia Rozario, Catherine Wyn-Rogers, Jamie MacDougall and Michael George

O Sonne, Knigin der Welt, Die unser dunkles Leben erhellt, O Sonne, Knigin der Welt, Die unser dunkles Rund erhellt, In lichter Majestt; Erhabnes Wunder einer Hand, Die jene Himmel ausgespannt Und Sterne hingest! Noch heute seh ich deinen Glanz, Mir lacht in ihrem Blumenkranz Noch heute die Natur. Der Vgel buntgefiedert Heer Singt morgen mir vielleicht nicht mehr Im Wald und auf der Flur. Ich fhle, dass ich sterblich bin, Mein Leben welkt wie Gras dahin, Wie ein verschmachtend Laub. Wer weiss, wie unerwartet bald Des hchsten Wort an mich erschallt: Komm wieder in den Staub!
JOHANN PETER UZ (17201796)

O sun, queen of the world, who lights our dark lives O sun, queen of the world, who lights our dark round in shining majesty; sublime marvel of a hand which spread out the distant heavens and strewed the stars within them! Today I can still see your radiance; in its garlands of flowers nature still smiles upon me today. Tomorrow the bright-feathered hosts of birds may never again sing to me in the woods and the meadows. I feel that I am mortal; my life withers away like grass, like languishing leaves. Who knows how unexpectedly, how soon the voice of the Almighty will ring out to me: Return to the dust!

Disc bo Das grosse Halleluja The great hallelujah Track cq D442. June 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna c1847 in volume 41 of the Nachlass
sung by Daniel Norman, Toby Spence, Christopher Maltman, Stephan Loges and Neal Davies

Ehre sei dem Hocherhabnen, dem Ersten, Dem Vater der Schpfung, Dem unsre Psalmen stammeln, Obgleich der wunderbare Er Unaussprechlich, und undenkbar ist! Eine Flamme von dem Altar an dem Thron Ist in unsere Seele gestrmt! Wir freuen uns Himmelsfreuden, Dass wir sind und ber Ihn erstaunen knnen! Ehre sei Ihm auch von uns an den Grbern hier, Obwohl an seines Thrones letzten Stufen Des Erzengels niedergeworfene Krone Und seines Preisgesangs Wonne tnt! Ehre sei, und Dank, und Preis dem Hocherhabnen, dem Ersten, Der nicht begann, und nicht aufhren wird! Der sogar des Staubs Bewohnern gab, Nicht aufzuhren! Ehre Dir! Ehre! Ehre Dir! Hocherhabner! Erster, Vater der Schpfung! Unaussprechlicher, o Undenkbarer!
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

Glory be to the Exalted One, the First, the Father of Creation, to whom we stammer our psalms although he, the wondrous One, is ineffable and unthinkable. A flame from the altar at the throne has entered our souls. We taste the joys of heaven, for we exist and can wonder at him. Glory be to him also from us among the graves, although the archangel has set his crown on the lowest steps of his throne, and joyous songs hymn his praise. Glory, thanks and praise be to the Exalted One, the First, who had no beginning, and will have no end, who granted that even the creatures of the dust shall have no end. Glory be to you, Exalted One, the First, Father of Creation! Ineffable, Unthinkable One!

Disc bo Schlachtgesang Battle song Track cr D443. June 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by John Mark Ainsley and The London Schubert Chorale (directed by Stephen Layton)

Mit unserm Arm ist nichts getan; Steht uns der Mchtige nicht bei, Der Alles ausfhrt! Umsonst entflamt uns khner Mut, Wenn uns der Sieg von Dem nicht wird, Der Alles ausfhrt!

Our arm is powerless if the Almighty does not stand by us. For he accomplishes all things. In vain are we fired by bold courage if victory does not come from him. For he accomplishes all things.

148

June 1816 SONG TEXTS


Vergebens fliesset unser Blut Frs Vaterland, wenn Der nicht hilft, Der Alles ausfhrt! Auf, in den Flammendampf hinein! Wir lchelten dem Tode zu Und lcheln, Feind, euch zu! Der Tanz, den unsre Trommel schlgt, Der laute schne Kriegestanz, Er tanzet hin nach euch! Durch ihn und uns ist nichts getan, Steht uns der Mchtige nicht bei, Der Alles ausfhrt! Dort dampft es noch. Hinein, hinein! Wir lchelten dem Tode zu Und lcheln, Feind, euch zu!
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

In vain does our blood flow for the Fatherland if he does not help us. For he accomplishes all things. Up now, into the smoking flames! We have smiled at death, and we smile at you, our foe! The dance of our drum-beat, the glorious resounding war dance, is dancing towards you. But we and our dance are powerless if the Almighty does not stand by us. For he accomplishes all things. The smoke is still rising there. Into the fray! We have smiled at death, and we smile at you, our foe!

Die Gestirne
Es tnet sein Lob Feld und Wald, Tal und Gebirg, Das Gestad hallet, es donnert das Meer dumpf brausend Des unendlichen Lob, siehe des Herrlichen, Unerreichten von dem Danklied der Natur! Es singt die Natur dennoch dem, welcher sie schuf, Ihr Getn schallet vom Himmel herab, lautpreisend In umwlkender Nacht rufet des Strahls Gefhrt Von dem Wipfeln, und der Berg Haupt es herab! Wer gab Melodie, Leier, dir? zog das Getn Und das Gold himmlischer Saiten dir auf? Du schallest Zu dem kreisenden Tanz, welchen, beseelt von dir, Der Planet hlt in der Laufbahn um dich her. Ich preise den Herrn! preise den, welcher des Monds Und des Tods khlender, heiliger Nacht, zu dmmern, Und zu leuchten! gebot. Erde, du Grab, das stets Auf uns harrt, Gott hat mit Blumen dich bestreut!
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803)

The constellations
Field and forest, valley and mountain sound his praise; the shore resounds, the sea thunders with a dull roar the praise of the Infinite Being, the Glorious One with whom natures thanksgiving cannot compare! Yet nature sings to him who created her; her song resounds down from heaven; in the cloud-veiled night lights companion loudly echoes his praises from the treetops and the mountain peaks. Lyre, who gave you melody? Did the golden music of heavenly strings just come to you? You play for the whirling dance that, inspired by you, the planet holds on its course all around you. I praise the Lord! I praise him who bade glimmer and gleam the sacred, cooling night of the moon and of death. Earth, you are a grave that forever awaits us; God has strewn you with flowers!

bo Disc
cs Track

D444. June 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in April 1831 in volume 10 of the Nachlass sung by Christine Brewer

Edone
Dein ssses Bild, Edone, Schwebt stets vor meinem Blick; Allein ihn trben Zhren, Dass du es selbst nicht bist. Ich seh es, wenn der Abend Mir dmmert, wenn der Mond Mir glnzt, seh ichs, und weine, Dass du es selbst nicht bist. Bei jenes Tales Blumen, Die ich ihr lesen will, Bei jenen Myrtenzweigen, Die ich ihr flechten will,

Edone
Your sweet image, Edone, forever hovers before my eyes; but they are clouded by tears, for it is not you. I see it when evening falls, I see it when the moon shines, and I weep, for it is not you. By the flowers in yonder valley, which I would gather for her, by those myrtle stems, which I would plait for her,

bo Disc
ct Track

D445. June 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1837 in volume 28 of the Nachlass sung by Christoph Prgardien

149

SONG TEXTS June 1816


Beschwr ich dich, Erscheinung, Auf, und verwandle dich! Verwandle dich, Erscheinung, Und werd Edone selbst!
FRIEDRICH GOTTLIEB KLOPSTOCK (17241803) END OF DISC 14

I call you up, apparition; arise, and transform yourself! Transform yourself, apparition, and become Edone herself!

Disc bp Die Liebesgtter The gods of love Track 1 D446. June 1816; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Christoph Prgardien

Cypris, meiner Phyllis gleich, Sass von Grazien umgeben! Denn ich sah ihr frohes Reich; Mich berauschten Cyperns Reben. Ein geweihter Myrthenwald, Den geheime Schatten schwrzten, War der Gttin Aufenthalt, Wo die Liebesgtter scherzten. Unter grner Bsche Nacht, Unter abgelegnen Struchen, Wo so manche Nymphe lacht, Sah ich sie am liebsten schleichen. Viele flohn mit leichtem Fuss Allen Zwang betrnter Ketten, Flatterten von Fuss zu Fuss Und von Blonden zu Brnetten.
JOHANN PETER UZ (17201796)

Cypris, like my Phyllis, sat surrounded by Graces; for I saw her happy realm, Cypris grapes made me euphoric. A consecrated myrtle grove, darkened by mysterious shadows, was the goddesss abode here the gods of love frolicked. Under cover of the green bushes in the far-off thicket, where many a nymph laughed, I saw them steal most gladly. Many shunned with light step all restraints of tear-soaked fetters, flitted from foot to foot and from blondes to brunettes.

Disc bp Gott im Frhlinge God in spring Track 2 D448. June 1816; first published in 1887 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Dame Felicity Lott

In seinem schimmernden Gewand Hast du den Frhling uns gesandt, Und Rosen um sein Haupt gewunden. Holdlchelnd kmmt er schon! Es fhren ihn die Stunden, O Gott, auf seinen Blumenthron. Er geht in Bschen, und sie blhen; Den Fluren kmmt ihr frisches Grn, Und Wldern wchst ihr Schatten wieder, Der West, liebkosend, schwingt Sein tauendes Gefieder, Und jeder frohe Vogel singt. Mit eurer Lieder sssem Klang, Ihr Vgel, soll auch mein Gesang Zum Vater der Natur sich schwingen. Entzckung reisst mich hin! Ich will dem Herrn lobsingen, Durch den ich wurde, was ich bin!
JOHANN PETER UZ (17201796)

You have sent us spring in his shimmering robes and entwined roses about his head. Already he comes, sweetly smiling; the hours lead him to his throne of flowers, O Lord. He walks among bushes, and they bloom; the meadows acquire their fresh green, and shade returns to the woods; caressingly the west wind waves its dewy wings and every happy bird sings. Birds, with the sweet notes of your songs let my song also soar up to the Father of Nature. I am filled with rapture! I will sing praises to the Lord who made me what I am.

Disc bp An den Schlaf To sleep Track 3 D447. June 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Peter Schreier

Komm, und senke die umflorten Schwingen, Ssser Schlummer, auf den mden Blick! Segner! Freund! in deinen Armen dringen Trost und Balsam aufs verlorne Glck.
ANONYMOUS attributed to JOHANN PETER UZ (17201796)

Come, and lay your gossamer wings, sweet slumber, upon my weary eyes. Benefactor! Friend! In your arms comfort and balm come to my lost happiness.

150

June 1816 SONG TEXTS Der gute Hirt


Was sorgest du? Sei stille, meine Seele! Denn Gott ist ein guter Hirt, Der mir, auch wenn ich mich nicht qule, Nichts mangeln lassen wird. Er weidet mich auf blumenreicher Aue, Er fhrt mich frischen Wassern zu, Und bringet mich im khlen Taue Zur sichern Abendruh. Er hrt nicht auf, mich liebreich zu beschirmen, Im Schatten vor des Tages Glut, In seinem Schosse vor den Strmen Und schwarzer Bosheit Wut. Auch wenn er mich durch finstre Tler leiten, Mich durch die Wste fhren wird, Will ich nichts frchten; mir zur Seiten Geht dieser treue Hirt. Ich aber will ihn preisen und ihm danken! Ich halt an meinem Hirten fest; Und mein Vertrauen soll nicht wanken, Wenn alles mich verlsst.
JOHANN PETER UZ (17201796)

The good shepherd


Why are you troubled? Be calm, my soul! For God is a good shepherd; even if I am not suffering he will let me want for nothing. He feeds me in flower-filled meadows, he leads me to fresh waters, and in the cool dew brings me to safe evening rest. He does not cease to protect me lovingly, in shade from the heat of day, in his bosom from tempests and from the rage of black evil. Even when he leads me through dark vales, or through the wilderness, I shall fear nothing; at my side walks the faithful shepherd. But I will praise him and thank him! I shall hold fast to my shepherd, and my faith shall never waver when all else forsakes me.

bp Disc
4 Track

D449. June 1816; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Arleen Auger

Gott im Ungewitter
Du Schrecklicher, du Schrecklicher, Wer kann vor dir und deinem Donner stehn? Gross ist der Herr, was trotzen wir? Er winkt, und wir vergehn. Er lagert sich in schwarzer Nacht, Die Vlker zittern schon: Geflgeltes Verderben wacht Um seinen furchtbarn Thron. Rothglhend schleudert seine Hand Den Blitz aus finstrer Hh: Und Donner strtzt sich auf das Land In einer Feuersee, Dass selbst der Erde fester Grund Vom Zorn des Donners bebt, Und was um ihr erschtternd Rund Und in der Tiefe lebt. Den Herrn und seinen Arm erkennt Die zitternde Natur, Da weit umher der Himmel brennt Und weit umher die Flur. Wer schtzt mich Sterblichen, mich Staub, Wenn, der im Himmel wohnt Und Welten pflckt wie drres Laub, Nicht huldreich mich verschont? Wir haben einen Gott voll Huld, Auch wenn er zornig scheint: Er herrscht mit schonender Geduld Der grosse Menschenfreund.
JOHANN PETER UZ (17201796)

God in the tempest


Awesome One, who can stand before you and your thunder? Great is the Lord; why do we defy him? When he gives a sign we perish; When he rests in the black night the nations tremble: winged destruction watches around his fearful throne. Glowing red, his hand hurls lightning from the dark heights, and thunder bursts upon the land in a sea of fire. So that even the earths solid foundations quake at the thunders wrath, together with all that dwells on its shaken surface and in its depths. Trembling nature recognizes the Lord and his arm, as far and wide the heavens and the fields blaze. Who will protect me, a mortal, mere dust, if he who dwells in heaven and plucks the whole world like withered leaves will not spare me in his mercy? We have a gracious God, even when he seems angry. He rules with gentle patience, the mighty friend of mankind.

bp Disc
5 Track

D985. 1816 (?); published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 112 No 1 sung by Patricia Rozario, Catherine Wyn-Rogers, Jamie MacDougall and Michael George

151

SONG TEXTS June 1816


Disc bp Gott der Weltschpfer God, creator of the world Track 6 D986. 1816 (?); published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 112 No 2
sung by Patricia Rozario, Catherine Wyn-Rogers, Jamie MacDougall and Michael George

Zu Gott, zu Gott flieg auf, hoch ber alle Sphren! Jauchz ihm, weitschallender Gesang, Dem Ewigen! Er hiess das alte Nichts gebren; Und sein allmchtig Wort war Zwang. Ihm, aller Wesen Quelle, werde Von allen Wesen Lob gebracht, Im Himmel und auf Erde Lob seiner weisen Macht.
JOHANN PETER UZ (17201796)

Fly up to God, high above all the spheres, Wide-echoing song, rejoice in him! The Eternal! He bade the ancient void give birth, And his almighty word was law. To him, source of all beings, Let all beings give praise; In heaven and on earth Praise be to his wise power.

Disc bp Fragment aus dem Aeschylus Fragment from Aeschylus Track 7 D450b. June 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1832 in volume 14 of the Nachlass
sung by Thomas Hampson

So wird der Mann, der sonder Zwang gerecht ist, Nicht unglcklich sein, versinken ganz in Elend kann er nimmer; Indes der frevelnde Verbrecher im Strome der Zeit Gewaltsam untergeht, wenn am zerschmetterten Maste Das Wetter die Segel ergreift. Er ruft, von keinem Ohr vernommen, Kmpft in des Strudels Mitte, hoffnungslos. Des Frevlers lacht die Gottheit nun, Sieht ihn, nun nicht mehr stolz, In Banden der Not verstrickt, Umsonst die Felsbank fliehn; An der Vergeltung Fels scheitert sein Glck, Und unbeweint versinkt er.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

Thus the man who is by nature just will not be unhappy; he can never sink completely into misery. Whereas in the river of time the wicked criminal is swept under violently when the storm tears the sails from the shattered mast. He cries out, but no ear hears him; he struggles hopelessly in the midst of the maelstrom. Now the gods mock the evildoer, and behold him, no longer proud, enmeshed in the toils of distress, fleeing in vain the rocky reef; on the cliffs of vengeance his fortune is wrecked, and unmourned he sinks.

Disc bp Das war ich That was I Track 8 Second setting, D174a/D450a. cJune 1816; fragment completed by Reinhard van Hoorickx
sung by Daniel Norman

Jngst trumte mir, ich sah auf lichten Hhen Ein Mdchen sich im jungen Tag ergehen, So hold, so sss, dass es Dir vllig glich. Und vor ihr lag ein Jngling auf den Knien, Er schien sie sanft an seine Brust zu ziehen, Und das war ich! Doch bald verndert hatte sich die Szene; In tiefen Fluthen sah ich jetzt die Schne, Wie ihr die letzte schwache Kraft entwich. Da kam ein Jngling hlfreich ihr geflogen, Er sprang ihr nach und trug sie aus den Wogen, Und das war ich! Und als ich endlich aus dem Traum erwachte, Der neue Tag die neue Sehnsucht brachte, Da blieb Dein liebes, ssses Bild um mich. Ich sah Dich von der Ksse Gluth erwarmen, Ich sah Dich selig in des Jnglings Armen, Und das war ich!
THEODOR KRNER (17911813)

Recently I dreamt I saw on sunlit hills a maiden wandering in the early morning, so fair, so sweet, that she resembled you. Before her knelt a youth, he seemed to draw her gently to his breast; and that was I. But soon the scene had changed. I now saw that fair maiden in the deep flood; her frail strength was deserting her. Then a youth rushed to her aid. He plunged after her and bore her from the waves; and that was I. And when at length I awoke from my dream, the new day brought new longing. Your dear, sweet image was still with me; I saw you warmed by the fire of his kisses; I saw you blissful in that youths arms. And that was I.

152

July 1816 SONG TEXTS Grablied auf einen Soldaten


Zieh hin, du braver Krieger du! Wir gleiten dich zur Grabesruh, Und schreiten mit gesunkner Wehr, Von Wehmuth schwer Und stumm vor deinem Sarge her. Du warst ein biedrer, deutscher Mann. Hast immerhin so brav gethan. Dein Herz, voll edler Tapferkeit, Hat nie im Streit Geschoss und Sbelhieb gescheut. Du standst in grauser Mitternacht, In Frost und Hitze auf der Wacht, Ertrugst so standhaft manche Noth Und danktest Gott Fr Wasser und frs liebe Brod. Wie du gelebt, so starbst auch du, Schlossst deine Augen freudig zu. Und dachtest: Aus ist nun der Streit Und Kampf der Zeit. Jetzt kommt die ewge Seligkeit.
CHRISTIAN FRIEDRICH DANIEL SCHUBART (17391791)

Dirge for a soldier


Depart hence, brave warrior! We accompany you to a peaceful grave, and with lowered weapons, heavy with sorrow, walk silently before your coffin. You were an upright German. You fought so bravely. Your heart, full of noble courage, never in battle feared the bullet and the sword. You kept watch at dread midnight, in frost and heat; you steadfastly endured many hardships, and gave thanks to God for water and for bread. You died as you lived, willingly closing your eyes, and reflecting: the battle and struggle of Time is past. Now comes eternal bliss.

bp Disc
9 Track

D454. July 1816; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Stephen Varcoe

Freude der Kinderjahre


Freude, die im frhen Lenze Meinem Haupte Blumen wand, Sieh, noch duften deine Krnze, Noch geh ich an deiner Hand; Selbst der Kindheit Knospen blhen Auf in meiner Phantasie; Und mit frischem Reize glhen Noch in meinem Herbste sie. Frh schon kannt ich dich! du wehtest Froh bei jedem Spiel um mich, Sprangst in meinem Balle, drehtest Leicht in meinem Kreisel dich: Liefst mit mir durch Gras und Hecken Flchtig Schmetterlingen nach, Rittest mit auf bunten Stecken Wirbeltest im Trommelschlag. Kamen auch zuweilen Sorgen: Kindersorgen sind nicht gross! Frh hpft ich am andern Morgen, Schaukelte die Sorgen los; Kletterte dir nach auf Bume, Wlzte md im Grase mich; Und entschlief ich: ssse Trume Zeigten mir im Bilde dich!
FRIEDRICH VON KPKEN (17371811)

Joy of childhood
Joy which in early spring wove flowers around my head, see, your garlands are still fragrant and I still walk holding your hand. Even the buds of childhood bloom in my imagination, and still shine with fresh charm in my autumn.

bp Disc
bl Track

D455. July 1816; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by Christoph Prgardien

From early childhood I knew you! You fluttered happily around me whenever I played, you bounced with my ball, spun easily in my top, you ran swiftly with me through grass and hedgerow, chasing butterflies. You rode with me on bright-painted hobby horses, and rolled when I played the drum. At times, too, there were cares; a childs cares are not great. Early the next morning I would skip about, and swing away my cares. I would climb trees, following you, and roll in the grass when tired; and when I fell asleep sweet dreams would reveal your image.

153

SONG TEXTS July 1816


Disc bp Das Heimweh Longing for home Track bm D456. July 1816; first published in 1887 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Peter Schreier

Oft in einsam stillen Stunden Hab ich ein Gefhl empfunden, Unerklrbar, wunderbar! Das wie Sehnsucht nach der Ferne Hoch hinauf in bessre Sterne, Wie ein leises Ahnen war. Jetzt, wo von der Heimat Frieden Ich so lang schon abgeschieden, Und in weiter Fremde bin, Fhlt ein ngstlich heisses Sehnen Unter sanften Wehmutstrnen Tief bewegt mein innrer Sinn. Wenn in Stunden selger Weihe Sich der frhern Wonnen Reihe Dunkel wr mein Geist bewusst, Wenn sich neue Sinne fnden, Die das Hhere verstnden In der tiefbewegten Brust!

Often, in quiet, solitary hours, I have experienced a feeling, inexplicable, marvellous, like a yearning for the far distance, high above, on a better star, like a soft presentiment. Now, in a distant foreign land, having left so long ago the peace of my homeland, I feel a fearful, burning longing beneath tears of gentle sadness deep in my troubled heart. If only, in hours of blissful solemnity, my spirit could dimly experience my former joys in turn; if only I could discover new senses which might divine the higher Truth in my sorely troubled heart!

THEODOR HELL pseudonym for KARL GOTTFRIED THEODOR WINKLER (17751856)

Disc bp An die untergehende Sonne To the setting sun Track bn D457. July 1816 May 1817; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in January 1827 as Op 44
sung by Dame Margaret Price

Sonne, du sinkst, Sonne, du sinkst, Sink in Frieden, o Sonne! Still und ruhig ist deines Scheidens Gang, Rhrend und feierlich deines Scheidens Schweigen. Wehmut lchelt dein freundliches Auge, Trnen enttrufeln den goldenen Wimpern; Segnungen strmst du der duftenden Erde. Immer tiefer, Immer leiser, Immer ernster, feierlicher Sinkest du den ther hinab. Es segnen die Vlker, Es suseln die Lfte, Es ruchern die dampfenden Wiesen dir nach; Winde durchrieseln dein lockiges Haar; Wogen khlen die brennende Wange; Weit auf tut sich dein Wasserbett . . . Ruh in Frieden, Ruh in Wonne! Die Nachtigall fltet dir Schlummergesang.
LUDWIG GOTTHARD THEOBUL KOSEGARTEN (17581818)

Sun, you are sinking. Sun, you are sinking. Sink in peace, O sun! Calm and tranquil is your parting, touching and solemn that partings silence. Sadness smiles from your kindly eyes; tears fall from your golden lashes; you pour blessings upon the fragrant earth. Ever deeper, ever softer, ever more grave and solemn, you sink in the heavens. The people bless you, the breezes whisper; mist drifts towards you from the hazy meadows; the winds blow through your curly hair, the waves cool your burning cheeks; your watery bed opens wide. Rest in peace, rest in joy! The nightingale is singing you lullabies.

