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Storyboard:

2. Overview
3. Recommendations for some media
4.-6. Introduction
7-12: Lesson 1, Practice 1, Quiz 1
13-18: Lesson 2, Practice 2, Quiz 2
19-24: Quiz
25: credits
*please see notes on each slide

Notes will have the narration, as well as navigation, animation, and multimedia
description. Text next to the slide should help you have a better grasp of what is
intended in the slide. On-screen text and images are intended to reflect what may be
on the slide. Notes are organized as followed:
Extra comments:
On-screen text is on the screen
allow users to repeat any narration
allow users to repeat multimedia
create branching at the end of each lesson to allow user to redo the lesson
before taking the quiz
create branching so that the user can redo the lesson at the end of the quiz
Areas of needed improvement
finding multimedia resources
branching

1.1 Welcome

1.2 Attention, Intro


Video?

1.3 Character intro


Hi (name)

objectives
name

3.2 Particles: Practice

slides 14-17

3.7 Particles: Quiz

slide 18

2.1 Waves: Lesson

Slides 7-9

Begin

2.7 Waves: Quiz

2.4 Waves: Practice

slide 13

Slide 12

Slides 10-11

4.1 Quiz Intro

4.2 Quiz

4.7 Results

3.1 Particles: lesson

slide 19

slides 20-24

slide 25

1.1 Welcome with music


1.2 Grab attention w/ video, Introduce character.
1.3 State objectives. Stimulate recall of prior knowledge
2.1 Stimulate recall of prior knowledge. Present information: Lesson 1: Waves
2.4 Provide guidance: practice
2.7 elicit performance, provide feedback
3.1 Stimulate recall of prior knowledge. Present information: Lesson 1: Waves
3.2 Provide guidance: practice
3.7 elicit performance, provide feedback
4.1 Assess performance: quiz

CRE
slide

http://oceanexplorer.noaa.
gov/explorations/sound01/backgrou
nd/acoustics/media/hz.html
http://exploration.grc.nasa.
gov/education/rocket/state.html

http://commons.wikimedia.
org/wiki/Main_Page

openclipart.org

http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K12/VirtualAero/BottleRocket/airplan
e/sndwave.html

http://oceanexplorer.noaa.
gov/gallery/sound/sound.html

Narration:
Multimedia used:
Animation:
Learner-content interaction:
Recommended sources for media:
Branching options:

Welcome to
your lesson
on SOUND
Narration:
Welcome to your lesson on SOUND
Multimedia used:
audio: friendly music or percussion from YouTubes creator studio
Animation:
Animate sound so that it is emphasized.
Title transitions in use a loud animation, growing?
Learner-content interaction:
Learner clicks continue
Recommended sources for media:
YouTubes creator studio
Branching options:
Continue button next slide (1.2)

Video or animation showing clipart during narration.

Enter name here

Narration:
Sound is difficult to see, but why can you hear it? Can you sound in water?
Through walls? Around buildings? What about in space? Does sound travel
differently in water? air? and metal? Why? If you could draw sound, how would sound
look like?
Hi, my name is and Im here to help you find out more about sound. Please enter
your name in the box and click next to find out what you will learn.
Multimedia used:
Either video, or animation with narration.
Animation:
Pedagogical character is talking
If animation is chosen instead of video, find resources in openclipart.org, wiki
commons, or other resources you have access to.
Learner-content interaction:
Learner enters name in the name box when prompted
Recommended sources for media:
eyes looking
listening
wall
water

Branching options:
User clicks next button next slide (1.3)

1.
2.
3.
4.

travels in waves
parts of the waves
frequency, amplitude, and wavelength
sound travels differently through different media
Well, (name), click begin when youre ready!

Begin

Narration:
So, today you will learn about
1. how sound travels in waves
2. what the different parts of the waves mean
3. the relationship between between frequency, amplitude, and wavelength
4. and how sound travels differently through different media such as solids,
liquids, and gasses
Multimedia used:
Animation:
Pedagogical character pops in to narrate
on-screen objectives appears with coinciding narration
User clicks next
Learner-content interaction:
Learner clicks begin when ready. button should not appear until narration is
completed.
Recommended sources for media:
shapes and character in program
Branching options: User clicks Begin Lesson 1 (2.1)

How come we hear sound?

Narration:
So, why do we hear sound? In this video, take a look and try to see what needs to
happen in order to hear sound.

