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OCSD5 Curriculum Pacing

Guide 3rd Grade

Acknowledgements
We would like to thank the following teachers for their dedication to the students of Orangeburg Consolidated School
District Five. These teachers gave their time and professional knowledge to modify the curriculum pacing guides. Their
contributions have contributed to the world-class instructional resources available
within our district.

draft form.
future
Please
as
as
Notes on
guide are
open on
access
the

The 2014School
overview
Core
practices,
Carolina
guide
and
core
to-school
build a

Facilitators
Jacqueline Jamison
Dr. Elrica C.Glover
Audrey Hallingquest
Dr. Derrick James
Karen James
Tammie Jenkins
Heath Owen
Tonya Ramey
Laura Steele
Dyisha Taylor

4K
Sharon Ellison
Starlette Jean
Kindergarten
Mozella Isaac
Dr. Teresa Jennings
First Grade
Jennifer Fanning
Nieka Hughes
Second Grade
Jacqueline Hogges
Faye Thompson

Reminder: This document is in


Based on the most current and
data, the pacing may change.
only print one semester at a time
changes may be made by the team
deemed necessary.
Links: All hyperlinks in the pacing
active. Some, however, may not
campus due to the district
educational filter. You will need to
these sites off campus to download
information.

ELA
Science
Dabetta Smith
Lynn Rivers
Benita Hughes
Mary Robinson
The
Purpose of Our Common
Core Howell
Curriculum Guides
Natasha
Berry
Tawana
Angelica Gentile
Crystal Bryant
2015 Orangeburg Consolidated
David Pasley
Linda Foster
District Five Common Core
Michele Johnson
Henrietta Hampton-Ellis
Curriculum Guides provide an
Majoria Pearson
Marcellina Guinyard
of key instructional shifts, Common
Shalanda Mack
Dr. Andrea Matthews
State Standards (CCSS) best
Ti-esha Williams-Vaughn
Andrew St. James
and upcoming changes to South
Katie Jensen
Teal Ryant
assessments. Each curriculum
Math
Social Studies
Chinyeaka Ihekweazu
Terry Walling
Monik Ellis
Andrea Perkins
Latasha Murray
Audrey Irick
Marcela Nesbitt
Crystal Adams
Tracy Brown
Lynette Milhouse
Michelle Wade
Sabrina Buggs
Common Core State Standards
Background
Sharlene Foster
Deneathro Edmonds
Raja Velummylum
Johnerra Alford
Veronica Williams
Ralph Alexander
Aronda Frazier
Juanita Gidron

offers pacing suggestions,


instructional strategies, resources,
assessment items. Our common
curriculum guides provide schoolcontinuity as we work together to
world-class school system.

The
Common Core State Standards
Initiative is
a state-led effort coordinated by
the
National Governors Association
Center for
Best Practices (NGA Center) and
the
Council of Chief State School
Officers (CCSSO). The standards were developed in collaboration with teachers, school administrators, and experts, to
provide a clear and consistent framework to prepare our children for college and the workforce.
The NGA Center and CCSSO received initial feedback on the draft standards from national organizations representing,
but not limited to, teachers, postsecondary educators (including community colleges), civil rights groups, English language
learners, and students with disabilities. Following the initial round of feedback, the draft standards were opened for public
comment, receiving nearly 10,000 responses.

The standards are informed by the highest, most effective models from states across the country and countries around the
world, and provide teachers and parents with a common understanding of what students are expected to learn. Consistent
standards will provide appropriate benchmarks for all students, regardless of where they live.
These standards define the knowledge and skills students should have within their K-12 education careers so that they
will graduate high school able to succeed in entry-level, credit-bearing academic college courses and in workforce training
programs. The standards:

Are aligned with college and work expectations;


Are clear, understandable and consistent;
Include rigorous content and application of knowledge through high-order skills;
Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards;
Are informed by other top performing countries, so that all students are prepared to succeed in our global
economy and society; and
Are evidence-based.

Source: http://www.corestandards.org/about-the-standards

Orangeburg Consolidated School District 5 Assessment Schedule


Assessment
Benchmark (Diagnostic)
Mini Bite 1
Mini Bite 2
Mini Bite 3
Benchmark (Writing Included)
Mini Bite 4
Benchmark
Mini Bite 5
Benchmark (Diagnostic)***

Date
August 20th-28th
September 22nd -25th
October 20th -23rd
November 19th -24th
December 8th -17th
January 27th -30th
February 25th March 5th
April 27th -30th
May 25th June 2nd

South Carolina Assessments Schedule

Elementary and Middle School


Grades 3-8

Content Area

Assessment

Testing Dates for 2013-2014

ELA Writing

PASS

Day 1: March 17, 2015


Day 2: March 18, 2015
Make-up Testing through March 24th

ELA Reading and Research

PASS

May 5, 2014

Math

PASS

May 6, 2014

Science or Social Studies (Grade 3)

PASS

May 7, 2014

Social Studies (Grades 4,5,6,7,8)

PASS

May 7, 2014

Science (Grades 4,5,6,7,8)

PASS

May 8, 2014

All Content Areas - Make-up Testing

PASS

Through May 15th

High School
End of Course Examination Program (EOCEP)

Test

Testing Dates for 2013-2014

English I
Algebra I
Biology
United States History & the Constitution

Tentative Dates:
Fall: December 1, 2013 January 28, 2015
Spring: May4-June 5, 2015
Summer: June 22-July 24, 2015

Common Core Instructional Shifts


There are twelve shifts that the Common Core requires of us if we are to be truly aligned with it in terms of curricular
materials and classroom instruction. There are six shifts in Mathematics and six shifts in ELA/ Literacy.

Shifts in Mathematics

Shift 1

Shift 2

Shift 3

Shift 4

Focus

Coherence

Fluency

Deep Understanding

Shift 5

Application

Shift 6

Dual Intensity

Teachers significantly narrow and deepen the scope of how


time and energy is spent in the math classroom. They do so
in order to focus deeply on only the concepts that are
prioritized in the standards.
Principals and teachers carefully connect the learning within and
across grades so that students can build new understanding
onto foundations built in previous years.
Students are expected to have speed and accuracy with
simple calculations; teachers structure class time and/or
homework time for students to memorize, through
repetition, core functions.
Students deeply understand and can operate easily within a
math concept before moving on. They learn more than the trick
to get the answer right. They learn the math.
Students are expected to use math and choose the
appropriate concept for application even when they are
not prompted to do so.
Students are practicing and understanding. There is more
than a balance between these two things in the classroom
both are occurring with intensity.

Mathematical Practices
Mathematical Practice One
What is it?
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
What should student be able to do?
When presented with a problem, students should be able to make a plan, carry out the plan and check its success.

What does it look like?


Before solving the problem, students should
explain the problem to themselves. (Have I solved a problem like this before?)
organize the information and make a plan to solve the problem.
Students should ask themselves, What is the question?, What is given?, What is not given?, What are the
relationships between known and unknown quantities?, What tools/strategies will I use? and What prior
knowledge do I have to help me?
While solving the problem, students should
persevere (Stick to it!)
monitor their work.
change their plan if it isnt working out.
ask themselves, Does this make sense?
After solving the problem, students should
check to make sure their answer is correct and that their representations connect to the solution.
evaluate to determine what worked, what didnt work and what other strategies were used. Also determine how
their solution was similar or different from their classmates.
Mathematical Practice Two
What is it?
Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
What should student be able to do?
Students should be able to use numbers, words, and reasoning habits to help make sense of problems.
What does it look like?
Contextualize Students can take numbers and put them in a real-world context.
Example:
If given, 3 X 2.5 = 7.5, the students can create the following context.
I walked 2.5 miles per day for 3 days. I walked a total of 7.5 miles.
Decontextualize- Students can take numbers out of context and work mathematically with them.
Example:
If given, I walked 2.5 miles per day for 3 days. How far did I walk?
The students should be able to write and solve
3 X 2.5 = 7.5
Reasoning Habits
1. Make an understandable representation of the problem.
2. Think about the units involved.
3. Pay attention to the meaning of the numbers.
4. Use the properties of operations or objects.

Mathematical Practice Three


What is it?
Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
What should student be able to do?
Students should be able to make logical arguments and respond to the mathematical thinking of others.
What does it look like?

Students should be able to construct, justify and communicate arguments by


using objects, drawings, diagrams and actions.
using examples and non-examples.
relating to contexts.
Students should be able to analyze the reasoning of others by
listening.
asking questions to clarify or improve arguments.
comparing strategies and arguments.
identifying flawed logic.
Mathematical Practice Four
What is it?
Model with mathematics.
What should student be able to do?
Students should be able to recognize math in everyday life and utilize the math that they know to solve problems.
What does it look like?
Students should be able to
make assumptions and estimate to make complex problems easier.
identify important quantities and use tools, such as diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts and formulas,
to show their relationships.
evaluate the answer and make changes if needed.
Mathematical Practice Five
What is it?
Use appropriate tools strategically.
What should student be able to do?
Students should be able to use certain tools to help them explore and deepen their math understanding.
What does it look like?
Students should
have a tool box. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator,
a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software.
know how to use math tools.
know when to use math tools.
reason: Did the tool I used give me an answer that makes sense?
Mathematical Practice Six
What is it?
Attend to precision.
What should student be able to do?
Students should be able to be precise when solving problems and clear when communicating their ideas.
What does it look like?
Problem Solving: Students should
calculate accurately.
calculate efficiently.
assure their answers match what the problem asked them to do.
Communicating: Student should
speak, read, write, and listen mathematically.
correctly use math symbols, math vocabulary and units of measure.

