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Jennifer Thomas

Fifth Grade
3/21/2013 from 11:25-12:25


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LESSON PLAN
JMU Elementary Education Program

A. TITLE/TYPE OF LESSON: The Growing Corner/Growing Patterns

B. CONTEXT OF LESSON
This activity is appropriate for the students because the students have had practice with patterns already.
They have worked with input and output tables, which relates to functions and expressions. The students
have analyzed many different function tables, and they have had to discover what the patter is. With these
tables, the students have had experience with growing patterns. The table was x+22=y. Many of the
students already knew how to write this equation or a formula. Some students also wrote n+22 as the
formula, which shows the foundations that the students have been forming with equations and functions.
The teacher only required an answer of +22, but many students were asking if x+22=y or n+22 were okay
answers. The students were excited and interested in the fact that they were able to go a step further than
what was required. This lesson will be used to help the students further build the idea that patterns and
functions can be represented in many different ways. This lesson can also be used to help students
understand that there are mathematical relationships to growing patterns.

C. LEARNING OBJECTIVES

1. The students will build the first four arrangements of the Corner pattern.
2. The students will draw/build and describethe fifth arrangement of the Corner pattern.
3. The students will determinethe number of cubes in the twentieth arrangement of the Corner pattern.
4. The students will try/attempt to createa formula to determine the number of cubes for any arrangement
of the corner pattern.

D. ASSESSING LEARNING

1. To assess objective one, the students will build each of the first four arrangements of the Corner
pattern. I will come around to each group, and I will record my observation with a check mark on the
observation form attached at the end of the lesson.
2. To assess objective two, the students will answer number two on the worksheet attached. I will go
through and record on the observation sheet attached.
3. To assess objective three, the students will fill out a worksheet that asks the students to determine the
number of cubes in the twentieth arrangement of the Corner pattern. I will have another observation sheet
to record the observation as I go through their papers.
4. To assess objective four, the students will record on the same worksheet the formula/expression that
they created/attempted. All I am looking for is that the students were making a connection between a
pattern and it having a formula. Although I do not except the correct formula, I want to see that they are
making the connection that patterns can be written as a formula.







Jennifer Thomas
Fifth Grade
3/21/2013 from 11:25-12:25


2

LESSON CONCEPTS LESSON OBJECTIVES PLAN FOR ASSESSMENT
Concept 1:
Understand that patterns and
functions can be represented
in many ways and described
using words, tables, and
symbols. (VA SOL 5.17)

Concept 2:
Understand the structure of a
pattern and how it grows or
changes using concrete
materials. (VA SOL 5.17)

Concept 3:
Understand that mathematical
relationships exist in patterns.
(VA SOL 5.17)

Concept 4:
Understand that expressions
can be numerical or variable
or a combination of numbers
and variables. (VA SOL 5.17)
1. The students will build the
first four arrangements of the
Corner pattern.

2. The students will draw/build
and describethe fifth
arrangement of the Corner
pattern.

3. The students will determine
the number of cubes in the
twentieth arrangement of the
Corner pattern.

4. The students will try/attempt
to createa formula to determine
the number of cubes for any
arrangement of the corner
pattern.
1. To assess objective one, the
students will build each of the
first four arrangements of the
Corner pattern. I will come
around to each group, and I will
record my observation with a
check mark on the observation
form attached at the end of the
lesson.

2. To assess objective two, the
students will answer number two
on the worksheet attached. I will
go through and record on the
observation sheet attached.

3. To assess objective three, the
students will fill out a worksheet
that asks the students to
determine the number of cubes in
the twentieth arrangement of the
Corner pattern. I will have
another observation sheet to
record the observation as I go
through their papers.

4. To assess objective four, the
students will record on the same
worksheet the formula/expression
that they created/attempted. All I
am looking for is that the students
were making a connection
between a pattern and it having a
formula. Although I do not except
the correct formula, I want to see
that they are making the
connection that patterns can be
written as a formula.








