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COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

LONG-RANGE PLAN
Major

Middles Grades
(Math/ELA)

Clinical Practice Intern

Taylor Fleming

School

*** Middle School (name of the Middle School has been excluded for privacy)

Grade Level/Subject Area

7th Grade ELA

General instructions to interns: Each long-range plan (LRP) should include all subjects/courses you will
teach.
Section I: Student Information (Key element 1.A)
School Demographics:
Teacher to Student Ratio: 13.8 to 1
Total Enrollment: Approximately 734 students with 53 full-time teachers. 240 in 6 th grade, 241 in 7th,
and 253 in 8th.
Ethnicity: 63% White/Caucasian, 29% Black, 7% Hispanic, 2% Asian, and 0% other
Lunch: 252 (34%) of students are eligible for free lunch and 76 (10%) are eligible for reduced lunch.
*During the time in which this data was pulled, the school was Title I eligible. However, I have been
informed that this academic year (2014-2015) the school is NOT considered to be Title I.
1st Period (GT; 19 students):
Gender: 8 Female & 11 Male
Ethnicity: 13 White, 1 Mixed, 2 Hispanic, 1 Asian, & 2 Black
Lunch: 7 Paid, 9 Free, & 3 Reduced
Eng. Prof. Score: 17 students with a score of 9, 1 with a score of 4, & 1 with a score indicated by C
Special Needs: 1 student identified for Spec. Ed. Services
Interests**: ice skating, art, piano, swimming, science experiments, dogs, games, photography,
crosswords, Sudoku, music, saxophone, violin, percussion, reading, math, softball, band, ELA, singing,
video games, cooking, 80s rock, sports, baseball, soccer, science, playing an instrument
Preferred Learning Styles**: showing/modeling/demonstrating a task or activity (not many students
responded to this question)
3rd Period (GT; 19 students):
Gender: 15 Female & 4 Male
Ethnicity: 8 White, 2 Mixed, 5 Hispanic, 1 Asian, & 3 Black
Lunch: 10 Paid, 6 Free, & 3 Reduced
Eng. Prof. Score: 14 students with a score of 9, 2 with a score of 8, 1 with a score of 7,
1 with a score of 6, & 1 with a score of 4
Special Needs: No students identified for Spec. Ed. Services
Interests**: Netflix, fish, youtube, Kylie Jenner, cheerleading, Bruno Mars, ELA, science, viola, baseball,
Tyler Oakley, drawing, violin, singing, photography, llamas, music, phone, acting, reading, clarinet,
food, pizza, designing/drawing clothes, saxophone, talking, shopping

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Preferred Learning Styles**: showing/modeling/demonstrating a task or activity, interactive learning,


hands-on, notes/being able to write things down, quiet/silence, wide range of styles combined
4th Period (General; 28 students):
Gender: 9 Female & 19 Male
Ethnicity: 13 White, 1 Mixed, 4 Hispanic, 1 Indian, & 9 Black
Lunch: 7 Paid, 17 Free, & 4 Reduced
Eng. Prof. Score: 24 students with a score of 9, 1 with a score of 4, 2 with a score of 2,
& 1 with a score indicated by C
Special Needs: 6 students identified for Spec. Ed. Services
Interests**: planting, drawing, dancing, soccer, skateboarding, movies, video games, biographies,
beach, sports, baseball, football
Preferred Learning Styles**: group work, hands-on, notes/being able to write things down, visual
learning, individual work, peer editing/having peers review work
6th Period (General; 27 students):
Gender: 13 Female & 14 Male
Ethnicity: 15 White, 1 Mixed, 5 Hispanic, & 6 Black
Lunch: 7 Paid, 15 Free, & 5 Reduced
Eng. Prof. Score: 23 students with a score of 9, 1 with a score of 3, & 3 with a score of 2
Special Needs: 9 students identified for Spec. Ed. Services
Interests**: ice hockey, youtube, movies, guitar, orchestra, violin, writing, learning new things, sports,
making videos, gymnastics, singing, hip-hop, dancing, anime, drawing, music, food, cookies, classic
cars, skateboarding, fairy tales, money, reading, video games, XBOX360, sleeping, Andy Biersack
Preferred Learning Styles**: visual learning, independent work, group work, hands-on, PPTs,
modeling/showing/demonstrating a task or activity
School Demographics pulled from:
http://www.publicschoolsk12.com
This is data from 2009-2010
Gender, Ethnicity, Lunch, English Proficiency Score, and Special Needs Information was obtained through
PowerTeacher by the cooperating teacher
** indicates that the answers were self-identified by students

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Section II: Learning and Developmental Goals (Key elements 1.B. and 1.D)
Unit 4 GT Goals

Evaluation Methods
(e.g., portfolios, benchmark tests, projects)

Students will identify theme/central ideas within a text

Students will work together to identify theme/moral


with short texts (Aesop fables worksheet) and then
discuss the theme of justice in Nothing But the Truth.

Students will track theme within a given text

Students will fill out a literature web provided by the


College of William and Mary to track theme/the main
idea of each chapter of Nothing But the Truth by Avi.

Students will analyze how different authors writing


about the same topic present their information
differently

As a class, and in smaller groups, students will


discuss the different ways in which the same evidence
is used in different ways throughout the mock trial
process. This will occur most prominently during the
Evidence Board lesson.

