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> Crackling Glazed Ham Challah + Babka = Genius P. 101 Showstopping Rib Roast P. 92

P. 98

DECEMBER 2014

BONAPPETIT.COM

How to keep all those guests & in-laws happy and well fed

P. 96

The Year’s Best Cookbooks P. 54

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PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL GRAYDON + NIKOLE HERRIOTT. FOOD STYLING BY SUSAN SPUNGEN. PROP STYLING BY THEO VAMVOUNAKIS.

8

BON

59

NUMBER

12

A double rainbow of freeze-dried delights takes our cover cookie to the next level.

P. 78

FEATURES

78 IMMACULATE

CONFECTION

Blow minds this year with saffron- flecked lollipops and other stunner sweets from San Francisco’s Craftsman and Wolves. RECIPES BY WILLIAM WERNER

88

THE FISH, THE FOWL & THE ROAST

Showstopping, gasp-inducing centerpiece entrées to secure your place in family holiday history. RECIPES BY ALISON ROMAN

96

THE BON APPÉTIT HOLIDAY SURVIVAL GUIDE

The cooking. The in-laws. The parties. We’ve got everything you need to make

it through alive.

RECIPES BY

CLAIRE SAFFITZ

106

INTO THE

WOODS

Andrew Knowlton treks deep into the

Norwegian forest for

snowy, dreamlike

a

Christmas feast—in

a

teepee.

ON THE COVER Lavender Shortbread with Fruits, Flowers, and Herbs (for recipe, see page 84). Photograph by Michael Graydon + Nikole Herriott. Food styling by Susan Spungen. Prop styling by Theo Vamvounakis.

BONAPPETIT.COM • DECEMBER 2014

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PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDERS OVERGAARD

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I T.C O M

Somewhere in this frosty Norwegian forest, crispy-skinned pork belly awaits.

P. 106

STARTERS

THE BA KITCHEN

19

43

THE BA GIFT

FAST, EASY,

GUIDE 2014

FRESH

Twelve gift-giving commandments to steer you right for the food lovers on your list.

Sizzling shrimp and other winter warmers. BY BA TEST KITCHEN

34

THE BA Q&A

Funnyman Seth Meyers on his chimichanga nightmares. BY ANDREW PARKS

36

THE BA

CHECKLIST

Celeb chef stamps, a charitable tote, and more of this month’s musts.

38

THE PROVIDERS

Getting fancy with the kids on New Year’s Eve. BY JENNY ROSENSTRACH AND ANDY WARD

54

A COOK’S GUIDE TO COOKBOOKS

Eleven cookbooks for the kitchen counter—the bookshelf can wait.

60

THE PARTY

A caviar- and vodka- fueled New Year’s from our comrades at PDX’s Kachka. BY AMIEL STANEK

COLUMNS

16

R.S.V.P.

Reader requests and editor favorites.

67

THE

OBSESSIVORE

Adam Sachs’s mad quest for a fruitcake worth keeping.

70

NAVIGATOR

Falling for the new Marrakech.

BY ALEXANDER

LOBRANO

127

PREP SCHOOL

Decoding duck,

braiding “babkallah,”

and more.

134

BACK OF

THE NAPKIN

At the holiday tavola with the inimitable Giorgio Armani. BY TORY HOEN

IN EVERY ISSUE

14

editor’s letter

132

recipe index

132

sourcebook

HAVE A QUESTION ABOUT A RECIPE, OR A COMMENT? E-mail us at askba@bonappetit.com, or contact the editorial offices: Bon Appétit, 4 Times Square, New York, NY 10036.

FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS AND CHANGES OF ADDRESS, call 800-765-9419 (515-243-3273 from outside the U.S.A.) or e-mail subscriptions@bonappetit.com. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.

“I should

Editor in Chief

Vice President & Publisher

ADAM RAPOPORT

Creative Director ALEX GROSSMAN Executive Editor CHRISTINE MUHLKE Digital Director STACEY C. RIVERA Managing Editor GREG FERRO Food Editor CARLA LALLI MUSIC

Restaurant & Drinks Editor ANDREW KNOWLTON Special Projects Editor ASHLEA HALPERN Senior Editor MERYL ROTHSTEIN Associate Restaurant Editor JULIA KRAMER

ADVERTISING NEW YORK Executive Director, Finance & New England MELISSA GOOLNICK Account Director STEFANIE BERGER Account Director, Beauty & Luxury JEANNIE LIVESAY Account Director CARA GOLDBERG Account Director ELLEN BENNETT Business Manager DAMON GONZALEZ Executive Assistant to the Publisher DANI ROSEN Business Coordinator STEPHANIE SONG Sales Assistants JEHOSHUA BROWN, GISELLE CONTRERAS, BRIDGET LAPOINT, MEGAN LOCKBAUM, ERICA STEINBERG, SUSIE STOKLOSA, ANDREA VOTH

I don’t actually have a

copy of Mastering the Art of French Cooking and I would very much like one.”

—S.R.

Deputy Editor SCOTT DESIMON

PAMELA DRUCKER MANN

Associate Publisher, Integrated Marketing ERIC JOHNSON, Associate Publisher JENNIFER MCCORMICK PANAWEK, Head of Digital Strategy CRAIG KOSTELIC Advertising Directors TAMI EAGLE BOWLING, JULIA HAWKINS, JORDANA PRANSKY Director of Finance & Business Operations SYLVIA W. CHAN

“Heading to Tokyo for NYE and would love Santa to get me a reservation at Sukiyabashi Jiro. Or a bottle of Chichibu ‘Ichiro’s Malt.’ Or both. What? I’ve been really good!”

—J.L.

Assistant Editor JOANNA SCIARRINO

Editorial Assistant BELLE CUSHING

Art Director KRISTIN EDDINGTON Deputy Art Director MIKE LEY Designer TIMOTHY MCSWEENEY Junior Designer ALAINA SULLIVAN

Staff Photographer ALEX LAU

Photo Director ALEX POLLACK Photo Editor JULIA DUQUETTE PORTER Associate Photo Editor RACHEL TOMLINSON Photo Assistant ELIZABETH JAIME OSCOFF

Senior Food Editor DAWN PERRY Recipe Editor LIESEL DAVIS Senior Associate Food Editor ALISON ROMAN Assistant Food Editor CLAIRE SAFFITZ Test Kitchen Manager BRAD LEONE

WHAT DO YOU WANT FOR THE HOLIDAYS?

Assistant Managing Editor FAYE CHIU MOSLEY Copy Chief GREG ROBERTSON

Production Director CRISTINA MARTINEZ Assistant Production Manager ALEX DELANY

Research Director CHRISTINE PENBERTHY

Assistant to the Editor in Chief AMIEL STANEK

INTEGRATED MARKETING & CREATIVE SERVICES Executive Director, Integrated Marketing & Creative Development CAROLYN MONTROSE Executive Director, Integrated Marketing COURTNEY WARCO VERDIER Executive Director, Digital Sales and Marketing SCOTT LAINE Senior Integrated Marketing Director RACHEL DURST Integrated Marketing Director CASEY MCCARTHY Associate Marketing Director HILLARY SMITH Associate Director, Integrated Marketing HAYLEY RUSSMAN

Integrated Marketing Manager STEVEN MARINOS Marketing Coordinator KELLY QUACKENBUSH

“As a newlywed, my favorite wedding gift this year was a

bourbon-of-the-

month subscription. It’s about to expire. Send help!”