Disc bp Aus Diego Manzanares: Ilmerine From Diego Manzanares: Ilmerine Track bo D458. 30 July 1816; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by Lucia Popp

Wo irrst du durch einsame Schluchten der Nacht, Wo bist du, mein Leben, mein Glck? Schon sind die Gestirne der Nacht Aus tauendem Dunkel erwacht, Und ach, der Geliebte kehrt noch nicht zurck.
FRANZ XAVER VON SCHLECHTA (17961875)

Why are you wandering through the lonely ravines of the night? Where are you, my life, my happiness? Already the night stars have awoken from their dewy darkness, and, alas, my beloved has not yet returned.

154

August 1816 SONG TEXTS Pflicht und Liebe


Du, der ewig um mich trauert, Nicht allein, nicht unbedauert, Jngling, seufzest du; Wann vor Schmerz die Seele schauert, Lget meine Stirne Ruh. Deines nassen Blickes Flehen Will ich, darf ich nicht verstehn; Aber zrne nicht! Was ich fhle, zu gestehen, Untersagt mir meine Pflicht. Freund, schweif aus mit deinen Blicken! Lass dich die Natur entzcken, Die dir sonst gelacht! Ach, sie wird auch mich beglcken, Wenn sie dich erst glcklich macht. Trauter Jngling, lchle wieder! Sieh, beim Grusse frohen Sangs Steigt die Sonn empor! Trbe sank sie gestern nieder, Herrlich geht sie heut hervor.
FRIEDRICH WILHELM GOTTER (17461797)

Duty and love


O youth, who always mourns for me, you do not sigh alone and unpitied; when your soul is racked with pain my brows calm is feigned. I will not, should not understand the entreaty of your moist eyes; but do not be angry! What I feel, my duty forbids me to confess. Friend, avert your eyes! Take pleasure in nature, which has always smiled on you. Ah, it will make me happy if only it makes you happy. Dearest youth, smile once more! See, the sun rises, greeted by joyous songs! Yesterday it set bedimmed; today it emerges in splendour.

bp Disc
bp Track

D467. August 1816; fragment first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig; completed by Max Friedlnder sung by Lucia Popp

An Chloen
Bei der Liebe reinsten Flammen Glnzt das arme Httendach: Liebchen! ewig nun beisammen! Liebchen! trumend oder wach! Ssses, zrtliches Umfangen, Wenn der Tag am Himmel graut: Heimlich klopfendes Verlangen, Wenn der Abend niederthaut! Und wir teilen alle Freuden, Sonn und Mond und Sternenglanz; Allen Segen, alles Leiden, Arbeit und Gebet und Tanz. So, bei reiner Liebe Flammen, Endet sich der schne Lauf; Ruhig schweben wir zusammen, Liebchen! Liebchen! himmelauf.
JOHANN GEORG JACOBI (17401814)

To Chloe
With the purest flames of love the humble cottage roof shines. Sweetheart, now we are together eternally, sweetheart, dreaming or awake! Sweet, tender embrace when day dawns; secret, tremulous longing when the dew of evening falls. And we shall share all our joys, sun, moon and starlight; each blessing, each sorrow, work, and prayer, and dancing. Thus, with the flames of pure love, shall the fair course end. Peacefully we shall float together, sweetheart, towards heaven.

bp Disc
bq Track

D462. August 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Sarah Walker

Hochzeitslied
Will singen euch im alten Ton Ein Lied von alter Treu; Es sangens unsre Vter schon; Doch bleibts der Liebe neu. Im Glcke macht es freudenvoll, Kann trsten in der Not: Dass nichts die Herzen scheiden soll, Nichts scheiden, als der Tod: Dass immerdar mit frischem Mut Der Mann die Traute schtzt, Und alles opfert, Gut and Blut, Wenns seinem Weibchen ntzt;

Wedding song
I will sing you a song in the old style, a song of love and constancy. Our fathers once sang it. but it remains ever new for lovers. In good times it brings joy, in times of distress it can comfort: Let nothing part these hearts, nothing, save death. Let the man protect his bride evermore with new heart, and sacrifice everything, his wealth and his blood, for the good of his wife.

bp Disc
br Track

D463. August 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Sarah Walker

155

SONG TEXTS August 1816


Dass, wenn die Lerch im Felde schlgt, Sein Weib ihm Wonne lacht, Ihm, wenn der Acker Dornen trgt, Zum Spiel die Arbeit macht, Und doppelt sss der Ruhe Lust, Erquickend jedes Brot, Den Kummer leicht an ihrer Brust, Gelinder seinen Tod. Dann fhlt er noch die kalte Hand Von ihrer Hand gedrckt, Und sich ins neue Vaterland Aus ihrem Arm entrckt.
JOHANN GEORG JACOBI (17401814)

When the lark sings in the field let his wifes laughter bring him joy; when the land is strewn with thorns may she lighten his work. The delights of rest shall be doubly sweet, every meal shall refresh; his cares shall be eased on her breast, his death shall be gentler. Then he shall feel his cold hand pressed by her hand; he shall be borne from her arms to his new homeland.

Disc bp In der Mitternacht At midnight Track bs D464. August 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Sarah Walker

Todesstille deckt das Tal Bei des Mondes halbem Strahl; Winde flstern, dumpf und bang, In des Wchters Nachtgesang. Leiser, dumpfer Tnt es hier In der bangen Seele mir, Nimmt den Strahl der Hoffnung fort, Wie den Mond die Wolke dort. Hllt, ihr Wolken, hllt den Schein Immer tiefer, tiefer ein! Vor ihm bergen will mein Herz Seinen tiefen, tiefen Schmerz. Nennen soll ihn nicht mein Mund; Keine Trne mach ihn kund; Senken soll man ihn hinab Einst mit mir ins khle Grab. An des Todes milder Hand Geht der Weg ins Vaterland; Dort ist Liebe sonder Pein; Selig, selig werd ich sein.
JOHANN GEORG JACOBI (17401814)

Deathly silence lies over the valley beneath the moons pale beams; winds whisper, dull and troubled, mingling with the watchmans night song. Softer, duller, are the sounds within my troubled soul; they eclipse my ray of hope as the clouds eclipse the moon. Clouds, conceal the light ever more deeply! My heart would hide from him its deep, deep pain. My lips shall not name him; no tear shall make him known; one day they shall lower him into the cool grave, to lie with me. Guided by deaths gentle hand my path leads home. There is love without pain; there I shall find bliss.

Disc bp Trauer der Liebe Loves sorrows Track bt D465. August 1816; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Sarah Walker

Wo die Taub in stillen Buchen Ihren Tauber sich erwhlt, Wo sich Nachtigallen suchen, Und die Rebe sich vermhlt; Wo die Bche sich vereinen, Ging ich oft mit leichtem Schmerz, Ging ich oft mit bangem Weinen, Suchte mir ein liebend Herz. O, da gab die finstre Laube Leisen Trost im Abendschein; O, da kam ein ssser Glaube Mit dem Morgenglanz im Hain; Da vernahm ichs in den Winden, Ihr Geflster lehrte mich: Dass ich suchen sollt, und finden, Finden, holde Liebe, dich!

Where the dove, in silent beeches, chooses her mate, where nightingales seek one another and vines intertwine; where streams meet I often walked, in gentle melancholy, or with anxious tears, in search of a loving heart. There the dark foliage gave gentle comfort in the glow of evening; with the light of morning a sweet belief came to me in the grove; I heard it in the winds, their whispering told me that I should search and find you, fairest love.

156

August 1816 SONG TEXTS


Aber ach! wo blieb auf Erden, Holde Liebe, deine Spur? Lieben, um geliebt zu werden, Ist das Los der Engel nur. Statt der Wonne fand ich Schmerzen, Hing an dem, was mich verliess; Frieden gibt den treuen Herzen Nur ein knftig Paradies.
JOHANN GEORG JACOBI (17401814)

But alas, where on this earth did any trace of you remain? To love, and be loved in turn, is the fate of angels alone. Instead of happiness I found only sorrow, and clung to that which deserted me; peace is given to faithful hearts only in a future paradise.

Die Perle
Es ging ein Mann zur Frhlingszeit Durch Busch und Felder weit und breit Um Birke, Buch und Erle; Der Bume Grn im Maienlicht, Die Blumen drunter sah er nicht; Er suchte seine Perle. Die Perle war sein hchstes Gut, Er hatt um sie des Meeres Flut Durchschifft, und viel gelitten; Von ihr des Lebens Trost gehofft, Im Busen sie bewahrt, und oft Dem Ruber abgestritten. Der arme Pilger! So wie er, Geh ich zur Frhlingszeit umher Um Birke, Buch und Erle; Des Maies Wunder seh ich nicht; Was aber, ach! was mir gebricht, Ist mehr als eine Perle. Was mir gebricht, was ich verlor, Was ich zum hchsten Gut erkor, Ist Lieb in treuem Herzen. Vergebens wall ich auf und ab; Doch find ich einst ein khles Grab, Das endet alle Schmerzen.
JOHANN GEORG JACOBI (17401814)

The pearl
A man wandered in the springtime through bush and field, far and wide, past birch, beech and alder; he did not see the green trees in the May sunlight, nor the flowers below; he was looking for his pearl. The pearl was his most treasured possession; for it he had sailed the oceans waters and suffered much: he hoped it would be his lifes consolation; he kept it in his heart, and often saved it from thieves. Poor pilgrim! Like him I wander at springtime past birch, beech and alder; I do not see Mays splendour; but, alas, what I lack is more than a pearl. What I lack, what I have lost, what I counted as my most treasured possession, is love from a faithful heart. In vain I roam hither and thither, but one day I shall find a cool grave to end all my suffering.

bp Disc
bu Track

D466. August 1816; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Sarah Walker

Litanei auf das Fest Aller Seelen Am Tage Aller Seelen


Ruhn in Frieden alle Seelen, Die vollbracht ein banges Qulen, Die vollendet sssen Traum, Lebenssatt, geboren kaum, Aus der Welt hinber schieden: Alle Seelen ruhn in Frieden! Liebevoller Mdchen Seelen, Deren Trnen nicht zu zhlen, Die ein falscher Freund verliess, Und die blinde Welt verstiess: Alle, die von hinnen schieden, Alle Seelen ruhn in Frieden! Und die nie der Sonne lachten, Unterm Mond auf Dornen wachten, Gott, im reinen Himmelslicht, Einst zu sehn von Angesicht: Alle, die von hinnen schieden, Alle Seelen ruhn in Frieden!
JOHANN GEORG JACOBI (17401814)

Litany for the Feast of All Souls On All Souls Day


May all souls rest in peace; those whose fearful torment is past; those whose sweet dreams are over; those sated with life, those barely born, who have left this world: may all souls rest in peace! The souls of girls in love, whose tears are without number, who, abandoned by a faithless lover, rejected the blind world. May all who have departed hence, may all souls rest in peace! And those who never smiled at the sun, who lay awake beneath the moon on beds of thorns, so that they might one day see God face to face in the pure light of heaven: may all who have departed hence, may all souls rest in peace!

bp Disc
cl Track

D343. August 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1831 in volume 10 of the Nachlass sung by Lucia Popp

157

SONG TEXTS August September 1816


Disc bp An den Mond To the moon Track cm D468. 7 August 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Lucia Popp

Was schauest du so hell und klar Durch diese Apfelbume, Wo einst dein Freund so selig war Und trumte ssse Trume? Verhlle deinen Silberglanz, Und schimmre, wie du schimmerst, Wenn du den frhen Totenkranz Der jungen Braut beflimmerst! Du blickst umsonst so hell und klar In diese Laube nieder; Nie findest du das frohe Paar In ihrem Schatten wieder. Ein schwarzes, feindliches Geschick Entriss mir meine Schne! Kein Seufzer zaubert sie zurck, Und keine Sehnsuchtstrne! O wandelt sie hinfort einmal An meiner Ruhestelle, Dann mache flugs mit trbem Strahl Des Grabes Blumen helle! Sie setze weinend sich aufs Grab, Wo Rosen niederhangen, Und pflcke sich ein Blmchen ab, Und drck es an die Wangen.
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776)

Why do you gaze down, so bright and clear, through these apple trees, where once your friend was so happy, dreaming sweet dreams? Veil your silvery radiance, and glimmer as you do when you shine upon the funeral wreath of the young bride. In vain you gaze down, so bright and clear, into this arbour. Never again will you find the happy pair beneath its shade. Dark, hostile fate tore my beloved from me. No sighs, no tears of longing can conjure her back. If one day she should come to my resting place, then, swiftly, with your sombre light make bright the flowers on my grave. May she sit weeping on my grave where roses droop, and pluck a flower, and press it to her cheek.

Disc bp Lied des Orpheus, als er in die Hlle ging Song of Orpheus as he entered hell Track cn D474. September 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1832 in volume 19 of the Nachlass
sung by Brigitte Fassbaender

Wlze dich hinweg, du wildes Feuer! Diese Saiten hat ein Gott gekrnt; Er, mit welchem jedes Ungeheuer, Und vielleicht die Hlle sich vershnt. Diese Saiten stimmte seine Rechte: Frchterliche Schatten, flieht! Und ihr winselnden Bewohner dieser Nchte Horchet auf mein Lied! Von der Erde, wo die Sonne leuchtet Und der stille Mond, Wo der Tau das junge Moos befeuchtet, Wo Gesang im grnen Felde wohnt; Aus der Menschen sssem Vaterlande, Wo der Himmel euch so frohe Blicke gab Ziehen mich die schnsten Bande, Ziehet mich die Liebe selbst herab. Meine Klage tnt in eure Klage; Weit von hier geflohen ist das Glck; Aber denkt an jene Tage, Schaut in jene Welt zurck! Wenn ihr da nur einen Leidenden umarmtet, O, so fhlt die Wollust noch einmal Und der Augenblick, in dem ihr euch erbarmtet, Lindre diese lange Qual. O, ich sehe Trnen fliessen! Durch die Finsternisse bricht Ein Strahl von Hoffnung; ewig bssen Lassen euch die guten Gtter nicht.

Roll back, savage fire! These strings have been crowned by a god; with whom every monster and perhaps hell itself is reconciled. His right hand tunes these strings; flee, dread shadows! And you, whimpering inhabitants of this darkness, listen to my song! From earth, where the sun and the silent moon shine, where dew moistens fresh moss, where song dwells in green fields; From the sweet country of mankind, where the heavens once looked upon you with joyful gaze, I am drawn by the fairest of ties, I am drawn down by love itself. My lament mingles with yours, happiness has fled far from here; but remember those days, look back into that world! If there you embraced but one sufferer, then feel desire once more, and may that moment when you took pity soothe my long torment. O, I see tears flowing! Through the darkness a ray of hope breaks; the good gods will not let you atone for ever.

158

September 1816 SONG TEXTS


Gtter, die fr euch die Erde schufen, Werden aus der tiefen Nacht Euch in selige Gefilde rufen, Wo die Tugend unter Rosen lacht.
JOHANN GEORG JACOBI (17401814)

The gods who created the earth for you will call you from deep night into the Elysian fields where virtue smiles amid roses.

So lasst mich scheinen Mignon, 1. Weise Thus let me seem Mignon, 1st setting
Fragment of the first setting, D469 I. September 1816; first published in 1897 in the Revisions-Bericht of the Gesamtausgabe sung by Christine Schfer

bp Disc
co Track

So lasst mich scheinen, bis ich werde, Zieht mir das weisse Kleid nicht aus!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Thus let me seem till thus I become. Do not take off my white dress!

So lasst mich scheinen

Thus let me seem

bp Disc
cp Track

Fragment of the second setting, D469 II. September 1816; first published in 1897 in the Revisions-Bericht of the Gesamtausgabe sung by Christine Schfer

eine kleine Stille, Dann ffnet sich der frische Blick; Ich
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

a brief silence, Then my eyes shall open afresh. Then I

Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt Sehnsucht Only he who knows longing Longing Lied der Mignon Mignons Song
Third setting, D481. September 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Christine Schfer

bp Disc
cq Track

Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt Weiss, was ich leide! Allein und abgetrennt Von aller Freude, Seh ich ans Firmament Nach jener Seite. Ach! der mich liebt und kennt Ist in der Weite. Es schwindelt mir, es brennt Mein Eingeweide. Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt Weiss, was ich leide!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Only he who knows longing knows what I suffer. Alone, cut off from all joy, I gaze at the firmament in that direction. Ah, he who loves and knows me is far away. I feel giddy, my vitals are aflame. Only he who knows longing knows what I suffer.

Liedesend
Auf seinem goldnen Throne Der graue Knig sitzt Er starret in die Sonne, Die rot im Westen blitzt. Der Snger rhrt die Harfe, Sie rauschet Siegessang; Der Ernst jedoch, der scharfe, Er trotzt dem vollen Klang. Nun stimmt er ssse Weisen, Ans Herz sich klammernd an; Ob er ihn nicht mit leisen Versuchen mildern kann. Vergeblich ist sein Mhen, Erschpft des Liedes Reich, Und auf der Stirne ziehen Die Sorgen wettergleich. Der Barde, tief erbittert, Schlgt die Harf entzwei, Und durch die Lfte zittert Der Silbersaiten Schrei.

Songs end
On his golden throne the grey king sits, staring into the sun that glows red in the west. The minstrel strokes his harp, a song of victory resounds; but austere solemnity defies the swelling tones. Now he plays sweet tunes which touch the heart; to see if he can soothe the king with gentle strains. His efforts are in vain, the realm of song is exhausted, and, like storm clouds, cares form upon the kings brow. The bard, sorely embittered, breaks his harp in two, and through the air vibrates the cry of the silver strings.

bp Disc
cr Track

D473. September 1816; published by A Diabelli & Con in Vienna in 1833 in volume 23 of the Nachlass sung by Ann Murray

159

SONG TEXTS September 1816


Doch wie auch alle beben, Der Herrscher zrnet nicht; Der Gnade Strahlen schweben Auf seinem Angesicht. Du wolle mich nicht zeihen Der Unempfindlichkeit; In lang verblhten Maien Wie hast du mich erfreut! Wie jede Lust gesteigert, Die aus der Urne fiel! Was mir ein Gott geweigert, Erstattete dein Spiel. Vom kalten Herzen gleitet Nun Liedeszauber ab, Und immer nher schreitet Nun Vergnglichkeit und Grab.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836) END OF DISC 15

But, though all tremble, the ruler is not enraged; the light of mercy lingers on his countenance. Do not reproach me with insensitivity; in months of May long past how you have gladdened me! How you enhanced every joy which fell from fates urn! What a god denied me your playing restored to me. From a cold heart the magic of song now steals away, and ever closer step transience and the grave.

Disc bq Abschied Farewell Track 1 D475. September 1816; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Ann Murray

ber die Berge zieht ihr fort, Kommt an manchen grnen Ort; Muss zurcke ganz allein, Lebet wohl! es muss so sein. Scheiden, meiden was man liebt, Ach wie wird das Herz betrbt! O Seenspiegel, Wald und Hgel schwinden all; Hr verschwimmen eurer Stimmen Wiederhall. Lebt wohl! klingt klagevoll, Ach wie wird das Herz betrbt. Scheiden, meiden was man liebt; Lebt wohl! klingt klagevoll.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

You go over the mountains and come upon many a green spot; I must return all alone, farewell, it must be so. Parting, leaving that which we love, ah, how it grieves the heart. Glassy lakes, woods and hills all vanish; I hear the echo of your voices fade away. The lament sounds: Farewell! Ah, how it grieves the heart. Parting, leaving that which we love; the lament sounds: Farewell!

Disc bq Rckweg The way back Track 2 D476. September 1816; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by Ann Murray

Zum Donaustrom, zur Kaiserstadt Geh ich in Bangigkeit: Denn was das Leben Schnes hat, Entweichet weit und weit. Die Berge schwinden allgemach, Mit ihnen Wald und Fluss; Der Khe Glocken luten nach, Und Htten nicken Gruss. Was starrt dein Auge trnenfeucht Hinaus in blaue Fern? Ach, dorten weilt ich, unerreicht, Frei unter Freien gern! Wo Liebe noch und Treue gilt, Da ffnet sich das Herz; Die Frucht an ihren Strahlen schwillt, Und strebet himmelwrts.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

To the river Danube, to the imperial city I go with apprehension; for the beauty of life recedes further and further behind me. The mountains gradually disappear, and with them forests and rivers; the tinkling of cowbells lingers in the air, and the huts nod their greeting. Why do your eyes, moist with tears, stare out into the blue distance? Ah, there I dwelt happily, in seclusion, a free man among free men. Where love and faith are still cherished the heart will open; the fruit will ripen in their light, and aspire towards heaven.

160

September 1816 SONG TEXTS Alte Liebe rostet nie


Alte Liebe rostet nie, Hrt ich oft die Mutter sagen; Alte Liebe rostet nie, Muss ich nun erfahrend klagen. Wie die Luft umgibt sie mich, Die ich einst die Meine nannte, Die ich liebte ritterlich, Die mich in die Ferne sandte. Seit die Holde ich verlor, Hab ich Meer und Land gesehen, Vor der schnsten Frauen Flor Durft ich unerschttert stehen. Denn aus mir ihr Bildnis trat, Zrnend, wie zum Kampf mit ihnen; Mit dem Zauber, den sie hat, Musste sie das Spiel gewinnen. Da der Garten, dort das Haus, Wo wir oft so traulich kosten! Seh ich recht? sie schwebt heraus Wird die alte Liebe rosten?
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

Old love never dies


Old love never dies, I often heard my mother say old love never dies; with experience I must now sadly agree. She envelops me like the air, she whom I once called my own, whom I loved chivalrously, who sent me into the wide world. Since I lost my beloved I have travelled on sea and land before the fairest flower of womanhood I could only stand unmoved. For her image arose from within me, angrily, as if in opposition to them; with the magic she possesses she had to win the contest. There is the garden, there the house where we once caressed so lovingly! Am I seeing things? She glides out towards me will old love never die?

bq Disc
3 Track

D477. September 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Philip Langridge

Lied eines Schiffers an die Dioskuren


Dioskuren, Zwillingssterne, Die ihr leuchtet meinem Nachen, Mich beruhigt auf dem Meere Eure Milde, euer Wachen. Wer auch fest in sich begrndet, Unverzagt dem Sturm begegnet, Fhlt sich doch in euren Strahlen Doppelt mutig und gesegnet. Dieses Ruder, das ich schwinge, Meeresfluten zu zerteilen, Hnge ich, so ich geborgen, Auf an eures Tempels Sulen.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

Boatmans song to the Dioscuri


Dioscuri, twin stars, shining on my boat, your gentleness and vigilance comfort me on the ocean. However firmly a man believes in himself, however fearlessly he meets the storm, he feels doubly valiant and blessed in your light. This oar which I ply to cleave the oceans waves, I shall hang, once I have landed safely, on the pillars of your temple.

bq Disc
4 Track

D360. 1816; published by Cappi und Czerny in Vienna in 1826 as Op 65 No 1 sung by Thomas Hampson

Wer nie sein Brot mit Trnen ass Harfenspieler III


Wer nie sein Brot mit Trnen ass, Wer nie die kummervollen Nchte Auf seinem Bette weinend sass, Der kennt euch nicht, ihr himmlischen Mchte! Ihr fhrt ins Leben uns hinein, Ihr lasst den Armen schuldig werden, Dann berlasst ihr ihn der Pein: Denn alle Schuld rcht sich auf Erden.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

He who has never eaten his bread with tears The harpers song III bq Disc

First setting, first version, D478 No 2. September 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by John Mark Ainsley

5 Track

He who has never eaten his bread with tears, who, through nights of grief, has never sat weeping on his bed, knows you not, heavenly powers. You bring us into life, you let the poor wretch fall into guilt, then you abandon him to his agony: for all guilt is avenged on earth.