Students will engage in a range of collaborative


discussions

Students will work independently, with partners, in


small and large groups, as well as contribute to larger
class discussions throughout the unit.

Students will present claims and findings in a


coherent manner

Students will present their claims and findings for the


mock trial and are expected to present them in an
organized manner that follows the trial process
worksheet provided by the SC bar association for
middle school mock trial.

Students will write an explanatory essay

Students will write an explanatory essay that looks


into how the outcome for the characters within
Nothing But the Truth would be different had the case
been taken to court/an actual school board hearing.

Students will gather relevant information from multiple


sources

Students will draw from multiple sources and present


this information not only in the mock trial, but also
upon their Evidence Boards and within their Nothing
But the Truth On Trial graphic organizer.

Students will assess the credibility and accuracy of


sources

Students will construct an argument within the mock


trial and within their explanatory essay as to why
certain evidence was or was not credible and/or
accurate.

Unit 4 General Goals

Evaluation Methods
(e.g., portfolios, benchmark tests, projects)

Students will track theme within a given text

Students will use their theme trackers to track


development of theme in the novel Touching Spirit
Bear. Students will also utilize their Fairytale Graphic
Organizers to chart and explain evidence of the theme
of justice within one of three fairytales provided.

Students will identify claim and supporting evidence

Students will annotate their chocolate milk articles


highlighting the claim and supporting evidence.

Students will analyze how different authors writing


about the same topic present their information

Students will compare/contrast Touching Spirit Bear, a


text from class, and a folk tale or fairy tale in both an

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Unit 4 General Goals

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS


Evaluation Methods
(e.g., portfolios, benchmark tests, projects)

differently

essay and presentation. Students will


compare/contrast the information presented in two
different versions of the story of the 3 little pigs.

Students will engage in a range of collaborative


discussions

Students will have the opportunity to work


independently, in pairs, in small and large groups, and
as a class

Students will write a comparison/contrast essay


(informative/explanatory text) using proper
conventions and citations

Students will compare/contrast the central ideas about


the concept of justice within their novel and a folk tale
or fairy tale.

Students will present the ideas from their respective


comparison/contrast essay

Students will compare/contrast the central ideas about


the concept of justice within their novel and a folk tale
or fairy tale.

Students will gather relevant information from multiple


sources

Students will be pulling information for their essay and


presentations from at least 2 different sources.

Unit 5 GT Goals

Evaluation Methods
(e.g., portfolios, benchmark tests, projects)

Students will identify theme within a text, specifically


A Tale of Two Cities

Students will discuss the theme within A Tale of Two


Cities in small groups and in whole class discussion.

Students will analyze how the structure of a text


contributes to its meaning

Within the provided graphic organizer for the poetry


analysis lesson, students will explain how the
structure of their poem contributes to its meaning. A
Tale of Two Cities was published in what Dickens
referred to as separate books; the implications of this
structure will be discussed as a class.

Students will cite multiple pieces of evidence to


support their analysis of a text

Students will cite evidence from A Tale of Two Cities,


poems from their poetry analysis, and additional
research they have conducted when writing their
valedictorian speech. For the poetry analysis,
students will be including multiple pieces of evidence
in order to back up a claim as to whether their
represented time period was the best of times or the
worst of times. The evidence was able to be
presented in various ways (i.e. mini-poster, minispeech, comic strip, etc.).

Students will compare and contrast a fictional


portrayal of time to a historical account of the same
period

Events, figures, and inventions will be pulled from A


Tale of Two Cities and compared/contrasted to
historical accounts of the events, figures, and
inventions represented.

Students will write arguments to support claims

Using gathered research about assigned time periods,


students will construct a brief argument about whether
their time period was the best of times OR worst of
times. Students will present their information in the
form of a mini-poster, mini-speech, comic strip, or
other format approved by the teacher.

Students will demonstrate an understanding of

Students will be assessed using a pre- and post-test

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Unit 5 GT Goals

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS


Evaluation Methods
(e.g., portfolios, benchmark tests, projects)

figurative language

on a brief figurative language unit that ties into A Tale


of Two Cities. Students will use a figurative language
devices tracker as the class moves through various
mini-lessons throughout the week.

Students will trace and evaluate claims and


arguments within a text

Students will research an event, figure, or invention


from the French Revolution and trace and evaluate
claims that are presented orally, visually, and
quantitatively.

Students will write for a specific audience (i.e. peers,


parents, the school, young children, etc.) and purpose
(i.e. to inform, to explain, to persuade, etc.) and be
able to identify the differences/changes in language
and structure for these types of writing.

Students will be formatively assessed through written


responses/short answer questions. Students will be
writing a valedictorian speech as a summative
assessment at the conclusion of the unit and will have
to take their audience into account.

Unit 5 General Goals

Evaluation Methods
(e.g., portfolios, benchmark tests, projects)

Students will identify theme within a novel

Students will track examples of theme throughout the


unit novel Devils Arithmetic by Jane Yolen.

Students will explain how structure/form (e.g. sonnet,


soliloquy, etc.) affects meaning in both poetry and
drama

In small groups and as a class, students will


participate in a discussion about different
structures/forms of text and record notes on how the
structures/forms contribute to the overall meaning of
the text.