—R.D.

Design Director CARLOS QUINTERO Art Director AMI POURANA

Special Projects Director COLU HENRY Special Events Director NIKKI REISS Senior Special Events Manager JAMIE RUDOLPH Senior Special Events Coordinator JENNIFER CASSEL

Senior Web Editor CAREY POLIS Web Writer ROCHELLE BILOW

Senior Digital Project Manager KAITLYN WONG

Associate Developer MELISSA FINKELSTEIN

Digital Art Director ALICIA BROOKS Web Developer DANYLO BERKO

Marketing Coordinator HANNAH MICLEY

THE BON APPÉTIT CULINARY STUDIO Executive Chef MARY NOLAN

Contributors MONIKA BIEGLER EYERS, MELISSA HAMILTON, CHRISTOPHER HIRSHEIMER, DITTE ISAGER, REBECCA JURKEVICH, DAVID LYNCH, MICKEY RAPKIN, JENNY ROSENSTRACH, ADAM SACHS, ANDY WARD; JESSIE DAMUCK, ALFIA MUZIO, JACKIE OURMAN (TEST KITCHEN); RANDY HARTWELL, CARA CANNELLA (RESEARCH); COREY MARSEY, BEN VINA, SHELLEY WOLSON (TABLET); LILLI SHERMAN (PUBLIC RELATIONS)

Executive Director, Public Relations & Events FREDERIKA BROOKFIELD Associate Director, Public Relations DAN ALDWORTH

“I know it’s not practical for my tiny apartment kitchen, but I would really dig a stainless- steel KitchenAid stand mixer—with all of the attachments.”

—D.A.

Artistic Director

ANNA WINTOUR

BRANCH OFFICES Canada BOB DODD, DODD MEDIA Detroit ANNE GREEN, DIRECTOR Hawaii LOREN MALENCHEK, MALENCHEK & ASSOCIATES Los Angeles CRISTINA THOMPSON, DIRECTOR Midwest JENNA ERNSTER, DIRECTOR Midwest PAMELA QUANDT, DIRECTOR Northwest KATHRYN SOTER, DIRECTOR Southeast PETER ZUCKERMAN, Z-MEDIA, INC. Southwest LEWIS STAFFORD COMPANY

PUBLISHED BY CONDÉ NAST

Chairman Chief Executive Officer President

Chief Financial Officer President–Condé Nast Media Group & Chief Marketing Officer Chief Administrative Officer Chief Technology Officer

S. I. NEWHOUSE, JR. CHARLES H. TOWNSEND ROBERT A. SAUERBERG, JR.

DAVID E. GEITHNER EDWARD J. MENICHESCHI JILL BRIGHT JOE SIMON

Senior Vice President–Operations & Strategic Sourcing DAVID ORLIN Senior Vice President–Corporate Controller DAVID B. CHEMIDLIN Senior Vice President–Finance JENNIFER GRAHAM Senior Vice President–Editorial Operations RICK LEVINE Senior Vice President–Digital Technology NICK ROCKWELL Senior Vice President–Editorial Assets & Rights EDWARD KLARIS Vice President–Manufacturing GENA KELLY Vice President–Planning & Strategy SHEN-HSIN HUNG Vice President–Human Resources NICOLE ZUSSMAN Vice President–Digital Operations & Monetization CHRISTOPHER GUENTHER

Managing Director–Real Estate ROBERT BENNIS Senior Vice President–Market Research SCOTT MCDONALD Senior Vice President–Business Development JULIE MICHALOWSKI Senior Vice President–Human Resources JOANN MURRAY Senior Vice President–Corporate Communications PATRICIA RÖCKENWAGNER Vice President–CN Licensing JOHN KULHAWIK Vice President–Strategic Sourcing TONY TURNER Vice President–Digital Product Development CHRIS JONES Vice President–Special Projects PATTY NEWBURGER Vice President–Corporate Communications JOSEPH LIBONATI

CONDÉ NAST MEDIA GROUP

Vice President–Corporate Partnerships JOSH STINCHCOMB Vice President–Marketing Solutions PADRAIG CONNOLLY

Vice President–Insights & Brand Strategy DANIELLA WELLS Vice President–Finance JUDY SAFIR

CONDÉ NAST CONSUMER MARKETING

Executive Vice President

MONICA RAY

Vice President–Consumer Marketing

GARY FOODIM

Vice President–Planning & Operations

MATTHEW HOFFMEYER

Vice President–Consumer Marketing Promotion

GINA SIMMONS

Vice President–Marketing Analytics

CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS

CONDÉ NAST ENTERTAINMENT

President Executive Vice President–Chief Operating Officer SAHAR ELHABASHI Executive Vice President–Programming & Content Strategy–Digital Channels MICHAEL KLEIN Executive Vice President–Alternative TV JOE LABRACIO Senior Vice President–Business Development & Strategy WHITNEY HOWARD Vice President–Technology MARVIN LI

Vice President–Marketing MEI LEE Vice President–Scripted TV GINA MARCHESCHI

DAWN OSTROFF Executive Vice President–Motion Pictures JEREMY STECKLER Executive Vice President–Chief Digital Officer FRED SANTARPIA Chief Revenue Officer LISA VALENTINO Senior Vice President–Digital Video Operations LARRY BAACH Vice President–Revenue Operations JASON BAIRD Vice President–Production JED WEINTROB Vice PresidentBranded Content & Sales Marketing ANISSA E. FREY

Those submitting manu- scripts, photographs, artwork, or other materials to Bon Appétit for consid- eration should not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by Bon Appétit in writing. Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, and other submitted materials must be accompanied by a self-addressed return envelope, postage prepaid. However, Bon Appétit is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. Subscription inquiries:

Please write to Bon Appétit, P.O. Box 37614, Boone, IA 50037; call 800-765-9419 (515-243- 3273 from outside the U.S.A.); send e-mail to subscriptions@bonappetit .com; or visit our Web site, bonappetit.com.

FOOD STYLING BY SUSAN SPUNGEN. PROP STYLING BY AMY WILSON.

14

editor’s letter

THE CROWD-PLEASER

A couple Decembers ago, my wife, Simone, and I decided to flip the holiday script. Instead of hopping the hour flight to Buffalo, we’d get Buffalo to come to us—her parents, John and Linda, her older sister, Shella, and her husband, Marc, and his teenage kids. We’d do the cooking, the decorating, the coordi- nating, the crisis managing—these are the holidays after all, and sometimes, as you’ll learn on page 96, simply surviving is a reasonable goal. First we addressed the issue of where everyone would stay in Manhattan. Then we had to figure out what everyone would…do. Museums! Third-tier college-bowl games! A walk on the High Line! Most significantly, we debated what to cook. If you’ve ever hosted the holidays, you know that talking about what you’re going to eat is as much of an event as the meals themselves. For instance, would we do shrimp cocktail on Christmas night? If so, where would we get the shrimp? Who would do all the cook- ing? And how might others help out? (“By staying out of the kitchen!” as any avid home cook will insist.) I wanted to make something special but not pre- cious, delicious but not elaborate. I wanted a crowd- pleaser. “What about gnocchi?” Simone asked. Bingo. Those who’ve made the potato-and-flour dumplings know they’re not difficult—you’re basically making Play-Doh. And yet they always impress. “Wait, you made these?” someone will inevitably ask. So on Christmas Day, Simone rolled out the dough, and I got to work on a braised pork shoulder. As the sun dipped, John mixed cocktails for himself and me, Simone popped Champagne, and Linda pulled the shrimp cocktail from the fridge. Eventually, as we helped ourselves to tender pork and velvety gnocchi in a bright tomato sauce, all felt right in our world. It didn’t matter where we were. We were around the table with family. That’s always where home is.