Mathematical Practice Seven


What is it?
Look for and make use of structure.
What should student be able to do?
Students should be able to see and understand how numbers and spaces are organized and put together as parts and

wholes.
What does it look like?
Numbers:
For Example:
Base 10 Structure
Operations and properties
Terms, coefficients, exponents

Spaces:
For Example:
Dimension
Location
Attributes
Transformation

Mathematical Practice Eight


What is it?
Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
What should student be able to do?
Students should be able to notice when calculations are repeated, and use that information to find more general
methods and short cuts.
What does it look like?
As students work, they should
think about what they are trying to figure out while paying attention to the details.
evaluate if the results are reasonable.
Example: Students might notice when dividing 25 by 11 that they are repeating the same calculations over and over
again, and conclude they have a repeating decimal.

The Importance of Using the Problem Solving Mat


Mathematics Common Core is divided into two parts: Content Standards and Standards for Mathematical Practice. A
major focus of the Standards for Mathematical Practice is using problem solving to reinforce important concepts, skills,

and to demonstrate a students mathematical understanding. As we prepare for full implementation of Common Core,
teachers must have an understanding of what problem solving is, why it is important, and how to go about implementing it.
According to National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), "Problem solving means engaging in a task for which
the solution method is not known in advance. In order to find a solution, students must draw on their knowledge, and
through this process, they will often develop new mathematical understandings. Solving problems is not only a goal of
learning mathematics, but also a major means of doing so." (NCTM, 2000, p. 52) Problem solving gives students a
context to help them make sense out of the mathematics they are learning. Problems can be used to introduce new
concepts and extend previous learned knowledge.
The NCTM Problem-Solving Standard states that instructional programs should enable all students to, build new
mathematical knowledge through problem solving, to solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts,
apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems, and monitor and reflect on the process of
mathematical problem solving.
Findings in the recent report, Improving Mathematical Problem Solving in Grades 4 Through 8, published in May 2012
under the aegis of the What Works Clearinghouse (NCEE 2012-4055, U.S. Department of Education, available online
from the Institute of Education Sciences) provides educators with specific, evidence-based recommendations that
address the challenge of improving mathematical problem solving. In the Introduction, the panel that authored the report
makes the following points:

Problem solving is important. - Students who develop proficiency in mathematical problem solving early are
better prepared for advanced mathematics and other complex problem-solving tasks. The panel recommends
that problem solving be part of each curricular unit.

Instruction in problem solving should begin in the earliest grades. - Problem solving involves reasoning and
analysis, argument construction, and the development of innovative strategies. These should be included
throughout the curriculum and begin in kindergarten.

The teaching of problem solving should not be isolated. - instead, it can serve to support and enrich the
learning of mathematics concepts and notation.

To address these points and improve the teaching of problem solving, the panel offers five recommendations.
Recommendation 1 - Prepare problems and use them in whole-class instruction.
In selecting or creating problems, it is critical that the language used in the problem and the context of the problem are not
barriers to a students being able to solve the problem. The same is true for a students understanding of the
mathematical content necessary to solve the problem.
Recommendation 2 - Assist students in monitoring and reflecting on the problem-solving process.
Students learn mathematics and solve problems better when they monitor their thinking and problem-solving steps as
they solve problems.
Recommendation 3 - Teach students how to use visual representations.
Students who learn to visually represent the mathematical information in problems prior to writing an equation are more
effective at problem solving.
Recommendation 4 - Expose students to multiple problem-solving strategies.
Students who are taught multiple strategies approach problems with greater ease and flexibility.
Recommendation 5 - Help students recognize and articulate mathematical concepts and notation.
When students have a strong understanding of mathematical concepts and notation, they are better able to recognize the
mathematics present in the problem, extend their understanding to new problems, and explore various options when
solving problems. Building from students prior knowledge of mathematical concepts and notation is instrumental in
developing problem-solving skills.
To accomplish the goal of effectively engaging students in problem solving activities, teachers should utilize the Problem
Solving Mat (K-2 and 3-12) and problem solving strategies included in the OCSD5 Teaching and Learning Framework.
Sources: http://www.learner.org/courses/teachingmath/gradesk_2/session_03/index.html

http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/pdf/practice_guides/mps_pg_052212.pdf
Mathematical Practice and Problem Solving: Preparing Your Teachers for Common Core:

http://www.exemplars.com/blog/education/mathematical-practice-and-problem-solving-preparingyour-teachers-for-common-core Principles and Standards of School Mathematics (NCTM, 2000)

Recommendations 2 - 5
III: INSTRUCTION

PROBLEM SOLVING STRATEGIES


Explanation

Strategy

Act out or
use objects

Make a picture or
diagram

Use or make
a table

Make an
organized list

Guess and
check

Dramatizations or moving around objects can help you remember the process
you use and you may be able to use it again for solving other similar problems.
Making a picture or diagram to solve problems can help you understand and
manipulate data. Draw a Picture Strategy is especially useful with problems
that involve mapping, geometry
and graphing.
Use or Make a Table is a strategy that uses an orderly arrangement of data,
such as numbers, that helps you keep track of data, spot missing data, and
identify data that is asked for in the problem.
When making an Organized List you can organize your thinking about a
problem. Recording your work in list form allows you to review that you have
done and identify important steps that you need to do to complete solving the
problem. This strategy provides a systematic way to record computations
made with given data.
The Guess and Check strategy is helpful when a problem presents large
numbers or many pieces of data, or when the problem requires finding one
solution to many possible solutions. This strategy involves guessing the
answer, testing to see if it is correct, and making another guess if the answer
is not correct.

Use or look for a


pattern

Use or Look for a Pattern strategy involves identifying a pattern and predicting
what will come next and what will happen again and again in the same way.
Making a number table often reveals a pattern.

Work backwards

When making a series of computations, you can start with data presented at
the end of the problem and end with data presented at the beginning of the
problem.

Use logical
reasoning

Logical Reasoning is really used in all the problem solving strategies.


However, when answer- ing conditional problems such as "if" and "then" type
of problems you can display your data in a chart or matrix. This strategy
requires formal logical reasoning.

Make it simpler

Making It Simpler is useful when solving a complex problem because it allows


you to reduce large numbers to small numbers, or reducing the number of
items given in a problem. Some- times a simpler representation will show a
pattern which can help solve a problem.

Brainstorm

The Brainstorm strategy is often used when all else fails! Brainstorming means
looking at a problem in new and inventive ways. Use your imagination, be
creative, and by all means, be flexible in your thinking! Eventually the light
bulb will go on and you will find a solution!

PROBLEM SOLVING MAT K-2


Problem of the Day (Daily Oral Math)

Recommendation 1

Choose a strategy to solve your problem.

Make a pattern

Guess and check

Act It Out or use objects

Draw a picture

Show your strategy.

Recommendation 2, 3, and 4

Recommendation 2, 3, and 4
Write your answers in words.
Recommendation 5

PROBLEM SOLVING MAT 3-12

Problem of the Day (Daily Oral Math)

Recommendation 1

Act out or use objects

Make a picture or diagram

Use or make a table

Make an organized list

Guess and check

Use or look for a pattern

Work backwards

Use logical reasoning

Make it simpler

Brainstorm
Recommendation 4

I KNOW Data/Facts

I Do Not Know...Question

Recommendation 2

Representation/Picture/Strategy

Recommendation 2

Final Answer (In a complete sentence restate what you


found out, including your answer.) I found out that ...
Recommendation 5

Recommendation 3

(Complete the following sentence)


My answer is reasonable because...
Recommendation 5

Week of Aug. 20th - Aug. 22nd


Aug. 20th - Aug. 22nd
CCSS
Benchmark Testing window: August 20th August 28th

Review base ten numeration system and place value


Review-skip counting by 2s, 5s, and 10
Review basic facts for addition and subtraction
Review odd and even numbers
Review Rounding to the nearest 10 and 100
Review fact families
Instructional Strategies
Use Voyager baseline assessments/screenings to identify students who require small group interventions.
Introduce students to the Problem Solving Mat. Review the mathematical strategies that students need in order to
problem solve.
Introduce students to the CUBES math problem-solving strategy that will assist them with math problem solving.
Review key concepts to help students prepare for 3rd grade mathematics.
Resources
Math Problem Solving Mat
Problem of the Day Workbooks