Students will compare/contrast a historical


event/person/or place with a fictional portrayal of the
same event/person/or place

Students will complete graphic organizers and


contribute to class discussion during the close reading
and text to text comparison lessons. These lessons
ask students to compare historical events to fictional
portrayals of the same event.

Students will write arguments to support a claim,


using clear reasoning and relevant evidence

In their summative assignment, students will create a


multimedia presentation that explains why the novel
read should be included within a documentary of the
time period the novel represents.

Students will determine an authors point of view and


purpose

Students will compare texts about the same topic,


written by different authors in the text to text
comparison lesson. With a partner, and as a class,
students will identify the POV of each author and their
purpose for writing, using examples from the text to
support their answers. One text that will be used is
Eve Buntings Terrible Things.

Students will evaluate arguments and claims within a


text, assessing whether they are sound and why/why
not

Throughout all texts used within Unit 5, students will


work to identify claims and hold small group
discussions about the soundness of these claims.
Students might keep an organizer on evaluating
claims throughout the unit to keep track of the
different authors and their claims.

Students will write for a specific audience (i.e. peers,


parents, the school, young children, etc.) and purpose

Students will be formatively assessed through written


responses/short answer questions. The summative

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Unit 5 General Goals

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS


Evaluation Methods
(e.g., portfolios, benchmark tests, projects)

(i.e. to inform, to explain, to persuade, etc.) and be


assessment includes a presentation on whether or not
able to identify the differences/changes in language
the used novel should be included in a documentary
and structure for these types of writing.
for the time period. The audience is a TV channel.
Section III: Instructional Units and Assessments (Key elements 1.C and 1.D)

Unit 4 GT-Justice
(6 weeks)

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

Length
(i.e., number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes,
chapter/unit tests, homework
assignments. Include
weightings, if appropriate)

Close Reading:
Nothing But the Truth

CCSS.ELA.RL.7.2- Determine
a theme or central idea of a
text and analyze its
development over the course
of the text; provide an
objective summary of the text.
RL9-Compare and contrast a
fictional portrayal of a time,
place, or character and a
historical account of the same
period as a means of
understanding hoe authors of
fiction use or alter history.

3 days

Formative: Students will work


in groups of 2 or 3 to complete
the College of William and
Mary Literature Web

Interpreting and Comparing:


Mock Trial

CCSS.ELA.RI.7.8RI9- Analyze how two or more


authors writing about the
same topic shape their
presentations of key
information by emphasizing
different evidence or
advancing different
interpretations of facts.
CCSS.ELA.SL.7.3- Delineate
a speakers argument and
specific claims, evaluating the
soundness of the reasoning
and the relevance and
sufficiency of the evidence.
CCSS.ELA.SL.7.4- Present
claims and findings,
emphasizing salient points in
a focused, coherent manner
with pertinent descriptions,
facts, details, and examples;
use appropriate eye contact,
adequate volume, and clear
pronunciation.

Prep (2
weeks)
Actual Trial
(2 days)

Formative: Students will


complete the Nothing But the
Truth On Trial sheet, filling it
with gathered evidence.
Summative: Students will be
graded according to the mock
trial rubric.

Analyze:
Evidence Boards

CCSS.ELA.RI.7.9- Analyze
how two or more authors
writing about the same topic

2-3 days

Formative: Evidence Boards


will be graded according to
rubric and criteria met.

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Unit 4 GT-Justice
(6 weeks)

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Length
(i.e., number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes,
chapter/unit tests, homework
assignments. Include
weightings, if appropriate)

shape their presentations of


key information by
emphasizing different
evidence or advancing
different interpretations of
facts.
CCSS.ELA.SL.7.3- Delineate
a speakers argument and
specific claims, evaluating the
soundness of the reasoning
and the relevance and
sufficiency of the evidence.
CCSS.ELA.SL.7.4- Present
claims and findings,
emphasizing salient points in
a focused, coherent manner
with pertinent descriptions,
facts, details, and examples;
use appropriate eye contact,
adequate volume, and clear
pronunciation.
Research:
Students will gather relevant
information from the
following links while
assessing the credibility and
accuracy of each source.
They will quote or
paraphrase the information
to be used in a Venn
Diagram comparing the
case in Texas to the case
from Nothing But the Truth.

CCSS.ELA.W.7.8- Gather
relevant information from
multiple print and digital
sources, using search terms
effectively; assess the
credibility and accuracy of
each source; and quote or
paraphrase the data and
conclusions of others while
avoiding plagiarism and
following a standard format for
citation.
CCSS.ELA.RL.7.9- Compare
and contrast a fictional
portrayal of a time, place, or
character and a historical
account of the same period as
a means of understanding
how authors of fiction use or
alter history.

2-3 days

Formative: Students will


complete Venn Diagrams using
information collected from the
links provided in the Unit
Performance Tasks and the
novel Nothing But the Truth.

Writing:
Students will use all
readings, trial notes,
organizers, and reasoning to
write an explanatory essay
explaining how the outcome
may have been different if it

CCSS.ELA.W.7.2- Write
informative/explanatory texts
to examine a topic and
convey ideas, concepts, and
information through the
selection, organization, and
analysis of relevant content.

2-4 days

Summative: Students will be


graded according to rubric and
criteria met.