Jennifer Thomas
Fifth Grade
3/21/2013 from 11:25-12:25


3

E. RELATED VIRGINIA STANDARDS OF LEARNING (and NATIONAL STANDARDS if required)

VA SOL: Patterns, Functions, and Algebra 5.17:

1. Understand that patterns and functions can be represented in many ways and described using
words, tables, and symbols.
2. Understand the structure of a pattern and how it grows or changes using concrete materials.
3. Understand that mathematical relationships exist in patterns.
4. Understand that an expression uses symbols to define a relationship and shows how each
number in the list, after the first number, is related to the preceding number.
5. Describe numerical and geometric patterns formed by using concrete materials.
6. Describe the relationship found in patterns, using words, tables, and symbols to express the
relationship.
NCTM:

1. Describe, extend, and male generalizations about geometric and numeric patterns. (Problem Solving).
2. Represent and analyze patterns and functions, using words, tables, and graphs.

F. MATERIALS NEEDED
1. 10-15 baggies of 30 blocks: Mrs. Lightner
2. 5 pieces of poster board: Me
3. 5 packs of markers and crayons: Me
4. Worksheet for problem25 problems: Me
5. Challenge/Remedial Problem worksheets10 of each: me

G. PROCEDURE

BEFORE: Anticipated Student Responses:
Begin: Pass out baggies of blocks to each pair of
students.

What is a pattern?







Show this pattern on the doc camera:



Is this a pattern? Why?


What is happening in this pattern?




1. Student Response: It is something that repeats.
-Teacher: Okay. Can anyone be more specific?
2. Student Response: It is something that repeats
and goes on and on.
-Teacher: Okay. Does anyone have something else
to add?
3. Student Response: Something that continues on
by following a certain rule or formula.




Student Response: Yes because it is repeating the
same thing over and over.

1. Student Response: It is going square, triangle,
square, triangle and on and on.
Jennifer Thomas
Fifth Grade
3/21/2013 from 11:25-12:25


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Okay, lets look at another.













You have a partner that you will share your blocks.
In your pairs, build the first 4 arrangements. What
do you notice is happening from one arrangement
to the next?







How many blocks are in each figure?










Can anyone describe what the fifth figure will look
like?


-Teacher: Okay, how else can you describe it?
2. Student Response: It is a shape pattern.
-Teacher: Okay, so what is happening with the
square and the triangle?
3. They are repeating.
-Teacher: Yes, this is what we call a repeating
pattern.

Is this a pattern? Raise your hand if you think it is.
Hands down. Raise your hand if you think it is not.
Hands down. If no, why? If yes, why?

1. It is getting bigger each time.
2. You are adding more blocks from each figure to
the next.
3. It is a pattern.
-Teacher: This represents a growing pattern. What
happens from one step to the next is the same, but it
does not repeat itself like the squares and triangles
do. It gets bigger (or smaller) depending on the
pattern that takes you from one step to the next.

1. Student Response: It is getting bigger.
-Teacher: Okay, what else is happening?
2. Student Response: Each one is doubling
(misconception).
-Teacher: Test that rule on the third one. Count the
blocks. There are 9 blocks. Is 9 the double of 3?
3. Student Response: Well 9 is triple of 3 because
3x3=9.
-Teacher: Okay, how can you use that thinking
about each of the arrangements you have made?

-Student Response: There is 1 in the first
arrangement, 4 in the second arrangement and 9 in
the third arrangement.
-Teacher: How did you figure out how many blocks
are in each arrangement?
-Student Response: I counted them.
-Teacher: Did anyone else figure out how many
blocks are in each arrangement a different way?
-Student Response: I saw that you time the number
by itself to figure out how many blocks are in it.

1. Student Response: You add 5 across the bottom
and then 4 more going up the side.
2. Student Response: You do 5x5 to get 25, and
you make a square with it.
Jennifer Thomas
Fifth Grade
3/21/2013 from 11:25-12:25


5




How many blocks are in the fifth figure?