Wer nie sein Brot mit Trnen ass Gesang des Harfners

He who has never eaten his bread with tears Song of the harper bq Disc

First setting, second version, D478 No 2b. September 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by John Mark Ainsley

6 Track

see above, disc bq track 5 , for text and translation

161

SONG TEXTS September 1816


Disc bq Der Snger am Felsen The singer on the rock Track 7 D482. September 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Arleen Auger

Klage, meine Flte, klage Die entschwundnen schnen Tage Und des Frhlings schnelle Flucht, Hier auf den verwelkten Fluren, Wo mein Geist umsonst die Spuren Sss gewohnter Freuden sucht. Klage, meine Flte, klage! Einsam rufest du dem Tage, Der dem Schmerz zu spt erwacht. Einsam schallen meine Lieder; Nur das Echo hallt sie wieder Durch die Schatten stiller Nacht. Klage, meine Flte, klage! Krzt den Faden meiner Tage Bald der strengen Parze Stahl: O dann sing auf Lethes Matten Irgend einem guten Schatten Meine Lieb und meine Qual!
CAROLINE PICHLER (17691843)

Mourn, my flute, mourn the beautiful, vanished days, and the swift flight of spring here on the faded meadows, where in vain my spirit seeks the traces of sweet, familiar pleasures. Mourn, my flute, mourn! All alone you cry out to the day which too late awakes to pain. My lonely songs ring out; only the echo carries them back through the shades of the silent night. Mourn, my flute, mourn! Should the blade of the harsh fates soon shorten the thread of my days, then, on Lethes meadows, sing to a kindly shade of my love and my torment.

Disc bq Lied Ferne von der grossen Stadt Song Far from the great city Track 8 D483. September 1816; published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Elizabeth Connell

Ferne von der grossen Stadt, Nimm mich auf in deine Stille, Tal, das mit des Frhlings Flle Die Natur geschmcket hat! Wo kein Lrmen, kein Getmmel Meinen Schlummer krzer macht, Und ein ewig heitrer Himmel ber selgen Fluren lacht! Freuden, die die Ruhe beut, Will ich ungestrt hier schmecken, Hier, wo Bume mich bedecken, Und die Linde Duft verstreut, Diese Quelle sei mein Spiegel, Mein Parkett der junge Klee, Und der frischberaste Hgel Sei mein grnes Kanapee. Deiner mtterlichen Spur, Dem Gesetz, das ungerochen Noch kein Sterblicher gebrochen Will ich folgen, o Natur! Aus dem dunkeln Schoss der Erden, Will ich Freuden mir erziehn, Und aus Baum und Blume werden Seligkeiten mir erblhn.
CAROLINE PICHLER (17691843)

Far from the great city, receive me into your stillness, O valley, which nature has adorned with springs abundance; where no din, no turmoil shortens my slumber, and a serene sky smiles eternally upon happy meadows. Here I shall savour undisturbed the joys that tranquillity offers; here, where trees cover me and the linden scatters its sweet scent, let this spring be my mirror, and the young clover my floor, and the hill, fresh with grass, my green couch. O Nature, I shall follow your maternal trail, the law that no mortal has yet broken unavenged. From the earths dark womb I shall garner delights; and joys shall bloom on tree and flower.

Disc bq Gesang der Geister ber den Wassern The song of the spirits over the waters Track 9 First setting, D484. September 1816; fragment, first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
completed by Reinhard van Hoorickx cf Loewe Gesang der Geister, disc 40 7 sung by Michael George

162

Des Menschen Seele Gleicht dem Wasser: Vom Himmel kommt es, Zum Himmel steigt es, Und wieder nieder Zur Erde muss es, Ewig wechselnd.

The soul of mankind is like the water: from heaven it comes; to heaven it rises; and again to earth it must descend, eternally fluctuating.

September October 1816 SONG TEXTS


Strmt von der hhen, Steilen Felswand Der reine Strahl, Dann stubt er lieblich In Wolkenwellen Zum glatten Fels, Und leicht empfangen, Wallt verschleiernd, Leisrauschend dann Zur Tiefe nieder. Ragen Klippen Dem Sturz entgegen, Schumt er unmutig Stufenweise Zu dem Abgrund. Im flachen Bette Schleichet er das Wiesental hin, Und in dem glatten See Weiden ihr Antlitz Alle Gestirne. Wind ist der Welle Lieblicher Buhler; Wind mischt von Grund aus Schumende Wogen. Seele des Menschen, Wie gleichst du dem Wasser! Schicksal des Menschen, Wie gleichst du dem Wind!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

When the pure jet gushes from the high, steep rock-face, it sprays gratefully its misty waves against the smooth rock, and when lightly gathered surges like a veil, softly hissing, down into the depths. If cliffs loom up in the path of its fall, it foams angrily, step by step, into the abyss. In its level bed it meanders through the meadow valley, and in the glassy lake all the stars delight in their own countenance. The wind is the waves sweet lover; the wind thoroughly stirs up the foaming billows. Soul of mankind, how like the water you are! Fate of mankind, how like the wind!

Der Wanderer
Ich komme vom Gebirge her, Es dampft das Tal, es braust das Meer. Ich wandle still, bin wenig froh, Und immer fragt der Seufzer: wo? Die Sonne dnkt mich hier so kalt, Die Blte welk, das Leben alt, Und was sie reden, leerer Schall, Ich bin ein Fremdling berall. Wo bist du, mein geliebtes Land? Gesucht, geahnt und nie gekannt! Das Land, das Land, so hoffnungsgrn, Das Land, wo meine Rosen blhn, Wo meine Freunde wandeln gehn, Wo meine Toten auferstehn, Das Land, das meine Sprache spricht, O Land, wo bist du? Ich wandle still, bin wenig froh, Und immer fragt der Seufzer: wo? Im Geisterhauch tnts mir zurck: Dort, wo du nicht bist, dort ist das Glck!
GEORG PHILIPP SCHMIDT VON LBECK (17661849) originally attributed to ZACHARIAS WERNER (17681823)

The wanderer
I come from the mountains; the valley steams, the ocean roars. I wander, silent and joyless, and my sighs for ever ask: Where? Here the sun seems so cold, the blossom faded, life old, and mens words mere hollow noise; I am a stranger everywhere. Where are you, my beloved land? Sought, dreamt of, yet never known! The land so green with hope, the land where my roses bloom, Where my friends walk, where my dead ones rise again, the land that speaks my tongue, O land, where are you? I wander, silent and joyless, and my sighs for ever ask: Where? In a ghostly whisper the answer comes: There, where you are not, is happiness!

bq Disc
bl Track

D489/D493. October 1816; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 4 No 1 sung by Christopher Maltman

163

SONG TEXTS October 1816


Disc bq Der Hirt The shepherd Track bm D490. 8 October 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Christoph Prgardien

Du Turm! zu meinem Leide Ragst du so hoch empor, Und mahnest grausam immer An das, was ich verlor. Sie hngt an einem Andern, Und wohnt im Weiler dort. Mein armes Herz verblutet, Vom schrfsten Pfeil durchbohrt. In ihren schnen Augen War keiner Untreu Spur; Ich sah der Liebe Himmel, Der Anmut Spiegel nur. Wohin ich mich nun wende Der Turm, er folget mir; O sagt er, statt der Stunden, Was mich vernichtet, ihr!
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

Bell-tower, to my grief you soar so high, and forever remind me cruelly of what I have lost. She is devoted to another, and lives in the hamlet there. My poor heart bleeds, pierced by the sharpest arrow. In her beautiful eyes there was no trace of faithlessness, I saw in them only heavenly love, the mirror of grace. Now wherever I turn the bell-tower follows me. Would that, instead of telling the hours, it told her what is destroying me.

Disc bq Geheimnis An Franz Schubert Secret To Franz Schubert Track bn D491. October 1816; first published in 1887 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Lucia Popp

Sag an, wer lehrt dich Lieder, So schmeichelnd und so zart? Sie zauben einen Himmel Aus trber Gegenwart. Erst lag das Land verschleiert Im Nebel vor uns da Du singst und Sonnen leuchten, Und Frhling ist uns nah. Den schilfbekrnzten Alten, Der seine Urne giesst, Erblickst du nicht, nur Wasser, Wies durch die Wiesen fliesst. So geht es auch dem Snger, Er singt, er staunt in sich; Was still ein Gott bereitet, Befremdet ihn wie dich.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

Tell us, who teaches you such tender, flattering songs? They evoke a heaven from these cheerless times. First the land lay veiled in mist before us then you sing, and the sun shines, and spring is near. You do not see the old man, crowned with reeds, emptying his urn; you see only water flowing through the meadows. So too it is with the singer. He sings, he marvels inwardly; he wonders, as you do, at Gods silent creation.

Disc bq Zum Punsche In praise of punch Track bo D492. October 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1849 in volume 44 of the Nachlass
sung by Christopher Maltman, Toby Spence, Daniel Norman and Neal Davies

Woget brausend, Harmonien, Kehre wieder, alte Zeit; Punschgefllte Becher, wandert In des Kreises Heiterkeit! Mich ergreifen schon die Wellen, Bin der Erde weit entrckt; Sterne winken, Lfte suseln Und die Seele ist beglckt. Was das Leben aufgebrdet, Liegt am Ufer nebelschwer; Steure fort, ein rascher Schwimmer, In das hohe Friedensmeer.

Swell, ring out, harmony! Old times, return! Let cups brimming with punch pass around the cheerful circle! The waves already engulf me, I am far removed from this world; stars beckon, breezes whisper, and my soul is enraptured. The burden of life lies heavy as mist on the shore; head off, fast swimmer, towards the high sea of peace.

164

November 1816 SONG TEXTS


Was des Schwimmers Lust vermehrt, Ist das Pltschern hinterdrein; Denn es folgen die Genossen, Keiner will der Letzte sein.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

What enhances the swimmers pleasure is the splashing behind him; for his companions follow him; no one wants to be the last.

Der Geistertanz
Die bretterne Kammer Der Toten erbebt, Wenn zwlfmal den Hammer Die Mitternacht hebt. Rasch tanzen um Grber Und morsches Gebein Wir luftigen Schweber Den sausenden Reihn. Was winseln die Hunde Beim schlafenden Herrn? Sie wittern die Runde Der Geister von Fern. Die Raben entflattern Der wsten Abtei, Und fliehn an den Gattern Des Kirchhofs vorbei. Wir gaukeln und scherzen Hinab und empor Gleich irrenden Kerzen Im dustigen Moor. O Herz, dessen Zauber Zur Marter uns ward, Du ruhst nun in tauber Verdumpfung erstarrt; Tief bargst du im dstern Gemach unser Weh; Wir Glcklichen flstern Dir frhlich: Ade!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Ghost dance
The boarded chamber of the dead trembles when midnight twelve times raises the hammer. Quickly we airy spirits strike up a whirling dance around graves and rotting bones. Why do the dogs whine as their masters sleep? They scent from afar the spirits dance. Ravens flutter up from the ruined abbey, and fly past the graveyard gates. Jesting, we flit up and down like will-o-the-wisps over the misty moor. O heart, whose spell was our torment, you rest now, frozen in a numb stupor. You have buried our grief deep in the gloomy chamber; happy we, who whisper you a cheerful farewell!

bq Disc
bp Track

Fourth setting, D494. November 1816; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1871 sung by The London Schubert Chorale (directed by Stephen Layton), unaccompanied

Abendlied der Frstin


Der Abend rtet nun das Tal, Mild schimmert Hesperus. Die Buchen stehen still zumal Und leiser rauscht der Fluss. Die Wolken segeln goldbesumt Am klaren Firmament; Das Herz, es schwelgt, das Herz, es trumt, Von Erdenqual getrennt. Am grnem Hgel hingestreckt, Schlft wohl der Jger ein Doch pltzlich ihn der Donner weckt, Und Blitze zischen drein. Wo bist du, heilig Abendrot, Wo, sanfter Hesperus? So wandelt denn in Schmerz und Not Sich jeglicher Genuss.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

The princesss evening song


The evening tinges the valley with red; Hesperus gleams softly. The beech trees stand silent, and the river murmurs more softly. The clouds, fringed with gold, sail across the dear sky; the heart swells, the heart dreams, free from earthly sorrow. The huntsman, stretched out on the green hillside, falls sound asleep; but then he is suddenly woken by thunder, and the hiss of lightning. Where are you, sacred evening glow? Where are you, gentle Hesperus? Thus every pleasure turns to grief and distress.

bq Disc
bq Track

D495. November 1816; first published by Wilhelm Mller in Berlin in 1868 sung by Sarah Walker

165

SONG TEXTS November 1816


Disc bq Bei dem Grabe meines Vater At my fathers grave Track br D496. November 1816; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Christoph Prgardien

Friede sei um diesen Grabstein her! Sanfter Friede Gottes! Ach, sie haben Einen guten Mann begraben, Und mir war er mehr. Trufte mir von Segen, dieser Mann, Wie ein Stern aus bessern Welten! Und ich kanns ihm nicht vergelten, Was er mir getan. Er entschlief, sie gruben ihn hier ein. Leiser, ssser Trost von Gott, Und ein Ahnden von dem ewgen Leben Dft um sein Gebein! Bis ihn Jesus Christus, gross und hehr! Freundlich wird erwecken, Ach, sie haben ihn begraben! Einen guten Mann begraben, Und mir war er mehr.
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

Peace be to this tombstone, the tender peace of God. Ah, they have buried a good man, and to me he was still more. He showered blessings upon me like a star from a better world, and I can never repay what he did for me. He fell asleep, they buried him here. May Gods sweet, gentle comfort and a presentiment of eternal life embalm his mortal remains, until Jesus Christ, great and glorious, lovingly wakens him. Ah, they have buried him, buried a good man, and to me he was still more.

Disc bq Klage um Ali Bey Lament for Ali Bey Track bs D496a. November 1816; solo version published in 1968 in series 4 of the Neue Schubert Ausgabe, Kassel
sung by Lucia Popp

Lasst mich! lasst mich! ich will klagen, Frhlich sein nicht mehr! Aboudahab hat geschlagen Ali und sein Heer. So ein muntrer khner Krieger Wird nicht wieder sein; ber alles ward er Sieger, Haut es kurz und klein. Er verschmhte Wein und Weiber, Ging nur Kriegesbahn, Und war fr die Zeitungsschreiber Gar ein lieber Mann. Jedermann in Syrus saget: Schade, dass er fiel! Und in ganz gypten klaget Mensch und Krokodil.
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

Leave me! Leave me! I wish to lament, and never again be joyful! Abu Dahab has slain Ali and his army! Such a bold and cheerful warrior there will never be again; he vanquished all, hacking them to pieces. He scorned wine and women, pursuing only the path of war, and was beloved by the newspapers. Everyone in Syria is saying: What a pity that he has fallen! And throughout all Egypt men and crocodiles lament.

Disc bq An die Nachtigall To the nightingale Track bt D497. November 1816; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1829 as Op 98 No 1
sung by Lucia Popp

Er liegt und schlft an meinem Herzen, Mein guter Schutzgeist sang ihn ein; Und ich kann frhlich sein und scherzen, Kann jeder Blum und jedes Blatts mich freun. Nachtigall, ach! Nachtigall, ach! Sing mir den Amor nicht wach!
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

He lies sleeping upon my heart; my kind tutelary spirit sang him to sleep. And I can be merry and jest, delight in every flower and leaf. Nightingale, ah, nightingale, do not awaken my love with your singing!

Disc bq Wiegenlied Lullaby Track bu D498. November 1816; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1829 as Op 98 No 2
sung by Sarah Walker

Schlafe, holder, ssser Knabe, Leise wiegt dich deiner Mutter Hand; Sanfte Ruhe, milde Labe Bringt dir schwebend dieses Wiegenband.

Sleep, dear, sweet boy, your mothers hand rocks you softly. This swaying cradle strap brings you gentle peace and tender comfort.

166

November 1816 SONG TEXTS


Schlafe in dem sssen Grabe, Noch beschtzt dich deiner Mutter Arm, Alle Wnsche, alle Habe Fasst sie liebend, alle liebewarm. Schlafe in der Flaumen Schoosse, Noch umtnt dich lauter Liebeston, Eine Lilie, eine Rose, Nach dem Schlafe werd sie dir zum Lohn.
ANONYMOUS

Sleep in the sweet grave; your mothers arms still protect you. All her wishes, all her possessions she holds lovingly, with loving warmth. Sleep in her lap, soft as down; pure notes of love still echo around you. A lily, a rose shall be your reward after sleep.

Abendlied
Der Mond ist aufgegangen, Die goldnen Sternlein prangen Am Himmel hell und klar; Der Wald steht schwarz und schweiget, Und aus den Wiesen steiget Der weisse Nebel wunderbar. Wie ist die Welt so stille, Und in der Dmmrung Hlle So traulich und so hold! Als eine stille Kammer, Wo ihr des Tages Jammer Verschlafen und vergessen sollt. Seht ihr den Mond dort stehen? Er ist nur halb zu sehen, Und ist doch rund und schn! So sind wohl manche Sachen, Die wir getrost belachen, Weil unsre Augen sie nicht sehn. Gott, lass dein Heil uns schauen Auf nichts Vergnglichs trauen Nicht Eitelkeit uns freun! Lass uns einfltig werden, Und vor dir hier auf Erden Wie Kinder fromm und frhlich sein!
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

Evening song
The moon is up, the golden stars shine bright and clear in the heavens. The woods lie dark and silent, and from the meadows, uncannily, the white mist rises. How still the world is, and in dusks mantle how intimate and tender, like a peaceful room where you may sleep and forget the days cares. Do you see the moon there? It is only half visible and yet it is so round and fair. Thus it is with many things: we thoughtlessly mock them because we cannot see them. God, may we behold your grace, mistrust all that is transitory, and delight not in vanity. May we attain simplicity, and before you here on earth live as children, pious and cheerful.

bq Disc
cl Track

D499. November 1816; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by Peter Schreier

Am Grabe Anselmos
Dass ich dich verloren habe, Dass du nicht mehr bist, Ach, dass hier in diesem Grabe Mein Anselmo ist, Das ist mein Schmerz! Seht, wie liebten wir uns beide, Und so lang ich bin, kommt Freude Niemals wieder in mein Herz.
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

At Anselmos grave
That I have lost you, that you are no more, that my Anselmo lies here in this grave: that is my sorrow! See, we loved each other, and as long as I live joy will never return to my heart.

bq Disc
cm Track

D504. 4 November 1816; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 6 No 3 sung by Lucia Popp

Phidile
Ich war erst sechzehn Sommer alt, Unschuldig und nichts weiter, Und kannte nichts als unsern Wald, Als Blumen, Gras und Kruter.

Phidile
I was only sixteen summers old, nothing more than an innocent, and knew nothing but our woods, flowers, grass and herbs.

bq Disc
cn Track

D500. November 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Lucia Popp

167

SONG TEXTS November 1816


Da kam ein fremder Jngling her; Ich hatt ihn nicht verschrieben, Und wusste nicht wohin noch her; Der kam und sprach von Lieben. Er ging mir allenthalben nach, Und drckte mir die Hnde, Und sagte immer O und Ach, Und ksste sie behende. Ich sah ihn einmal freundlich an, Und fragte, was er meinte; Da fiel der junge schne Mann Mir um den Hals und weinte. Das hatte niemand noch getan; Doch wars mir nicht zuwider Und meine beiden Augen sahn In meinen Busen nieder. Ich sagt ihm nicht ein einzig Wort, Als ob ichs bel nhme, Kein einzigs, und er flohe fort; Wenn er doch wieder kme!
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

Then a youthful stranger came along; I had not bid him come and knew not whence he came. He came and spoke of love. He followed me everywhere, and pressed my hands, and kept saying Oh and Alas, and kissed them quickly. One day I looked at him kindly and asked what he meant; then the fair young man fell upon my neck and wept. No one had ever done that; but I did not find it unpleasant, and my two eyes looked down at my bosom. I did not say a single word to him to indicate that I took it amiss, not a single word and he fled; if only he would come back again!

Disc bq Zufriedenheit Lied Contentment Song Track co Second setting, D501. November 1816; first published in 1895 in the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Stephen Varcoe

Ich bin vergngt, im Siegeston Verknd es mein Gedicht, Und mancher Mann mit seiner Kron Und Szepter ist es nicht. Und wr ers auch; nun, immerhin! Mag ers! so ist er, was ich bin. Des Sultans Pracht, des Mogols Geld Des Glck, wie hiess er doch, Der, als er Herr war von der Welt, Zum Mond hinauf sah noch? Ich wnsche nichts von alle dem, Zu lcheln drob fllt mir bequem. Zufrieden sein, das ist mein Spruch! Was hlf mir Geld und Ehr? Das, was ich hab, ist mir genug, Wer klug ist, wnscht nichts sehr; Denn, was man wnschet, wenn mans hat, So ist man darum doch nicht satt. Recht tun und edel sein und gut Ist mehr als Geld und Ehr; Da hat man immer guten Mut Und Freude um sich her, Und man ist stolz und mit sich eins, Scheut kein Geschpf und frchtet keins.
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

I am happy, my verses proclaim it triumphantly, and many a man with his crown and sceptre is not. And even if he is, well, all the better! Let him be: he is as I am. The sultans splendour, the moguls wealth, the good fortune of what was his name? He who, when ruler of the world, still gazed up at the moon. I desire none of that; I prefer to smile at it. To be content, that is my motto! What use would I have for wealth and honour? What I have is enough for me. He who is wise does not desire much; for when people have what they desire they are still not satisfied with it. To do right, to be generous and good, is more than wealth and honour; such a man is always in good spirits, with joy around him; he is proud and at one with himself, shuns no creature and fears nothing.