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Unit 4 GT-Justice
(6 weeks)

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Length
(i.e., number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes,
chapter/unit tests, homework
assignments. Include
weightings, if appropriate)

would have gone to trial in


the novel. Students will need
to use proper outlining,
transitional phrases, and
citations when writing.
Theme:
Identifying theme in Nothing
But the Truth by Avi.

Symbolism:
What is symbolism?
Examples in everyday life
and in literature. How
symbolism works to
develop/strengthen a theme
within literature.

Unit 4 General-Justice
(7 weeks)

CCSS.ELA.RL.7.2- Determine
a theme or central idea of a
text and analyze its
development over the course
of the text; provide an
objective summary of the text.
There is not a specific
standard that correlates with
the idea of symbolism BUT
this lesson will be used to
later support the following
standard:
CCSS.ELA.RL.7.3- Analyze
how particular elements of a
story or drama interact (in this
instance, how symbolism
shapes the theme within a
text).

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

1 day

Formative: Students will work


with partners or in small groups
to identify the theme of their
novel. Themes will be recorded
on a worksheet and/or
discussed as a class.

1 day

Formative: Think, Pair, Share


about symbolism questions and
symbols that appear within
Nothing But the Truth.

Length
(i.e., number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes,
chapter/unit tests, homework
assignments. Include
weightings, if appropriate)

Close Reading:
-Justice PPT
-Colorado Girl Shaves
Head to Support Friend,
Suspended for Dress Code
Breach.
-True Moo & Pro/Con:
Should Chocolate Milk be
Served in Schools?

CCSS.ELA.RI.7.2- Determine
two or more central ideas in a
text and analyze their
development over the course
of the text; provide an
objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA.RI.7.9- Analyze
how two or more authors
writing about the same topic
shape their presentations of
key information by
emphasizing different
evidence or advancing
different interpretations of
facts.

3-5 days

Formative: Students will hold a


class discussion about the PPT
and article involving the young
girl who shaved her head.
Students will annotate the
chocolate milk articles as
guided by the teacher AND
independently, identifying claim
and evidence. The discussion
will be one on bias, justice, and
fairness.

Optional Close Read:

CCSS.ELA.RL.7.2- Determine

1 day

Formative: Students will

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Unit 4 General-Justice
(7 weeks)

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Length
(i.e., number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes,
chapter/unit tests, homework
assignments. Include
weightings, if appropriate)

-The Goose Girl

a theme or central idea of a


text and analyze its
development over the course
of the text; provide an
objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA.RL.7.9- Compare
and contrast a fictional
portrayal of a time, place, or
character and a historical
account of the same period as
a means of understanding
how authors of fiction use or
alter history.

answer provided questions


about the text independently,
with a partner, or in small
groups.

Research:
-Parenthetical
documentation/citation work

CCSS.ELA.W.7.8- Gather
relevant information from
multiple print and digital
sources, using search terms
effectively; assess the
credibility and accuracy of
each source; and quote or
paraphrase the data and
conclusions of others while
avoiding plagiarism and
following a standard format for
citation.

1 day

Formative: Observation of
student practice in class.
Summative: Evidence of
citations will be used in student
comparison/contrast essay.

Writing:
-Comparison/contrast essay
using Touching Spirit Bear
and a folk tale or fairy tale

CCSS.ELA.W.7.2- Write
informative/explanatory texts
to examine a topic and
convey ideas, concepts, and
information through the
selection, organization, and
analysis of relevant content.

3-5 days

Formative: Students will


organize evidence of the theme
of justice using their theme
trackers and Fairytale graphic
organizer, as well as their
Touching Spirit Bear dialogue
tracker.
Summative: The essay will be
combined with a presentation
to act as the final test/project
grade of the unit.

Presentation:
-Sharing ideas from
comparison/contrast essay

CCSS.ELA.RI.7.9- Analyze
how two or more authors
writing about the same topic
shape their presentations of
key information by
emphasizing different
evidence or advancing
different interpretations of
facts.
CCSS.ELA.W.7.8- Gather
relevant information from

3-4 days

Summative: The presentation


will be combined with the
comparison/contrast essay for
the final test/project grade of
the unit.

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Unit 4 General-Justice
(7 weeks)

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Length
(i.e., number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes,
chapter/unit tests, homework
assignments. Include
weightings, if appropriate)

multiple print and digital


sources, using search terms
effectively; assess the
credibility and accuracy of
each source; and quote or
paraphrase the data and
conclusions of others while
avoiding plagiarism and
following a standard format for
citation.
CCSS.ELA.W.7.2- Write
informative/explanatory texts
to examine a topic and
convey ideas, concepts, and
information through the
selection, organization, and
analysis of relevant content.
Reading/Literature Circles:
-Touching Spirit Bear

CCSS.ELA.RL.7.2- Determine
a theme or central idea of a
text and analyze its
development over the course
of the text; provide an
objective summary of the text.

5-7 days

Formative: Students will be


completing and discussing
(with partners and as a class)
their theme trackers as they
move from chapter to chapter.
Students will also be held
accountable for completing
their designated job for their
literature circle discussion
group.

Bias Activity:
-The Three Little Pigs
original story
-The True Story of the Three
Little Pigs (from the Wolfs
POV)

CCSS.ELA.RI.7.9- Analyze
how two or more authors
writing about the same topic
shape their presentations of
key information by
emphasizing different
evidence or advancing
different interpretations of
facts.