Web Resources:
www.studyisland.com
www.aaamath.com
Assessment
Benchmark Testing window: August 20th August 28th
1. Round 483 to the nearest 10.
_____________________________
2. Which of the following is related to 5 + 7=12?
a. 7-5=12
b. 12+7=5
c. 12-5=7
d. 12+5=7
3. Which of the following sets of numbers are odd?
a. 4,12,17,20
b. 6,14,28,30

Week of Aug. 25th - Aug. 29th Benchmark Testing window: August 20th August 28th
Aug. 25th - Aug. 29th

CCSS
3.NBT.1 Use place value understanding to round whole numbers the nearest 10 or 100.
3.NBT.2 Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of
operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
Instructional Strategies
1. Begin by reviewing place value in 2, 3, and 4-digit numbers.
Use the video clips from www.pearsonsuccess.net (Interactive Digital Path) to introduce each lesson in Topic 1
of Envision MATH
2. Emphasize that:
a. Our number system is based on groups of ten. Whenever we get 10 in one place, we move to the next
greater place value.
b. Place value can be used to name numbers in different ways. Uses of numbers include telling how many and
showing a date or an address.
c. The place-value periods units, thousands, millions, and so forth, are used to read and write large numbers.
d. Each whole number can be associated with a unique point on the number line. Zero is the least whole
number on the number line, and there is no greatest number.
e. Equal distances on the number line must correspond to equal differences in the numbers. The scale on
some graphs is a number line.
f. Place value can help you compare whole numbers.
g. Place value can help you order whole numbers.
h. Some problems can be solved by generating a list of outcomes and organizing that list in a systematic way
so all outcomes are accounted for.
3.
Label and laminate index cards with place values up to the ten thousands place. Give the students erasable
markers and tell them to write the numbers that you supply in the correct places. The students can hold these up
for you to
see. The students using small index cards cut in half can prepare most of these cards.
4. Use base-ten blocks to build numbers. (Example: Students choose 4 hundreds blocks, 3 tens blocks, and 5 ones
blocks and write the number 435).
5. Use play money to demonstrate the value of digits in larger numbers. (Ex: 17 ten dollar bills give you 170
dollars). Students should compare this to 1 hundred and 7 tens.
6.
Model expanded notation using numbers up to 999,999 with and without zeros
(Ex: 234,696
(Ex: 30,609

200,000+30,000+4,000+600+90+6).
30,000+600+9)

7.

Allow students experiences transferring between standard notation and expanded notation. Zeros are not
represented in expanded form.
8. Have students record numbers in a place value chart and use the tool to give the value of each digit.
9. Using 10 index cards and a marker (for each student), have students create number cards from 0 to 9. Write a 3digit number on the board and have students use their number cards to represent the number on the board.
Repeat the process with a second 3-digit number and have students read and compare the numbers using
words and symbols for greater than, less than, and equal.
10. Pose the following questions and have students model the number 1,500 in two different ways.

11. Provide practice in writing numbers in word, expanded, and standard forms. Use the sample chart below for this.
Standard Form
148
3,659
7,021

Word Form
One hundred forty eight

Expanded Form
100 +40 + 8

Resources
Round Up or Down?
Round to the Nearest Ten
Round to the Nearest 100
3 Digit Addition Split
Doubling to 1000
Difference Add
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 1
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 1
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net , www.studyisland.com, www.ixl.com, http://www.aaamath.com/B/nam14bx2.htm ,
http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/math4/e/ordernumbers3l.cfm , http://www.superkids.com/aweb/ , http://www.freetraining-tutorial.com/place-value/collecttheships.html , www.mathworksheets4kids.com , http://softschools.com/math/ ,
www.havefunteaching.com
http://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/math/numbers/order-whole-numbers.htm Ordering #s video
http://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/math/numbers/expanded-notation.htm Expanded notation video
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
Benchmark Testing window: August 20th August 28th
1. Most years, Big Bend National Park gets about three hundred fifty thousand visitors. Which is the standard form of this
number?
A 350
B 35,000
C 350,000
D 300,050,000
2. Look at the expanded form of 75,857.
75,857 _ 70,000 _ _ 800 _ 50 _7
Which number belongs in the ?
A5
B 50
C 500
D 5,000
3. Which is the place of the underlined digit?
319,509
A ones
B hundreds
C ten thousands
D hundred thousands
4. Writing to Explain How are 814,605 and 184,560 alike?
How are they different?

Sept. 2nd - Sept. 5th


CCSS
3.NBT.1;Use place value understanding to round whole numbers the nearest 10 or 100.
3.NBT.2: Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of
operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Instructional Strategies
1. Begin by reviewing place value in 2, 3, and 4-digit numbers.
Use the video clips from www.pearsonsuccess.net (Interactive Digital Path) to introduce each lesson in Topic 1
of Envision MATH
2. Emphasize that:
a. Our number system is based on groups of ten. Whenever we get 10 in one place, we move to the next
greater place value.
b. Place value can be used to name numbers in different ways. Uses of numbers include telling how many and
showing a date or an address.
c. The place-value periods units, thousands, millions, and so forth, are used to read and write large numbers.
d. Each whole number can be associated with a unique point on the number line. Zero is the least whole
number on the number line, and there is no greatest number.
e. Equal distances on the number line must correspond to equal differences in the numbers. The scale on
some graphs is a number line.
f. Place value can help you compare whole numbers.
g. Place value can help you order whole numbers.
h. Some problems can be solved by generating a list of outcomes and organizing that list in a systematic way
so all outcomes are accounted for.
3. Label and laminate index cards with place values up to the ten thousands place. Give the students erasable
markers and tell them to write the numbers that you supply in the correct places. The students can hold these up
for you to
see. The students using small index cards cut in half can prepare most of these cards.
4. Use base-ten blocks to build numbers. (Example: Students choose 4 hundreds blocks, 3 tens blocks, and 5 ones
blocks and write the number 435).
5. Use play money to demonstrate the value of digits in larger numbers. (Ex: 17 ten dollar bills give you 170
dollars). Students should compare this to 1 hundred and 7 tens.
6.
Model expanded notation using numbers up to 999,999 with and without zeros
(Ex: 234,696
(Ex: 30,609

200,000+30,000+4,000+600+90+6).
30,000+600+9)

7.

Allow students experiences transferring between standard notation and expanded notation. Zeros are not
represented in expanded form.
8. Have students record numbers in a place value chart and use the tool to give the value of each digit.
9. Using 10 index cards and a marker (for each student), have students create number cards from 0 to 9. Write a 3digit number on the board and have students use their number cards to represent the number on the board.
Repeat the process with a second 3-digit number and have students read and compare the numbers using
words and symbols for greater than, less than, and equal.
10. Pose the following questions and have students model the number 1,500 in two different ways.

11. Provide practice in writing numbers in word, expanded, and standard forms. Use the sample chart below for this.
Standard
Word Form
Form
148
One hundred forty eight
3,659
7,021
Resources
Round Up or Down?
Round to the Nearest Ten
Round to the Nearest 100

Expanded Form
100 +40 + 8

3 Digit Addition Split


Doubling to 1000
Difference Add
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 1
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net , www.studyisland.com, www.ixl.com, http://www.aaamath.com/B/nam14bx2.htm ,
http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/math4/e/ordernumbers3l.cfm , http://www.superkids.com/aweb/ , http://www.freetraining-tutorial.com/place-value/collecttheships.html , www.mathworksheets4kids.com , http://softschools.com/math/ ,
www.havefunteaching.com
http://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/math/numbers/order-whole-numbers.htm Ordering #s video
http://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/math/numbers/expanded-notation.htm Expanded notation video
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
Write each number in standard form.
1.

900 + 40 + 7

2. Write the place of the underlined digit. Then write its value.
5,342

7,095

6,398

Week of Sept. 8th - Sept. 12th


Sept. 8th - Sept. 12th
CCSS
3.NBT.1 Use place value understanding to round whole numbers the nearest 10 or 100.
3.NBT.2 Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of
operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
Instructional Strategies
1. Explain and demonstrate the following:

2. Pose the following:

3. Have students put a set of numbers in order from greatest to least and explain how they decided.
4. Show students four cards with different one digit numbers on them. Have them determine the greatest and least
4-digit numbers they could create with the numbers. Repeat this process several times to give each student an
opportunity to demonstrate understanding.
Guide students to solve the following: What numbers fit following clue? It is a 2-digit odd number. The digit in the tens
place is greater than 3. The digit in the ones place is less than 5. Make an organizational list of possible numbers and
explain how you know you found all of them.
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 1
Web Resources:
http://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/math/numbers/place-value.htm Place value video
www.pearsonsuccess.net
www.studyisland.com
www.ixl.com
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
1. Explain why points A and B both represent the number 6.

Both points A and B are equally distant from 5 and 7.


2.