ADAM RAPOPORT EDITOR IN CHIEF

FOLLOW ADAM ON TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM AT @RAPO4

Recipes for tomato sauce and pork are at bonappetit.com /edletter

Potato Gnocchi

Get the texture right: Use a light hand with any extra flour, and test by cooking one piece first.

Prick 3 lb. scrubbed medium russet potatoes (6 or 7) all over with a fork, then bake in a 350° oven directly on the rack until very tender, about 1 hour. Let cool slightly. Scrape flesh into a bowl, then pass through a food mill or ricer onto a paper towel–lined baking sheet (to absorb excess liquid). Let cool.

Knead potatoes in a bowl with ¾ cup all-purpose flour and 1 Tbsp. kosher salt to create a sticky dough. Lightly flour your hands and work surface. Divide dough into 6 portions. Roll each into a long, compact rope about ½" thick. Cut into 1" pieces. Working in 4 batches, cook gnocchi in a large pot of boiling salted water until they float, about 3 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a pan of tomato sauce as you go. Serve with grated Parmesan and roast pork shoulder. 8 servings

BONAPPETIT.COM • DECEMBER 2014

PHOTOGRAPH

BY

CHRISTOPHER

TESTANI

ILLUSTRATIONS: LARRY JOST (SALAD); CLAIRE MCCRACKEN (PORTRAIT, MSG). FOR RESTAURANT DETAILS, SEE SOURCEBOOK.

Want us to get a restaurant recipe for you?

E-mail us at rsvp@bonappetit.com, or use the

hashtag #bonapprsvp on Twitter or Instagram. Submissions become the property of Bon Appétit.

r.s.v.p.

READERS SOUND OFF

DEAR BON APPÉTIT, LAST YEAR WE HAD A GIRLS’ WEEKEND AT THE ARIZONA BILTMORE. THE RESTAURANT, FRANK & ALBERT’S, HAD THE BEST CELERY CAESAR. I’VE TRIED TO RE-CREATE IT A FEW TIMES AT HOME, BUT I’M CLEARLY MISSING SOME IMPORTANT INGREDIENT!

—LAURAN DERIGNE, St. Louis

CELERY CAESAR SALAD

4 SERVINGS Look for celery root that is firm—not spongy—at the bottom end.

Preheat oven to 400°. Toss bread with olive oil on a rimmed baking sheet, squeezing to help it absorb the oil; season with salt. Toast, tossing halfway

2

thick slices country-style bread, torn into bite-size pieces

through, until golden and crisp, 5–10 minutes. Let croutons cool.

2

Tbsp. olive oil Kosher salt

Blend egg yolk, anchovy, garlic, lemon juice, vinegar, and mustard in

1

large egg yolk

a blender until smooth. With motor

1

anchovy fillet, chopped

running, gradually drizzle in vegetable

1

small garlic clove, chopped

oil, blending until thickened. Dressing

1

Tbsp. fresh lemon juice

should be pourable (add a splash or

1 ½

tsp. white wine vinegar

two of water to thin, if needed).

½

tsp. Dijon mustard

Transfer dressing to a bowl large

¼

cup vegetable oil Freshly ground black pepper

enough to hold salad and season with salt and pepper. Mix in grated Parmesan.

1

oz. Parmesan, grated (about ⅓ cup), plus shaved for serving

Add romaine, celery stalks and leaves, and celery root; toss to coat.

2

romaine hearts, leaves separated

Serve salad topped with croutons

8

celery heart stalks, thinly sliced, plus all leaves

and shaved Parmesan. DO AHEAD: Dressing can be made

¼

large celery root (celeriac), peeled, cut into matchsticks

2 days ahead. Cover and chill. Bring to room temperature before using.

Ask

the

Chef

Q: I’ve been seeing squid ink used in pasta on a lot of menus. How can I cook with it at home?

M I M I

DW Y E R,

Potomac, MD

A: Squid ink is the ingredient that will really “murder out” your food, as we say at the restaurant. Cooking with ink is like driving one of those cool sports cars in matte black; it makes a dish super metal, with dramatic color and a deep brininess. We source ink in bulk, but you can buy it in jars at specialty stores [or at food52.com]. Combine it with eggs for any hand-cranked pasta dough, or use it to finish a risotto. We even spoon some into charred-eggplant purée. Count on a teaspoon or so to get that striking black. It stays soft and can be used straight from the freezer, so you don’t have to use it all right away. Just be sure to put down parchment paper while you work—that ink is pretty gnarly.

P H I L I P

K R A J EC K ,

Rolf and Daughters, Nashville

Letter Rip:

Rage Against the MSG

In our September issue, chef Quealy Watson of Hot Joy praised the “flavor and roundness” of MSG. Based on your letters and comments, the feeling was not mutual. Keep telling us how you really feel at askba@bonappetit.com.

“I doubt seriously that any

“Absolutely no. Gives me a

“Thanks,

one of you would knowingly

migraine faster than you can

but no

feed it to your own children.”

say ‘monosodium glutamate!’”

thanks.

 

Less is

more.”

“Arsenic is naturally occurring, but I won’t add it to my food, no matter how delicious it may be.”

4

1

0

2

R

E

B

M

E

C

E

D

H

B

A

T

2

4

0

1

WHERE GREAT TASTE BEGINS

PHOTOGRAPHS

Those initials at the base of this brass bottle opener? They could be yours. See page 24 for details.

BY

DANNY

KIM

E

Gift

Guide

Follow these 12 gift-giving commandments and we promise you’ll win over every kitchen nerd, liquor snob, and sugar-crazed nephew on your holiday shopping list

THE

1

The Shinier

the Gift,

the Happier

the People.

“When tastefully chosen, a little flash goes a long way.”

—JOANNA SCIARRINO,

BA Gift Guide

1

2 of 7

5

Avenue Road

Reversible meat

handblown-glass

tenderizer

container

$410; call 212-453- 9880 to order

$30; williams-

sonoma.com

6

3

2 Gilded Cornet

Liquid

Body flask

$45; areaware.com

3

Frieling

citrus press

$150; bedbath

andbeyond.com

cake server

$14;

anthropologie.com

7

Hario Buono

copper

pouring kettle

$150;

prima-coffee.com
4

2

Mauviel copper

mixing bowl

$100;

surlatable.com

8

Dutch salt shaker

$23; kioskkiosk.com

9

Brass bread knife

$135; alderand

coshop.com

Finally: a

commercial-

grade

10

Metal trivet set

$20; cb2.com

assistant editor

juice press

attractive enough to keep out on the counter.

10

1

Behold:

the most

beautiful

8

bread knife

you’ve ever

seen—

handmade

in Japan,

of course.

2

GIFT SETS DON’T HAVE TO BE LAME.