If the pattern were to continue, what would the 10
th

figure look like? In your pairs, discuss what the 10
th

figure would look like without building it. Look at
the pattern of the other figures to help you figure
out how many are in the 10
th
figure.

Who can tell me how many blocks will be in the
10
th
figure?














Has anyone heard of a formula?












Okay, so how would you write a formula to
3. Student Response: You just make it bigger.
-Teacher: Okay, how do you make it bigger?

1. Student Response: There are 25.
-Teacher: How did you figure that out?
2. Student Response: I counted them.
-Teacher: Did anyone else figure out how many
blocks are in each arrangement a different way?
3. Student Response: I saw that you time the
number by itself to figure out how many blocks are
in it, so I did 5x5=25.







1. Student Response: Based off of the 5
th
figure, I
multiplied 10x10 because it is the 10
th
figure in the
pattern.
-Teacher: Did someone else see it differently?
2. Student Response: It is 10 rows of 10, so
10x10=100.
-Teacher: Did anyone else see it differently?
3. Student Response: The length of one side is 10
because in the 5
th
figure the length of one side was
5, in the 4
th
figure it was 4, in the 3
rd
figure it was 3,
in the 2
nd
figure is was 2, and in the 1
st
figure it was
1. The length of another side is 10, and to find the
area of a square or rectangle you multiply the
length x width. So, 10x10=100.
-Teacher: Can we write a formula for this?

--No: How do you find the area of a square or
rectangle?
1. Student Response: It is the length time the width.
-Teacher: Okay, that is a formula.
--Yes: Okay, what is a formula?
1. Student Response: It is something that you use to
represent something.
-Teacher: Give me an example?
2. Student Response: The length x width to find the
area of a square or rectangle.
-Teacher: Okay, so how would you write a formula
to represent what is happening in the pattern?

1. Student Response: length x width=area, so the
Jennifer Thomas
Fifth Grade
3/21/2013 from 11:25-12:25


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represent what is happening in the pattern?








number in the sequence=n n x n= number of
blocks in the arrangement.
2. Student Response: Well it is just whatever
number it is in the pattern multiplied by itself.
3. Student Response: You can just square the
number.
-Teacher: Are all of these doing the same thing?
1. Student Response: Yes. They just show a
different thinking when coming up with the
formula.

DURING:

Present the problem by passing out the
handout/worksheet. Put them in groups of 4-5. The
students will work in their groups to try and figure
out the Corner Pattern. See the attached
worksheet.

In your groups start discussing where to begin.
Some things to think about are what it looks like.
How does each figure compare to the next figure?










-Walk around and observe/listen to what the
students are talking about. Make sure students are
on the right track. Ask questions if students appear
to be stuck, going in the wrong direction, or if I do
not know/understand what they are doing.








1. Student Response: It looks like 2 sides of a
square, so we can just add 20 + 20 for the number
of blocks in the twentieth figure. (Misconception).
-Teacher: Lets check with figures 4 and 5 to see if
that rule works.
2. Student Response: You can add 19+19, since
that is how many cubes are in the 10
th
figure.
(Misconception). 19+19=38, not the correct
amount of blocks in the pattern.
-Teacher: Can you check that rule/formula by using
the 5
th
figure to find how many blocks in the 10
th

figure? Did it work? Keep thinking.


Reason for asking question: Question to ask:

I do not know what they are doing or if the group is
off task.

The group has a wrong idea.



Need to help the group so that they can continue to

Please explain to me what your group is discussing.


Can you try that rule on ________ figure to see if it
works? Try a smaller figure so you and your group
can build it.

What have you guys discussed so far?
Jennifer Thomas
Fifth Grade
3/21/2013 from 11:25-12:25


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move forward.

If students are stuck at the beginning.