Multimedia used:
Video plays when user clicks play. Video is long. Only allow the user to view the first
few seconds of the video.
Animation:
Learner-content interaction:
Recommended sources for media:
drum
video
Branching options:

(Username), what do you think causes sound? (check all that


apply)
A. silence
B. vibration
C. hitting an instrument
D. stillness

Narration:
What causes sound? silence, vibration, hitting an instrument, stillness
Multimedia used:
narration when the user hovers over the text.
Animation:
none
Learner-content interaction:
answer question (check all that apply)
Recommended sources for media:
Branching options:
submit button next slide

Narration:
Sound is caused by vibration, creating sound waves. This can happen by hitting an
instrument (Ping!) or vibrating your vocal chords when you speak. Go ahead and try
it. Put your fingers on your throat and say la la la la la. (pause) Did you feel the
vibrations in your fingers caused by your vocal chords?
Sound waves, may look similar to a water drop on a pond. The waves ripple in all
directions. And unlike light, they can sometimes go around or through things like walls
or steel.
Here is an image of a typical wave. Amplitude shows how loud a sound is and you
can see this by looking at how much distance is between the equilibrium and either
crest or trough. The wavelength is how long one entire wave is. Frequency is
caused by pitch. A high pitch sound creates high frequency waves, which makes the
wavelengths shorter.
Multimedia used:
If you can find a tuning fork image with sound wave representations for the beginning,
it would be a nice touch.
The water droplet should be used for that representation.
Should go with narration: drum, water droplet, wave.
Animation:
The words in bold need to be highlighted on the image so that the learner has a visual
to follow along.

Learner-content interaction:
none
Recommended sources for media:
complex wave (vector based and editable)
simple wave
water droplet
drumset
Branching options:
automatically jumps to the next slide when the timeline reaches end its end.

Narration:
Take a look at this animation (http://www.educationscotland.gov.
uk/resources/s/sound/amplitude.asp) and see how you can make the wavelength,
amplitude, and frequency change. After you are done, click next to listen to the
difference.
Multimedia used:
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/resources/s/sound/amplitude.asp
Animation:
Fade in after narration ends
Learner-content interaction:
Click animation to begin. User interacts with online simulation
Recommended sources for media:
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/resources/s/sound/amplitude.asp you will need
to embed the website for simulation to function.
Branching options:
User clicks next next slide

Narration:
Now make the volume change the amplitude and the pitch change the frequency in
this animation. Try to hear the difference. http://www.educationscotland.gov.
uk/resources/s/sound/oscilloscope.asp?
strReferringChannel=resources&strReferringPageID=tcm:4-248291-64. After you are
done, click next to check what you have understood.
Multimedia used:
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/resources/s/sound/oscilloscope.asp?
strReferringChannel=resources&strReferringPageID=tcm:4-248291-64.
Animation:
Pedagogical character slides in from the side, embedded item available after
narration ends.
Learner-content interaction:
Learner interacts with sound using the online simulation.
Recommended sources for media:
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/resources/s/sound/oscilloscope.asp?
strReferringChannel=resources&strReferringPageID=tcm:4-248291-64.
Branching options:
user clicks next next slide

If I play an instrument with a lot of amplitude, it will sound


A. high pitched
B. low pitched
C. loud
D. quiet

Narration:
If I play an instrument with a lot of amplitude, it will sound
A.
high pitched
B.
low pitched
C.
loud
D.
quiet
Feedback:
Correct: Correct, high amplitude means high volume, which will make the sound loud.
Incorrect: Incorrect, high amplitude means high volume, which will make the sound
loud.
Multimedia used:
Animation:
Learner-content interaction:
Recommended sources for media:
Branching options:
Return to lesson 1 return the the beginning of lesson one
Move on to lesson 2 next slide

Narration:
Now that we know that sound travels in waves, how does it travel through different
media?
Lets see what you remember about the different states of matter: solids, liquids,
and gasses. If you recall, the particles inside solids are very close together, theyre
farther apart in liquid, and even farther apart in gasses.
When a drum is hit, vibration occurs. This vibration moves the air particles, causing
them to hit one another. The vibrating particles make your eardrum vibrate so that you
can hear that drum.

Multimedia used:
Highlight the bold narrated words as they are spoken.
It might be interesting to allow the user to hit the drum and include a drum sound
when they do so.
The wave behind the drum is an animated gif file, giving the user some illustration of
sound wave travel.
Animation:
Character floats in
slg image fades in
Drum and waves fade in with narration.
transition with fade out on all objects

Learner-content interaction:
It might be interesting to allow the user to hit the drum and include a drum sound
when they do so.
Recommended sources for media:
solid liquid gas image
drum
compression wave
Branching options:
next next slide

Narration:
Depending on how hard the drum is hit or how loud the sound is, will determine how
far the sound can clearly travel a distance. If there is loud noise, there is more
amplitude and the vibration can hit more particles.
Try this demonstration then hit next to try a different demonstration.
Multimedia used:
online simulation
Animation:
Character fades in
narration ends, simulation is available and the character fades out.
Learner-content interaction:
User hits hammer, visualizing particles being hit.
Recommended sources for media:
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/resources/s/sound/soundpulse.asp?
strReferringChannel=resources&strReferringPageID=tcm:4-248294-64
Branching options:
User clicks next next slide