9

“Often the words gift basket conjure images of raffia, cellophane, and pepper jelly. (Why is there always pepper jelly?) Don’t let those abominations give the gift set a bad name. A box of things I actually want? Yes,

please. —JULIA KRAMER, associate restaurant editor

7

6

5

4

This is a two-in-one tenderizer:

Remove the base, flip

the spiky head, and you’ve got yourself a

flat pounder.

Coffee Collective’s

Taster package

Four bags of exceptional direct- trade beans from the cult Danish roaster. $52; coffeecollective.com

THE

3

It’s Okay

to Be

a Little

Selfish.

“I love cooking with my in-laws during the holidays, but I miss my own knives. Solution:

Send them a great blade ahead of time, then do your dicing together.”

—CARLA LALLI

MUSIC,

food editor

Oliva Elité 8" Stealth chef ’s knife

$150; messer

meister.com

Coolhaus’s Sammie of

BA Gift Guide

3 of 7

the Month Club

Each delivery includes four ice cream sandwiches in one crazy combo. From $55; eatcoolhaus.com

5

MAKE

IT

PERSONAL.

“The key to getting custom gifts right is subtlety: initials only, barely there engravings, and absolutely no photos.”

ASHLEA HALPERN,

special

projects editor

Penta-Hex brass

bottle opener

The coolest thing about Bec Brittain’s hexagonal cap popper? The initials etched into the corner. $53; sightunseen.com

Monogrammed

napkins

These beauties from Kate Spade are hand- embroidered by Rwandan artisans. $15 each; saturday.com

4

GIVE A

GIFT THAT

KEEPS

ON GIVING.

“What’s better than getting a present in December? Getting another one in January. Food subscriptions are monthly reminders that someone loves me.”

—CLAIRE SAFFITZ, assistant food editor

Long-grain

cutting board

A quality board will last a lifetime; brand it and they’ll always know it’s theirs. $80; brooklynbutcher blocks.com

6

EXPERIENCES

ARE

BETTER THAN

THINGS.

“Last Christmas, I gave my wife an empty bottle of Japanese whisky. Worst gift ever? Maybe, except that stuck inside was a handwritten note promising a trip to Tokyo. Experiences they’ll remember forever—cooking lessons, reservations at an impossible-to-crack restaurant—always beat material presents.” —ANDREW KNOWLTON, The BA Foodist

THE

GUTTER

BA Gift Guide

4 of 7

1

Mugolio

pine syrup

$30 for 3.6 oz.; deandeluca.com

6

Sfoglini pasta

$7–$8 for 16 oz.; sfoglini.com

7

7

Make Over

Their

Pantry All

Fancy-Like.

“It might be hard to justify shelling out on an expensive finishing oil for yourself, but splurging for a friend? That’s what the holidays are all about.”

—ALISON ROMAN,

senior associate

food editor

1

Drizzle

delicate pine

syrup over

ricotta, crudo,

even vanilla

ice cream.

4

Sprinkle on mushroom pasta or a

2 fennel and celery salad, or use it to make the most delicate popcorn you’ve never dreamed of.

2

3

5

2 Delfino colatura

di alici

$15 for 100 ml; almagourmet.com

8

Emilia vinegar

$45 for 100 ml; georgepaul vinegar.com

Wine Forest

Wild Foods

fennel pollen

$25 for .7 oz.; abchome.com

3

Mustapha’s

preserved lemons

$10 for 12.4 oz.; murrayscheese.com

9

Premium

4 Kyela rice

Regalis dried

black morels

$25 for 1 oz.; regalisfoods.com

5

Castillo de Canena smoked olive oil

$32 for 250 ml; tienda.com

$17 for 2.2 lb.; askinosie.com

10

Les Moulins

Mahjoub wild mountain capers in sea salt

$10 for 3.5 oz.; surlatable.com

Made in

Brooklyn,

these

noodles

bring

restaurant-

trendy ingredients like rye and cuttlefish to the home pot.

6

10

9

8

7

For a liquid umami boost, add a dash of this Italian fish sauce to cooked grains.

THE

Baton lighter $28; momastore.org

GUTTER

8

SOME

GIFTS GET

BETTER

WITH AGE.

“The newest, hottest, and latest is all good, but it’s one-of-a-kind vintage finds that really get me going. Whether it’s a first-edition M.F.K. Fisher or a pamphlet on microwave cooking for men, secondhand cookbook shops are absolute treasure troves.”

—BELLE CUSHING,

editorial assistant

Bonnie Slotnick

Cookbooks, NYC

bonnieslotnick

cookbooks.com

Rabelais,

Biddeford, ME

rabelaisbooks.com

Kitchen Arts & Letters, NYC

kitchenartsand

letters.com

Heirloom

Bookshop,

Charleston, SC

theheirloom

collection.com

10

GIFTS

SHOULD

BE

USEFUL.

BA Gift Guide

5 of 7

La Praline

Birch wood

Historique

toothpicks

$8 for 3 oz.; bellocchio.com

$5 for 12; kaufmann- mercantile.com

9

Good

Things Come

in Small

Packages.

“Stockings don’t have to be stuffed with $10-and-under afterthoughts. Opt instead for small, thoughtfully chosen (and occasionally pricier) items to up the surprise factor.”

— DAW N P E R RY, senior food editor

Raw honeycomb

$15 for 5.5 oz.; savannahbee.com

Pallarès Solsona Navaja Blanca folding knife

$165; quitokeeto.com

Combo pizza wheel and bottle opener

$18; normann-

copenhagen.com

Wide angle/macro

iPhone lens

$50; photojojo.com

Saipua soap

$10 for 4 oz.; shop.saipua.com

Starter garden

seeds

$15 for 6; williams- sonoma.com

Kaol mints

$14 for 14.5 g; kioskkiosk.com

Various Projects

keytags

$15; variouskeytags.com

Twizzlie pops

$9 for a bag of 8; quincandy.com

“Put down the corkscrew shaped like a reproductive organ, and walk away from the bacon-scented cologne. A gag gift is good for one laugh but not so funny when you’re trying to find space in a tiny apartment for a superfluous object you feel too guilty to throw away. Spare your friends the indignity and focus on giving gifts that actually have a function.” —JULIA DUQUETTE, photo editor

Actual

size

THE

6

5

7

1

11

The

Best Gifts

Wrap

Themselves.

1

BA Gift Guide

2

6 of 7

3

4

“Everyone loves chocolate—and the newest wave of small- batch bars look as good as they taste.”

—ELIZABETH JAIME,

photo assistant

1

Dandelion

$8 each; dandelion chocolate.com

2

Rogue Chocolatier

$16–$18 each; rogue chocolatier.com

3

Mazet

$8 each;

demedici.com

4

Raaka

$4–$8 each;

raakachocolate.com

Take risks

when

choosing

flavors.

Vanilla

rooibos and

dark ginger

are two

of our

favorites.

5

Marou

$9 each;

darkchocolate

imports.com

6

Mast Brothers

$8 each;

mastbrothers.com

7

Compartés

$10 each;

compartes.com

THE

PROP STYLING BY MARTIN BOURNE. ILLUSTRATIONS BY THOM LESSNER.

Portland 32 oz. Growlette with Leash and 64 oz. Beer Growler

$60 and $65; portland growler company.com

Gents

cocktail picks

$195 for 8; ralphlauren home.com

This special- edition cart was designed with bar- tender Jim Meehan and handcrafted in Virginia out of black walnut, birch, and brass.