1 day

Symbolism:
What is symbolism?
Examples in everyday life
and in literature. How
symbolism works to
develop/strengthen a theme
within literature.

There is not a specific


standard that correlates with
the idea of symbolism BUT
this lesson will be used to
later support the following
standard:
CCSS.ELA.RL.7.3- Analyze
how particular elements of a
story or drama interact (in this
instance, how symbolism

1 day

Formative: Students will


complete a Venn Diagram that
compares/contrasts the two
versions of the story.
Students will complete an exit
slip that identifies what bias is
and how it affects the reader.
Formative: Think, Pair, Share
about symbolism questions and
symbols that appear within
Touching Spirit Bear.

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Unit 4 General-Justice
(7 weeks)

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Length
(i.e., number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes,
chapter/unit tests, homework
assignments. Include
weightings, if appropriate)

Length
(i.e., number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes,
chapter/unit tests, homework
assignments. Include
weightings, if appropriate)

shapes the theme within a


text).

Unit 5 GT-Timeless Voices


(9 weeks)

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

Close Reading:
-First few paragraphs of A
Tale of Two Cities by
Charles Dickens (notes and
background info. on French
Revolution may be shared)

CCSS.ELA.RL.7.1- Cite
several pieces of textual
evidence to support analysis
of what the text says explicitly
as well as inferences drawn
from the text.
CCSS.ELA.RL.7.2- Determine
a theme or central idea of a
text and analyze its
development over the course
of the text; provide an
objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA.RL.7.4- Determine
the meaning of words and
phrases as they are used in a
text, including figurative and
connotative meanings;
analyze the impact of rhymes
and other repetitions of
sounds on a specific verse or
stanza of a poem or section of
a story or drama.
CCSS.ELA.RL.7.9- Compare
and contrast a fictional
portrayal of a time, place, or
character, and a historical
account of the same period as
a means of understanding
how authors of fiction use or
alter history.
CCSS.ELA.RI.7.1- Cite
several pieces of textual
evidence to support analysis
of what the text says explicitly
as well as inferences drawn
from the text.

1-2 days

Formative: Students will take


notes on pos. and neg. aspects
portrayed in the excerpt about
the French Revolution. There
will also be class discussion to
share prior knowledge and
answers.

Poetry Analysis:
-One to two poems of a

CCSS.ELA.RL.7.1- Cite
several pieces of textual

3-4 days

Formative: Student answers


will be shared in small groups

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Unit 5 GT-Timeless Voices


(9 weeks)

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

specific time period.


-Inferences about the pos.
and neg. aspects of the time
period are to be drawn from
the poems.

evidence to support analysis


of what the text says explicitly
as well as inferences drawn
from the text.
CCSS.ELA.RL.7.2- Determine
a theme or central idea of a
text and analyze its
development over the course
of the text; provide an
objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA.RL.7.4- Determine
the meaning of words and
phrases as they are used in a
text, including figurative and
connotative meanings;
analyze the impact of rhymes
and other repetitions of
sounds on a specific verse or
stanza of a poem or section of
a story or drama.
CCSS.ELA.RL.7.5- Analyze
how a drama or poems form
or structure (e.g., soliloquy,
sonnet) contributes to its
meaning.
CCSS.ELA.SL.7.1- Engage
effectively in a range of
collaborative discussions with
diverse partners on grade 7
topics, texts, and issues,
building on others ideas and
expressing their own clearly.
CCSS.ELA.L.7.4- Determine
or clarify the meaning of
unknown and multiplemeaning words and phrases
based on grade 7 reading and
content, choosing flexibly from
a range of strategies.
CCSS.ELA.L.7.5Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word
relationships, and nuances in
word meanings.

Was it the best of times or


the worst of times?:
-Students will use previously

CCSS.ELA.W.7.1- Write
arguments to support claims
with clear reasons and
relevant evidence.

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Length
(i.e., number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes,
chapter/unit tests, homework
assignments. Include
weightings, if appropriate)
and as a whole class. Students
will complete a graphic
organizer that will contain pos.
and neg. aspects of the time
period that were drawn from
the poems along with evidence
from the poems that support
these inferences.
Summative: Students will
produce a mini-project that
makes a claim for whether the
period of their poetry was the
best of times or the worst of
times. They must have sound
evidence, as well as an
explanation of their evidence,
that supports their claim.

1-3 days

Formative: In small groups, or


partners, students will present
their mini-project to the class,
focusing on strong

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Unit 5 GT-Timeless Voices


(9 weeks)

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

collected research to
present an argument about
whether their time period
was the best OR the worst
of times.

CCSS.ELA.W.7.6- Use
technology, including the
internet, to produce and
publish writing and link to and
cite sources as well as to
interact and collaborate with
others, including linking to and
citing sources.
CCSS.ELA.W.7.7- Conduct
short research projects to
answer a question, drawing
on several sources and
generating additional related,
focused questions for further
research and investigation.
CCSS.ELA.L.7.3- Use
knowledge of language and
its conventions when writing,
speaking, reading, or
listening.
CCSS.ELA.RI.7.1- Cite
several pieces of textual
evidence to support analysis
of what the text says explicitly
as well as inferences drawn
from the text.

Create a Speech:
-Valedictorian speech about
the best and worst of times
in modern day and
connecting them back to the
best and worst of times of
the past learned from
literature, research, and
peer presentations.