3. Use place value mat to complete the following task.

4. Have students use what they know about place value and smaller numbers to complete the task below.

Week of Sept. 15th - Sept. 19th


Sept. 15th - Sept. 19th
CCSS
3.NBT1,Use place value understanding to round whole numbers the nearest 10 or 100. 3.NBT.2: Fluently add and
subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the
relationship between addition and subtraction.
3.OA.8: Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a
letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and
estimations strategies including rounding.
3.OA.9: Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them
using properties of operations. For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a
number can be decomposed into two equal addends.
Instructional Strategies
1. Begin by introducing the Commutative, Identity, and Associative Properties of Addition. Use several examples to
module each property. Use the video clips from www.pearsonsuccess.net (Interactive Digital Path) to introduce each
lesson in Topic 2 of Envision MATH
Commutative Property of Addition: Numbers could be added in any order and the sum will be the same. See the
example below.

7 + 5 = 12

5 + 7 = 12

Identity Property of Addition: The sum of zero and any number is that same number.
8+0=8
6+0=6
3+0=3
Associative Property of Addition: You can group addends in any way and the sum will be the same.
The parenthesis shows what to add first. You can group addends in any way and the sum will be the same. This is the
Associative (grouping) Property of Addition.

2. Remind students that subtraction is used when some things are taken away, when comparing two groups, and when
finding missing parts. Make a list of some subtraction clue words on the board with students. For example, how many
are left, how many more, how many did not, how many are still, what is the difference, etc.
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 2
Possible Activities for 3.NBT.1
Round Up or Down? Round to the Nearest Ten, Round to the Nearest 100, 3 Digit Addition Split
Possible Activities for 3.OA.8
Two-Step Word Problems Set 1, Two-Step Word Problems Set 2,
Possible Activities for 3.OA.9:

Odd and Even Sums, Odd and Even Products, Roll a Rule, Roll a Rule (2 Step) ,
Using Number Patterns to Describe Multiples , Increasing and Decreasing Number Patterns
Two Step Number Patterns , Patterns in the Addition Table , Patterns in the Multiplication Table
Drawing Multiplication Patterns
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net , www.studyisland.com . www.ixl.com
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
1. Which number makes the sentence true?
12 + ___ = 18

a. 12

b. 9

c. 6

d. 5

2. Lorna is playing a game. She gets 13 points on her first turn.


She gets 17 points on her second turn. Use mental math to
find her score so far.
A 31
B 30
C 29
D 20
3. Does (4 + 5) + 2 = 9 + 2? Explain_______________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
4.

Which of the following is NOT a reason to subtract?


A to estimate the sum
B to find a missing addend
C to compare two amounts
D to figure how many are left

5. Writing to Explain Tina has 15 magnets for sale. She sells 8 to Mr. Khan. Write a number sentence to fit this
problem. Then explain how you would find the difference.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Week of Sept. 22nd - Sept. 26th Mini Bite 1 Testing Window: September 22nd - 25th
Sept. 22nd - Sept. 26th
CCSS
3.NBT1,Use place value understanding to round whole numbers the nearest 10 or 100.
3.NBT.2: Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of
operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
3.OA.8: Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a
letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and
estimations strategies including rounding.
3.OA.9: Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them
using properties of operations. For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a
number can be decomposed into two equal addends.
Instructional Strategies
1. Begin by reviewing basic facts and mental calculations for solving addition and subtraction facts. Use the
video clips from www.pearsonsuccess.net (Interactive Digital Path) to introduce each lesson in Topic 2 of
Envision MATH
2. Explain that numbers can be added in any order. For example, 8 + 9 could added as 9 + 8. When adding, the
order of the numbers does not affect the sum.
3. Guide students to understand that there is more than one way to do a mental calculation. Techniques for
doing addition and subtraction calculations mentally involve changing the numbers or expressions so the
calculation is easy to do mentally. Below are some strategies to consider.
Counting On: For example, in the equation 5+3, you want students to start with the 5 in their heads, and
then count up, 6, 7, 8. This is to discourage students from counting like, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5..6, 7, 8. Students
also need to be taught that if an equation looks like this: 2+6, they still should start with the bigger number
in this case 6 and count up 7, 8.
Doubles: For example, when a student sees the equation 8+8, he should know that it equals 16 without
even stopping to think. Building a strong foundation of doubles will help students with the next strategy,
Doubles Plus One.
Doubles Plus One: For example, in the equation 5+6, a student could think, I know that 5+5 makes 10, and
one more makes 11. This strategy will likely require a bit more teaching than the previous two, but it will be
well worth it; when students know their doubles and doubles plus one facts, they know 25% of the addition
table!!
Make a Ten: Make a ten strategy involves memorizing the number combinations that add to ten. This
includes 7 and 3, 8 and 2, 6 and 4, & 5 and 5. Again, it is important that students develop automaticity with
regards to these facts so that when they see a combination, they quickly know that it is a making ten
combination. Once students begin to use this strategy, counting on becomes unnecessary in some
circumstances.
Make Multiples of Ten: This strategy is a natural follow-up to making ten, as it uses the same number
combinations in a different way. When teaching this strategy, students will learn to use the making ten facts in
equations such as 27+3. In this case, students will see the ones digits and realize that 7 and 3 make 10, so
27 and 3 makes 30.
Front End Addition (only for students with strong foundation in place value): Front end addition
involves adding numbers from left to right, eliminating the need for carrying. This strategies requires more
instruction than the others.
4. Use the video clips from www.pearsonsuccess.net to introduce each lesson in Topic 2 of Envision MATH:
5. Explain that rounding is a process for finding the multiple of 10, 100, and so on, closest to a given number.
Mark different points on a number line and have students determine which ten the numbers are closest to.
Provide the following explanation:

Rounding to a particular place value


Look at the digit directly to the right of the place value you wish to round to.
If the digit to the right is 5 or greater, add 1 to the digit in the place value. Print the following rounding chart
for students journal.

Rounding Rap:
Find the value and circle that digit.
Move to the right and underline, get it?
0-4, circle stays the same.
5-9, add "1" is the game.
Now flex your muscles like a hero,
Digits to the right change to a "0".
All the other digits remain the same.
Yo! You're a winner in the rounding game
1. Demonstrate how addition and subtraction problems could be solved by estimating sums and differences.
Have students use their knowledge of rounding to estimate sums and differences. For example,
63
60 (63 is rounded to 60)
+27
+ 30_(27 is rounded to 30)
90
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 2
Possible Activities for 3.NBT1
Round Up or Down?
Round to the Nearest Ten
Round to the Nearest 100
3 Digit Addition Split
Possible Activities for 3.OA8
Two-Step Word Problems Set 1
Two-Step Word Problems Set 2
Possible Activities for 3.OA9:
Odd and Even Sums
Odd and Even Products
Roll a Rule

Roll a Rule (2 Step)


Using Number Patterns to Describe Multiples
Increasing and Decreasing Number Patterns
Two Step Number Patterns
Patterns in the Addition Table
Patterns in the Multiplication Table
Drawing Multiplication Patterns
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
www.studyisland.com
www.ixl.com
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
Mini Bite 1 Testing Window: September 22nd - 25th
1. Write two addition and two subtraction facts for the following set of numbers: 23, 7, 16.
_____ + _____=___, ___ + ___ = ____,
____ - ____ = ____ , ____ - ____ = _____
2. Estimate the sum of the following pair of numbers. Remember to first Round the addends before adding.
34
+31
+ ______
3. Round 654 to the nearest 10___________ and to the nearest 100_____________ Explain your procedure below.
______________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________
4. What is the best estimate of 55 + 33 ?
a. 90

b. 100

c. 80

d. none of these

5. Solve the problem in two ways. 35 + 27


One Way

Another Way

Week of Sept. 29th-Oct. 3rd


Sept. 29th - Oct. 3rd
CCSS
3.NBT1 Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.
3.NBT2 Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of
operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
3.OA8 Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter
standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimations
strategies including rounding.
Instructional Strategies
1. Begin by reviewing the following vocabulary: difference, order, estimate, and regroup using the following questions:
i. When you trade 1 ten for ten ones, you ?___ Regroup
ii. The answer in a subtraction is the ?___ Difference
iii. When you find an answer that is close to the exact answer, you ?___ Estimate
Use the video clips from www.pearsonsuccess.net (Interactive Digital Path) to introduce each lesson in Topic 3 of
Envision MATH
2. Introduce expanded algorithm where students break addition problem into a series of easier problems based on place
value. Answers to the simpler problems are added to determine the final sum. Begin with 2-digit addends, then progress
to 3-digit addends.
Pose the problem 435 + 247. Begin by first adding the hundreds, then the tens, and the ones. Add the three sums to get
the final sum.
For example:
Now calculate the overall sum by adding the partial sums.
Hundreds
Tens
Ones
600
400
30
7
70
+200
+40
+5
+ 12
600
70
12
682
Pose several similar problems and guide students to solve them using expanded algorithm.
3. Demonstrate using place value blocks to model addition of two 3-digit addends. This allows students to visualize the
role of regrouping in addition. Students see that when the number of blocks in a given place is less than 10, there is
no need to regroup. But when the total number is 10 or greater, regrouping becomes necessary. This reinforces the
regrouping numbers that are written above the column when the traditional algorithm is applied.
4. Demonstrate addition of 3 or more 2/3-digit numbers using pencil and paper method and using addition to solve
problems. Provide ample opportunities for students to practice this skill. Emphasize the importance of lining up ones,
tens, and hundreds. See the example below.