12

When in

Doubt, Ply

Them with

Alcohol.

BA Gift Guide

7 of 7

The

only wine-

glasses

Usagi heavyweight

copper cobbler

shaker

$70; cocktail

kingdom.com

Tina Frey resin ice bucket

$100; dwell.com

Facundo

Exquisito Rum

$140 for 750 ml; facundorum .com for stores

Zalto Universal glasses

$59 each; winemonger.com

they’ll ever

need.

Bourbon cocktail

cherries

$16 for 16 oz.; jackrudy cocktailco.com

“Booze can be the most thoughtless gift of all time—or the ultimate sign that someone loves you. It all comes down to the bottle. Give something limited edition, hard to find, and a little bit spendy. Tell them the effort it took to find it, and they may even offer you a sip.” ANDREW KNOWLTON

Why these

liquors?

Bacardi’s

new rum

is blended

from

premium

family

reserves;

the mezcal

is single-

origin;

and the

single-malt

Taiwanese

whisky

is complex

beyond

its years.

Mezcal Marca

Negra

$69 for 750 ml; hpsepicurean .com for stores

Kavalan

King Car

Whisky

$96 for 750 ml; wine anthology .com

Jim Meehan x Moore & Giles bar cart

$13,500;

800-737-0169

for info

GROOMING BY MICHELLE KEARNS. HAIR BY BETTIE ROGERS. WARDROBE STYLING BY ERIC JUSTIAN. TUXEDO BY CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION. TUXEDO SHIRT AND BOW TIE BY RALPH LAUREN PURPLE LABEL. CUFF LINKS COURTESY ILENE CHAZANOF, DECORATIVE ARTS, NY.

9

Q U E ST I O N S FOR

The BA Q&A

Seth Meyers

The NBC Late Night host and former SNL star on office holiday parties—and eating like a human

He eats,

he drinks,

he ’grams,

he tweets.

Follow

Seth at

@seth

meyers.

So what’s New Year’s Eve like for you?

“Well, a few years ago I got the chance to perform in Atlantic City. But in the end, it was too depressing for my wife—making her sit backstage with some Bud Lights and a turkey sandwich. After that, we decided to travel. We were in Mexico last year.”

What’s your drink? “I love beer, Scotch, and a little tequila, but right now I’m in the

wine chapter of my drinking life. I’m no connoisseur, but I do like spicy, full-bodied reds and a good, dry Riesling.”

When was your last hangover? “Not long

ago—it was one of those nights where you end up drinking more wine than you realize. That’s its own unique brand of hangover. You just feel overladen with liquid, like your pockets are filled with gallon bags of water.”

Do you enjoy office holiday parties?

“See, the thing about SNL is you kinda have an office party every Saturday night. So you’ve already seen everyone at their most sober and their most inebriated within the first four shows.”

How did your eating habits change when you went from SNL’s writing room to hosting a late-night show? SNL was a lot

of delivery—you start thinking a Red Bull and a doughnut is where the comedy is.

The nice thing about being on a regular schedule is having better habits. My wife has

a human job as well, so we start the day

with smoothies, then I’ll have a salad mid- day, and we’ll eat dinner together at night.”

What’s the last thing you ate? “A granola

bar. Let me look at the garbage here—yep,

it was a Kind bar.”

And the strangest item in your fridge?

“Eight kinds of mustard. We think it’s the greatest condiment. We’re weirdos.”

Death-row last meal? “My mom’s home-

made Chex mix. No one makes it like her, although I recently learned the key to her success is just butter.”

Last question. One of your first jobs was as a pizza delivery boy. Did that teach you to be a good tipper?

“Yeah, and I’ve waited tables as well. I’m an over-tipper because I know how stressful those jobs can be. I never had stress dreams about SNL—arguably the most stressful job in the world— but I still have stress dreams about table nine needing their chimichanga.”

—INTERVIEW BY ANDREW PARKS

For video of Seth taking our lightning-round food quiz, go to bonappetit.com/celebs

BY

GARDNER

THE VITALS

Age 40

Homebase New York City

Favorite cheese

Gouda

Movie snack

Peanut M&Ms

Airplane drink “If I’m feeling Draper, a Dewar’s and soda.”

Number of times he’s cooked/ crafted with Martha Stewart on TV 10

T

H

E

C

H

E

C

K

L

I

S

T

ANTONIO PARK (SUSHI); PUNCH

(SANDWICH)

(CRAVE);

DENNIS PRESCOTT

(CAFÉ); DELUY/CSDIV

SEPTEMBER LIONEL

PEPPERMINT);

ATELIER

STAMPS, STROP,

TEAPOT, (DESSERTS);

ZOE NATHAN

KIM (POTS,

DANNY (CAT);

ANDY RICKER

PHOTOGRAPHS:

(DRINK);

Hey, let’s be Insta

Americans

eat

Chinese.

friends. Follow us at

@bonappetitmag.

Everything you need to eat, drink, buy, and mail this month

by

JULIA KRAMER

Dear

Peppermint Bark,

I know what it’s like—foodie people laughing at you. Rolling their eyes when you show up. Why do they do this? They do

it because they hate themselves. But you know what? I love you.

I love you in your red-and-white Williams-Sonoma uniform ($29; williams-sonoma.com).

I love you in your special artisanal Apothecary’s Kitchen outfit ($12; theapothecaryskitchen.com). But really, I don’t even care how

you look; all that matters is how you taste—like a heaven made

of chocolate and candy canes.

Signed, Your Fan Julia

Buy this Food 52 x MZ Wallace market tote and $50 goes to supporting the Edible Schoolyard Project. $365; food52.com

LISTENING

HOUR

King of the Egg Cream, an audio series loosely based on the true story of Harry Solomon Dolowich, who ran a chocolate-syrup ring in 1920s NYC, delves into the history surrounding this eggless, creamless beverage. Learn more at bonappetit.com/eggcream, or download the “radio play,” featuring the voice of Lewis Black, at tabletmag .com/eggcream.

Cutting-Edge Kitchen Accessory

For the ultimate knife geek: a strop, custom-made from Spanish leather by Brooklyn craftsman Michael Zieba. From $85; info@masterchefknives.com

Tempest in a Tea

Three inventive ways to take your afternoon, evening, and airplane tea

Instagram

Crushes

du Jour

Without her, there’d be no Sean, Hugh, or Donald.

Yup, like the House. And the thousand cookbooks.

We Heart the USPS

Does anyone have an envelope?! The new “Celebrity Chef” Forever stamps, featuring coq au vin queen Julia Child and tapas king Felipe Rojas-Lombardi (among other greats), have single-handedly revived our interest in snail mail. $2.45 for a strip of five, $4.90 for a block of ten, $9.80 for a sheet of 20; usps.com

@chef antoniopark Sushi gone wild

@punch_drink Where it’s always 5 o’clock

@pawkhrua

Andy Ricker’s

cats (and

Thai food)

@zoenathan

loeb

Perfectly rustic

desserts

@atelier

september

That

Copenhagen

café life

Braise in Me!

As if we could love these Dansk enameled-steel pots any more, they’re newly available in a fun retro green. From $80; momastore.org

Pot

If Rem Koolhaas designed a teapot, it might look something like Joey Roth’s updated and rereleased Sorapot. $285; joeyroth.com

Crave

@dennis

($35), now

theprescott

available

Adventures in

sandwiches

 

REMEMBER

2004?