CCSS.ELA.RL.7.1- Cite
several pieces of textual
evidence to support analysis
of what the text says explicitly
as well as inferences drawn
from the text.
CCSS.ELA.RI.7.1- Cite
several pieces of textual
evidence to support analysis
of what the text says explicitly
as well as inferences drawn
from the text.
CCSS.ELA.W.7.1- Write
arguments to support claims
with clear reasons and
relevant evidence.
CCSS.ELA.W.7.4- Produce
clear and coherent writing in
which the development,
organization, and style are
appropriate to task, purpose,

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Length
(i.e., number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes,
chapter/unit tests, homework
assignments. Include
weightings, if appropriate)
counterclaims.

5-8 days

Summative: The valedictorian


speech will involve prior data
and research collected
throughout the unit and will be
a written work that serves as a
culminating project for the unit.

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Unit 5 GT-Timeless Voices


(9 weeks)

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Length
(i.e., number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes,
chapter/unit tests, homework
assignments. Include
weightings, if appropriate)

and audience.
CCSS.ELA.W.7.5- With some
guidance and support from
peers and adults, develop and
strengthen writing as needed
by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new
approach, focusing on how
well purpose and audience
have been addressed.
CCSS.ELA.W.7.9- Draw
evidence from literary or
informational texts to support
analysis, reflection, and
research.
CCSS.ELA.SL.7.4- Present
claims and findings,
emphasizing salient points in
a focused, coherent manner
with pertinent descriptions,
fact, details, and examples;
use appropriate eye contact,
adequate volume, and clear
pronunciation.
CCSS.ELA.L.7.1Demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard
English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
Reading:
A Tale of Two Cities by
Charles Dickens

CCSS.ELA.RL.7.2- Determine
a theme or central idea of a
text and analyze its
development over the course
of the text; provide an
objective summary of the text.

4-6 weeks
(reading will
be done with
lessons)

Figurative Language and


Poetic Devices

CCSS.ELA2 weeks (as


LITERACY.RL.7.4mini-lessons)
Determine the meaning of
words and phrases as they
are used in a text, including
figurative and connotative
meanings; analyze the impact
of rhymes and other
repetitions of sounds (e.g.,
alliteration) on a specific verse
or stanza of a poem or section
of a story or drama.

Formative: Students will


compile notes from the text in a
graphic organizer. One of these
organizers will be a character
tracker.
Formative: Students will keep
trackers to define the devices,
record their purpose, track
examples in the novel, and
generate examples of their
own.
Summative: Students will take
a figurative language and
poetic devices post-quiz.

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Unit 5 GT-Timeless Voices


(9 weeks)

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Length
(i.e., number
of days)

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes,
chapter/unit tests, homework
assignments. Include
weightings, if appropriate)

CCSS.ELALITERACY.L.7.5.AInterpret figures of speech


(e.g., literary, biblical, and
mythological allusions) in
context.
Audience and Purpose

Unit 5 General- Voices


of Change and
Conflict
(8 weeks)
Close Read:
-Determining/tracking
theme
-Eve Buntings Terrible
Things and the poem
First They Came for the
Jews
-Holocaust word web
(activating prior
knowledge)

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.4Produce clear and coherent


writing in which the
development, organization,
and style are appropriate to
task, purpose, and audience.

Correlated Standards/
Expectations
CCSS.ELA.RL.7.2Determine a theme or
central idea of a text and
analyze its development
over the course of the
text; provide an objective
summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA.RL.7.5Analyze how a drama or
poems form or structure
contributes to its
meaning.
CCSS.ELA.RL.7.9Compare and contrast a
fictional portrayal of time,
place, or character and a
historical account of the
same period as a means
of understanding how
authors of fiction use or

1-2 days

Formative: Students will


produce short pieces of writing
in response to prompts for
specific audiences and
purposes. As a class, and with
partners, students will identify
the differences in their writing
and try to match each piece of
writing with its purpose or
audience. They will evaluate
how their language changes
depending on the audience and
purpose and will assess why
they make those changes.

Length
(i.e.,
number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes, chapter/unit tests,
homework assignments. Include weightings,
if appropriate)

2-4 days

Formative:
-Students will be asked various questions
that will be up for class discussion. They will
also be asked to place themselves in the
shoes of little rabbit and give advice to the
other animals.
-Poem/Story connection- Students will
complete a provided exit slip that asks them
to compare the poem and the short story.
-After being told that the story is about the
Holocaust, students will work with a partner
to create a what, when, where, why, and
who word web for the Holocaust. These will
be posted and shared.

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE
Unit 5 General- Voices
of Change and
Conflict
(8 weeks)

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Length
(i.e.,
number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes, chapter/unit tests,
homework assignments. Include weightings,
if appropriate)

alter history.
Text to Text
Comparison:
-Terrible Things and
First They Came for the
Jews.

CCSS.ELA.RI.7.6Determine an authors
point of view or purpose
in a text and analyze how
the author distinguishes
his or her position from
that of others.
CCSS.ELA.RI.7.9Analyze how two or more
authors writing about the
same topic shape their
presentations of key
information by
emphasizing different
evidence or advancing
different interpretations of
facts.

1-2 days

Formative: Students will compare texts and


answer provided questions with a partner.