5. Explain that information in a problem can often be shown using a picture or diagram. Some problems can be solved
by writing and completing a number sentence. Pose this problem. An aquarium has 25 guppies and 18 goldfish in it.
How many fish live in the aquarium? Draw a picture to solve the problem. Then write a number sentence. See below.

Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 3
Materials:
Place Value blocks or Teaching Tool 18, Teaching Tool 34 (Envision Math)
Possible Activities for 3.NBT1:
Round Up or Down?
Round to the Nearest Ten
Round to the Nearest 100
Possible Activities 3.NBT2:
3 Digit Addition Split
Doubling to 1000
Difference Add
Possible Activities for 3.OA.8
Two-Step Word Problems Set 1
Web Resources:
http://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/math/numbers/nestimate-whole-numbers.htm Estimating video
www.pearsonsuccess.net
www.studyisland.com
www.ixl.com
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
1.
Write two addition and two subtraction facts for the following set of numbers: 23, 7, 16.
_____ + _____=___, ___ + ___ = ____,
____ - ____ = ____ , ____ - ____ = _____
2.
Estimate the sum of the following pair of numbers. Remember to first Round the addends before adding.
34
+31
+ ______
3. Round 654 to the nearest 10___________ and to the nearest 100_____________ Explain your procedure below.
______________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________
4. What is the best estimate of 55 + 33 ?
a. 90 b. 100
c. 80 d. none of these
5. Solve the problem in two ways. 35 + 27
One Way

Envision Math Topic 3 Assessments

Another Way

Week of Oct. 6th Oct. 10th


Oct. 6th - Sept. 10th
CCSS
3.NBT1 Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.
3.NBT2 Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of
operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
3.OA8 Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter
standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimations
strategies including rounding.
Instructional Strategies
1. Use the video clips from www.pearsonsuccess.net (Interactive Digital Path) to introduce each lesson in Topic 3 of
Envision MATH
2. Give a number description orally and instruct students to write the three-digit number described on their dry erase
boards or paper. Example: What number has 6 hundreds, no tens, and no ones? (600) Brainstorm other ways to
depict the same number. Example: 5 hundreds, 10 tens and no ones OR 4 hundreds, 10 tens and 100 ones, etc.
3. Using base ten blocks (unifix cubes) made for overhead projectors, model the subtraction of 175 from 600. An
alternative is to use the following link to an interactive site that uses base ten blocks to depict subtraction problems.
Regardless of the method chosen, model regrouping across zeros. Complete several practice problems, then have
students work in small groups with manipulatives to solve three-digit subtraction problems. Allow individual practice
either at the overhead or on the website. Base Block Subtraction Click on "Create a Problem".
4. After adequate practice with the base ten blocks students will practice computing three-digit subtraction problems. Roll
three dice to arrive at a three-digit number. Record the number. Roll the dice again to arrive at a second three-digit
number. Students should determine which number is larger and create a subtraction problem using the two numbers.
Students will compute the problem on dry erase boards and reveal their work to the teacher. A nod or thumbs up can
be given to students with correct answers. Depending on time students can play the dice game in small groups.
(http://mste.illinois.edu/activity/webdice.html) This site may be used if you are short on dice.
5. Instruct students to use classroom computers to access the following website, print the worksheet, and complete the
math problems independently. (Three-Digit Subtraction with Regrouping)
6. Make situation cards that require addition or subtraction. Have the students decide whether they need to add or
subtract. Then have the students apply the operation that they chose to the situation. Discuss ways that students
thought of to solve the problems. (Ex: writing an equation, drawing a picture, grouping objects). Write them on the
board. Have them tell you which one was the most efficient one for solving the given situation.
7. Prepare 20 number cards with numbers from 100 to 999 on them. Pick two cards. Tell students a real-world situation
(Use the numbers they picked in the situation) and have them either add or subtract the numbers to match the
situation.
4. Use the same 20 number cards with numbers from 100 to 999 on them. Pick two cards. Call on volunteers to make
up situations that use the numbers on the cards. Have the other students use laminated index cards and erasable
markers to add or subtract the problem. They can hold these up for a quick check by you.
5. Have students use hand signals (one finger for a minus sign or two fingers crossed to make the plus sign) to indicate
what operation they think should be used to solve a problem in a given situation.
6. Give half an index card to each student and have the student put a plus sign on one side and a minus sign on the
other side. Call five students to the front of the room with their cards and give each of them a situation card. They take
turns reading their card out to the others and holding up the side of the plus/minus card that indicates the sign they think
to be the correct operation. The other (seated) students hold up the card for what they think is the correct operation. The
teacher confirms the correct answer. The student continues to stand if he or she was correct. Another (seated) student
takes his place if he was incorrect.
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 3

Possible Activities for 3.NBT1:


Round Up or Down?, Round to the Nearest Ten, Round to the Nearest 100
Possible Activities 3.NBT2:
3 Digit Addition Split, Doubling to 1000, Difference Add
Possible Activities for 3.OA.8
Two-Step Word Problems Set 1, Two-Step Word Problems Set 2
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net, www.studyisland.com, www.ixl.com, http://vmathlive.com/,
http://www.teachervision.fen.com/tv/printables/Math_3_PS_4-11.pdf , www.superkids.com , www.softschools.com ,
www.studyisland.com , http://math.about.com/library/sub3digitre.pdf , www.tlsbooks.com ,
www.helpingwithmath.com , http://mste.illinois.edu/activity/webdice.html , www.mathdrills.com , www.education.com
www.havefunteaching.com , www.subtractionworksheets.org , www.mathblaster.com , www.kidslearningstation.com
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
1. Which of the 3-digit numbers below does NOT fit these clues?
The hundreds digit is less than 3.
The tens digit is greater than 7.
The ones digit is greater than 8.
A 198
B 199
C 289
D 299
2. How many different ways can you make 18 cents, using dimes,
nickels, or pennies? HINT: Make an organized list.
A8
B6
C5
D4
3. At Sues Diner, you can get one scoop of frozen yogurt in a cup, in a waffle cone, or in a sugar cone. Todays yogurt
flavors are vanilla, mint, or peach. How many different
combinations are there for one scoop of frozen yogurt?
A3
B5
C6
D9
4. Writing to Explain Alex visited Max for the weekend. He packed a red T-shirt and a striped shirt. He brought a pair of
tan shorts and a pair of jeans. How many different outfits can Alex wear? Make an organized list to find out. Tell how you
know that you have listed all the possibilities.
_____________________________________________________________________

Week of Oct. 27th - Oct. 31st


Oct. 27th - Oct. 31st
CCSS
3.OA1 Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g. interpret 5 x 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects
each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 x 7.
3.OA3 Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and
measurement quantities, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the
problem.
3.OA5 Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. Examples: If 6x4=24 is known then 4x6=24 is
also known (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3x5x2 can be found by 3x5=15, then 15x2=30, or by 5x2=10, then
3x10=30 (Associative property of multiplication). Knowing that 8x5=40 and 8x2=16, one can find 8x7 as 8 x (5+2) = (8x5)
+ (8x2) = 40 +16 =56 (Distributive property).
3.OA9 Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them using
properties of operations. For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a number
can be decomposed into two equal addends.
Instructional Strategies

1. Warm Up: review multiplication facts.


2. Use base ten block to demonstrate a strategy for solving 46 X 4. Now give students base ten blocks and have them
solve several 2-digit by 1-digit multiplication problems.
3. Discuss other strategies that students could use to solve such problems, including repeated addition, and model
drawing. Demonstrate using repeated addition and model drawing to solve 2 by 1-digit multiplication.
4. Now give students 2 problems. Have them use repeated addition to solve one, and model drawing to solve the other.
5. Have a class discussion about which strategy students prefer and why.
6. Students will then use the website below to practice 2-digit multiplication with base ten blocks. Base 10 Blocks Online
http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_152_g_2_t_1.html?from=category_g_2_t_1.html
7. Tell this story to the class. Mrs. Brown hired 4 people to clear out all of the weeds in her yard. She agreed to pay
them each $15. How much did she pay to have the weeds cleared out of her yard?
8. Ask the students to talk with a partner about how they would solve this problem. Then ask them to solve the problem
and represent how they solved the problem either with manipulatives or with a picture.
9. Have the students do a gallery walk to see how everyone else solved the problem. When they finish the gallery walk,
ask: Is there any problem that you would like further explanation as to how they solved it? Encourage them to share
their ideas and question their classmates when they dont understand.
10. Repeat this process with other similar word problems.
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 4
Possible Resources: Multiplication Bump (X2)Multiplication Bump (X10)Multiples (2,5,10), Multiplication 4 in a Row,
Multiplication (3,4,5,6), Multiplication Challenge, I Have, Who Has, I Have, Who Has, (x2, x 10), Missing Numbers, Array
Picture Cards, Multiplication Number Wheel
Web Resources: www.pearsonsuccess.net
http://www.studyisland.com/ , http://vmathlive.com/ , www.mathdrills.com , www.softschools.com ,
www.studyisland.com , www.dadsworksheets.com , http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_152_g_2_t_1.html?
from=category_g_2_t_1.html,
http://www.k-5mathteachingresources.com/3rd-grade-number-activities.html
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
1. Explain It: If you know that 7 8 = 56, how can you use the Commutative
(Order) Property of Multiplication to find the product of 8 7?
___________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________
2. Tinas class went on a trip. They went in 6 cars. Each car carried 4 students, with 1 adult driving. How many students
went on the trip?
A 28
B 24
C 22
D 11
2. Model: Hot dog buns come in packages of 8. Mrs. Wilson has a total of 40 hot dog buns. Draw a picture to find how
many packages of hot dog buns Mrs. Wilson has.
3. Mr. Wilson is setting up volleyball teams. There are 6 players on a team.

a. Complete the table below.