Disc bq Am Bach im Frhling By the brook in spring Track cp D361. 1816; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 109 No 1
sung by Stephen Varcoe

Du brachst sie nun, die kalte Rinde, Und rieselst froh und frei dahin, Die Lfte wehen wieder linde, Und Moos und Gras wird neu und grn.

Now you have broken the frozen crust, and ripple along, free and happy; the breezes blow mild again, moss and grass are fresh and green.

168

November 1816 SONG TEXTS


Allein, mit traurigem Gemte Tret ich wie sonst zu deiner Flut. Der Erde allgemeine Blte Kommt meinem Herzen nicht zu gut. Hier treiben immer gleiche Winde, Kein Hoffen kommt in meinen Sinn, Als dass ich hier ein Blmchen finde, Blau, wie sie der Erinnrung blhn.
FRANZ VON SCHOBER (17981882)

Alone, with sorrowful spirit, I approach your waters as before; the flowering of the whole earth does not gladden my heart. Here the same winds forever blow, no hope cheers my spirit, save that I find a flower here, blue, as the flowers of remembrance.

Herbstlied
Bunt sind schon die Wlder, Gelb die Stoppelfelder, Und der Herbst beginnt. Rote Bltter fallen, Graue Nebel wallen, Khler weht der Wind. Wie die volle Traube Aus dem Rebenlaube Purpurfarbig strahlt! Am Gelnder reifen Pfirsiche mit Streifen Rot und weiss bemalt. Sieh, wie hier die Dirne Emsig Pflaum und Birne In ihr Krbchen legt; Dort, mit leichten Schritten Jene goldne Quitten In den Landhof trgt! Flinke Trger springen, Und die Mdchen singen, Alles jubelt froh! Bunte Bnder schweben Zwischen hohen Reben Auf dem Hut von Stroh.

Autumn song
The woods are already brightly coloured, the fields of stubble yellow, and autumn is here. Red leaves fall, grey mists surge, the wind blows colder. How purple shines the plump grape from the vine leaves! On the espalier peaches ripen painted with red and white streaks. Look how busily the maiden here gathers plums and pears in her basket; look how that one there, with light steps, carries golden quinces to the house. The lads dance nimbly and the girls sing; all shout for joy. Amid the tall vines coloured ribbons flutter on hats of straw.

bq Disc
cq Track

D502. November 1816; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Lucia Popp

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

Mailied
Grner wird die Au, Und der Himmel blau; Schwalben kehren wieder Und die Erstlingslieder Kleiner Vgelein Zwitschern durch den Hain. Aus dem Bltenstrauch Weht der Liebe Hauch: Seit der Lenz erschienen, Waltet sie im Grnen Malt die Blumen bunt, Rot des Mdchens Mund. Brder, ksset ihn! Den die Jahre fliehn! Einen Kuss in Ehren Kann euch niemand wehren! Ksst ihn, Brder, ksst, Weil er ksslich ist!

May song
The meadow grows greener, and the sky is blue; swallows return and the little birds warble their first songs throughout the grove. The breath of love wafts; from the blossoming bushes since spring has appeared love reigns over the verdant landscape, painting the flowers bright colours, and the lips of maidens red. Brothers, kiss them! For the years fly past! No one can forbid you one honourable kiss! Kiss them, brothers, kiss them, since they are kissable.

bq Disc
cr Track

Third setting (first solo song setting), D503. November 1816; fragment completed by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by Christoph Prgardien

169

SONG TEXTS December 1816


Seht, der Tauber girrt, Seht, der Tauber schwirrt Um sein liebes Tubchen! Nehmt euch auch ein Weibchen, Wie der Tauber tut, Und seid wohlgemut!
LUDWIG HEINRICH CHRISTOPH HLTY (17481776) END OF DISC 16

See, the dove is cooing; see, the dove is billing around his beloved mate! Like the dove, you too should take a wife and be happy!

Disc br Skolie Skolion Track 1 D507. December 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Christoph Prgardien

Mdchen entsiegelten, Brder, die Flaschen; Auf! die geflgelten Freuden zu haschen, Locken und Becher von Rosen umglht. Auf! eh die moosigen Hgel uns winken, Wonne von rosigen Lippen zu trinken; Huldigung Allem, was jugendlich blht!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

The girls have unsealed the bottles, brothers; come, let us snatch winged joys, curls, and cups rimmed with glowing roses. Come, before the mossy hills beckon to us, let us drink bliss from rosy lips, and do homage to all in the bloom of youth.

Disc br Lebenslied Song of life Track 2 D508. December 1816; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1845 in volume 38 of the Nachlass
sung by Lucia Popp

Kommen und Scheiden, Suchen und Meiden, Frchten und Sehnen, Zweifeln und Whnen, Armut und Flle, Verdung und Pracht Wechseln auf Erden wie Dmmrung und Nacht! Fruchtlos hinieden Ringst du nach Frieden! Tuschende Schimmer Winken dir immer; Doch, wie die Furchen des gleitenden Kahns, Schwinden die Zaubergebilde des Wahns! Auf zu der Sterne Leuchtender Ferne Blicke vom Staube Mutig der Glaube: Dort nur verknpft ein unsterbliches Band Wahrheit und Frieden, Verein und Bestand! Gnstige Fluten Tragen die Guten, Frdern die Braven Sicher zum Hafen, Und, ein harmonisch verklingendes Lied, Schliesst sich das Leben dem edlen Gemt!
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Arriving and departing, seeking and shunning, fearing and yearning, doubting and guessing, poverty and abundance, desolation and splendour alternate on earth like dusk and night. In vain you strive for peace here below. Will-o-the-wisps forever beckon to you; but, like the furrows ploughed by the gliding boat, these magic creations of illusion vanish. Let faith bravely gaze up from the dust to the stars shining in the distance; only there does an undying bond unite truth and peace, fellowship and permanence. Favourable tides bear the virtuous, carry the brave safely to harbour, and to the noble spirit life closes as a harmonious, dying song.

Disc br Leiden der Trennung The sorrow of separation Track 3 D509. December 1816; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by Lucia Popp

Vom Meere trennt sich die Welle, Und seufzet durch Blumen im Tal, Und fhlet, gewiegt in der Quelle, Gebannt in dem Brunnen, nur Qual!

The wave is separated from the sea and sighs amid the flowers in the valley; cradled in the spring, captive in the well, it feels nothing but torment.

170

December 1816 SONG TEXTS


Es sehnt sich die Welle In lispelnder Quelle, Im murmelnden Bache, Im Brunnengemache Zum Meer, von dem sie kam, Von dem sie Leben nahm, Von dem, des Irrens matt und mde, Sie ssse Ruh verhofft und Friede.
HEINRICH VON COLLIN (17711811)

In the whispering spring, in the murmuring brook, in the well-chamber, the wave longs For the sea from which it came, from which it drew life, from which, faint and weary with wandering, it hopes for peace and sweet repose.

Licht und Liebe


Liebe ist ein ssses Licht. Wie die Erde strebt zur Sonne, Und zu jenen hellen Sternen In den weiten blauen Fernen, Strebt das Herz nach Liebeswonne: Denn sie ist ein ssses Licht. Sieh! wie hoch in stiller Feier Droben helle Sterne funkeln: Von der Erde fliehn die dunkeln Schwermutsvollen trben Schleier. Wehe mir, wie so trbe Fhl ich tief mich im Gemte, Das in Freuden sonst erblhte, Nun vereinsamt, ohne Liebe.
MATTHUS VON COLLIN (17791824)

Light and love


Love is a sweet light. Just as the earth aches for the sun and those bright stars in the distant blue expanses, so the heart aches for loves bliss, for love is a sweet light. See, high in the silent solemnity, bright stars glitter up above: from the earth flee the dark heavy baleful mists. Alas! Yet how sad I feel deep in my soul; once I brimmed with joy; now I am abandoned, unloved.

br Disc
4 Track

D352. 1816 (?); first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1847 in volume 41 of the Nachlass sung by Michael Schade and Lynne Dawson

Didone abbandonata
Vedi quanto tadoro ancora ingrato. Con un tuo sguardo solo Mi togli ogni difesa, e mi disarmi. Ed hai cor di tradirmi? E puoi lasciarmi? Ah, non lasciarmi, no, Bell idol mio; Di chi mi fider Se tu minganni? Di vita mancherei Nel dirti addio; Ch viver non potrei Fra tanti affanni.
PIETRO METASTASIO (16981782)

Dido abandoned
See how much I love you, ungrateful man! With a single glance you remove all my defences, and disarm me. Do you have the heart to betray me? And then to leave me? Ah, do not leave me, my beloved. Whom shall I trust if you deceive me? My life would fail me as I said farewell to you. I could not live with such grief.

br Disc
5 Track

D510. December 1816; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Arleen Auger

Didone abbandonata Vedi quanto tadoro Dido abandoned See how much I love you br Disc
D510a. December 1816; fragment completed by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by Ann Murray

6 Track

see above, disc br track 5 , for text and translation

An den Tod
Tod, du Schrecken der Natur, Immer rieselt deine Uhr: Die geschwungne Sense blinkt, Gras, und Halm und Blume sinkt. Mhe nicht ohn Unterschied, Dieses Blmchen, das erst blht, Dieses Rschen, erst halbrot; Sei barmherzig, lieber Tod!
CHRISTIAN FRIEDRICH DANIEL SCHUBART (17391791)

To death
Death, terror of nature, your hour-glass trickles ceaselessly; the swinging scythe flashes, grass, stalk and flower fall. Do not mow down indiscriminately this little flower just bloomed, this rose half-opened; be merciful, dear death!

br Disc
7 Track

D518. 1816 or 1817; published in 1824 as a supplement to the Wiener Allgemeinen musikalischen Zeitung sung by Brigitte Fassbaender

171

A SCHUBERT CALENDAR 1817 A SCHUBERT CALENDAR 1817 aged 20 The early months of the year are particularly rich in songs. The last and perhaps greatest Ossian setting, Die Nacht, dates from February, as does Der Tod und das Mdchen. A turning point in the spring is Schuberts meeting, arranged by Schober and Spaun, with Johann Michael Vogl (17681840) the operatic baritone whom Schubert had heard in 1813 as Orestes in Glucks Iphignie. Vogls chilly self-importance gradually yields to an almost bewildered, yet devoted, admiration for Schuberts work. The performances given later by the baritone and composeraccompanist are to lay the foundation of the later Liederabend and song recital tour. Vogls classical sympathies (he reads Latin and Greek) coincide with Schuberts deepening friendship with Mayrhofer, and an increasing absorption in setting the lyrics by that poet with a mythological background. There are no fewer than twenty Mayrhofer settings in this year and many of these are ideal material for Vogl. The Goethe setting Ganymed and Schillers Gruppe aus dem Tartarus and Elysium seem to owe their existence to the same Mayrhofer-inspired enthusiasm for antiquity. Franz von Schober (three of whose poems are set in 1817, including An die Musik) leaves Vienna in August due to a family crisis; this occasions the valedictory Abschied von einem Freunde, the only solo song in which the composer sets his own words to music. Local Viennese personalities like Ludwig von Szchnyi, Matthus von Collin and Ignaz Castelli are set to music, a sign that the composer is mixing increasingly in local artistic circles, but in Schobers absence there is nothing for Schubert but to return to live at his fathers schoolhouse. The Schubert circle is enlarged by the arrival in Vienna of Josef Httenbrenner, brother of the composer Anselm (see disc 40), who becomes a self-appointed agent for Schuberts interests, and later a kind of personal assistant. Some other works of 1817 Piano Sonata in A minor (D537); Piano Sonata in A flat (D557); Piano Sonata in E minor (D566); Piano Sonata in E flat (D568); Sonata in A major (Duo) for violin and piano (D557); Piano Sonata in B major (D575); 12 Variations on a Theme of Anselm Httenbrenner for piano (D576); String Trio in B flat (D581); Symphony No 6 in C major (D589, begun in 1817); Overtures in the Italian Style in D (D590) and in C (D591); Two Scherzi for piano (D593).

The castle at Greifenstein, inspiration for Mayrhofers Auf der Donau, from the almanac Vesta, 1835

172

1817 SONG TEXTS Nur wer die Liebe kennt Impromptu


Nur wer die Liebe kennt Versteht das Sehnen, An dem Geliebten ewig fest zu hangen, Und Lebensmut aus seinem Aug zu trinken, Der kennt das schmerzlich selige Verlangen, Dahin zu schmelzen in ein Meer von Trnen, Und aufgelst in Liebe zu versinken!
ZACHARIAS WERNER (17681823)

Only those who know love Impromptu


Only those who know love understand the longing forever to hold fast to the lover, and to drink lifes courage from his eyes. They know the blissful pain of longing to dissolve into an ocean of tears and sink, exhausted, in love!

br Disc
8 Track

D513a. 1817 (?); first published in a performing edition by Reinhard van Hoorickx in 1974 sung by Edith Mathis

Die abgeblhte Linde


Wirst du halten, was du schwurst, Wenn mir die Zeit die Locken bleicht? Wie du ber Berge fuhrst, Eilt das Wiedersehn nicht leicht. ndrung ist das Kind der Zeit, Womit Trennung uns bedroht, Und was die Zukunft beut, Ist ein blssers Lebensrot. Sieh, die Linde blhet noch, Als du heute von ihr gehst: Wirst sie wieder finden, doch Ihre Blten stiehlt der West. Einsam steht sie dann, vorbei Geht man kalt, bemerkt sie kaum. Nur der Grtner bleibt ihr treu, Denn er liebt in ihr den Baum.
LUDWIG VON SZCHNYI (17811855)

The faded linden tree


Will you abide by what you pledged to me when time has made my hair white? Since you went away over the mountains reunions are not easy. Change is the child of time with which parting threatens us; and what the future offers us is a paler gleam of life. See, the linden tree is still blooming as you leave here today; you will find it again though the west wind steals its blossoms. Then it will stand alone, people will pass by, indifferent, scarcely noticing it. Only the gardener will remain true, since he loves the tree for itself.

br Disc
9 Track

D514. 1817 (?); published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in November 1821 as Op 7 No 1 sung by Edith Mathis

Der Flug der Zeit


Es floh die Zeit im Wirbelfluge Und trug des Lebens Plan mit sich. Wohl strmisch war es auf dem Zuge, Beschwerlich oft und widerlich. So ging es fort durch alle Zonen, Durch Kinderjahre, durch Jugendglck, Durch Tler, wo die Freuden wohnen, Die sinnend sucht der Sehnsucht Blick. Bis an der Freundschaft lichten Hgel Die Zeit nun sanfter, stiller flog, Und endlich da die raschen Flgel In ssser Ruh zusammenbog.
LUDWIG VON SZCHNYI (17811855)

The flight of time


Time flew past like a whirlwind, and bore with it the plan of life. It was stormy on the journey; often arduous and unpleasant. Thus it went through each age, through childhood years and youthful happiness; through valleys wherein joys dwell, sought by longings reflective gaze. Until, flying more gently and calmly, time came to the shining hill of friendship, and there at last folded its fleet wings in sweet repose.

br Disc
bl Track

D515. 1817 (?); published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in November 1821 as Op 7 No 2 sung by Edith Mathis

Frohsinn
Ich bin von lockerem Schlage, Geniess ohne Trbsinn die Welt, Mich drckt kein Schmerz, keine Plage, Mein Frohsinn wrzt mir die Tage; Ihn hab ich zum Schild mir gewhlt.

Cheerfulness
Im a happy-go-lucky fellow, and enjoy the world without melancholy; no sorrow, no care worries me, my cheerfulness adds spice to my days; I have chosen it as my shield.

br Disc
bm Track

D520. January 1817; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 45 of the Nachlass sung by Stephan Loges

173

SONG TEXTS January 1817


Ich grsse froh jeden Morgen, Der nur neue Freuden mir bringt, Fehlt Geld mir, muss ich wohl borgen, Doch dies macht niemals mir Sorgen, Weil stets jeder Wunsch mir gelingt. Bei Mdchen gerne gesehen, Qult Eifersucht niemals mein Herz; Schmollt eine, lass ich sie stehen, Vor Liebesgram zu vergehen, Das wre ein bitterer Scherz.
IGNAZ FRANZ CASTELLI (17811862)

I greet each morning cheerfully, and it brings me only new joys. If Im short of money, then I have to borrow some; but this never worries me, since my every request is always granted. Though girls like to see it, jealousy never plagues my heart; if a girl sulks, I walk off and leave her; to die of the pangs of love would be a bitter joke.

Disc br Jagdlied Hunting song Track bn D521. January 1817; first published (with different words) as a coda for the Nachlass publication of Die Nacht in 1830;
in this version in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Anthony Rolfe Johnson, with Alan Armstrong, Jason Balla, Mark Hammond, Philip Lawford, Arthur Linley, and Richard Edgar-Wilson (tenors) and David Barnard, David Beezer, Duncan Perkins, James Pitman and Christopher Vigar (basses)

Trarah, trarah! Wir kehren daheim Wir bringen die Beute der Jagd! Es sinket die Nacht, drum halten wir Wacht; Das Licht hat ber das Dunkel Macht! Trarah, trarah! Auf, auf, auf! Das Feuer angefacht! Trarah, trarah! Wir zechen im Kreis! Wir spotten des Dunkels der Nacht! Des Menschen Macht, In freudiger Pracht, Die Qual verhhnt, des Todes lacht! Trarah, trarah! Auf, auf, auf! Die Glut ist angefacht!
ZACHARIAS WERNER (17681823)

Tara, tara! We are returning home, bringing the spoils of the chase! Night is falling, so we keep watch; light has power over darkness! Tara, tara! Up, up, up! Fan the flames! Tara, tara! We drink in a circle! We mock the darkness of the night! The might of man, joyous and glorious, scorns pain and laughs at death! Tara, tara! Up, up, up! the fire is ablaze!

Disc br Die Liebe Love Track bo D522. January 1817; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Edith Mathis

Wo weht der Liebe hoher Geist? Er weht in Blum und Baum, Im weiten Erdenraum, Er weht, wo sich die Knospen spalten Und wo die Blmlein sich entfalten. Wo weht der Liebe hoher Geist? Er weht im Abendglanz, Er weht im Sternenkranz, Wo Bien und Maienkfer schwirren Und zart die Turteltauben girren. Wo weht der Liebe hoher Geist? Er weht bei Freud und Schmerz In aller Mtter Herz, Er weht in jungen Nachtigallen, Wenn lieblich ihre Lieder schallen. Wo weht der Liebe hoher Geist? In Wasser, Feuer, Luft Und in des Morgens Duft. Er weht, wo sich ein Leben reget, Und wo sich nur ein Herz beweget.
GOTTLIEB VON LEON (17571832)

Where does loves noble spirit breathe? It breathes in flower and tree, in the wide world it breathes wherever the buds burst open and the flowers unfold. Where does loves noble spirit breathe? It breathes in the glow of evening, it breathes in the circle of stars; wherever bees and cockchafers hum, and turtle doves coo tenderly. Where does loves noble spirit breathe? It breathes in joy and sorrow in every mothers heart, it breathes in young nightingales when their sweet songs sound forth. Where does loves noble spirit breathe? In water, fire and air, and in the mornings fragrance; it breathes wherever life stirs and wherever even a single heart beats.

Disc br Trost Comfort Track bp D523. January 1817; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Edith Mathis

Nimmer lange weil ich hier, Komme bald hinauf zu dir; Tief und still fhl ichs in mir: Nimmer lange weil ich hier.

I shall not tarry here much longer, soon I shall come to you above; deeply, silently I feel within me: I shall not tarry here much longer.

174

January 1817 SONG TEXTS


Komme bald hinauf zu dir, Schmerzen, Qualen, fr und fr Wten in dem Busen mir; Komme bald hinauf zu dir. Tief und still fhl ichs in mir: Eines heissen Dranges Gier Zehrt die Flamm im Innern hier, Tief und still fhl ichs in mir.
ANONYMOUS

Soon I shall come to you above; sorrow and torment forever rage in my breast; soon I shall come to you above. Deeply, silently I feel within me: the flame of ardent desire consumes my innermost being. Deeply, silently I feel it within me.

Der Alpenjger
Auf hohem Bergesrcken, Wo frischer alles grnt, Ins Land hinab zu blicken, Das nebelleicht zerrinnt Erfreut den Alpenjger. Je steiler und je schrger Die Pfade sich verwinden, Je mehr Gefahr aus Schlnden, So freier schlgt die Brust. Er ist der fernen Lieben, Die ihm daheim geblieben, Sich seliger bewusst. Und ist er nun am Ziele So drngt sich in der Stille Ein ssses Bild ihm vor; Der Sonne goldne Strahlen, Sie weben und sie malen, Die er im Tal erkor.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

The Alpine huntsman


High on the mountain ridge where everything is greener and fresher, the huntsman delights in gazing down at the landscape veiled in mist. The more steeply the paths wind upwards, the more dangerous the precipices, the more freely his heart beats, The more fondly he thinks of his distant beloved who remains at home. And when he reaches his goal a sweet image fills his mind in the stillness; the suns golden beams weave and paint a portrait of her whom he has chosen in the valley.

br Disc
bq Track

D524. January 1817; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1822 as Op 13 No 3 sung by Christopher Maltman

Wie Ulfru fischt


Die Angel zucht, die Rute bebt, Doch leicht fhrt sie heraus. Ihr eigensinngen Nixen gebt Dem Fischer keinen Schmaus. Was frommet ihm sein kluger Sinn, Die Fische baumeln spottend hin; Er steht am Ufer fest gebannt, Kann nicht ins Wasser, ihn hlt das Land. Die glatte Flche kruselt sich, Vom Schuppenvolk bewegt, Das seine Glieder wonniglich In sichern Fluten regt. Forellen zappeln hin und her, Doch bleibt des Fischers Angel leer, Sie fhlen, was die Freiheit ist, Fruchtlos ist Fischers alte List. Die Erde ist gewaltig schn, Doch sicher ist sie nicht. Es senden Strme Eiseshhn, Der Hagel und der Frost zerbricht Mit einem Schlage, einem Druck, Das goldne Korn, der Rosen Schmuck; Den Fischlein unterm weichen Dach, Kein Sturm folgt ihnen vom Lande nach.
JOHANN MAYHOFER (17871836)

Ulfru fishing
The rod quivers, the line trembles, but it comes up easily. You capricious water sprites give the fisherman no feast. What use is his cunning? The fish glide away mockingly; he stands spellbound on the shore, he cannot enter the water, the land holds him fast. The smooth surface is ruffled, disturbed by the scaly shoals that swim blithely in the safe waters. Trout dart to and fro, but the fishermans rod stays empty; they feel what freedom is, the fishermans well tried guile is in vain. The earth is surpassingly beautiful, but safe it is not. Storms blow from the icy peaks, hail and frost destroy at one stroke, with one blow, the golden corn, the roses beauty; the little fish beneath their soft roof are pursued by no storm from the land.

br Disc
br Track

D525. January 1817; published by Sauer und Leidesdorf in Vienna in 1823 as Op 21 No 3 sung by Stephen Varcoe

175

SONG TEXTS January 1817


Disc br Fahrt zum Hades Journey to Hades Track bs D526. January 1817; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1832 in volume 18 of the Nachlass
sung by Stephen Varcoe

Der Nachen drhnt, Cypressen flstern, Horch, Geister reden schaurig drein; Bald werd ich am Gestad, dem dstern, Weit von der schnen Erde sein. Da leuchten Sonne nicht, noch Sterne, Da tnt kein Lied, da ist kein Freund. Empfang die letzte Trne, o Ferne, Die dieses mde Auge weint. Schon schau ich die blassen Danaiden, Den fluchbeladnen Tantalus; Es murmelt todesschwangern Frieden, Vergessenheit, dein alter Fluss. Vergessen nenn ich zwiefach Sterben, Was ich mit hchster Kraft gewann, Verlieren, wieder es erwerben Wann enden diese Qualen? Wann?
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

The boat moans, the cypresses whisper; hark, the spirits add their gruesome cries. Soon I shall reach the shore, so gloomy, far from the fair earth. There neither sun nor stars shine, no song echoes, no friend is nigh. Distant earth, accept the last tear that these tired eyes will weep. Already I see the pale Danades and curse-laden Tantalus. Your ancient river, Oblivion, breathes a peace heavy with death. Oblivion I deem a twofold death; to lose that which I won with all my strength, to strive for it once more when will these torments cease? O when?