Narration:
The small spheres represented particles. You should have noticed that the particles
hit each other, allowing the sound wave to travel to the next particles. Now, lets think.
Should particles be able to travel faster or slower if they are close together like in a
solid? Lets try this next simulation to find out. Try this simulation to see how fast
sound can travel in air (gas), water (liquid), and steel (solid). Make sure that you
change the distance so you can really see the difference.
Multimedia used:
Particle representation
embedded link to online simulation
Animation:
Learner-content interaction:
Learner uses the hammer and changes the distance to see how fast sound can travel
through different mediums.
Recommended sources for media:
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/resources/s/sound/speedofsound.asp?
strReferringChannel=resources&strReferringPageID=tcm:4-248287-64
solid liquid gas image
Branching options:

Narration:
Lets take a look at how those particles look like in a solid when waves are traveling
through them, then lets compare that to a gas. Try out the different amplitudes and
frequencies in the two media. After you feel like you can answer some questions on
how sound travels, click next.
Multimedia used:
embedded online simulation
Animation:
character slides in, narrates, and slides out when narration is complete
embedded online simulation appears available after narration completes
Learner-content interaction:
embedded online simulation
Recommended sources for media:
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/resources/s/sound/solid.asp?
strReferringChannel=resources&strReferringPageID=tcm:4-248293-64
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/resources/s/sound/soundingas.asp?
strReferringChannel=resources&strReferringPageID=tcm:4-248289-64
Branching options:
User clicks next next slide

Narration:
So why do you think sound travels faster through solids than in liquids or gas?
(pause) It you thought it was because the solid particles are closer together, then you
re really thinking. Since sound is a vibration of these particles, its easier for the
particles to vibrate each other when theyre closer together.
Multimedia used:
I would like to have an ongoing simulation here but not sure if we could use this one:
http://www.passmyexams.co.uk/GCSE/physics/sound-waves.html
Animation:
character enters and talking
highlight the closeness of the particles
Learner-content interaction:
next button
Recommended sources for media:
Branching options:
user clicks next next slide

T/F:
You cant hear any sound under water because theres no air.

Narration:
T/F:
You cant hear any sound under water because theres no air.
True
False
Multimedia used:
Animation:
Learner-content interaction:
Recommended sources for media:
Branching options:
Begin Test quiz slide
Review Lesson 2 Lesson 2 Slide
Review Lesson 1 Lesson 1 Slide

quiz introduction with instructions

Narration:
Multimedia used:
Animation:
Learner-content interaction:
Recommended sources for media:
Branching options:

Using a matching feature, students need to match figures


representing particles in a solid (rigid particles), liquid (fluid
particles) and gas (floating particles) to an image representing a
solid (steel block), liquid (water), and gas (balloon). (Objective
1a)

Narration:
Multimedia used:
Animation:
Learner-content interaction:
Recommended sources for media:
Branching options:

Look at the two figures below, which one is louder? (Objective 2b)

Narration:
Multimedia used:
Animation:
Learner-content interaction:
Recommended sources for media:
Branching options:

Using a diagram representing the sound wave, use a drag and drop
feature or hotspot quiz to have the student label the wavelength and
amplitude. (Objective 2a)

Narration:
Multimedia used:
Animation:
Learner-content interaction:
Recommended sources for media:
Branching options:

Using the same diagram as Quiz question 3 and other diagrams (maybe
3) of sound waves at different frequencies and amplitudes, the student
will be asked Which choice represents a higher frequency. Further
questions can be asked along these lines if appropriate with different
choices -- different amplitudes (volumes) should also be included.
(Objective 2b & 2c)

Narration:
Multimedia used:
Animation:
Learner-content interaction:
Recommended sources for media:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sine_waves_different_frequencies.svg
Branching options:

Multiple choice: If the amplitude is higher, then, If the wavelength


is smaller then If the pitch is higher, then -- Questions and
answers need to be shuffled. (Objective 2d)
a. The sound is louder, but the frequency and wavelength stay the
same.
b. The volume stays the same, but the frequency is higher.
c. The amplitude stays the same, but the wavelength gets smaller.

Narration:
Multimedia used:
Animation:
Learner-content interaction:
Recommended sources for media:
Branching options:

Results

Narration:
Multimedia used:
Animation:
Learner-content interaction:
Recommended sources for media:
Branching options:

http://www.sciencea-z.com/
http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/sound/Lesson-1/Sound-is-a-PressureWave
http://www.passmyexams.co.uk/GCSE/physics/sound-waves.html