Teams
1
2
3
Players
6
12
18

b. Explain how the number of players changes as the number of teams changes.
______________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________

4. Look for Patterns: The table below shows the amount of money that Louise earns in allowance each week.
a. Complete the table.
Louises Allowance
Number of Weeks
Allowance
1
$8
2
$16
3
$24
4
5
b. How did the table help you to find the pattern?
________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________

Week of Nov. 3rd - Nov. 7th


Nov. 3rd - Nov. 4th
CCSS
Parent Conference Day & Election Day
Instructional Strategies
Parent Conference Day & Election Day
Resources
Parent Conference Day & Election Day
Assessment
Parent Conference Day & Election Day
Week of Nov 3rd - Nov. 7th

Nov. 3rd - Nov. 7th


CCSS
3.OA3 Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and
measurement quantities, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the
problem.
3.OA7 Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and
division (e.g., knowing that 8x5=40, one knows 405=8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from
memory all products of two one-digit numbers.
3.OA8 Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter
standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimations
strategies including rounding.
3.OA9 Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them using
properties of operations. For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a number
can be decomposed into two equal addends.
3.NBT3 Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., 9x80, 5x60) using strategies based
on place value and properties of operations.
Instructional Strategies
1. Explain that a multiple of a number is the product of the number and a whole number. Give several examples.
2. Demonstrate that there are patterns in the products for multiplication facts with factors of 1, 2, 5, 9, and 10 using the
information below.
3. Have students begin with the known 2 and 5 multiplication tables. Have them write these facts vertically on lined paper.
After writing the facts, they will observe the patterns that occur and discuss these with the class.

4. Provide opportunities for students to visualize pattern in multiplication factors. See below.

Ask students to describe the patterns they notice in the factors of nine. Remind them to look in both the tens and ones
places. Repeat similar examples with multiplication of 1, 2, 5, and 10.
5. Have 5 students stand in front of the class, each with a pencil. Ask the class How many pencils are there in all? Have
them draw a model to represent the problem and then write a multiplication sentence for it (5X1=5).
6. Teach the zero property of multiplication by asking what is 9 X 0? Pose several problems with 0 as a factor until
students internalize that any number multiplied by zero is zero.

7. Now ask How many crayons are there in all? Have them write a multiplication sentence to solve (5X0=0).
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 5
Web Resources:
http://www.aaastudy.com, www.pearsonsuccess.net
m/pat_by4.htm , http://www.funbrain.com/cracker/index.html,
http://www.studyisland.com/ , http://www.ixl.com/math/practice/grade-3-missing-factors-facts-to-12 ,
http://vmathlive.com/ , http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/online/missing.swf ,
Possible Activities for 3.OA3:
Building Arrays, Number Story Arrays (Set 1), Number Story Arrays (Set 2), Multiplication Word Problems
Equal Rows in a Marching Band, Sharing Marbles Equally
Math Read Aloud Task Cards:
100 Hungry Ants, Six Dinner Sid, Amanda Bean's Amazing Dream, Each Orange Had 8 Slices (1)
Each Orange Had 8 Slices (2), The Doorbell Rang
Possible Activities for 3.OA7:
The Product is ...
x2-x5 Arrays
The Answer is ...
Cuisenaire Multiplication
Multiply It!
Cuisenaire Rectangles
Six Sticks
Multiples Game
Multiplication Four in a Row (3,4,5,6)
I Have ... Who Has?
Multiplication Number Wheel
I Have ... Who Has? (x2 and x10)
Multiplication Bump (x2)
I Have ... Who Has? (x2 and x5)
Multiplication Bump (x10)
I Have ... Who Has? (x3 and x5)
Multiplication Bump (x100)
I Have ... Who Has? (x4 and x6)
Multiplication Challenge
I Have ... Who Has? (x4 and x10)

Division Riddles
Division Squares
I Have ... Who Has? (x7 and x3)
Division Spin
I Have ... Who Has? (x8 and x6)
Possible Activities for 3.OA8:
I Have ... Who Has? (x9 and x7)
Two-Step Word Problems Set 1 , Two-Step Word ,
Multiplication Grid (blank)
Problems Set 2
Possible Activities for 3.OA9:
Odd and Even Sums, Odd and Even Products, Roll a Rule, Roll a Rule (2 Step) , Using Number Patterns to Describe
Multiples, Increasing and Decreasing Number Patterns, Two Step Number Patterns, Patterns in the Addition Table,
Patterns in the Multiplication Table, Drawing Multiplication Patterns
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
1. Tara walks 2 miles each day. How many miles does she walk in a week? How your work.
2. There are 5 days in each school week. How many school days are there in 9 weeks? Show your work.
3. Which number below is a multiple of 9?
A

35

46

54

D 65

4. Which multiplication problem below has the greatest product?


A 51
B
5. Complete. Use +, , or .
2 9 = 10

60
14.

C
20 + 16 = 9

07

D 80
4

15.

9 5 = 50

Week of Nov. 10th - Nov. 14th


Nov. 10th - Nov. 14th
CCSS
3.OA3 Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and
measurement quantities, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the
problem.
3.OA7 Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and
division (e.g., knowing that 8x5=40, one knows 405=8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from
memory all products of two one-digit numbers.
3.OA8 Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter
standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimations
strategies including rounding.
3.OA9 Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them using
properties of operations. For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a number
can be decomposed into two equal addends.
3.NBT3 Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., 9x80, 5x60) using strategies based
on place value and properties of operations.
Instructional Strategies
Begin by reviewing patterns in the products for multiplication facts with factors of 2 and 5. Provide students with grid
paper and have them write the 2 and 5 time tables. Then show them number patterns with missing numbers and have
them determine the rules and provide the missing number. Now have students generate their own number patterns with
missing numbers and have classmates solve them.
Review the patterns in multiplication facts with factors of 0 and 1. Proceed to patterns in multiplication facts with factors of

9. Show the 9 time table and have students describe the patterns they see in the ones and tens place.
Generate number patterns with multiples of nine and have students determine the rule and supply the missing numbers.
1. Play Find the Missing Addend. Put a number of objects on the overhead but cover part of them. Tell the students
how any you have in all. They tell you how many are hidden. (Ex. They see twenty and you tell them that there were fifty
in all. They should be able to tell you that thirty are hidden. They need to write the number sentence: 20 + n = 50)
before solving.
2. Play Find the Missing Factor. Put a number of circles on the overhead. Tell the students how many you have in all.
They tell you how many should be in each circle.(Ex. They see six circles and you tell them that there were sixty in all.
They should be able to tell you that ten would be in each circle. They need to write the number sentence: 6 x n = 60)
before solving.
3. Write a different missing addend sentence or missing factor sentence on several index cards. Put them in a paper
lunch bag. Have the students take turns picking two of the cards, supplying the missing factors or addends.
4. Write numbers, placeholders, and operation signs on note cards. Create number sentences on the board with the
cards. Students manipulate the cards to solve the equation. (Ex. 70 + X = 90)
5. Draw ten sections on 10 circles 3 or 4 in diameter. Laminate them and brad a spinner on each. Give each pair of
students an erasable marker and instruct them to write the multiples of one set of multiplication facts on each section.
(Example: Have each pair of students take turns spinning the spinner and telling what it landed on (56). Write the
number sentence replacing the missing addend or factor with a symbol. Have them supply the missing factor.
7x
= 56 (Answer: 8). Pair the students and have one of the partners say an addition or multiplication sentence
while leaving out an addend or factor (e.g., 32 +
= 76). Have the other student supply the missing addend (44).
Have them record the results in their math journals.