What have you discussed? Lets look at the figures
you do know about and can build. How many
blocks are in each of these figures? Record in the
chart.
After:

Once all the groups have finished, they will record
what they have discovered on a poster paper. They
will present to the class their thinking when solving
the problem. The students will put their drawing of
the 20
th
figure on the poster, but they will show a
formula/rule that works for any figure in the
pattern.
The students have to figure out how to explain their
reasoning to the class. I will have checked all the
groups to make sure they understand.

If some students finish early, refer to the challenge
problem. This is on a separate sheet from the
original problem. It only has the pattern, and the
students have to figure out how many blocks are in
the 20
th
pattern.


Group 1: They may have come up with (n+n)-
1=the number of blocks in any figure.

Group 2: (n x 2)-1= the number of blocks in any
figure.

Group 3: 2n-1= the number of blocks in any figure.

H. DIFFERENTIATION

-CHALLENGE: This problem is if a group finishes before other groups. They will have the opportunity
to work on this pattern until the other groups are done. Once all groups are done, the group(s) may return
to this problem at a later date or for homework.
-The students are to figure out how many blocks would be in the 20
th
figure of this pattern. The
students will have to draw the 4
th
figure first. Then, the students will figure out a formula/rule that will
allow them to determine how many blocks would be in any figure of this pattern.
-The answer is (nx4)+1= the number of blocks in the figure.
-(n+n+n+n)+1=the number of blocks in the figure.
-(4n)+1=the number of blocks in the figure.











Jennifer Thomas
Fifth Grade
3/21/2013 from 11:25-12:25


8

-REMEDIAL: This problem is for the students who are having a hard time understanding the given
problem. The student will figure out what is happening in the pattern in order to determine what the 20
th

figure would look like.
-The student will draw the 4
th
and 5
th
patterns. They will record it in the chart on the remedial
worksheet.
-Answer: (nx2)=the number of blocks in the figure.
-(n + n)=the number of blocks in the figure.






I. References:

Department of education. (2009). Retrieved from http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/sol/frameworks/
mathematics_framewks/2009/framewk_math5.pdf.
Patterns that grow. (2013). Retrieved from http://scimathmn.org/stemtc/frameworks/421-input-output-
rules.
Wallace, A. (2013). Lesson plan example: The staircase problem [lesson plan template].

J. WHAT COULD GO WRONG WITH THIS LESSON AND WHAT WILL YOU DO ABOUT IT?
1. The document camera could not work, so I will draw the figures on the board.
2. The student could be confused of what a formula is, and I will explain that a formula is a rule expressed
by symbols. I will use the area formula of which the students are very familiar. AREA of
SQUARE=length x width.
3. If time runs out and the students still have not finished, they will take about 15 minutes at the
beginning of math the next day to finish.
4. There could be an emergency drill. I will instruct the students to leave everything where it is, and
follow the proper directions/instructions that has been indicated.

Jennifer Thomas
Fifth Grade
3/21/2013 from 11:25-12:25


9

Lesson Implementation Reflection

As soon as possible after teaching your lesson, think about the experience. Use the
questions/prompts below to guide your thinking. Be thorough in your reflection and use specific
examples to support your insights.

I. How did your actual teaching of the lesson differ from your plans? Describe the changes and
explain why you made them.

II. Based on the assessment you created, what can you conclude about your impact on student
learning? Did they learn? Who learned? What did they learn? What evidence can you offer
that your conclusions are valid?

III. Describe at least one way you could incorporate developmentally appropriate practice in a
better or more thorough way if you were to teach this lesson again.

IV. Based on the assessment data you collected, what would you do/teach next if you were the
classroom teacher?

V. As a result of planning and teaching this lesson, what have you learned or had reinforced
about young children as learners?

VI. As a result of planning and teaching this lesson, what have you learned or had reinforced
about teaching?

VII. As a result of planning and teaching this lesson, what have you learned or had reinforced
about yourself?