Disc br Augenlied Song of the eyes Track bt D297. 1817 (?); first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Ann Murray

Ssse Augen, klare Bronnen! Meine Qual und Seligkeit Ist frwahr aus euch gewonnen, Und mein Dichten euch geweiht. Wo ich weile, Wie ich eile, Liebend strahlet ihr mich an; Ihr erleuchtet, Ihr befeuchtet, Mir mit Trnen meine Bahn. Treue Sterne, schwindet nimmer, Leitet mich zum Acheron! Und mit eurem letzten Schimmer Sei mein Leben auch entflohn.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

Sweet eyes, limpid fountains, my torment and my bliss truly arise from you, and my songs I dedicate to you. Where I linger, when I hasten, you smile upon me, radiant with love; you illuminate my path, and moisten it with your tears. Faithful stars, never vanish; lead me to Acheron! And with your last glimmer may my life, too, fade away.

Disc br Sehnsucht Longing Track bu D516. 1817 (?); published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in May 1822 as Op 8 No 2
sung by Edith Mathis

Der Lerche wolkennahe Lieder Erschmettern zu des Winters Flucht, Die Erde hllt in Samt die Glieder, Und Blten bilden rote Frucht. Nur du, o sturmbewegte Seele, Nur du bist bltenlos, in dich gekehrt, Und wirst in goldner Frhlingshelle Von tiefer Sehnsucht aufgezehrt. Nie wird, was du verlangst, entkeimen Dem Boden, Idealen fremd; Der trotzig deinen schnsten Trumen Die rohe Kraft entgegenstemmt. Du ringst dich matt mit seiner Hrte, Vom Wunsche heftiger entbrannt: Mit Kranichen ein strebender Gefhrte, Zu wandern in ein milder Land.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

The songs of the cloud-soaring lark ring out as winter flees; the earth wraps her limbs in velvet, and red fruit forms from the blossoms. You alone, storm-tossed soul, do not flower; turned in on yourself, you are consumed by deep longing amid springs golden radiance. What you crave will never burgeon from this earth, alien to ideals, which defiantly opposes its raw strength to your fairest dreams. You grow weary struggling with its harshness, ever more inflamed by the desire to journey to a kinder land, an aspiring companion to the cranes.

176

January February 1817 SONG TEXTS Schlaflied Schlummerlied Sleep song Slumber song

br Disc
cl Track

D527. January 1817; published by Sauer und Leidesdorf in Vienna in October 1823 as Op 24 No 2 reprinted by Diabelli (and later Peters) as Schlummerlied sung by Edith Mathis

Es mahnt der Wald, es ruft der Strom: Du liebes Bbchen, zu uns komm! Der Knabe kommt, und staunend weilt, Und ist von jedem Schmerz geheilt. Aus Bschen fltet Wachtelschlag, Mit ihren Farben spielt der Tag; Auf Blmchen rot, auf Blmchen blau Erglnzt des Himmels feuchter Tau. Ins frische Gras legt er sich hin, Lsst ber sich die Wolken ziehn, An seine Mutter angeschmiegt, Hat ihn der Traumgott eingewiegt.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

The woods exhort, the river cries out: Sweet boy, come to us! The boy approaches, marvels and tarries, and is healed of all pain. The quails song echoes from the bushes, the day makes play with shimmering colours; on flowers red and blue the moist dew of heaven glistens. He lies down in the cool grass and lets the clouds drift above him; nestling close to his mother he is lulled to sleep by the god of dreams.

La pastorella al prato
La pastorella al prato Contenta se ne va Coll agnellino a lato Cantando in libert. Se linnocente amore Grandisce il suo pastore La bella pastorella Contenta ognor sar.
CARLO GOLDONI (17071793)

The shepherdess in the meadow


The shepherdess in the meadow wanders happily, the lambs at her side, and sings blithely. If her innocent love pleases her shepherd, the fair shepherdess will always be happy.

br Disc
cm Track

D528. January 1817; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Arleen Auger

La pastorella al prato

The shepherdess in the meadow

br Disc
cn Track

D513. 1817 (?); first published in 1891 in series 16 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by John Mark Ainsley, Jamie MacDougall, Simon Keenlyside and Michael George

see above, disc br track cm , for text and translation

An eine Quelle
Du kleine grnumwachsne Quelle, An der ich Daphne jngst gesehn! Dein Wasser war so still und helle! Und Daphnes Bild darin so schn! O wenn sie sich noch mal am Ufer sehen lsst, So halte du ihr schnes Bild doch fest; Ich schleiche heimlich dann mit nassen Augen hin, Dem Bild meine Not zu klagen; Denn, wenn ich bei ihr selber bin, Dann, ach dann kann ich ihr nichts sagen.
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

To a spring
Little spring, mantled in green, where lately I saw Daphne! Your water was so still and clear, and Daphnes reflection so fair! O, if she should appear once more on your banks, hold her fair image fast. Then I will steal up furtively, with moist eyes, to bewail my distress to her image; for, when I am with her, ah, then I cannot say a word to her.

br Disc
co Track

D530. February 1817; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1829 as Op posth 109 No 3 sung by Edith Mathis

Das Lied vom Reifen


Seht meine lieben Bume an, Wie sie so herrlich stehn, Auf allen Zweigen angetan Mit Reifen wunderschn! Von unten an bis oben naus Auf allen Zweigelein Hngts weiss und zierlich, zart und kraus, Und kann nicht schner sein.

The song of the frost


Look how splendid my beloved trees are, adorned on every branch with beautiful frost! From top to bottom it hangs on every twig, white and delicate, fragile and crisp. Nothing could be lovelier.

br Disc
cp Track

D532. February 1817; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Edith Mathis

177

SONG TEXTS February 1817


Und alle Bume rund umher, Und alle weit und breit, Stehn da, geschmckt mit gleicher Ehr, In gleicher Herrlichkeit. Viel schn, viel schn ist unser Wald! Dort Nebel berall, Hier eine weisse Baumgestalt Im vollen Sonnenstrahl Wir sehn das an und denken noch Einfltiglich dabei: Woher der Reif und wie er doch Zu Stande kommen sei? Lichthell, still, edel, rein und frei, Und ber alles fein! O aller Menschen Seele sei So lichthell und so rein!
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

And all the trees around, far and wide, stand arrayed in like dignity and splendour. Our woods are so lovely; yonder all is veiled in mist; here a white tree is outlined in full sunlight. We look upon this scene and naively reflect: whence this frost? How could it have got here? Shining, silent, noble, pure, and free, and exquisite beyond all else! May the souls of all mankind be as shining and as pure!

Disc br Der Tod und das Mdchen Death and the maiden Track cq D531. February 1817; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in November 1821 as Op 7 No 3
sung by Brigitte Fassbaender

DAS MDCHEN Vorber, ach, vorber! Geh, wilder Knochenmann! Ich bin noch jung, geh, Lieber! Und rhre mich nicht an. DER TOD Gib deine Hand, du schn und zart Gebild! Bin Freund und komme nicht zu strafen. Sei gutes Muts! Ich bin nicht wild, Sollst sanft in meinen Armen schlafen!
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

THE MAIDEN Pass by, ah, pass by! Away, cruel Death! I am still young; leave me, dear one and do not touch me. DEATH
Give me your hand, you lovely, tender creature. I am your friend, and come not to chastise. Be of good courage. I am not cruel; you shall sleep softly in my arms.

Disc br Tglich zu singen To be sung daily Track cr D533. February 1817; published as a piano arrangement in 1876; as a song in 1895
in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by Elizabeth Connell

Ich danke Gott und freue mich Wies Kind zur Weihnachtsgabe, Dass ich hier bin! Und dass ich dich, Schn menschlich Antlitz habe. Dass ich die Sonne, Berg und Meer Und Laub und Gras kann sehen Und abends unterm Sternenheer Und lieben Monde gehen. Gott gebe mir nur jeden Tag, So viel ich darf zum Leben. Er gibts dem Sperling auf dem Dach; Wie sollt ers mir nicht geben!
MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS (17401815)

I thank God, and rejoice like a child at Christmas, that I am here, and that I possess the fair countenence of mankind. That I can see sun, mountains and the sea, leaves and grass, and can walk in the evening beneath the host of stars and the beloved moon. May God give me each day just so much as I need for my life. He gives this to the sparrow on the roof; why should he not give it to me?

Disc br Die Nacht The night Track cs D534. February 1817; fragment, first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1830 as volume 1 of the Nachlass
sung by Anthony Rolfe Johnson

ERSTER BARDE Die Nacht ist dumpfig und finster. An den Hgeln ruhn die Wolken. Kein Stern mit grnzitterndem Strahl; kein Mond schaut durch die Luft. Im Walde hr ich den Hauch; aber ich hr ihn weit in der Ferne. Der Strom des Thals erbraust; aber sein Brausen ist strmisch und trb. Vom Baum beim Grabe

FIRST BARD
Night is dull and dark. The clouds rest on the hills. No star with green trembling beam; no moon looks from the sky. I hear the blast in the wood; but I hear it distant far. The stream of the valley murmurs; but its murmur is sullen and sad. From the tree at the grave

178

February 1817 SONG TEXTS


der Todten, hrt man lang die krchzende Eul. An der Ebne erblick ich eine dmmernde Bildung! es ist ein Geist! er schwindet, er flieht. Durch diesen Weg wird eine Leiche getragen: ihren Pfad bezeichnet das Luftbild. Die fernere Dogge heult von der Htte des Hgels. Der Hirsch liegt im Moose des Bergs: neben ihm ruht die Hndin. In seinem astigten Geweihe hrt sie den Wind; fhrt auf, und legt sich zur Ruhe wieder nieder. Dster und keuchend, zittern und traurig, verlor der Wanderer den Weg. Er irrt durch Gebsche, durch Dornen lngs der sprudelnden Quelle. Er frchtet die Klippe und den Sumpf. Er frchtet den Geist der Nacht. Der alte Baum chzt zu dem Windstoss; der fallende Ast erschallt. Die verwelkte zusammen verworrene Klette, treibt der Wind ber das Gras. Es ist der leichte Tritt eines Geists! er bebt in der Mitte der Nacht. Die Nacht ist dster, dunkel, und heulend; wolkigt, strmisch und schwanger mit Geistern! Die Todten streifen umher! Empfangt mich von der Nacht, meine Freunde. DER GEBIETER Lass Wolken an Hgeln ruhn; Geister fliegen und Wandrer beben. Lass die Winde der Wlder sich heben, brausende Strme das Thal durchwehn. Strme brllen, Fenster klirren, grnbeflgelte Dmpfe fliegen; den bleichen Mond sich hinter seinen Hgeln erheben, oder sein Haupt in Wolken einhllen; die Nacht gilt mir gleich; die Luft sei klar, strmisch, oder dunkel. Die Nacht flieht vorm Strahl, wenn er am Hgel sich giest. Der junge Tag kehrt von seinen Wolken, aber wir kehren nimmer zurck. Wo sind unsre Fhrer der vorwelt; wo sind unsre weit berhmten Gebieter? Schweigend sind die Felder ihrer Schlachten. Kaum sind ihre moosigten Grber noch brig. Man wird auch unser vergessen. Dies erhabene Gebu wird zerfallen. Unsere Shne werden die Trmmer im Grase nicht erblicken. Sie werden die Greisen befragen, Wo standen die Mauern unsrer Vter? Ertnet das Lied und schlaget die Harfen; sendet die frhlichen Muscheln herum. Stellt hundert Kerzen in die Hhe. Jnglinge, Mdchen beginnet den Tanz. Nah sei ein graulockigter Barde, mir die Taten der Vorwelt zu knden; von Knigen berhmt in unserm Land, von Gebietern, die wir nicht mehr sehn. Lass die Nacht also vergehen, bis der Morgen in unserm Hallen erscheine. Dann seien nicht ferne, der Bogen, die Doggen, die Jnglinge der Jagd. Wir werden die Hgel mit dem Morgen besteigen, und die Hirsche erwecken.
of the dead the long-howling owl is heard. I see a dim form on the plain! It is a ghost! It fades, it flies. Some funeral shall pass this way: the meteor marks the path. The distant dog is howling from the hut on the hill. The stag lies on the mountain moss: the hind is at his side. She hears the wind in his branchy horns. She starts, but lies again. Dark, panting, trembling, sad, the traveller has lost his way. Through shrubs, through thorns, he goes, along the gurgling rill. He fears the rock and the fen. He fears the ghost of night. The old tree groans to the blast; the falling branch resounds. The wind drives the withered burs, clung together, along the grass. It is the light tread of a ghost! He trembles amidst the night. Dark, dusty, howling is night, cloudy, windy, and full of ghosts! The dead are abroad! My friends, receive me from the night.

THE CHIEFTAIN
Let clouds rest on the hills: spirits fly, and travellers fear. Let the winds of the woods arise, the sounding storms blow. Roar streams and windows flap, and green-winged meteors fly! Rise the pale moon from behind her hills, or enclose her head in clouds; night is alike to me, clear, stormy, or gloomy the sky. Night flies before the beam, when it is poured on the hill. The young day returns from his clouds, but we return no more. Where are our chiefs of old? Where our kings of mighty name? The fields of their battles are silent. Scarce their mossy tombs remain. We shall also be forgot. This lofty house shall fall. Our sons shall not behold the ruins in grass. They shall ask of the aged: Where stood the walls of our fathers? Raise the song, and strike the harp; send round the shells of joy. Suspend a hundred tapers on high. Youths and maids, begin the dance. Let some grey bard be near me to tell the deeds of other times; of kings renowned in our land, of chiefs we behold no more. Thus let the night pass until morning shall appear in our halls. Then let the bow be at hand, the dogs, the youths of the chase. We shall descend the hill with day, and awake the deer.

ct Track

JAMES MACPHERSON OSSIAN (17361796) translated by BARON EDMUND VON HAROLD (17371808) END OF DISC 17

179

SONG TEXTS March 1817


Disc bs Philoktet Philoctetes Track 1 D540. March 1817; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1831 in volume 11 of the Nachlass
sung by Thomas Hampson

Da sitz ich ohne Bogen und starre in den Sand. Was tat ich dir Ulysses, dass du sie mir entwandt? Die Waffe, die den Trojern des Todes Bote war, Die auf der wsten Insel mir Unterhalt gebar. Es rauschen Vgelschwrme mir berm greisen Haupt; Ich greife nach dem Bogen, umsonst, er ist geraubt! Aus dichtem Busche raschelt der braune Hirsch hervor: Ich strecke leere Arme zur Nemesis empor. Du schlauer Knig, scheue der Gttin Rcherblick! Erbarme dich und stelle den Bogen mir zurck.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

I sit here without my bow, staring at the sand. What did I do to you, Ulysses, that you took from me the weapon that was the harbinger of death to the Trojans, that gave me sustenance on this desolate island? Flocks of birds sweep over my grey head; I reach for my bow: in vain, it has been stolen. The brown stag rushes from the dense thicket; I stretch bare arms up to Nemesis. Cunning king, beware the vengeful goddesss gaze! Take pity and restore to me my bow.

Disc bs Memnon Memnon Track 2 D541. March 1817; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1821 as Op 6 No 1
sung by Thomas Hampson

Den Tag hindurch nur einmal mag ich sprechen, Gewohnt zu schweigen immer und zu trauern: Wenn durch die nachtgebornen Nebelmauern Aurorens Purpurstrahlen liebend brechen. Fr Menschenohren sind es Harmonien. Weil ich die Klage selbst melodisch knde Und durch der Dichtung Glut des Rauhe rnde, Vermuten sie in mir ein selig Blhen. In mir, nach dem des Todes Arme langen, In dessen tiefstem Herzen Schlangen whlen; Genhrt von meinen schmerzlichen Gefhlen Fast wtend durch ein ungestillt Verlangen: Mit dir, des Morgens Gttin, mich zu einen, Und weit von diesem nichtigen Getriebe, Aus Sphren edler Freiheit, aus Sphren reiner Liebe, Ein stiller, bleicher Stern herab zu scheinen.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

Constant silence and grieving are my wont; the whole day long I may speak but once: when Auroras tender crimson rays break through the night-begotten walls of mist. To mens ears this is music. Since I proclaim my very grief in song, and transfigure its harshness in the fire of poetry, they imagine that joy flowers within me. Within me, to whom the arms of death stretch out, as serpents writhe deep in my heart; I am nourished by my anguished thoughts, and almost frenzied with unquiet longing. Oh to be united with you, goddess of morning, and, far from this vain bustle, to shine down as a pale, silent star from spheres of noble freedom and pure love.

Disc bs Der Schiffer The boatman Track 3 D536. March (?) 1817; published by Sauer und Leidesdorf in Vienna in 1823 as Op 21 No 2
sung by Stephen Varcoe

Im Winde, im Sturme befahr ich den Fluss, Die Klieder durchweichet der Regen im Guss; Ich peitsche die Wellen mit mchtigem Schlag, Erhoffend mir heiteren Tag. Die Wellen, sie jagen das chzende Schiff, Es drohet der Strudel, es drohet der Riff, Gesteine entkollern den felsigen Hhn, Und Tannen erseufzen wie Geistergesthn. So musste es kommen, ich hab es gewollt, Ich hasse ein Leben behaglich entrollt; Und schlngen die Wellen den chzenden Kahn, Ich priese doch immer die eigene Bahn. Drum tose des Wassers ohnmchtige Zorn, Dem Herzen entquillet ein seliger Born, Die Nerven erfrischend, o himmlische Lust, Dem Sturme zu trotzen mit mnnlicher Brust!
JOHANN MAYHOFER (17871836)

In wind and storm I row on the river, my clothes are soaked by the pouring rain; I lash the waves with powerful strokes, hoping for a fine day. The waves drive the creaking boat, whirlpool and reef threaten: rocks roll down from the craggy heights, and fir trees sigh like moaning ghosts. It had to come to this, I wished it so; I hate a life that unfolds comfortably. And if the waves devoured the creaking boat, I would still extol my chosen course. So let the waters roar with impotent rage; a fountain of bliss gushes from my heart, refreshing my nerves. O celestial joy, to defy the storm with a manly heart!

180

March 1817 SONG TEXTS Am Strome


Ist mirs doch, als sei mein Leben An den schnen Strom gebunden; Hab ich Frohes nicht an seinem Ufer, Und Betrbtes hier empfunden? Ja, du gleichest meiner Seele; Manchmal grn und glatt gestaltet, Und zu Zeiten herrschen Strme Schumend, unruhvoll, gefaltet. Fliessest zu dem fernen Meere, Darfst allda nicht heimisch werden; Mich drngts auch in mildre Lande, Finde nicht das Glck auf Erden.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

By the river
It seems to me that my life is bound to the fair river; have I not known joy and sorrow on its banks? Yes, you are like my soul; sometimes green and unruffled, and sometimes lashed by storms, foaming, agitated, furrowed. You flow to the distant sea, and cannot find your home there. I, too, yearn for a more welcoming land; I can find no happiness on earth.

bs Disc
4 Track

D539. March 1817; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in May 1822 as Op 8 No 4 sung by Philip Langridge

Antigone und Oedip


ANTIGONE Ihr hohen Himmlischen erhret Der Tochter herzentstrmtes Flehen: Lasst einen khlen Hauch des Trostes In des Vaters grosse Seele wehn. Genget, euren Zorn zu shnen, Dies junge Leben nehmt es hin; Und euer Rachestrahl vernichte Die tiefbetrbte Dulderin. Demtig falte ich die Hnde Das Firmament bleibt glatt und rein, Und stille ists, nur laue Lfte Durchschauern noch den alten Hain. Was seufzt und sthnt der bleiche Vater? Ich ahns ein furchtbares Gesicht Verscheucht von ihm den leichten Schlummer; Er springt vom Rasen auf er spricht: OEDIP Ich trume einen schweren Traum. Schwang nicht den Zepter diese Rechte? Doch Hoheit lsten starke Mchte Dir auf, o Greis, in nichtgen Schaum. Trank ich in schnen Tagen nicht In meiner grossen Vter Halle, Beim Heldensang und Hrnerschalle, O Helios, dein golden Licht, Das ich nun nimmer schauen kann? Zerstrung ruft von allen Seiten: Zum Tode sollst du dich bereiten; Dein irdisch Werk ist abgetan.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

Antigone and Oedipus


ANTIGONE Ye gods on high,
hear a daughters heartfelt entreaty; let the cool breath of comfort waft into my fathers great soul. This young life is sufficient to assuage your anger take it, and let your avenging blow destroy this deeply distressed sufferer. Humbly I clasp my hands; the firmament remains serene and clear and all is calm; now only mild breezes quiver through the ancient grove. Why does my pallid father sigh and moan? I can guess a terrible vision drives away his light sleep; he starts up from the grass and speaks:

bs Disc
5 Track

D542. March 1817; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in August 1821 as Op 6 No 2 sung by Marie McLaughlin and Thomas Hampson

OEDIPUS I dream a troubled dream.


Did not this right hand wield the sceptre? But powerful forces reduced your majesty, old man, to mere foam. In happy days, in the halls of my great fathers amid the songs of heroes and the peal of horns, did I not drink your golden light, O Helios, Which now I can never see again? Destruction calls from all sides: You are to prepare for death; your earthly task is done.

Orest auf Tauris


Ist dies Tauris, wo der Eumeniden Wut zu stillen Pythia versprach? Weh! die Schwestern mit den Schlangenhaaren Folgen mir vom Land der Griechen nach. Rauhes Eiland, kndest keinen Segen: Nirgends sprosst der Ceres milde Frucht; Keine Reben blhn, der Lfte Snger, Wie die Schiffe, meiden diese Bucht.