You will when you flip through Ludo Lefebvre’s first cookbook, which the Trois Mec chef recently reissued—with many new photos—on its tenth anniversary.

Pint

Tin

Tea-rrific ice cream, in flavors like Chamomile and Masala Chai, combines two post-dinner rituals into one creamy scoop. $7; tearrificicecream.com

Say no to airline-issued tea bags and yes to the elegant single- estate teas in Silver Needle Tea Co.’s portable Jetsetter tin. $15; silverneedleteaco.com

delight

by

design

Y REBECCA JURKEVICH PHOTOGRAPH: OWEN FRANKEN/CORBIS

38

The Providers

Appetizers

If it’s fussy, it works: New Year’s Eve is all about old- fashioned finger foods. Gougères, fried cheese sticks, warm crab dip, and anything with puff pastry make the cut.

Good kettle- cooked potato chips for the kids. Potato chips plus crème fraîche and caviar (the paddlefish stuff works just fine) for the adults. Chips: They’re the easier, saltier blinis.

At the Inn at Little Washington in Virginia, chef Patrick O’Connell grates a whole truffle over a batch of warm popcorn, which is both appalling and off- the-hook delicious. We go with the poor man’s version:

Rancho Gordo boutique pop- corn, salted and drizzled with a little truffle oil.

Drinks

Cheers! We pour Martinelli’s Sparkling Cider for the girls, Billecart-Salmon Brut Rosé Champagne for us.

The Main Event

Lobster:

steamed, shelled, and then dunked in melted smoked- paprika butter for the grown-ups, and straight up drawn butter for the kids.

Mashed potatoes spiked with fresh horseradish are beloved by all—no kid-customization required.

Dessert

Dark chocolate bread pudding is decadent and delicious, and, most important, offers a place to stake sparklers— the whole point of any New Year’s party as far as children are concerned.

Festive Touches

This is the only time of year we use our wedding china. Don’t believe us? The price tags are still on the bottom—and we got married when Clinton was president.

Our daughters write “fortunes” for each of us and tuck them under the place cards. It’s always something sweet, like “Maybe this year Dad will grow his hair back.”

Tiaras, crackers, squawkers, confetti (because you sure can’t count on Ryan Seacrest to keep you entertained).

For more Jenny and Andy, check out their blog, Dinner:

A Love Story.

To get our Dark Chocolate Bread Pudding recipe, go to bonappetit .com/providers

New Year’s Eve, Family-Style

Those all-night ragers of yore? Long gone. These days, we party at home with our kids

by JENNY ROSENSTRACH and ANDY WARD

New Year’s Eve for us has become our one night to—as our ten-year-old daughter used to say—“get fancy” at the dinner table. Because we’re feeding only our immediate family, versus a gaggle of relatives, we can afford to go all Eloise with the thing: passed hors d’oeuvres, bubbly drinks, fine china, place cards. The kids love it because it feels special, and we love it because we’re not succumbing to an overpriced prix fixe. Here’s how we do it.

For the record, BA endorses children chugging sparkling cider on New Year’s, not Champagne.

BONAPPETIT.COM • DECEMBER 2014

FOOD STYLING BY ALISON ATTENBOROUGH. PROP STYLING BY KALEN KAMINSKI.

BA

PARM BROTH

fast,

easy,

fresh

PHOTOGRAPH

BY

> RECIPES, TIPS, AND MENU IDEAS FROM OUR EXPERTS

For a pasta starring your very own Parm broth, see Prep School, page 131.

You might say I hoard Parmesan rinds. I save them all year long, freezing them in a resealable bag. As soon as that first cold front sweeps in, I transform those long-collected ends into a rich and versatile Parmesan Broth. I start by sautéing a halved head of garlic and a quartered onion in some olive oil, along with a handful of thyme, a few sprigs of parsley, a bay leaf, and a shake of black peppercorns. Once the garlic is browned, I add a cup of dry white wine and simmer, scraping the pot to get the brown bits loosened up, until reduced by half. In goes 1 lb. Parmesan rinds and 8 cups of water. The whole thing simmers until it tastes robust and has reduced by half, about 2 hours. (I stir every now and then—the rinds will stick to the bottom of the pot if you let them.) I strain, and then use the broth in vegetable soups, instant-supper pastas, and beans in need of a boost. Then I start hoarding all over again. —Alfia Muzio

TUUKKA

KOSKI

DECEMBER 2014 • BONAPPETIT.COM

43

RECIPES BY DAWN PERRY AND CLAIRE SAFFITZ

k FAST, E ASY, FRESH

LU N C H A L D E S KO PACK IT UP AND ENJOY THE FRUITS OF YOUR LABOR—AGAIN!

Good news: This chili might be even better reheated, after the flavors meld. Better news:

lunch that will keep you satisfied until dinner. Keep toppings—avocado, scallion, Cotija

A smaller portion over brown rice or quinoa is a power

cheese, pepitasseparate so they stay fresh.

LUNCH YOUR LEFTOVERS

Winter Comfort

A warming beef chili gets serious depth from toasted chiles and a touch of sweetness from squash

Beef and Squash Chili

ACTIVE

4 SERVINGS

1

HR

10

MIN

- TOTAL 1

HR 30 MIN

2

Tbsp. fresh lime juice

2

Tbsp. raw pumpkin seeds (pepitas) Sour cream, chopped avocado, and sliced red onion (for serving)

Toast chiles in a dry small skillet over medium-high heat, turning occasionally and pressing down to help them make contact with the pan, until darkened in color and beginning to soften, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and cover

1

dried ancho chile

with 2 cups boiling water; let sit 30

1

dried pasilla chile

minutes to soften. Drain; remove seeds

3

cups low-sodium chicken broth

and stems. Purée chiles and broth in

2

Tbsp. plus 1 tsp. vegetable oil

a blender until smooth, about 1 minute.

1

lb. boneless beef chuck roast, cut into ½" pieces Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

Once chiles have soaked 10 minutes, heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a large heavy pot over medium-high. Season beef with salt and

1

large white onion, finely chopped

pepper and cook, stirring occasionally,

4

garlic cloves, finely chopped

until browned all over, about 5 minutes.

2

tsp. ground cumin

At this point, quite a bit of liquid will

1

tsp. dried oregano

have accumulated; continue to cook

1

12-oz. bottle lager

until it has evaporated, about 3 minutes.

½

acorn squash, scrubbed, sliced into thin wedges, then into 1" pieces

Transfer beef to a plate. Add 1 Tbsp. oil to pot, then white onion and garlic; season with salt and pepper.

Cook, stirring often, until softened, 6–8

minutes; onion juices will help loosen anything left on bottom of pot. Add cumin and oregano and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Return beef to pot and add beer. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until almost completely reduced, about 4 minutes. Add chile purée, season with salt and pepper, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until liquid is slightly thickened and meat is tender, 20–25 minutes. Add squash; cover and cook until tender, 10–15 minutes. Stir in lime juice. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350°. Toss pumpkin seeds and remaining 1 tsp. oil on a rimmed baking sheet; season with salt. Bake, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, 8–10 minutes. Let cool. Serve chili topped with sour cream, avocado, red onion, and toasted pumpkin seeds. DO AHEAD: Chili can be made 3 days ahead. Let cool; cover and chill, or freeze up to 1 month.