Research and Socratic


Seminar:
-Using informational text
from the time period of
the novel and
discussing the source in
a Socratic seminar.

CCSS.ELA.RL.7.9Compare and contrast a


fictional portrayal of time,
place, or character and a
historical account of the
same period as a means
of understanding how
authors of fiction use or
alter history.
CCSS.ELA.RI.7.9Analyze how two or more
authors writing about the
same topic shape their
presentations of key
information by
emphasizing different
evidence or advancing
different interpretations of
facts.

2-4 days

Formative: Students will be assessed on


their contribution to the Socratic Seminar
and their preparedness for the event (Do
they have their source? Do they have their
notes? Etc.)

Multimedia
Presentation:
-Argument for novel to
be included within a
documentary of the time
period it represents

CCSS.ELA.W.7.1- Write
arguments to support
claims with clear reasons
and relevant evidence.
CCSS.ELA.W.7.6- Use
technology, including the
Internet, to produce and
publish writing and link to
and cite sources as well
as to interact and
collaborate with others,

4-6 days

Summative: Using technology and relevant,


credible sources, students will create a
presentation that argues why The Devils
Arithmetic should be included within a
documentary of the time period it
encapsulates.

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE
Unit 5 General- Voices
of Change and
Conflict
(8 weeks)

Correlated Standards/
Expectations

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Length
(i.e.,
number
of days)

Assessment(s)
(e.g., projects, quizzes, chapter/unit tests,
homework assignments. Include weightings,
if appropriate)

including linking to and


citing sources.
Reading:
-The Devils Arithmetic
by Jane Yolen

CCSS.ELA.RL.7.2Determine a theme or
central idea of a text and
analyze its development
over the course of the
text; provide an objective
summary of the text.
Compare and contrast a
fictional portrayal of time,
place, or character and a
historical account of the
same period as a means
of understanding how
authors of fiction use or
alter history.

3-5
weeks
(can be
adjusted
as
needed)

Formative: Students will track the


development of theme of their novel with an
organizer, providing examples of how the
theme is represented in the text through
dialogue, actions, etc.
Summative: Students will be using the novel
to develop and support the argument they
will present within their multimedia
presentation.

Audience and Purpose

CCSS.ELALITERACY.W.7.4Produce clear and


coherent writing in which
the development,
organization, and style
are appropriate to task,
purpose, and audience.

1-2 days

Formative: Students will produce short


pieces of writing in response to prompts for
specific audiences and purposes. As a
class, and with partners, students will
identify the differences in their writing and
try to match each piece of writing with its
purpose or audience. They will evaluate
how their language changes depending on
the audience and purpose and will assess
why they make those changes.
Summative: Students will be writing for a
specific audience in their summative project,
arguing whether or not their novel should be
included in a documentary about the novels
depicted time period.

Making Inferences

CCSS.ELALITERACY.RL.7.1Cite several pieces of


textual evidence to
support analysis of what
the text says explicitly as
well as inferences drawn
from the text.

1-2 days

Formative: In groups, students will create 35 driving questions they have so far about
the novel. Then, they will make inferences,
using prior knowledge, to answer not only
their questions, but also the questions of
their peers.

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Section IV: Assessment Data (Key element 1.D)


Describe methods for analyzing, evaluating, recording, and reporting student progress and achievement.
Students will be assessed using both formative and summative assessments. Formative assessments
range from graphic organizers and quizzes to review activities and classroom participation. These are activities
that are used daily and relate back to standards relevant to the unit currently being taught. Summative
assessments generally present themselves at the end of the unit in the form of a culminating project, writing
assignment, or large class activity. Smaller summative assessments occur every other week in the form of a
vocabulary and/or grammar quiz. These summative quizzes reflect the daily formative assessments of
vocabulary and grammar that start each class.
Formative assessments are used to see where students stand with their knowledge of a given topic or
task; it assists in letting me know if I need to review or provide additional instruction or if students are ready to
move on or be given something more challenging. It is a good tool for monitoring and adjusting lessons. The
summative assessments reflect the knowledge that students gained from the unit; it indicates whether or not
they took away what they were supposed to from the instruction. The information can be used to plan how I will
go about the next unit or the same unit, but for the next year. Both types of assessment are used to track
student progress; formative tracks day to day progress while summative tracks unit to unit progress.
There is a pre-test at the beginning of a unit and a post-test at the end of each unit. These tests are
comprised of multiple choice questions and a short response. Projects and writing assignments are evaluated
using rubrics. The majority of class material (e.g.tasks, readings, graphic organizers), including the
assessments, are provided by The College of William and Mary and must be used by the school in exchange
for funding provided by the college. However, while teachers must use these assessments, it is left to their
discretion whether or not the assessments will be counted for a test grade. Pre-tests are used to assess prior
knowledge and indicate where students will need less or more instruction within the unit. The post-test is used
as one way of evaluating whether or not students mastered the standards of the unit.
In addition to these assessments, students are required to take PASS testing in the spring. This test
assesses their knowledge in the four core academic areas. This year, there is debate on whether or not PASS
testing will be used to assess ELA knowledge, because the creators of the ACT have created a test for
students to take. The scores from these examinations help teachers prepare for what they can do better the
following year. It also helps teachers know where their incoming students stand with the prior years material.
For the classroom that I am in, the weighting of grades is as follows: Tests/projects-50%, classwork25%, and quizzes-25%. Students are not given extra credit opportunities, but are given chances to complete
missed work and to re-do work that they are unhappy with.