Orestes on Tauris
Is this Tauris, where Pythia promised to appease the anger of the Eumenides? Alas, the snake-haired sisters pursue me from the land of the Greeks. Bleak island, you announce no blessing: nowhere does Ceres tender fruit grow; no vines bloom; the singers of the air, like the ships, shun this bay.

bs Disc
6 Track

D548. March 1817; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1831 in volume 11 of the Nachlass sung by Thomas Hampson

181

SONG TEXTS March 1817


Steine fgt die Kunst nicht zu Gebuden, Zelte spannt des Skythen Armut sich; Unter starren Felsen, rauhen Wldern Ist das Leben einsam, schauerlich! Und hier soll, so ist ja doch ergangen An den Flehenden der heilige Spruch, Eine hohe Priesterin Dianens Lsen meinen und der Vter Fluch.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

Art does not fashion these stones into buildings; in their poverty the Scythians erect only tents. Amid harsh rocks and wild forests life is lonely and frightening. And here, according to the sacred decree revealed to the suppliant, a high priestess of Diana is to lift the curse on me and my fathers.

Disc bs Auf dem See On the lake Track 7 D543. March 1817; published by M J Leidesdorf in 1828 as Op 87 (later changed to Op 92 No 2)
sung by Dame Felicity Lott

Und frische Nahrung, neues Blut Saug ich aus freier Welt; Wie ist Natur so hold und gut, Die mich am Busen hlt! Die Welle wiegen unsern Kahn Im Rudertakt hinauf, Und Berge, wolkig himmelan, Begegnen unserm Lauf. Aug, mein Aug, was sinkst du nieder? Goldne Trume, kommt ihr wieder? Weg, du Traum! so gold du bist; Hier auch Lieb und Leben ist. Auf der Welle blinken Tausend schwebende Sterne, Weiche Nebel trinken Rings die trmende Ferne; Morgenwind umflgelt Die beschattete Bucht, Und im See bespiegelt Sich die reifende Frucht.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

And I suck fresh nourishment and new blood from the wide world; how gracious and kindly is Nature who holds me to her breast! The waves rock our boat up and down to the rhythm of the oars, and soaring, cloud-capped mountains meet us in our course. My eyes, why are you cast down? Golden dreams, will you return? Begone, dream, golden as you are; there is love here, and life too. On the waves float twinkling a thousand twinkling stars; soft mists drink up the looming distances; The morning breeze wings around the shaded bay, and in the lake the ripening fruit is mirrored.

Disc bs Ganymed Ganymede Track 8 D544. March 1817; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1825 as Op 19 No 3
sung by Christine Schfer

Wie im Morgenglanze Du rings mich anglhst, Frhling, Geliebter! Mit tausendfacher Liebeswonne Sich an mein Herze drngt Deiner ewigen Wrme Heilig Gefhl, Unendliche Schne! Dass ich dich fassen mcht In diesen Arm! Ach, an deinem Busen Lieg ich und schmachte, Und deine Blumen, dein Gras Drngen sich an mein Herz. Du khlst den brennenden Durst meines Busens, Lieblicher Morgenwind! Ruft drein die Nachtigall Liebend mach mir aus dem Nebeltal. Ich komm, ich komme! Ach wohin, wohin?

How your glow envelops me in the morning radiance, spring, my beloved! With loves thousandfold joy the hallowed sensation of your eternal warmth floods my heart, infinite beauty! O that I might clasp you in my arms! Ah, on your breast I lie languishing, and your flowers, your grass press close to my heart. You cool the burning thirst within my breast, sweet morning breeze, as the nightingale calls tenderly to me from the misty valley. I come, I come! But whither? Ah, whither?

182

March 1817 SONG TEXTS


Hinauf! strebts hinauf! Es schweben die Wolken Abwrts, die Wolken Neigen sich der sehnenden Liebe. Mir! Mir! In euerm Schosse Aufwrts! Umfangend umfangen! Aufwrts an deinen Busen, Alliebender Vater!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Upwards! Strive upwards! The clouds drift down, yielding to yearning love, to me, to me! In your lap, upwards, embracing and embraced! Upwards to your bosom, all-loving Father!

Mahomets Gesang

The song of Mahomet

bs Disc
9 Track

First setting, D549. March 1817; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig performing version (not a setting of the complete Goethe poem) by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by John Mark Ainsley

Seht den Felsenquell, Wie ein Sternenblick; Freudehell, ber Wolken Nhrten seine Jugend Gute Geister Zwischen Klippen im Gebsch. Jnglingfrisch Tanzt er aus der Wolke nieder Auf die Marmorfelsen nieder, Jauchzet wieder Nach dem Himmel. Durch die Gipfelgnge Jagt er bunten Kieseln nach, Und mit frhem Fhrertritt Reisst er seine Bruderquellen Mit sich fort. Drunten in dem Tal Unter seinem Fusstritt werden Blumen, Und die Wiese Lebt von seinem Hauch. Doch ihn hlt kein Schattenthal, Keine Blumen, Die ihm seine Knie umschlingen, Ihm mit Liebes-Augen schmeicheln: Nach der Ebne dringt sein Lauf Schlangenwandelnd. Bche schmiegen Sich gesellig an. Nun tritt er In die Ebne silberprangend, Und die Ebne prangt mit ihm, Und die Flsse von der Ebne, Und die Bche von den Bergen, Jauchzen ihm und rufen: Bruder! Bruder, nimm die Brder mit, Mit zu deinem alten Vater, Zu dem ewgen Ocean
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Behold the spring among the rocks, bright and joyful as a twinkling star; above the clouds its youth was nurtured by good spirits in the bushes between the crags. Fresh as a boy it dances from the clouds down on to the marble rocks, and returns in jubilation to the sky. Through gullies among the peaks it chases after brightly-coloured pebbles, and with the precocious step of a leader bears its brother springs away with it. Down in the valley flowers appear beneath its tread, and the meadow draws life from its breath. But no shady valley can detain it, nor the flowers that embrace its knees, and flatter it with lovelorn looks; winding like a snake it rushes its course towards the plain. Streams cling to it for company. Now in silver radiance, it enters the plain, and the plain is equally radiant, and the rivers of the plain and the streams from the mountains cry out to him jubilantly: brother, take your brothers with you, with you to your ancient father, to the eternal ocean.

Der Jngling und der Tod


DER JNGLING Die Sonne sinkt, o knnt ich mit ihr scheiden, Mit ihrem letzten Strahl entfliehen! Ach diese namenlosen Qualen meiden Und weit in schnre Welten ziehn!

The youth and death


THE YOUTH
The sun is sinking; O that I might depart with it, flee with its last ray: escape these nameless torments, and journey far away to fairer worlds!

bs Disc
bl Track

D545. March 1817; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872 sung by Ann Murray

183

SONG TEXTS March April 1817


O komme, Tod, und lse diese Bande! Ich lchle dir, o Knochenmann, Entfhre mich leicht in getrumte Lande! O komm und rhre mich doch an! DER TOD Es ruht sich khl und sanft in meinen Armen, Du rufst, ich will mich deiner Qual erbarmen.
JOSEF VON SPAUN (17881865)

O come, death, and loose these bonds! I smile upon you, skeleton; lead me gently to the land of dreams! O come and touch me, come!

DEATH
In my arms you will find cool, gentle rest; you call. I will take pity on your suffering.

Disc bs Trost im Liede Comfort in song Track bm D546. March 1817; published in 1827 as a supplement to the Wiener Zeitschrift fr Kunst, Literatur, Theater und Mode
and by H A Probst in Leipzig in 1828 as Op posth 101 No 3 sung by Ann Murray

Braust des Unglcks Sturm empor, Halt ich meine Harfe vor, Schtzen knnen Saiten nicht, Die er leicht und schnell durchbricht: Aber durch des Sanges Tor Schlgt er milder an mein Ohr. Sanfte Laute hr ich klingen, Die mir in die Seele dringen, Die mir auf des Wohllauts Schwingen Wunderbare Trstung bringen. Und ob Klagen mir entschweben, Ob ich still und schmerzlich weine, Fhl ich mich doch so ergeben, Dass ich fest und glubig meine: Es gehrt zu meinem Leben, Dass sich Schmerz und Freude eine.
FRANZ VON SCHOBER (17981882)

When the tempest of misfortune roars I hold up my harp. Strings cannot protect, the storm breaks them swiftly and easily, but through the portals of song it strikes my ear more gently. I hear sweet sounds that pierce my soul; on the wings of harmony they bring me mysterious comfort. And even if threnodies escape my lips, and I weep in silence and sorrow, yet I feel such humility that I firmly and devoutly believe it is part of my life that pain and joy are mingled.

Disc bs An die Musik To music Track bn D547. March 1817; published by Thaddus Weigl in Vienna in 1827 as Op 88 No 4
sung by Edith Mathis

Du holde Kunst, in wieviel grauen Stunden, Wo mich des Lebens wilder Kreis umstrickt, Hast du mein Herz zu warmer Lieb entzunden, Hast mich in eine bessre Welt entrckt! Oft hat ein Seufzer, deiner Harf entflossen, Ein ssser, heiliger Akkord von dir Den Himmel bessrer Zeiten mir erschlossen, Du holde Kunst, ich danke dir dafr!
FRANZ VON SCHOBER (17981882)

Beloved art, in how many a bleak hour, when I am enmeshed in lifes tumultuous round, have you kindled my heart to the warmth of love, and borne me away to a better world! Often a sigh, escaping from your harp, a sweet, celestial chord has revealed to me a heaven of happier times. Beloved art, for this I thank you!

Disc bs Pax vobiscum Peace be with you Track bo D551. April 1817; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1831 in volume 10 of the Nachlass
sung by Ann Murray

Der Friede sei mit euch! Das war dein Abschiedssegen. Und so vom Kreis der Glubigen umkniet, Vom Siegesstrahl der Gottheit angeglht, Flogst du dem ewgen Heimatland entgegen. Und Friede kam in ihre treuen Herzen, Und lohnte sie in ihren grssten Schmerzen, Und strkte sie in ihrem Martertod. Ich glaube dich, du grosser Gott! Der Friede sei mit euch! So lacht die erste Blume Des jungen Frhlings uns vertraulich an, Wenn sie, mit allen Reizen angethan, Sich bildet in der Schpfung Heiligthume.

Peace be with you! That was your parting blessing. And so, surrounded by the kneeling faithful, lit by the rays of the triumphant godhead, you soared to the eternal homeland. Peace entered their devoted hearts, rewarded them in their greatest sorrow, and strengthened them in their martyrs death. I believe in you, Almighty God! Peace be with you! So tenderly the first flower of young spring smiles upon us when, decked with all its charms, it unfolds in the sanctuary of creation.

184

March April 1817 SONG TEXTS


Wen sollte auch nicht Friede da umschweben, Wo Erd und Himmel rings um sich beleben, Und alles aufsteht aus des Winters Tod? Ich hoff auf dich, du starker Gott! Der Friede sei mit euch! Rufst du im Rosenglhen Des Himmels uns an jedem Abend zu, Wenn alle Wesen zur ersehnten Ruh Vom harten Gang des schwlen Tages ziehen; Und Berg und Thal und Strom und Meereswogen, Vom weichen Hauch des Nebels berflogen, Noch schner werden unterm milden Roth; Ich liebe dich, du guter Gott!
FRANZ VON SCHOBER (17981882)

Who could not feel the aura of peace when earth and sky are everywhere reborn, and all things rise again from the death of winter? I hope in you, all-powerful God! Peace be with you! You cry to us each evening in the roseate glow of sunset, when all creatures take their longed-for rest after hard toil in the sultry day, when mountain and valley, river and ocean wave covered by a soft veil of mist, grow still lovelier in the gentle crimson. I love you, merciful God!

Hnflings Liebeswerbung
Ahidi! ich liebe. Mild lchelt die Sonne, Mild wehen die Weste, Sanft rieselt die Quelle, Sss duften die Blumen. Ich liebe, Ahidi! Ahidi! ich liebe. Dich lieb ich, du Sanfte, Mit seidnem Gefieder, Mit strahlenden uglein, Dich, Schnste der Schwestern! Ich liebe, Ahidi! Ahidi! ich liebe. O sieh, wie die Blumen Sich liebevoll grssen, Sich liebevoll nicken! O liebe mich wieder! Ich liebe, Ahidi! Ahidi! ich liebe. O sieh, wie der Epheu Mit liebenden Armen Die Eiche umschlinget. O liebe mich wieder! Ich liebe, Ahidi!
JOHANN FRIEDRICH KIND (17681843)

The linnets wooing


Chirp, chirp, I am in love! The sun smiles gently, the west wind blows mild, the stream murmurs softly, the flowers scent is sweet! I am in love, chirp, chirp! Chirp, chirp, I am in love! I love you, my tender one, with your silken feathers and your radiant little eyes. Fairest among your sisters! I am in love, chirp, chirp! Chirp, chirp, I am in love! See how the flowers lovingly greet one another, lovingly nod to each other! Love me in return! I am in love, chirp, chirp! Chirp, chirp, I am in love! See how the ivy embraces the oak tree with loving arms. Love me in return! I am in love, chirp, chirp!

bs Disc
bp Track

D552. April 1817; published by Sauer und Leidesdorf in Vienna in April 1823 as Op 20 No 3 sung by Edith Mathis

Der Schfer und der Reiter


Ein Schfer sass im Grnen, Sein Liebchen sss im Arm; Durch Buchenwipfel schienen Der Sonne Strahlen warm. Sie kosten froh und heiter Von Liebestndelei. Da ritt bewehrt ein Reiter Den Glcklichen vorbei. Sitz ab und suche Khle, Rief ihm der Schfer zu. Des Mittags nahe Schwle Gebietet stille Ruh. Noch lacht im Morgenglanze So Strauch als Blume hier, Und Liebchen pflckt zum Kranze Die schnsten Blten dir.

The shepherd and the horseman


A shepherd sat amid the greenery, his sweetheart in his arms; through the tops of the beech trees shone the suns warm rays. Joyfully, blithely, they dallied and caressed. Then a horseman, armed, rode by the happy pair. Dismount and come to the cool shade, the shepherd called to him. The sultry midday heat approaches and bids us rest quietly. Here bush and flower still smile in the radiant morning, and my sweetheart will pick the loveliest flowers to make you a garland.

bs Disc
bq Track

D517. April 1817; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in December 1822 as Op 13 No 1 sung by Edith Mathis

185

SONG TEXTS April 1817


Da sprach der finstre Reiter: Nie hlt mich Wald und Flur; Mich treibt mein Schicksal weiter, Und ach, mein ernster Schwur. Ich gab mein junges Leben Dahin um schnden Sold. Glck kann ich nicht erstreben Nur hchstens Ruhm und Gold. Drum schnell, mein Ross, und trabe Vorbei wo Blumen blhn, Einst lohnt wohl Ruh im Grabe Des Kmpfenden Bemhn.
Then the gloomy rider spoke: Woods and meadows can never keep me: my fate drives me onwards, and, ah, my solemn vow. I gave up my young life for vile money. I can never aspire to happiness; at best only to gold and glory. Make haste then, my steed, and trot past the flowers in bloom. One day the peace of the grave may reward the warriors toil.

FRIEDRICH HEINRICH KARL, FREIHERR DE LA MOTTE FOUQU (17771843)

Disc bs Auf der Donau On the Danube Track br D553. April 1817; published by Sauer und Leidesdorf in Vienna in 1823 as Op 21 No 1
sung by Stephen Varcoe

Auf der Wellen Spiegel schwimmt der Kahn, Alte Burgen ragen himmelan, Tannenwlder rauschen geistergleich, Und das Herz im Busen wird uns weich. Denn der Menschen Werke sinken all, Wo ist Turm, wo Pforte, wo der Wall, Wo sie selbst, die Starken, erzgeschirmt, Die in Krieg und Jagden hingestrmt? Trauriges Gestrppe wuchert fort, Whrend frommer Sage Kraft verdorrt: Und im kleinen Kahne wird uns bang, Wellen drohn wie Zeiten Untergang.
JOHANN MAYHOFER (17871836)

The boat glides on the mirror of the waves; old castles soar heavenwards, pine forests stir like ghosts, and our hearts grow faint within our breasts. For the works of man all perish; where now is the tower, the gate, the rampart? Where are the mighty themselves, in their bronze armour, who stormed forth to battle and the chase? Mournful brushwood grows rampant while the power of pious myth fades. And in our little boat we grow afraid; waves, like time, threaten doom.

Disc bs Uraniens Flucht Uranias flight Track bs D554. April 1817; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Thomas Hampson

Lasst uns, ihr Himmlischen, ein Fest begehen! Gebietet Zeus Und von der Unterwelt, den Hhn und Seen, Steigt Alles zum Olympus unverweilt. Der Rebengott verlsst, den er bezwungen, Des Indus blumenreichen Fabelstrand Des Helikons erhabne Dmmerungen Apoll, und Cypria ihr Inselland. Die Strmerinnen moosbesumter Quellen, Dryadengruppen aus dem stillen Hain, Und der beherrscht des Ozeanes Wellen, Sie finden willig sich zum Feste ein. Und wie sie nun in glnzenden Gewanden Den ewgen Kreis, an dem kein Wechsel zehrt, Den blhenden, um unsern Donnrer wanden, Da strahlt sein Auge jugendlich verklrt. Er winkt: und Hebe fllt die goldnen Schalen, Er winkt: und Ceres reicht Ambrosia, Er winkt: und ssse Freudenhymnen schallen; Und was er immer ordnet, das geschah. Schon rtet Lust der Gste Stirn und Wange, Der schlaue Eros lchelt still fr sich: Die Flgel ffnen sich im sachten Gange Ein edles Weib in die Versammlung schlich. Unstreitig ist sie aus der Uraniden Geschlecht, ihr Haupt umhellt ein Sternenkranz; Es leuchtet herrlich auf dem lebensmden Und bleichgefrbten Antlitz Himmelsglanz.

Let us, Immortals, hold a feast! commands Zeus. And from the underworld, the hills and lakes, all climb up to Olympus without delay. The god of the vine leaves the fabled flowery banks of the Indus, which he has conquered, Apollo the sublime shade of Helicon and Cypria her native island. River nymphs from mossy springs, dryads from the silent grove, and he who rules the ocean waves gladly join the feast. And as they now in radiant attire dance the eternal, unchanging, round-dance about our Thunderer, his eyes sparkle with the light of youth. He gives the sign, and Hebe fills the golden cups; he gives the sign, and Ceres offers ambrosia; he gives the sign, and sweet hymns of joy resound; whatever he commands comes to pass. Already the guests brows and cheeks glow crimson with pleasure and sly Eros smiles silently to himself. The doors open and with soft steps a noble woman creeps into the company. Without doubt she is of the race of the Uranides; around her head is a bright crown of stars, and a wonderful heavenly radiance shines upon her pale, life-weary face.

186

April 1817 SONG TEXTS


Doch ihre gelben Haare sind verschnitten, Ein drftig Kleid deckt ihren reinen Leib. Die wunden Hnde deuten, dass gelitten Der Knechtschaft schwere Schmach das Gtterweib. Es sphet Jupiter in ihren Zgen: Du bist du bist es nicht, Urania! Ich bins. Die Gtter taumeln von den Krgen Erstaunt, und rufen: wie? Urania! Ich kenne dich nicht mehr. In holder Schne Spricht Zeus zogst du von mir der Erde zu. Den Gttlichen befreunden ihre Shne In meine Wohnung leiten solltest du. Womit Pandora einstens sich gebrstet, Ist unbedeutend wahrlich und gering, Erwge ich, womit ich dich gerstet, Den Schmuck, den meine Liebe um dich hing. Was du, o Herr, mir damals aufgetragen Wozu des Herzens eigner Drang mich trieb, Vollzog ich willig, ja ich darf es sagen; Doch dass mein Wirken ohne Frchte blieb. Magst du, o Herrscher, mit dem Schicksal rechten, Dem alles, was entstand, ist untertan: Der Mensch verwirrt das Gute mit dem Schlechten, Ihn hlt gefangen Sinnlichkeit und Wahn. Dem Einen musst ich seine cker pflgen Dem Andern Schaffnerin im Hause sein, Dem seine Kindlein in die Ruhe wiegen, Dem Andern sollt ich Lobgedichte streun. Der Eine sperrte mich in tiefe Schachten, Ihm auszubeuten klingendes Metall; Der Andre jagte mich durch blutge Schlachten Um Ruhm so wechselte der Armen Qual. Ja dieses Diadem die goldnen Sterne Das du der Scheidenden hast zugewandt, Sie htten es zur Feuerung ganz gerne Bei winterlichem Froste weggebrannt. Verwnschte Brut, herrscht Zeus mit wilder Stimme, Dem schnellsten Untergang sei sie geweiht! Die Wolkenburg erbebt von seinem Grimme Und Luft und Meer und Land erzittern weit. Er reisst den Blitz gewaltsam aus den Fngen Des Adlers; berm hohen Haupte schwenkt Die Lohe er, die Erde zu versengen, Die seinen Liebling unerhrt gekrnkt. Er schreitet vorwrts, um sie zu verderben, Es drut der rote Blitz, noch mehr sein Blick. Die bange Welt bereitet sich zu sterben Es sinkt der Rcherarm, er tritt zurck, Und heisst Uranien hinunter schauen. Sie sieht in weiter Fern ein liebend Paar Auf einer grnen stromumflossnen Aue, Ihr Bildnis ziert den lndlichen Altar, Vor dem die Beiden opfernd niederknieen, Die Himmlische ersehnend, die entflohn: Und wie ein mchtig Meer von Harmonien Umwogt die Gttin ihres Flehens Ton.
But her yellow hair is cropped, and a wretched garment covers her pure body. Her sore hands reveal that the divine woman has suffered the heavy shame of servitude. Jupiter studies her features. You are you are not Urania? I am. The gods lurch from their cups, astonished, and cry: What? Urania! I no longer know you, says Zeus. In your beauty and grace you left me and went to the earth. You were to acquaint her sons with the gods and lead them to my abode. The finery of which Pandora was once proud was truly meagre and insignificant when I consider the jewels with which I adorned you, and which my love hung about you. The task with which you entrusted me then, to which my own heart, my lord, urged me, I fulfilled willingly, if I may say so; but my work remained fruitless. You, my lord, may dispute with fate, to which every living thing is subject. Man confuses good with evil; lust and delusion hold him captive. For one I had to plough his fields; for another I had to be housekeeper; for one I had to rock his children to sleep; for another I had to broadcast eulogies. One locked me in deep shafts to dig out jangling metal for him; another hunted me through bloody battles for glory thus were the varied torments of the poor wretches. Even this diadem these golden stars you gave to me when I departed, they would gladly have burnt up as fuel during the winter frosts. Accursed race, cries Zeus with angry, imperious voice. It shall be condemned to swift ruin! The palace amid the clouds quakes at his fury, and air, sea and land tremble far around. Violently he tears the lightning from the eagles talons; high above his head he brandishes the flames to burn the earth, which shamefully harmed his darling. He steps forward to destroy it; the red lightning threatens, his countenance is more menacing still. The world, in trepidation, prepares to die but the avengers arm sinks down, and he steps back. He bids Urania look down. In the far distance she sees a loving couple on a green meadow lapped by a stream; her own image adorns the rustic altar. Before this the pair kneel down in sacrifice, yearning for the goddess who fled from there. And, like a mighty ocean of harmonies, the sound of their entreaties envelops the goddess.