Calories 400 - Fat 21 g - Fiber 4 g

44

BONAPPETIT.COM • DECEMBER 2014

PHOTOGRAPHS

BY

EVA

KOLENKO

k FAST, E ASY, FRESH

KEY TECHNIQUE

There’s Bread in My Vinaigrette!

And we like it that way. Sourdough enriches salad dressing for a creamy, tangy finish

Radicchio Salad with Sourdough Dressing

ACTIVE 15 MIN - TOTAL 25 MIN 4 SERVINGS

3 oz. sourdough bread, crust removed, torn into small pieces (about 1 cup), divided

1 Tbsp. plus ⅓ cup olive oil Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

1 small garlic clove

2 Tbsp. red wine vinegar

tsp. Dijon mustard

1

1 tsp. sugar

W H Y W E … > BLITZ THE BREAD

Using a blender rather than a food processor yields a smooth dressing and whips in air for a light texture.

1 head radicchio, leaves separated, torn if large

2 scallions, thinly sliced

Preheat oven to 425°. Toss half of bread with 1 Tbsp. oil on a rimmed baking sheet; season with salt and pepper. Bake, tossing once, until golden brown, 8–10 minutes. Pulse garlic, vinegar, mustard, sugar, remaining bread, and 2 Tbsp. water in a blender to combine; let sit 5 minutes to soften bread. With motor running,

gradually add remaining ⅓ cup oil; blend until smooth (bread will blend into dressing, thickening and flavoring it,

while retaining some texture), about 2 minutes; season with salt and pepper. Toss radicchio, scallions, croutons,

and dressing in a large bowl; season

with salt and pepper.

Calories 270 - Fat 3 g - Fiber 1 g »

K I TC H E N DISPATCH

The Day-Old

Dilemma

You know that sinking feeling

when a good loaf of bread fades the next day?

I make sure

it doesn’t go to waste with this sourdough vinaigrette. But that’s hardly

your only option:

Turn it into breadcrumbs to top pasta, soak

it in milk for

meatballs, or use it to make (sweet or savory) bread pudding. And of course there are croutons, which promise that stale bread pulls double duty in this salad.

Claire Saffitz,

assistant

food editor

GUTTER

k FAST, E ASY, FRESH

We eat these guys shells and all, but you can sub in peeled shrimp instead.

and the cook time is too. But the flavors? Huge. All it needs is a bowl of white rice.”

Dawn Perry, senior food editor

15-MINUTE MAIN

Shrimp That Sizzles

Crunchy shrimp (thanks for the help, cornstarch!) gets its zesty, floral heat from Sichuan peppercorns. It’s hard to believe that a main course this complex comes together so quickly

Salt-and-Pepper Shrimp

Using kitchen shears, cut along the backs

ACTIVE 15 MIN - TOTAL 15 MIN 4 SERVINGS

of shrimp through shells and just deep enough to expose veins; remove veins. Pat shrimp dry. Whisk cornstarch, black

1 ½

lb. shell-on large shrimp

pepper, and ¾ tsp. salt in a large bowl;

3

Tbsp. cornstarch

add shrimp and toss to coat.

1

tsp. freshly ground black pepper

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-

1 ½

tsp. kosher salt, divided

high heat. Working in 2 batches, fry

1

cup vegetable oil

shrimp until golden, crisp, and cooked

1

tsp. Sichuan peppercorns, ground

through, about 1 minute per side. Transfer to paper towels and let drain,

1

Fresno chile, thinly sliced, seeds removed if desired

then toss in a medium bowl with Sichuan peppercorns and remaining ¾ tsp. salt.

½

cup fresh cilantro leaves with

Add chile and cilantro to bowl and toss

tender stems

to combine. Calories 170 - Fat 4 g - Fiber 1 g

FOOD STYLING BY REBECCA JURKEVICH. PROP STYLING BY KALEN KAMINSKI. ILLUSTRATIONS BY JOE WILSON.

k FAST, E ASY, FRESH

W H Y

> START ON THE STOVE

Browning a chicken on the stovetop before roasting nets golden-brown skin and jump-starts the cooking process so this bird’s done in less than an hour.

W E …

FO R COMPLETE N U T R I T I O N A L INFO FO R THE RECIPES IN THIS STO RY, G O TO B O N A P P E T I T .COM/RECIPES

SUPER-SIMPLE

The Whole Shebang

A beautifully browned bird and seasonal vegetables cook in a single skillet for an effortless dinner. Swap in carrots, quartered onions, or tiny potatoes—anything goes

Skillet Roast Chicken with Fennel, Parsnips, and Scallions

ACTIVE 20 MIN - TOTAL 1 HR 6 SERVINGS

3

Tbsp. olive oil, divided

1

3 ½–4-lb. chicken Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

1

fennel bulb, sliced lengthwise ½" thick

2

large parsnips, peeled, sliced ½" thick on the diagonal

1

bunch scallions

3

wide strips lemon zest Lemon wedges (for serving)

Preheat oven to 425°. Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a large ovenproof skillet over medium-high. Season chicken inside and out with salt and pepper and cook, breast side down, until a beautiful golden brown. Use tongs to gently rotate chicken, being careful not to tear skin, and brown on all sides, 12–15 minutes total; transfer to a plate. Reserve skillet. Toss fennel, parsnips, scallions, and lemon zest in skillet with remaining 2 Tbsp. oil; season with salt and pepper. Place chicken, breast side up, on top of vegetables. Roast until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of chicken thigh registers 165°, 35–40 minutes. (You can also check doneness by cutting into thigh meat right at the joint. If the juices run clear, the bird is ready.) Transfer chicken to a cutting board and let rest at least 10 minutes before carving. Serve chicken and vegetables with pan juices for spooning over and lemon

wedges. Calories 500 - Fat 33 g - Fiber 5 g

k k

a cook’s guide to cookbooks

Forget style-over-substance. Instead, gift the year’s releases that are already getting a serious workout in our own kitchens

GIFT IT WITH Erickson’s back- pocket flavor trick:

Scalia salt-packed

anchovies ($27;

chefshop.com).

A Boat, a Whale & a Walrus Renee Erickson ($40)

“I don’t know who I’m inviting to my next dinner party, but I know what I’m cooking. Erickson’s book has an Ina Garten–like blend of effortlessness and luxuriousness that makes you believe that king salmon with walnut tarator will practically cook itself. But then, with her forgiving guidelines and clear

descriptionsit basically does. Julia Kramer, associate restaurant editor

Prune

Gabrielle

Hamilton

($45)

“Hamilton not only wants you to cook like a pro line cook, she wants you to think like one too. Her funny, personal kitchen notebook brings her beloved East Village restaurant to life.

I’ve learned how to ‘pick up’ that brunch carbonara that I prepped ahead, and

I was scolded not

to leave fingerprints

while plating. You may wonder,

Do I need to make

a whole quart of,

say, brown butter vinaigrette at a time? After reading this book, yes.”

Christine Muhlke,

executive editor

GIFT IT WITH The pro tool kit:

Sharpie, masking tape, and a stack of plastic quart containers.