Section V: Classroom Management (Key element I.E)


List the classroom rules and your expectations regarding student behavior during instructional and noninstructional procedures and routines.
Middle School Students SOAR
All Settings
Safe

Hallways

-Keep
-Walk on
hands and right side
feet
to of
the
yourself
hallway
-Walk

-Eyes
forward

Classrooms

Cafeteria

-Enter and -Follow the


exit
cafeteria
classroom
guidelines
quietly and
orderly
-Keep aisles
clear

Restrooms

Lockers

Busses

-Wash and -Open and -Remain


dry hands
close
seated
lockers with
-Clean up
-Keep aisle
care
after
clear
yourself
-Keep
hands and
objects
inside
the
bus

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE
Organized

-Be
prepared

-Move to
a correct
area in a
timely
manner

-Complete
-Have all -Use time
all
needed
efficiently
assignments items
before
-Bring
sitting
required
down
materials

Accountable -Have
agenda

-Have a -Be on task


-Know
pass
in
lunch
-Be on time
the
number
-Leave area
-Turn
in
hallway
clean
assignments
-Keep
-Follow
on time
hallways
expectations
free
of -Actively
in handbook
participate
litter

Respectful

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

-Be kind in -Remain


-Listen while
words and quiet
in others are
actions
the
speaking
hallway
-Follow
directions of -Keep
all adults
feet
on
the floor
-Speak
at
and
an
hands to
appropriate
yourself
volume

-Keep
-Get to the
locker clean bus stop on
and neat
time
-Use
lockers at
an
appropriate
time

-Flush and -Keep


leave the locker
toilet clean combination
private
-Report
conditions -Keep
that need lockers
attention
secured

-Wait
in -Respect
line quietly each
others
-Use
privacy
appropriate
table
manners

-Respect
each
others
space

-Listen for
your
bus
number to
be called
-Take care
of
all
possessions
-Use
appropriate
volume
-Stay
in
your area

-Say
please
and Thank
you

-Respect
school
property
In the classroom, I have distributed the following set of procedures that are specific to my class. Most of these
procedures and expectations are in accordance with SOAR and the procedures and expectations of the
cooperating teacher.
Classroom Procedures
Entering Class
Class starts when you walk through the door.
You are to go to your seat and take out your materials for class upon entering the classroom.
Now is the time to sharpen pencils if needed.
Work on the starting activity on the front board quietly and independently.
During Class
Please participate as much as possible during class. What you have to say matters.
Raise your hand to speak during class and speak loudly for all to hear.
Hands go down when another student is speaking.
When work is completed, you are to read your library/home book silently or work on make-up
assignments.
You are responsible for collecting missed/make-up work.
Independent work is to be completed quietly and at your own desk.
All members of a group are expected to contribute to the group.
Listen to all instructions before moving or asking questions.

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS

Bring appropriate class materials each day. If borrowing materials, please return them in the same
condition in which they were received.
If you need to leave the classroom, please have your agenda out to be signed and get my attention at a
discreet time.
Leaving Class
I dismiss you, not the bell.
You will be expected to work until the end of class. Do not pack up early.
Make sure your area is clean and that you do not leave anything behind.
Other
Follow these same procedures when there is a substitute, visitor, etc.
Remain quiet and seated during drills so that you may listen to further instruction.
Check all that apply:

x
x

Classroom rules and expectations are developed collaboratively with the students.
Classroom rules and expectations are presented on the first day of class.
Classroom rules and expectations are sent home (e.g., via parent letter, newsletter). Attach a copy
Classroom rules and expectations are posted in the room. **on wall bulletin board & in hallways**
Students keep a copy of the rules and expectations in notebooks. **in Agenda**
Other:

Describe the consequences for appropriate behavior, misbehavior, and disruptive behavior.
When students follow the SOAR model or show exceptionally good behavior in accordance with this model,
they receive something called skymiles from their teachers which they can then cash in for rewards. These
rewards can be from the school store or entries into a drawing for a prize.
If the rules are not adhered to then students may receive warnings, can be sent to a buddy room to cool
down, or are given silent lunch, ISS, or full suspension depending upon the severity of the offense.
For those who follow the behavioral guidelines, but do not turn in their assignments: these students can be
referred to Saturday School or Tuesday Intervention to work on what they are missing.
Every 9 weeks, students are nominated by teachers for an Eagles Award. This award recognizes exceptional
students for both their academic and behavioral performance in school. Students and parents join together for
a small ceremony and breakfast gathering.
The consequences that I made specifically for my class on the handout I distributed are as follows:
Consequences
You will receive 1-2 warnings prior to action being taken, depending on the severity of the offense.
If it is a matter of disruption, you will be moved after these warnings. If the disruption continues, you
will receive a silent lunch.
If it is a matter of repeated missing work, you will be given silent lunch after these warnings. If the
missing work continues, you will be pulled for Tuesday Intervention and/or recommended for
Friday/Saturday school.
Any incident where you harm/threaten another student, shout profanity, violate major school rules,
etc. is cause for an immediate referral.

Section VI: Additional intern comments (optional)

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

TT1: LONG RANGE PLANS