187

SONG TEXTS May 1817


Ihr dunkles Auge fllet eine Trne, Der Schmerz der Liebenden hat sie erreicht; Ihr Unmut wird, wie eines Bogens Sehne Vom feuchten Morgentaue, nun erweicht. Verzeihe, heischt die gttliche Vershnte: Ich war zu rasch im Zorn, mein Dienst, er gilt Noch auf der Erde: wie man mich auch hhnte, Manch frommes Herz ist noch von mir erfllt. O lass mich zu den armen Menschen steigen, Sie lehren, was dein hoher Wille ist, Und ihnen mtterlich in Trumen zeigen Das Land, wo der Vollendung Blume spriesst. Es sei, ruft Zeus, reich will ich dich bestatten; Zeuch, Tochter, hin, mit frischem starken Sinn! Und komme, fhlst du deine Kraft ermatten, Zu uns herauf, des Himmels Brgerin. Oft sehen wir dich kommen, wieder scheiden, In immer lngern Rumen bleibst du aus, Und endlich gar es enden deine Leiden Die weite Erde nennst du einst dein Haus. Da, Dulderin! wirst du geachtet wohnen, Noch mehr, als wir. Vergnglich ist die Macht Die uns erfreut; der Sturm fllt unsre Thronen, Doch deine Sterne leuchten durch die Nacht.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836) END OF DISC 18

Tears fill her dark eyes; the lovers sorrow has touched her. Like a bowstring in the moist dew her displeasure is now softened. Forgive me, begs the goddess, appeased. I was too swift in my anger; my cult is still practised on earth; though I was scorned many a pious heart still holds me dear. Oh let me descend to wretched mankind to teach them your noble will and, like a mother, show them in dreams the land where the flower of perfection blooms. It shall be so, cries Zeus. I shall deck you out richly. Go forth, daughter, with new strength of purpose! And should you feel your powers wane, return to us, citizen of heaven. Often we shall see you come and depart again; for ever longer periods you shall remain away, and finally your sufferings will cease, and you will call the wide earth your home. You who have suffered will dwell there more highly revered than we are. The power we enjoy shall end; the storm shall destroy our thrones, but your stars shall shine through the night.

Disc bt Liebhaber in allen Gestalten A lover in all guises Track 1 D558. May 1817; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig
sung by Edith Mathis

Ich wollt ich wr ein Fisch, So hurtig und frisch; Und kmst Du zu angeln, Ich wrde nicht mangeln. Ich wollt ich wr ein Fisch, So hurtig und frisch. Ich wollt ich wre Gold! Dir immer im Sold; Und ttst Du was kaufen, Km ich gelaufen. Ich wollt ich wre Gold! Dir immer im Sold. Wr ich gut wie ein Schaf! Wie der Lwe so brav; Htt Augen wies Lchschen, Und Listen wies Fchschen. Wr ich gut wie ein Schaf! Wie der Lwe so brav; Doch bin ich wie ich bin, Und nimm mich nur hin! Willst bessre besitzen, So lass Dir sie schnitzen. Ich bin nun wie ich bin; So nimm mich nur hin!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

I wish I were a fish, so agile and fresh; and if you came to catch me, I would not fail you. I wish I were a fish, so agile and fresh. I wish I were gold, always at your service. And if you bought something, I would come running back again. I wish I were gold, always at your service! Would that I were as meek as a lamb and as brave as a lion; that I had the eyes of a lynx and the cunning of a fox! Would that I were as meek as a lamb and as brave as a lion! But I am as I am; just accept me like this. If you want a better man, then have him made for you. I am as I am; just accept me like this.

188

May 1817 SONG TEXTS Schweizerlied


Ufm Bergli Bin i gssse, Ha de Vgle Zu gschaut; Hnt gsunge, Hnt gsprunge, Hnts Nstli Gbaut. Im a Garte Bin i gstande, Ha de Imbli Zu gschaut; Hnt gbrummet, Hnt gsummet, Hnt Zelli Gbaut. Uf dWiese Bin i gange, Lugt i Summer Vgle a; Hnt gsoge, Hnt gfloge, Gar zu schn hnts Gtan. Und da kummt au Der Hansel, Und da zeig i Em froh, Wies sies mache, Und mer lachet, Und machets Au so.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

Swiss song
I sat on the mountainside watching the birds; they sang, they hopped, they built their nests. I stood in a garden, watching the bees; they hummed, they buzzed, they built their cells. I walked in the meadow, looking at the butterflies; they sucked, they flew, and they did it very prettily. Then Hansel comes along and I show him gaily how they do it; and we laugh, and do as they do.

bt Disc
2 Track

D559. May 1817; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by Edith Mathis

Der Goldschmiedsgesell
Es ist doch meine Nachbarin Ein allerliebstes Mdchen! Wie frh ich in der Werkstatt bin, Blick ich nach ihrem Ldchen. Zu Ring und Kette poch ich dann Die feinen goldnen Drchten. Ach! Denk ich, wann? und wieder, wann? Ist solch ein Ring fr Ktchen? Ich feile; wohl zerfeil ich dann Auch manches goldne Drchten. Der Meister brummt, der harte Mann! Er merkt, es war das Ldchen. Und flugs wie nur der Handel still, Gleich greift sie nach dem Rdchen, Ich weiss wohl, was sie spinnen will: Es hofft, das liebe Mdchen. Das kleine Fsschen tritt und tritt; Da denk ich mir das Wdchen, Das Strumpfband denk ich auch wohl mit, Ich schenkts dem lieben Mdchen.

The goldsmiths apprentice


My neighbour is an enchanting girl. In the morning, at my workbench, I gaze at her little shop. Then I beat the fine gold threads into ring and chain. Ah! When? I think, and again, when will such a ring be for Ktchen? I file away, and at times I file right through many a golden thread. My master grumbles, unfeeling man! He sees it was that little shop. And as soon as her work is finished she reaches for her spinning-wheel. I well know what she intends to spin. She has her hopes, the darling girl. As her little foot keeps on working I think of her dainty calves and of her garter; I gave it to the darling girl.

bt Disc
3 Track

D560. May 1817; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1850 in volume 48 of the Nachlass sung by Simon Keenlyside

189

SONG TEXTS May 1817


Und nach den Lippen fhrt der Schatz Das allerfeinste Fdchen. O wr ich doch an seinem Platz, Wie ksst ich mir das Mdchen.
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

My sweetheart takes the finest thread to her lips. Ah, if only I could be in its place, how I should kiss her!

Disc bt Nach einem Gewitter After a thunderstorm Track 4 D561. May 1817; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by Dame Felicity Lott

Auf den Blumen flimmern Perlen, Philomelens Klagen fliessen; Mutiger nun dunkle Erlen In die reinen Lfte spriessen. Und dem Tale, so erblichen, Kehret holde Rte wieder, In der Blten Wohlgerchen Baden Vgel ihr Gefieder. Hat die Brust sich ausgewittert, Seitwrts lehnt der Gott den Bogen, Und sein golden Antlitz zittert Reiner auf vershnten Wogen.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

Pearls glisten on the flowers; Philomels lament pours forth. More boldly now, dark alders shoot up into the pure air. And to the valley, grown so pale, a fair flush returns. In the fragrance of the flowers birds bathe their plumage. When the storm has ceased within the heart God tilts his bow sideways, and his golden countenance glitters more clearly upon the stilled waves.

Disc bt Die Blumensprache The language of flowers Track 5 D519. 1817 (?); first published by C A Spina in Vienna in 1867 as Op posth 173 No 5
sung by Dame Felicity Lott

Es deuten die Blumen der Herzens Gefhle, Sie sprechen manch heimliches Wort; Sie neigen sich traulich am schwankenden Stiele, Als zge die Liebe sie fort. Sie bergen verschmt sich im deckenden Laube, Als htte verraten der Wunsch sie dem Raube. Sie deuten im leise bezaubernden Bilde Der Frauen, der Mdchen Sinn; Sie deuten das Schne, die Anmut, die Milde, Sie deuten des Lebens Gewinn: Es hat mit der Knospe, so heimlich verschlungen, Der Jngling die Perle der Hoffnung gefunden. Sie weben der Sehnsucht, des Harmes Gedanken Aus Farben ins duftige Kleid. Nichts frommen der Trennung gehssige Schranken, Die Blumen verknden das Leid. Was laut nicht der Mund, der bewachte, darf sagen, Das waget die Huld sich in Blumen zu klagen.
ANTON PLATNER (17871855)

Flowers reveal the feelings of the heart; they speak many a secret word; they incline confidingly on their swaying stems as though drawn by love. They hide shyly amid concealing foliage, as though desire had betrayed them to seduction. They reveal, in a delicate, enchanting image, the nature of women and maidens; they signify beauty, grace, gentleness; they embody lifes rewards: in the bud, so secretly concealed, the youth has found the pearl of hope. With coloured strands they weave into their fragrant dress thoughts of yearning and sorrow. The hateful barriers of separation are of no importance; flowers proclaim our suffering. What guarded lips may not speak aloud kindness will dare to lament through flowers.

Disc bt Fischerlied Fishermans song Track 6 Third version, D562. May 1817; published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
sung by Stephen Varcoe

Das Fischergewerbe Gibt rstigen Mut! Wir haben zum Erbe Die Gter der Flut. Wir graben nicht Schtze. Wir pflgen kein Feld; Wir ernten im Netze, Wir angeln uns Geld.

The fishermans trade gives us a cheerful heart. Our inheritance is the wealth of the waters. We dig for no treasure, we plough no fields; we harvest with our nets, we fish for money.

190

May 1817 SONG TEXTS


Wir heben die Reusen Den Schilfbach entlang, Und ruhn bei den Schleusen, Zu sondern den Fang. Goldweiden beschatten Das moosige Dach; Wir schlummern auf Matten Im khlen Gemach. Mit roten Korallen Prangt Spiegel und Wand, Den Estrich der Hallen Deckt silberner Sand. Das Grtchen daneben Grnt lndlich umzunt Von kreuzenden Stben Mit Baste vereint. Der Herr, der in Strmen Der Mitternacht blitzt, Vermag uns zu schirmen, Und kennt, was uns ntzt. Gleich unter den Flgeln Des Ewigen ruht Der Rasengruft Hgel, Das Grab in der Flut.
We lay the fish traps along the reed-covered stream, and rest at the locks to sort our catch. Golden willows shade the mossy roof; we sleep on mats in the cool chamber. Mirror and wall are resplendent with red corals; silver sand covers the floors of the halls. Close by the little garden blooms, ringed by a rustic fence of criss-crossed stakes mingled with velvet. The Lord, whose thunderbolts flash in midnight storms, can protect us and knows what we need. Beneath the wings of the Eternal One rest both the mound of the grassy tomb and the grave beneath the waters.

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

Die Einsiedelei
Es rieselt, klar und wehend, Ein Quell im Eichenwald; Da whl ich einsam gehend, Mir meinen Aufenthalt. Mir dienet zur Kapelle Ein Grttchen, duftig, frisch; Zu meiner Klausnerzelle Verschlungenes Gebsch. Wie sich das Herz erweitert Im engen, dichten Wald! Den den Trbsinn heitert Der traute Schatten bald. Kein berlegner Spher Erforscht hier meine Spur; Hier bin ich frei und nher Der Einfalt und Natur. O blieb ich von den Ketten Des Weltgewirres frei! Knnt ich zu dir mich retten, Du traute Siedelei! Froh, dass ich dem Gebrause Des Menschenschwarms entwich, Baut ich hier eine Klause Fr Liebchen und fr mich.

The hermitage
In the oak wood flows a stream, clean and rippling. Wandering alone, I choose there my resting place. A grotto, cool and fragrant serves as my chapel. Entwined bushes are my hermits cell. How the heart is elated in the thick, dense forest! Gloomy melancholy is soon cheered by its friendly shade. Here no disdainful eye spies on my steps; here I am free, and closer to simplicity and to nature. Would that I were free from the fetters of the worlds tumult! Would that I could find salvation in you, beloved hermitage! Glad to escape the din of the swarming throng, I should build here a retreat for my love and me.

bt Disc
7 Track

D563. May 1817; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by Philip Langridge

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

Gretchens Bitte Gretchen im Zwinger

Gretchens prayer Gretchen caged

bt Disc
8 Track

D564. May 1817; published as a fragment in 1838 completed (from Die Scherben vor meinem Fenster) by Benjamin Britten sung by Marie McLaughlin

Ach, neige Du Schmerzenreiche, Dein Antlitz gndig meiner Not!

You who are laden with sorrow, incline your face graciously to my distress.

191

SONG TEXTS June 1817


Das Schwert im Herzen, Mit tausend Schmerzen Blickst auf zu deines Sohnes Tod. Zum Vater blickst du, Und Seufzer schickst du Hinauf um sein und deine Not. Wer fhlet, Wie whlet Der Schmerz mir im Gebein? Was mein armes Herz hier banget, Was es zittert, was verlanget, Weisst nur du, nur du allein! Wohin ich immer gehe Wie weh, wie weh, wie wehe Wird mir im Busen hier! Ich bin, ach, kaum alleine, Ich wein, ich wein, ich weine, Das Herz zerbricht in mir. Die Scherben vor meinem Fenster Bethaut ich mit Trnen, ach! Als ich am frhen Morgen Dir diese Blumen brach. Schien hell in meine Kmmer Die Sonne frh herauf, Sass ich in allem Jammer In meinem Bett schon auf. Hilf! rette mich vom Schmach und Tod!
JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (17491832)

With the sword in your heart, and a thousand sorrows, you look up at your dying son. You gaze up to the Father, and let a sigh rise up for his affliction and your own. Who can feel how the pain gnaws away in my bones? What my poor heart fears, what it dreads, what it craves, only you can know! Wherever I go, how it hurts, how it hurts here in my breast! Alas, no sooner am I alone than I weep, I weep, and my heart breaks within me. Ah, I sprinkled with dewy tears the broken pots at my window! When early this morning I plucked these flowers for you. When the early sun shone brightly up into my room I, in all my misery, was already sitting up in bed. Help! Save me from shame and death!

Disc bt Der Strom The river Track 9 D565. June (?) 1817; first published by E W Fritsch in Leipzig in 1876
sung by Stephen Varcoe

Mein Leben wlzt sich murrend fort, Es steigt und fllt in krausen Wogen, Hier bumt es sich, jagt nieder dort In wilde Zgen, hohen Bogen. Das stille Tal, das grne Feld Durchrauscht es nun mit leisem Beben, Sich Ruh ersehnend, ruhige Welt, Ergtzt es sich am ruhigen Leben. Doch nimmer findend, was es sucht, Und immer sehnend tost es weiter, Unmutig rollts auf steter Flucht, Wird nimmer froh, wird nimmer heiter.
ANONYMOUS

My life rolls grumbling onwards, rising and falling in curling waves; here it rears up, there it plunges down, with wild spurts and soaring curves. Now, gently quivering, it ripples through silent valleys and green fields, yearning for peace, a tranquil world, and delighting in a life of calm. Yet never finding what it seeks, forever longing, it surges onwards; discontented, it rolls on in ceaseless flight, never joyful, never serene.

Disc bt Der Jngling an der Quelle The youth by the spring Track bl D300. c1817; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1842 in volume 36 of the Nachlass
sung by Christoph Prgardien

Leise, rieselnder Quell! Ihr wallenden, flispernden Pappeln! Euer Schlummergerusch Wecket die Liebe nur auf. Linderung sucht ich bei euch, Und sie zu vergessen, die Sprde; Ach, und Bltter und Bach Seufzen, Luise, dir nach!

Softly rippling brook, swaying, whispering poplars, your slumbrous murmur awakens only love. I sought consolation in you, wishing to forget her, she who is so aloof. But alas, the leaves and the brook sigh for you, Louise!

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

192

June August 1817 SONG TEXTS Das Grab


Das Grab ist tief und stille, Und schauderhaft sein Rand, Es deckt mit schwarzer Hlle Ein unbekanntes Land. Das Lied der Nachtigallen Tnt nicht in seinem Schooss. Der Freundschaft Rosen fallen Nur auf des Hgels Moos. Verlassne Brute ringen Umsonst die Hnde wund; Der Waise Klagen dringen Nicht in der Tiefe Grund.

The grave
Deep and silent is the grave, terrible its brink; with its black shroud it covers an unknown land. The nightingales song does not sound in its depths. Only friendships roses fall on the mossy mound. In vain forsaken brides wring their hands sore; the orphans wailing does not reach its lowest depths.

bt Disc
bm Track

Fourth setting, D569. June 1817; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig sung by The London Schubert Chorale (directed by Stephen Layton)

JOHANN GAUDENZ, FREIHERR VON SALIS-SEEWIS (17621834)

Iphigenia
Blht denn hier an Tauris Strande, Aus dem teuren Vaterlande keine Blume, Weht kein Hauch Aus den seligen Gefilden, Wo Geschwister mit mir spielten? Ach, mein Leben ist ein Rauch! Trauernd wank ich in dem Haine, Keine Hoffnung nhr ich keine, Meine Heimat zu ersehn, Und die See mit hohen Wellen, Die an Klippen sich zerschellen, bertubt mein leises Flehn. Gttin, die du mich gerettet, An die Wildnis angekettet, Rette mich zum zweitenmal; Gndig lasse mich den Meinen, Lass o Gttin! mich erscheinen In des grossen Knigs Saal!
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

Iphigenia
Does no flower from my beloved homeland bloom here on the shore of Tauris? Does no breeze blow from the blessed fields where my brothers and sisters played with me? Ah, my life is but smoke! Sadly, hesitantly, I walk through the grove; I cherish no hope none of ever seeing my homeland. And the sea, with its mighty waves crashing against the cliffs, drowns my soft pleas. Goddess who rescued me and chained me in this wilderness, rescue me a second time; mercifully grant, O goddess, that I may appear before my own people in the hall of the great king!

bt Disc
bn Track

D573. July 1817; published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1829 as Op 98 No 3 sung by Ann Murray

Die Entzckung an Laura

Enchanted by Laura

bt Disc
bo Track

Second setting, D577. August 1817; published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig two fragments of the same song linked and completed by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by Sir Thomas Allen

Laura, ber diese Welt zu flchten Whr ich, Wenn dein Blick in meine Blicke flimmt; therlfte trum ich einzusaugen, Wenn mein Bild in deiner sanften Augen Himmelblauem Spiegel schwimmt. Leierklang aus Paradieses Fernen, Harfenschwung aus angenehmem Sternen Ras ich, in mein trunknes Ohr zu ziehn; Meine Muse fhlt die Schferstunde, Wenn von deinem wollustheissen Munde Silbertne ungern fliehn. Amoretten seh ich Flgel schwingen, Hinter dir die trunknen Fichten springen Wie von Orpheus Saitenruf belebt; Rascher rollen um mich her die Polen, Wenn im Wirbeltanz deine Sohle Flchtig, wie die Welle, schwebt.

Laura, when your shimmering eyes are reflected in mine, I imagine I am fleeing this world. I dream I am breathing ethereal air when my image floats in the sky-blue mirror of your gentle eyes. I burn to draw to my intoxicated ears the sound of lyres from distant Paradise, the flourish of harps from more pleasurable stars; my muse senses the hour of love when from your warm, sensual lips silvery notes reluctantly escape. I see cupids flap their wings; behind you the drunken spruce trees dance as if brought to life at the call of Orpheus strings. The poles revolve more swiftly around me when in the whirling dance your feet slide, as fleeting as the waves.

193

SONG TEXTS August September 1817


Deine Blicke, wenn sie Liebe lcheln, Knnten Leben durch den Marmor fcheln, Felsenadern Pulse leihn; Trume werden um mich her zu Wesen, Kann ich nur in deinen Augen lesen, Laura, Laura mein!
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Your glances, when they smile love, could stir marble to life and make the veins of rocks pulsate. Around me dreams become reality; if I can only read in your eyes: Laura, my Laura!

Disc bt Abschied von einem Freunde Farewell to a friend Track bp D578. 24 August 1817; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1838 in volume 29 of the Nachlass
sung by Edith Mathis

Lebe wohl! Du lieber Freund! Ziehe hin in fernes Land, Nimm der Freundschaft trautes Band Und bewahrs in treuer Hand! Lebe wohl! Du lieber Freund! Hr in diesem Trauersang Meines Herzens innern Drang, Tnt er doch so dumpf und bang. Lebe wohl! Du lieber Freund! Scheiden heisst das bittre Wort, Weh, es ruft Dich von uns fort Hin an den Bestimmungsort. Lebe wohl! Du lieber Freund! Wenn dies Lied Dein Herz ergreift, Freundes Schatten nher schweift, Meiner Seele Saiten streift.
FRANZ SCHUBERT (17971828)

Farewell, dear friend! Go forth to a distant land; take this cherished bond of friendship and keep it faithfully. Farewell, dear friend! Hear in this mournful song the yearning of my inmost heart, muffled and anxious. Farewell, dear friend! Parting is a bitter word; alas, it calls you from us to the place decreed for you. Farewell, dear friend! If this song should stir your heart, my friendly spirit shall hover close by, touching the strings of my soul.

Disc bt Der Knabe in der Wiege Wiegenlied The infant in the cradle Lullaby Track bq D579. Autumn 1817; first published by J P Gotthard in Vienna in 1872
sung by Anthony Rolfe Johnson

Er schlft so sss, der Mutter Blicke hangen An ihres Lieblings leisem Atemzug, Den sie mit stillem sehnsuchtsvollem Bangen So lange unterm Herzen trug. Sie sieht so froh die vollen Wangen glhen In gelbe Ringellocken halb versteckt, Und will das rmchen sanft herunter ziehen, Das sich im Schlummer ausgestreckt. Und leis und leiser schaukelt sie die Wiege Und singt den kleinen Schlfer leis in Ruh; Ein Lcheln spielet um die holden Zge, Doch bleibt das Auge friedlich zu. Erwachst du Kleiner, o so lchle wieder, Und schau ihr hell ins Mutterangesicht: So lauter Liebe schaut es auf dich nieder, Noch kennest du die Liebe nicht.
ANTON OTTENWALT (17891845)

He sleeps so sweetly. His mothers gaze hangs on the soft breathing of her darling, whom, with silent, anxious yearning, she carried for so long beneath her heart. With joy sees his full cheeks glowing, half-hidden in yellow curls, and gently tucks in the little arm that lies stretched out in sleep. Ever more gently she rocks the cradle, and softly sings the infant to sleep; a smile plays around his fair features, but his eyes stay peacefully closed. When you awake, little one, smile once more, and look brightly into your mothers face. With pure love she looks down upon you, though you do not yet know what love is.

Disc bt Vollendung Fulfilment Track br D579a (formerly D989). September October 1817; first published by Brenreiter in Kassel in 1970
sung by Brigitte Fassbaender

Wenn ich einst das Ziel errungen habe, In den Lichtgefilden jener Welt, Heil, der Trne dann an meinem Grabe Die auf hingestreute Rosen fllt! Sehnsuchtsvoll, mit banger Ahnungswonne, Ruhig, wie der mondbeglnzte Hain, Lchelnd, wie beim Niedergang die Sonne, Harr ich, gttliche Vollendung, dein!