54

BONAPPETIT.COM • DECEMBER 2014

T

H E

N E W

V E G E TA R I A N

C O O K I N G

F

OR EVERYONE

DEBORAH MADISON ($40)

“This update on the comprehensive, hardworking 1997 classic— packed with new recipes and revised ingredient info—is the answer to what to do with the produce in your CSA box or those unfamiliar grains you’ve been gearing up to try.”

Liesel Davis, recipe editor

GIFT IT WITH Classic Microplane ($13; us.microplane.com), for citrus, garlic, and more.

The Meat Hook Meat Book Tom Mylan ($38)

“When I first dove into this, I thought, Does the world really need another book about meat by some Brooklyn beardos? Turns out it does. Mylan strikes a perfect balance between thorough—and thoughtful—info on butchery, deliriously delicious recipes (Duck-Fat Potato Poutine!), and hilarious accounts of dude debauchery.”

Amiel Stanek, assistant to the editor in chief

PHOTOGRAPHS

BY

MEIKO

GIFT IT WITH Victorinox 5" Rosewood boning knife ($39; cutlery andmore.com), so your butcher- to-be can start breaking down primals at home.

TAKECHI

ARQUILLOS

PROP STYLING BY BOBBI LIN

k C O O K BO O KS OF THE YEAR

PLUS OUR TOP COFFEE-TABLE TOMES OF 2014

RELÆ CHRISTIAN F. PUGLISI

EATING WITH THE CHEFS PER-ANDERS JÖRGENSEN

NEVER TRUST A SKINNY ITALIAN CHEF MASSIMO BOTTURA

Lunch at the Shop Peter Miller ($25)

“At his eponymous bookstore in Seattle, Miller and his colleagues prepare and sit down to lunch together daily, a practice he writes about so compellingly in this manifesto- cum-cookbook, it’ll make you drop your turkey wrap on the spot. Many of the recipes are very simple—like the apple, almond butter, and Fromager d’Affinois sandwich I now sometimes pack for work—but they still feel sophisticated.”

Meryl Rothstein, senior editor

GIFT IT WITH Waterproof waxed canvas lunch bag ($48; kaufmann- mercantile.com), for a lunch carrier as chic as its contents.

GIFT IT WITH A Japanese- style jigger ($9; cocktailkingdom .com); those cocktails won’t measure themselves.

Baking Chez Moi Dorie Greenspan

($40)

“It’s the holidays, so you should be baking. Which is why I plan on giving this to all the bakers in my life. Greenspan is the reassuring guide you need to tackle all the delicious French desserts you know (but have never made) and several you don’t. Since everything in this book is entertaining-worthy or giftable, I’ll be making gems like buckwheat and chocolate sablés all month long.”

Claire Saffitz, assistant food editor

GIFT IT WITH A piping bag and pastry tips (Ateco 14-Piece Cake Decorating Set, $20; surlatable.com), for those cream puffs and macarons.

LIQUID INTELLIGENCE DAVE ARNOLD ($35)

“What Harold McGee’s On Food and Cooking was for chefs, Dave Arnold’s Liquid Intelligence will be for bartenders: a geeky, science-driven game-changer that explores the whys and hows of cocktails. Make sure to get an invitation to your giftees next cocktail party.

Andrew Knowlton, restaurant and drinks editor

GIFT IT WITH An indestructible mortar and pestle (Mason Cash medium mortar and pestle, $18; amazon.com).

Twelve Recipes Cal Peternell ($27)

“Chez Panisse chef Peternell wrote this chatty cookbook as a primer for his sons and covers everything from toast to special salads, egg essentials, and classic braises—even some desserts. I let my boys select recipes to try from the photos, then relay Peternell’s smart straight-talk advice while we cook together.”

Carla Lalli Music, food editor

k T H E PARTY

THE MENU

raise your (shot) glass

Champagne? Not your only option. Ring in the new year with a Russian-style vodka-and-caviar menu from Portland restaurant Kachka. It’s an evening you’ll remember forever. Or maybe not

CAVIAR & ACCOMPANIMENTS

BEET-FILLED EGGS

SHRIMP OLIVIER B R E A D & BU T T E R

CHARRED ROSEMARY–INFUSED VODKA

PICKLES!

by Amiel Stanek

This is a drinking party not a dinner party. But that doesn’t mean there won’t be plenty to eat. On New Year’s Eve in Russia, the table is covered end-to-end with an astonishing display of food— tart pickles, bread,

you and a group of your most game friends to enjoy her menu of zakuski (think Russian tapas) the way her Belarusian relatives would. “It’s about a lot of little repetitions,” she says. It’s a giddy and garrulous cycle:

salads, caviar— some homemade, most purchased. Shots of icy vodka are poured, properly toasted (Za vas!), gleefully downed, and chased with a fortifying snack. At Portland, Oregon’s Kachka, chef Bonnie Morales cultivates precisely this kind of evening. She wants

Toast. Drink. Eat. Repeat. Is there any more symbolic—or festive—way to mark the rolling of one year into the next? Nyet.

k

T H E PA RT Y

r u s s i a n year’s eve

>

n e w

Use affordable vodka for infusing; pour the good stuff (try Russian Standard) straight.

Charred Rosemary–Infused Vodka

ACTIVE 5 MIN - TOTAL 28 HR

8 SERVINGS Kachka offers a variety

of flavored vodkas, including this smoky collaboration with the chefs at Ox in Portland. For a floral take, replace the charred rosemary with ¼ cup loose dried chamomile (or 8 tea bags).

Char 1 large rosemary sprig in a dry skillet over medium-high heat, turning occasionally, until blackened in spots and fragrant, about 4 minutes. Place in a 1-qt. glass jar and pour in one 750 ml bottle vodka (reserve bottle). Let sit at room temperature 24 hours. Taste it—you should be able to detect the flavor; if not, let infuse longer. Strain into reserved bottle and freeze at least 4 hours before serving.

Shrimp Olivier

ACTIVE 35 MIN - TOTAL 35 MIN

8 SERVINGS Morales insists it’s

not a Russian party without this retro seafood salad on the table.

H OW

TO

D R I N K

L I K E

A

R U S S I A N

THE KACHKA CREW EXPLAINS

1

IF YOU WANT TO DRINK LOTS OF VODKA, you must eat lots

of food. Fill out

the

sliced bread (try challah, rye, or lepyoshka flatbread), butter, and a

mix

Eat

tandem during

the

2

YOUR VODKA. Bring out the bottle only to pour into small pitchers or shot glasses before each toast.

spread with

of pickles. and drink in

night.

FREEZE

3

NEED ARE SHOT GLASSES. Responsible host trick: Get the smallest ones you can.

4

TO THE TOASTS. Maintain the rhythm: After a heartfelt toast, everyone raises their glasses and drinks. Then comes eating, then the process repeats. Two addendums:

No drinking without toasts, and no drinking between toasts!

ALL YOU

HERE’S

Cook potatoes in a large pot of boiling

salted water until just tender, 6–8 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon; let cool. Meanwhile, return water to a boil

and cook carrots until tender, about

3 minutes; let cool in a colander set in

a bowl of ice water. Drain, pat dry, and transfer to a large bowl. Repeat with peas, cooking until bright green, about 30 seconds; add to bowl with carrots. Working in 2 batches, repeat (cook, cool, dry) with rock and medium shrimp, boiling until cooked through, about

1 minute for rock shrimp and 2 minutes for medium. Add rock shrimp to bowl