6. Distribute spinners with numbers from 0-9 on them to pairs of students and have one of the partners spin the spinner
twice to make a two-digit number, such as 50. Have them spin it again to make another two-digit number, such as 42.
Then use the numbers to make a missing addend number sentence (Ex. 42 +
= 50). Have the other student
supply the missing addend (8). Have them record the results in their math journals.
7. Use Navigating Through Algebra in Grades 3 through 5, The Variable Machine. This activity can be used as an
introduction to variables. Students explore the idea of variable as a symbol that can stand for any member of a set of
numbers. Also, students substitute numbers for variables to discover unknown values.
8. Use Navigating Through Algebra in Grades 3 through 5, Catch of the Day! In this activity, students work with
variables as they determine the number of each kind of fish caught. They record, in algebraic statements, the results of
their catch.
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 6
Web Sites: www.pearsonsuccess.net
http://mathresources.anderson5.net , http://www.studyisland.com/ , http://www.ixl.com/math/practice/grade-3-missingfactors-facts-to-12 , http://vmathlive.com/ , http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/online/missing.swf

Possible Activities for 3.OA7:


x2-x5 Arrays
Cuisenaire Multiplication
Cuisenaire Rectangles
Multiples Game
Multiplication Four in a Row (3,4,5,6)
Multiplication Number Wheel
Multiplication Bump (x2)
Multiplication Bump (x10)
Multiplication Bump (x100)
Multiplication Challenge
Division Riddles
Division Squares
Division Spin
Possible Activities for 3.OA8:
Two-Step Word Problems Set 1 , Two-Step Word ,
Problems Set 2

The Product is ...


The Answer is ...
Multiply It!
Six Sticks
I Have ... Who Has?
I Have ... Who Has? (x2 and x10)
I Have ... Who Has? (x2 and x5)
I Have ... Who Has? (x3 and x5)
I Have ... Who Has? (x4 and x6)
I Have ... Who Has? (x4 and x10)
I Have ... Who Has? (x7 and x3)
I Have ... Who Has? (x8 and x6)
I Have ... Who Has? (x9 and x7)
Multiplication Grid (blank)

S3Curriculum Link:
http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mat
hematics

Assessment
1. Desmond baked a bunch of brownies. When he used them to make 2 identical plates, there were 13
5

brownies on each plate. Which equation, when solved, will tell how many brownies Desmond baked?
b 2 = 13
b 2 = 13
b 2 = 26
b 2 = 13

2.

Christine bought 2 packages of light bulbs. She bought 12 light bulbs in all. Which equation, when
1

solved, will tell how many light bulbs were in each package?
2 b = 12
2 12 = b
2 b = 12
b 2 = 12
3. Which number makes this sentence true? N X 9 = 45
a. 7
b. 5
c. 36

d. 6
4. Look at the number pattern below. Which numbers complete the pattern?
18, 27, 36, 45, ____, _____, 72, 81
a. 55 and 66
b. 52 and 63
c. 54 and 63
d. 50 and 60

Week of Nov. 17th - Nov. 21st Mini Bite 3 Testing window: November 19th 24th
Nov. 14th - Nov. 21st
CCSS
3.OA3 Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and
measurement quantities, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the
problem.
3.OA5 Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. Examples: If 6x4=24 is known then 4x6=24 is
also known (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3x5x2 can be found by 3x5=15, then 15x2=30, or by 5x2=10, then
3x10=30 (Associative property of multiplication). Knowing that 8x5=40 and 8x2=16, one can find 8x7 as 8 x (5+2) = (8x5)
+ (8x2) = 40 +16 =56 (Distributive property).
3.OA8 Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter
standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimations
strategies including rounding.
3.MD7 Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition. Use tiling to show in a concrete case that the area of a
rectangle with whole-number side lengths a and b + c is the sum of axb and axc. Use area models to represent the
distributive property in mathematical reasoning.
3.MD8 Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter
given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different
areas or with the same area and different perimeters.
Instructional Strategies

1. Begin by reviewing known multiplication facts and patterns.


2. Tell students that they will use the Distributive Property of multiplication by breaking apart large arrays that represent
multiplication facts into smaller arrays that represent other multiplication facts.
Build background by reminding students that they know that according to the Distributive Property, (a + b) X c =(a + c)+
(b + c). This means that as they begin to learn the multiplication facts, if they have difficulties recalling the value of 7 X 5,
they can be prompted to think of it as (5 + 2) X 5 or (5 X 5) + (2 X 5), two facts that they do remember. See the example
below.

Pose 5 X 4 and show an array to model it on the board with circles to represent counters. Ask if students see any other
arrays in the array shown. Ask if they could break apart the array into two other arrays. Discuss students observations.
See below.

Repeat the above process, giving students opportunities to break up arrays into smaller components.
3. Explain that students will use known facts to find products with 3 as a factor. They will use the 2 and 1 facts that they
learned earlier to do this.
To multiply 3 X 6, for example, begin with an array of 3 rows with 6in each row. Then break it apart with an array with 2
rows and an array with 1 row as shown below.

These two arrays represent 2 X 6 and 1 X 6, which are known multiplication facts:
2 X 6 =12 and 1 X 6 = 6
So 3 X 6 = 12 + 6 = 18.
The above applies the Commutative Property of multiplication (3 X 6= 6 X 3).

Pose several other multiplication facts with 3 as a factor and have students practice using known facts to solve them.
4. Proceed with using known facts to solve multiplication with 4, 7, and 8 as factors. Model and provide ample practice
with each factor.

Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 6
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
http://www.themathpage.com/arith/mental-arithmetic-multiplication.htm
http://www.nisdtx.org/cms/lib/TX21000351/Centricity/Domain/892/multiplication_strategies.pdf
http://www.educreations.com/lesson/view/decomposing-factors-in-multiplication/2930488/ Video
Possible Activities for 3.OA3:
Split a Factor , Decompose a Factor
Possible Activities for 3.OA5:
Split a Factor
Decompose a Factor
Possible Activities3.OA8:
Two-Step Word Problems Set 1 , Two-Step Word Problems Set 2
Possible Activities for 3MD7:
Developing a Formula for the Area of a Rectangle , Area Word Problems
Possible Activities for 3MD8:
Measuring Perimeter , Perimeter on the Geoboard, Perimeter with Color Tiles, Designing a Rabbit Enclosure
The Perimeter Stays the Same, The Area Stays the Same, Perimeter Word Problems
Assessment
Mini Bite 3 Testing window: November 19th 24th
1. Draw a line to separate each array into two smaller arrays.
Write the new facts.

( __X __ ) and ( __ X __ )
2. Which shows a way to find 4 X 9?
A4+9
B9+9+9
C 4 9 plus 1 9
D 2 9 plus 2 9
3. What multiplication fact can you double to find 4 X 7?
a. 8 X 7

b. 2 X 7

c. 1 X 7

d. 6 X 7

4. Karen buys 7 packages of paper plates. Each package has 8 plates. Karen uses 30 plates at a party. Which shows
one way to find the number of plates Karen has left?
A Multiply 7 by 8 and then subtract 30.
B Multiply 7 by 30 and then subtract 8.

C Multiply 1 by 8 and then add 30.


D Multiply 7 by 8 and then add 30.
5. The roller coaster at the amusement park has 7 cars. Each car seats 6 people. If all cars are full, how many people
can ride on the roller coaster?
A 49
B 42
C 35
D 13
Week of Jan. 12th - Jan. 16th
Jan. 12th - Jan. 14th
CCSS
3.OA3 Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and
measurement quantities, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the
problem.
3.OA4 Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. For
example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 x?=48, 5 = ?3, 6x6 =?
3.OA5 Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. Examples: If 6x4=24 is known then 4x6=24 is
also known (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3x5x2 can be found by 3x5=15, then 15x2=30, or by 5x2=10, then
3x10=30 (Associative property of multiplication). Knowing that 8x5=40 and 8x2=16, one can find 8x7 as 8 x (5+2) = (8x5)
+ (8x2) = 40 +16 =56 (Distributive property).
3.OA7 Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and
division (e.g., knowing that 8x5=40, one knows 405=8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from
memory all products of two one-digit numbers.
3.OA8 Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter
standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimations
strategies including rounding.
Instructional Strategies
Model solving multistep problems with the sample questions below. Say: There will be times that you will encounter word
problems that require multiple steps to solve. A bar model can be used as a visual representation of the problem. Bar
models allow one to break the problem in simpler parts. They can also help to create fewer steps to solve. The following
lesson is designed for use with grades 2 and 3. Craig has a twenty dollar bill. He buys six squirt guns for $2 each. How
much money did Craig have left?
NOTE: Calculations and bar models may vary. Students should be encouraged to create a variety of bar models. They do
not all need to look the same after they have learned how to create them.
Today, were going to use a strategy of drawing bar models to solve our word problems that require more than one step to
find a solution. These are called multi-step word problems. Here is our first problem.
Example #1
A teacher buys 55 pencils and 55 erasers for his class. Later, the teacher returns 14 items. How many items does
the teacher keep? Lets draw a bar that will represent the pencils and erasers. Both the pencils and erasers total 110
items.