When one day I reach my journeys end in the radiant fields of the world beyond, then I shall hail the tears which fall on the roses scattered upon my grave. Full of yearning, with anxious joy of anticipation, as calm as the moonlit grove, smiling, as at the setting sun, I shall await you, divine fulfilment!

194

September 1817 SONG TEXTS


Eil, o eile mich empor zu flgeln Wo sich unter mir die Welten drehn, Wo im Lebensquell sich Palmen spiegeln, Wo die Liebenden sich wieder sehn.
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

Hasten, O hasten to wing me on high, to where the spheres turn beneath me, where palm trees are mirrored in the spring of life, where lovers are reunited.

Die Erde
Wenn sanft entzckt mein Auge sieht, Wie schn im Lenz der Erde Blht; Wie jedes Wesen Angeschmiegt An ihren Segensbrsten liegt; Und wie sie jeden Sugling liebt, Ihm gern die milde Nahrung gibt, Und so in steter Jugendkraft Hervor bringt, Nhrt und Wachstum schafft: Dann fhl ich hohen Busendrang Zu rhmen den mit Tat und Sang, Dess wundervoller Allmachstruf Die weite Welt so schn erschuf.
FRIEDRICH VON MATTHISSON (17611831)

The earth
When with tender rapture my eyes behold how fair the earth blooms in spring, how every creature nestles at her bountiful breasts And how she loves each infant, and gladly gives it gentle nourishment and thus, with constant youthful strength, brings forth, nurtures and creates growth; Then I have an ardent, heartfelt longing to praise in deed and song him whose wondrous omnipotence made this vast world so beautiful.

bt Disc
bs Track

D579b (formerly D989). September October 1817; first published by Brenreiter in Kassel in 1970 sung by Elizabeth Connell

Gruppe aus dem Tartarus


Horch wie Murmeln des emprten Meeres, Wie durch hohler Felsen Becken weint ein Bach, Sthnt dort dumpfigtief ein schweres leeres, Qualerpresstes Ach! Schmerz verzerret Ihr Gesicht Verzweiflung sperret Ihren Rachen fluchend auf. Hohl sind ihre Augen ihre Blicke Sphen bang nach des Cocytus Brcke, Folgen trnend seinem Trauerlauf. Fragen sich einander ngstlich leise, Ob noch nicht Vollendung sei? Ewigkeit schwingt ber ihnen Kreise, Bricht die Sense des Saturns entzwei.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Group from Hades


Hark! Like the angry murmuring of the sea, or a brook sobbing through pools in hollow rocks, from the depths arises a muffled groan, heavy, empty and tormented! Pain distorts their faces in despair their mouths open wide, cursing. Their eyes are hollow their frightened gaze strains towards Cocytus bridge, following as they weep that rivers mournful course. Anxiously, softly, they ask one another if the end is yet nigh. Eternity sweeps in circles above them, breaking Saturns scythe in two.

bt Disc
bt Track

D583. September 1817; published by Sauer und Leidesdorf in Vienna in October 1823 as Op 24 No 1 sung by Thomas Hampson

Atys
Der Knabe seufzt bers grne Meer, Vom fernenden Ufer kam er her, Er wnscht sich mchtige Schwingen, Die sollten ihn ins heimische Land, Woran ihn ewige Sehnsucht mahnt, Im rauschenden Fluge bringen. O Heimweh! unergrndlicher Schmerz, Was folterst du das junge Herz? Kann Liebe dich nicht verdrngen? So willst du die Frucht, die herrlich reift, Die Gold und flssiger Purpur streift, Mit tdlichem Feuer versengen? Ich liebe, ich rase, ich hab sie gesehn, Die Lfte durchschnitt sie im Sturmeswehn, Auf lwengezogenem Wagen, Ich musste flehn: o nimm mich mit! Mein Leben ist dster und abgeblht; Wirst du meine Bitte versagen?

Attis
With a sigh the youth gazes over the green sea; he came from a distant shore, and longs for mighty wings that would take him in whirring flight to the homeland for which he yearns eternally. O longing for home, unfathomable pain, why do you torment the young heart? Can love not drive you out? Will you then scorch with your deadly fire the fruit that ripens gloriously, kissed by gold and liquid purple? I live, I rage, I have seen her; like a whirlwind she swept through the air in a chariot drawn by lions. I had to entreat: Take me with you! My life is bleak and barren. Will you deny my plea?

bt Disc
bu Track

D585. September 1817; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1833 in volume 22 of the Nachlass sung by Thomas Hampson

195

SONG TEXTS September 1817


Sie schaute mit gtigem Lcheln mich an; Nach Thrazien zog uns das Lwengespann, Da dien ich als Priester ihr eigen. Den Rasenden krnzt ein seliges Glck, Der Aufgewachte schaudert zurck: Kein Gott will sich hlfreich erzeigen. Dort, hinter den Bergen im scheidenden Strahl Des Abends entschlummert mein vterlich Tal; O wr ich jenseits der Wellen! Seufzet der Knabe. Doch Cymbelgetn Verkndet die Gttin; er strzt von Hhn In Grnde und waldige Stellen.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

She looked upon me with a kindly smile; the lions bore us off to Thrace where I serve as her priest. The madman is filled with blissful happiness; but when he awakes he recoils in fear: there is no god to lend his aid. There beyond the mountain, in the dying rays of evening, my native valley begins to slumber. O that I might cross the waters! Thus sighs the youth. But the clash of cymbals proclaims the goddess; he plunges from the heights into the woods deep below.

Disc bt Elysium Elysium Track cl D584. September 1817; first published by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in 1830 as volume 6 of the Nachlass
sung by Brigitte Fassbaender

Vorber die sthnende Klage! Elysiums Freudengelage Ersufen jegliches Ach. Elysiums Leben Ewige Wonne, ewiges Schweben Durch lachende Fluren ein fltender Bach. Jugendlich milde Beschwebt die Gefilde Ewiger Mai; Die Stunden entfliehen in goldenen Trumen, Die Seele schwillt aus in unendlichen Rumen. Wahrheit reisst hier den Schleier entzwei. Unendliche Freude Durchwallet das Herz. Hier mangelt der Name dem trauernden Leide Sanftes Entzcken nur heisset man Schmerz. Hier strecket der wallende Pilger die matten Brennenden Glieder in suselnden Schatten, Leget die Brde auf ewig dahin Seine Sichel entfllt hier dem Schnitter, Eingesungen von Harfengezitter Trumt er, geschnittene Halme zu sehn. Dessen Fahne Donnerstrme wallte, Dessen Ohren Mordgebrll umhallte, Berge bebten unter dessen Donnergang, Schlft hier linde bei des Baches Rieseln, Der wie Silber spielet ber Kieseln; Ihm verhallet wilder Speere Klang. Hier umarmen sich getreue Gatten, Kssen sich auf grnen samtnen Matten, Liebgekost vom Balsamwest; Ihre Krone findet hier die Liebe, Sicher vor des Todes strengem Hiebe Feiert sie ein ewig Hochzeitfest.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

Cease all plaintive moaning! Elysian banquets drown all suffering. Elysian life is eternal bliss, eternal lightness, a melodious stream flowing through smiling meadows. Eternal May, young and tender, hovers over the landscape; the hours fly past in golden dreams, the soul expands in infinite space. Here truth rends the veil. Endless joy fills the heart. Here grieving sorrow has no name; and rapture that is but gentle seems like pain. Here the pilgrim stretches his weary, burning limbs in the murmuring shade, and lays down his burden for ever. The reapers sickle falls from his hand; lulled to sleep by quivering harps he dreams he sees blades of mown grass. He whose standard raged with violent storms, whose ears rang with murderous cries, and beneath whose thunderous steps mountains quaked, sleeps gently here by the babbling stream that plays like silver over the pebbles. For him the violent clash of spears grows faint. Here faithful couples embrace and kiss on the green velvet sward caressed by the balmy west wind. Here love finds its crown; safe from the cruel stroke of death it celebrates an eternal wedding feast.

196

September October 1817 SONG TEXTS Erlafsee Lake Erlaf

bt Disc
cm Track

D586. September 1817; first published by Anton Doll in Vienna in February 1818 in a supplement to Mahlerisches Taschenbuch and by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1822 as Op 8 No 3 sung by Edith Mathis

Mir ist so wohl, so weh Am stillen Erlafsee. Heilig Schweigen In Fichtenzweigen. Regungslos Der blaue Schoss, Nur der Wolken Schatten fliehn berm dunklen Spiegel hin, Frische Winde Kruseln linde Das Gewsser Und der Sonne Gldne Krone Flimmert blsser. Mir ist so wohl, so weh Am stillen Erlafsee.
JOHANN MAYRHOFER (17871836)

I am so happy, and yet so sad, by the calm waters of Lake Erlaf. A solemn silence amid the pine-branches; motionless the blue depths. Only the clouds shadows flit across the dark surface. Cool breezes gently ruffle the water, and the suns golden corona grows paler. I am so happy, and yet so sad, by the calm waters of Lake Erlaf.

An den Frhling
Willkommen, schner Jngling! Du Wonne der Natur! Mit deinem Blumenkrbchen Willkommen auf der Flur! Ei, ei! da bist ja wieder! Und bist so lieb und schn! Und freun wir uns so herzlich, Entgegen dir zu gehn. Denkst auch noch an mein Mdchen? Ei, Lieber, denke doch! Dort liebte mich das Mdchen Unds Mdchen liebt mich noch! Frs Mdchen manches Blmchen Erbat ich mir von dir. Ich komm und bitte wieder, Und du? Du gibst es mir.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

To spring
Welcome, fair youth, natures delight! Welcome to the meadows with your basket of flowers! Ah, you are here again, so dear and lovely! We feel such joy as we come to meet you. Do you still think of my sweetheart? Ah, dear friend, think of her! There my girl loved me, and she loves me still! I asked you for many flowers for my sweetheart. I come and ask you once more, and you? You give them to me.

bt Disc
cn Track

Second setting, D587. October 1817; first published in 1885 in volume 7 of the Peters Edition, Leipzig sung by Dame Janet Baker

Der Alpenjger
Willst du nicht das Lmmlein hten? Lmmlein ist so fromm und sanft, Nhrt sich von des Grases Blten, Spielend an des Baches Ranft. Mutter, Mutter, lass mich gehen, Jagen nach des Berges Hhen! Willst du nicht die Herde locken Mit des Hornes munterm Klang? Lieblich tnt der Schall der Glocken In des Waldes Lustgesang. Mutter, Mutter, lass mich gehen, Schweifen nach den wilden Hhen!

The Alpine huntsman


Will you not tend the lamb, so meek and mild? It feeds on flowers in the grass, gambolling beside the brook. Mother, let me go hunting in the high mountains. Will you not call the herd with the merry sound of your horn? The bells mingle sweetly with the joyful song of the forest. Mother, let me go and roam the wild heights.

bt Disc
co Track

D588. October 1817; published by Cappi & Co in Vienna in 1825 as Op 37 No 2 sung by Dame Janet Baker

197

SONG TEXTS November 1817


Und der Knabe ging zu jagen, Und es treibt und reisst ihn fort, Rastlos fort mit blindem Wagen An des Berges finstern Ort, Vor ihm her mit Windesschnelle Flieht die zitternde Gazelle. Auf der Felsen nackte Rippen Klettert sie mit leichtem Schwung, Durch den Riss gespaltener Klippen Trgt sie der gewagte Sprung, Aber hinter ihr verwogen Folgt er mit dem Todesbogen. Mit der Jammers stummen Blicken Fleht sie zu den harten Mann, Fleht umsonst, denn loszudrcken Legt er schon den Bogen an. Pltzlich aus der Felsenspalte Tritt der Geist, der Bergesalte. Und mit seinen Gtterhnden Schtzt er das gequlte Tier. Musst du Tod und Jammer senden, Ruft er, bis herauf zu mir? Raum fr alle hat die Erde, Was verfolgst du meine Herde?
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

And the boy went hunting, driven relentlessly onwards with blind daring, to the bleak parts of the mountain. Before him, swift as the wind, flees the trembling gazelle. On the bare rock face she bounds effortlessly, bravely she leaps across chasms in the rocks; but he pursues her boldly with his deadly bow. Gazing in mute distress she implores the pitiless man: but in vain, for already he draws his bow and prepares to shoot. Suddenly, from a rocky cleft, the spirit of the mountain steps forth. With his godlike hands he protects the tormented beast. Must you even bring death and woe, he cries, up here to me? The earth has room for all; why do you persecute my herd?

Disc bt Lied eines Kindes A childs song Track cp D596. November 1817; first published in 1895 in series 20 of the Gesamtausgabe, Leipzig
fragment, completed by Reinhard van Hoorickx sung by Edith Mathis

Lauter Freude fhl ich, Lauter Liebe hr ich, Ich so berglcklich Frhlich spielend Kind. Dort der gute Vater, Hier die liebe Mutter Rund herum wir Kinder. Froh und frhlich sind!
ANONYMOUS

I feel nothing but joy, I hear nothing but love, I am such a lucky child, playing happily. There my good father, here my dear mother; and around them we children are glad and merry!

Disc bt Die Forelle The trout Track cq D550. c1817; first published in December 1820 as a supplement to the Wiener Zeitschrift fr Kunst, Literatur, Theater
und Mode and then by A Diabelli & Co in Vienna in January 1825, designated Op 32 in 1827 sung by Edith Mathis

198

In einem Bchlein helle Da schoss in froher Eil Die launische Forelle Vorber wie ein Pfeil. Ich stand an dem Gestade Und sah in ssser Ruh Des muntern Fischleins Bade Im klaren Bchlein zu. Ein Fischer mit der Rute Wohl an dem Ufer stand, Und sahs mit kaltem Blute, Wie sich das Fischlein wand. So lang dem Wasser Helle, So dacht ich, nicht gebricht, So fngt er die Forelle Mit seiner Angel nicht. Doch endlich ward dem Diebe Die Zeit zu lang. Er macht Das Bchlein tckisch trbe, Und eh ich es gedacht,

In a limpid brook the capricious trout in joyous haste darted by like an arrow. I stood on the bank in blissful peace, watching the lively fish swim in the clear brook. An angler with his rod stood on the bank cold-bloodedly watching the fishs contortions. As long as the water is clear, I thought, he wont catch the trout with his rod. But at length the thief grew impatient. Cunningly he made the brook cloudy, and in an instant

November 1817 SONG TEXTS


So zuckte seine Rute, Das Fischlein zappelt dran, Und ich mit regem Blute Sah die Betrogne an.
CHRISTIAN FRIEDRICH DANIEL SCHUBART (17391791) END OF DISC 19

his rod quivered, and the fish struggled on it. And I, my blood boiling, looked on at the cheated creature.

Der Kampf
Nein, lnger werd ich diesen Kampf nicht kmpfen, Den Riesenkampf der Pflicht. Kannst du des Herzens Flammentrieb nicht dmpfen, So fordre, Tugend, dieses Opfer nicht. Geschworen hab ichs, ja, ich habs geschworen, Mich selbst zu bndigen. Hier ist dein Kranz, er sei auf ewig mir verloren, Nimm ihn zurck und lass mich sndigen! Zerrissen sei, was wir bedungen haben; Sie liebt mich deine Krone sei verscherzt! Glckselig, wer, in Wonnetrunkenheit begraben, So leicht wie ich den tiefen Fall verschmerzt. Sie sieht den Wurm an meiner Jugend Blume nagen Und meinen Lenz entflohn; Bewundert still mein heldenmtiges Entsagen, Und grossmutsvoll beschliesst sie meinen Lohn. Misstraue, schne Seele, dieser Engelgte! Dein Mitleid waffnet zum Verbrechen mich. Gibts in des Lebens unermesslichem Gebiete, Gibts einen andern schnern Lohn als dich? Als das Verbrechen, das ich ewig fliehen wollte? Tyrannisches Geschick! Der einzge Lohn, der meine Tugend krnen sollte, Ist meiner Tugend letzter Augenblick!
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

The battle
No! I shall fight this battle no longer, this mighty battle of duty. If you cannot cool the fierce ardour within my heart, then, Virtue, do not demand this sacrifice. I took a vow, yes, I took a vow to master myself. Here is your crown; let it be lost to me for ever. Take it back and let me sin. Let us tear up the bond we have made: she loves me your crown shall be forfeit. Happy he who, drunk with ecstasy, takes his precipitous fall as lightly as I. She sees the worm gnawing at the flower of my youth; she sees the spring of my life slip by; she silently admires my heroic renunciation, and generously decides on my reward. Fair soul, distrust this angelic kindness! Your compassion armed me for my crime. Is there in lifes vast realm a fairer reward than you? Than the crime which I sought to flee for ever? Tyrannical fate! The sole reward which was to crown my virtue is my virtues final moment.

ck Disc
1 Track

D594. November 1817; published by Josef Czerny in Vienna in March 1829 as Op posth 110 sung by Neal Davies

Thekla Eine Geisterstimme


Wo ich sei, und wo mich hingewendet, Als mein flchtger Schatte dir entschwebt? Hab ich nicht beschlossen und geendet, Hab ich nicht geliebet und gelebt? Willst du nach den Nachtigallen fragen, Die mit seelenvoller Melodie Dich entzckten in des Lenzes Tagen? Nur so lang sie liebten, waren sie. Ob ich den Verlorenen gefunden? Glaube mir, ich bin mit ihm vereint, Wo sich nicht mehr trennt, was sich verbunden, Dort, wo keine Trne wird geweint. Dorten Wirst auch du uns wieder finden, Wenn dein Lieben unserm Lieben gleicht; Dort ist auch der Vater, frei von Snden, Den der blutge Mord nicht mehr erreicht.

Thekla A phantom voice


You ask me where I am, where I turned to when my fleeting shadow vanished. Have I not finished, reached my end? Have I not loved and lived? Would you ask after the nightingales who, with soulful melodies, delighted you in the days of spring? They lived only as long as they loved. Did I find my lost beloved? Believe me, I am united with him in the place where those who have formed a bond are never separated, where no tears are shed. There you will also find us again, when your love is as our love; there too is our father, free from sin, whom bloody murder can no longer strike.

ck Disc
2 Track

Second setting, D595. November 1817; published by Thaddus Weigl in Vienna in December 1827 as Op 88 No 2 sung by Arleen Auger

199

SONG TEXTS December 1817


Und er fhlt, dass ihn kein Wahn betrogen, Als er aufwrts zu den Sternen sah; Den wie jeder wgt, wird ihm gewogen, Wer es glaubt, dem ist das Heilge nah. Dort gehalten wird in jenen Rumen Jedem schnen glubigen Gefhl; Wage du, zu irren und zu trumen: Hoher Sinn liegt oft im kindschen Spiel.
FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER (17591805)

And he senses that he was not deluded when he gazed up at the stars. For as a man judges so he shall be judged; whoever believes this is close to holiness. There, in space, every fine, deeply-felt belief will be consummated; dare to err and to dream: often a higher meaning lies behind childlike play.

Disc ck Das Drfchen The hamlet Track 3 D598 (D641 in Deutsch 1). December 1817; published by Cappi und Diabelli in Vienna in 1822 as Op 11 No 1
sung by John Mark Ainsley, Jamie MacDougall, Simon Keenlyside and Michael George

Ich rhme mir mein Drfchen hier, Denn schnre Auen als ringsumher Die Blicke schauen, blhn nirgends mehr. Dort hrenfelder und Wiesengrn, Dem blaue Wlder die Grenze ziehn, An jener Hhe die Schferei, Und in der Nhe mein Sorgenfrei. So nenn ich meine geliebte, Meine kleine Einsiedelei, Worin ich lebe zur Lust erweckt, Die ein Gewebe Von Ulm und Rebe Grn berdeckt. Dort krnzen Schlehen die braune Kluft, Und Pappeln wehen in blauer Luft. Mit sanftem Rieseln schleicht hier gemach Auf Silberkieseln ein heller Bach, Fliesst unter den Zweigen, Die ber ihn Sich wlbend neigen, Bald schchtern hin. Lsst bald im Spiegel Den grnen Hgel, Wo Lmmer gehn, Des Ufers Bschchen Und alle Fischen Im Grunde sehn. Da gleiten Schmerlen Und blasen Perlen, Ihr schneller Lauf Geht bald hernieder, Und bald herauf Zur Flche wieder. O Seligkeit, Dass doch die Zeit Dich nie zerstre, Mir frisches Blut Und frohen Mut Stets neugewhre.
GOTTFRIED AUGUST BRGER (17471794)

I take pride in my hamlet here, for nowhere else do fairer meadows bloom than the eye can see all around. Behold the fields of corn and the green pastures, bordered by blue woods. On yonder hill the sheep farm, and nearby my Free from Care. For that is what I call my beloved little retreat where I live in joy, and which a network of elms and vines drapes in green. There sloes adorn the brown crevasse, and poplars sway in the blue air. A limpid brook steals unhurriedly over silver pebbles, and flows beneath branches that arch shyly above it. Now it mirrors on its bed the green hillside where lambs frisk, the little bushes on the bank and all the little fish. There loach glide and pearls bubble; their rapid course goes now down, now up again to the surface. O bliss! May time never destroy you! Grant me ever anew fresh blood and a joyful heart!

200

1818 A SCHUBERT CALENDAR A SCHUBERT CALENDAR 1818 aged 21 The composers father is promoted to a new position in December which means a change of working address to the Rossau the present Grnertorgasse 11. Depression regarding his own circumstances seems to have affected Schuberts productivity. In the meanwhile his works are beginning to become known to the general public. In February the Mayrhofer setting Erlafsee is published as a supplement to an almanac the first Schubert song to appear in print. One of the Overtures in Italian style is performed at the Theater an der Wien (the first orchestral work to be played in public), although Schuberts application to be a member of the Musikverein is refused. He seems to have jumped at the chance to leave Vienna to work at the country house of Count Esterhzy (17771834) in Zselz, Hungary, as music teacher to his two young daughters, the countesses Marie (18021837) and Karoline (18051851). He teaches them daily and writes a singing exercise for them to sing together. He is there, not altogether happily, from 7 July to 19 November, but meets some interesting people of his own age including the singer Karl von Schnstein (17961876) who was later to sing Die schne Mllerin. Settings of the poet Aloys Schreiber probably reflect the noble familys religious enthusiasms. On his return to Vienna it is clear that Schubert cannot face living at home. Mayrhofer (whose long poem Einsamkeit has been set in Zselz as Schuberts riposte to Beethovens cycle An die ferne Geliebte disc 38) offers to share his lodgings in the house of Frau Anna Sanssouci in the Wipplingerstrasse with the composer. Here Schubert begins work on a commission obtained through Vogl for the Krtnertor Theatre this is Der Zwillingsbrder, D647, a Singspiel that casts Vogl in the role of twin brothers. The three large Petrarch settings date from November and December of this year. Some other works of 1818 Adrast, a Singspiel with a text of Mayrhofer (between 1817 and 1819, D137); a large quantity of piano duets Rondo in D (D608), Sonata in B flat (D617), Deutscher in G major (D618), Eight Variations on a French song (D624); Deutsches Requiem in G minor (D621).

Die Geselligkeit, autograph of the poetcomposer Johann Karl Unger and probably the source of Schuberts setting of the same words, D609

201

<