110 items
Both the pencils and erasers total 110 items.
Is the answer to our problem 110? [No] Why not? [because we need to subtract the items that the teacher
returned] Yes, the teacher returned 14 items so that must be subtracted from

the total.

Write the answer as a complete sentence using the symbol for therefore at the beginning.
The teacher kept 96 items.
The next example can be a we try. The teacher scribes the students ideas (with guidance). Students need to copy the
example in their math notebooks.
Example #2
Janice bought 3 bags of 223 peanuts and 4 bags of 375 pretzels for a party. How many total pretzels and peanuts
did Janice buy?
What two items is this problem about? [peanuts and pretzels] So that is how we will label our bars. How many bags of
peanuts are there? [3] Ill give the peanut part of our bar 3 sections. How many bags of pretzels are there? [4] So Ill
divide the pretzel part into 4 sections. We have two barsone labeled peanuts and the other labeled pretzels. Our
peanut bar is divided into 3 sections because there are 3 bags. Our pretzel bar is divided into 4 sections because there
are 4 bags. Now we need to decide what numbers go in each section. How many peanuts are in each bag? [223] Lets
add that information to our bar model. How many pretzels are in each bag? [375] Lets add that information as well.
There are several ways to arrive at the answer which is displayed below.

Using repeated addition

OR

Multiplication

Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 8
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
http://www.internet4classrooms.com/skill_builders/word_problems_math_third_3rd_grade.htm
http://www.thinkingblocks.com/thinkingblocks_md/tb_md_main.html Multi-step Problems video
http://www.dadsworksheets.com/v1/Worksheets/Word%20Problems.html

Possible Activities for 3.OA3:


Building Arrays
Number Story Arrays (Set 1)
Number Story Arrays (Set 2)
Multiplication Word Problems
Equal Rows in a Marching Band
Sharing Marbles Equally
Math Read Aloud Task Cards:
100 Hungry Ants
Six Dinner Sid
Amanda Bean's Amazing Dream
Each Orange Had 8 Slices (1)
Each Orange Had 8 Slices (2)
The Doorbell Rang
Possible Activities for 3.OA4:
Missing Numbers (Multiplication)
What is the Missing Number? (Division)
Possible Activities for 3.OA5:
Split a Factor
Decompose a Factor

Possible Activities for 3.OA7:


x2-x5 Arrays
Cuisenaire Multiplication
Cuisenaire Rectangles
Multiples Game
Multiplication Four in a Row (3,4,5,6)
Multiplication Number Wheel
Multiplication Bump (x2)
Multiplication Bump (x10)
Multiplication Bump (x100)
Multiplication Challenge
Division Riddles
Division Squares
Division Spin

The Product is ...


The Answer is ...
Multiply It!
Six Sticks
I Have ... Who Has?
I Have ... Who Has? (x2 and x10)
I Have ... Who Has? (x2 and x5)
I Have ... Who Has? (x3 and x5)
I Have ... Who Has? (x4 and x6)
I Have ... Who Has? (x4 and x10)
I Have ... Who Has? (x7 and x3)
I Have ... Who Has? (x8 and x6)
I Have ... Who Has? (x9 and x7)
Multiplication Grid (blank)

Possible Activities for 3.OA8:


Two-Step Word Problems Set 1
Two-Step Word Problems Set 2
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
1. Maria invited 4 of her friends over for a water balloon fight in her backyard. At the start of the game, Maria gave each of
her friends 2 water balloons. She had one water balloon for herself. How many water balloons did they have altogether?
Show your work and label your answer.
2. Matthew and his brother Shawn played swimming-pool-basketball. Each basket was worth 3 points. Matthew scored 9
points. Shawn scored 6 points. What is the total number of baskets made during this game?
Show your work and label your answer.
3. Brayden and Gavin were playing touch football against Cole and Freddy. Touchdowns were worth 7 points. Brayden
and Gavin scored 7 touchdowns. Cole and Freddy's team scored 9 touchdowns. How many more points did Cole and
Freddy have than Brayden and Gavin?
Show your work and label your answer.

Jan. 20th - Jan. 23rd


CCSS
3.NF1 Understand a fraction 1/b as a quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is portioned into b equal parts: understand
a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.
3.NF2 Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram. a. Represent
a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and portioning it into b equal
parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the
number line.
b. Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking off a lengths 1/b from 0. Recognize that the resulting
interval has size a/b and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line.
3.OA3 Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and
measurement quantities, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the
problem.
Instructional Strategies
Essential Understandings:
i. A region can be divided into equal-sized parts in different ways. Equal sized parts of a region have the same area but
not necessarily the same shape.
ii. A fraction describes division of a whole (region, set, segment) into equal parts. The bottom number in a fraction tells
how many equal parts the whole is divided into. The top number tells how many equal parts are indicated. A fraction is
relative to the size of the whole.
iii. Finding a unit-fractional part of a whole is the same as dividing the whole by the denominator of the fraction.
iv. Some points between whole numbers on a number line can be labeled with fractions or mixed numbers. The
denominator of the fraction can be determined by counting the numbers of equal parts between two consecutive
whole numbers.
v. Fractions can be approximated by other fractions that are close.
vi. Some problems can be solved by recording and organizing data in a table and by finding and using numerical patterns
in a table.
Begin by eliciting students experiences with sharing things equally. Have them recall what they did to ensure that
everyone got equal share. Using Graham Crackers or Unifix cubes, show students 4 and have them describe it in terms
of fraction.
Give each student a strip of paper. Have each divide his/her strip into four equal parts by first folding it (vertically on the
short side) into halves and then fold the halves into halves. On one side of their strip, have each student color and label
to show . Have each student color to show 2/4. Guide them to conclude that 2/4=1/2.
Instructional Background: Use this to build instructional background.
Unit Fractions A fraction with 1 as the numerator, such as 1/3 is called a unit fraction.
Numerator The numerator tells how many of the equal parts you are talking about
(the counting number).
Denominator The denominator is how many equal parts the whole is divided into (whats being counted).
Equal Parts Fractional parts are equal shares or equal-sized portions of a whole or unit. A unit can be an object or a
collection of things. More abstractly, the unit is counted as 1. On the number line, the distance from 0 to 1 is the unit.

Parts of the Fraction The more fractional parts used to make a whole, the smaller the parts (the larger the
denominator, the smaller the part). For example, eighths are smaller than fifths.
Use this interactive game for fraction practice:
http://www.primarygames.com/fractions/question1.htm
Discuss that fractions can be a representation of parts of a group. Give each student ten small objects (e.g., confetti) or
pictures. Tell them a fraction to represent using the objects.
Discuss that fractions can be a way to share just one object. Bring something edible (e.g., Twix, candy bar) to represent
fractional parts (fourths). Have the students describe situations that would fit the need to have a candy bar sectioned that
way. Also use edible parts of groups to demonstrate fractions (e.g., Lance crackers).
Introduce fraction of a set. Explain that Set fraction is based on the number of items in a set. Remind students that it
takes 10 dimes to make a dollar. Now ask: If I have 4 dimes, what fraction of a dollar do I have? (4/10). Help students
make connections to previous learning by using base ten block to demonstrate set fractions-10 tens make
1hundred.Therefore, 1 tens block equals 1/10th of 100. 10 hundreds make 1 thousand. Therefore, 1 hundred block
equals 1/10th of 1000. See the example below.

This set has 27 Teddy Bears in it.


7/27 is yellow.
7/27 is blue.
7/27 is green.
6/27 is red.
Discuss fraction of a set: Explain that when dividing a set of objects like toys or pattern blocks, equal division depends
on the number of items in the set, not the area of each item. Give pairs of students 12 pieces of Unifix Cubes. Explain
that all the cubes they have make a set. Have them model , 1/3, and . Have them compare the parts to the whole
(explain that the set of cubes make a whole).
Regional Fraction: Students have learned how to tell time to the half hour and the quarter hour. Show them an analog
clock and relate half an hour and quarter hour to fractions. Divide the clock in hour and show that there are 60 minutes in
an hour and 30 minutes in a half hour. Divide a clock into 4 equal parts to show quarter or of an hour.
This lesson works well with students working in groups of 2-4. Give each group a set of pattern blocks. Let them explore
with the pattern blocks for about 3 minutes. Ask: What are you noticing about the pattern blocks? (color, shape, size,
some can be put together to make another one) Review the names of the shapes- hexagon-yellow, trapezoid-red,
square-orange, triangle-green, parallelogram- blue. Ask them to find a hexagon. Ask: what shapes can you find that will
cover the hexagon? (2 trapezoids, 3 parallelograms, and 6 triangles)
Tell them that if we think of the hexagon as one whole, then these other shapes divide the hexagon into equal parts.
When we have equal parts that make up a whole, those equal parts are called a fraction of the whole. If there are 2
trapezoids that make a hexagon, then each trapezoid is of the whole (hexagon). Then ask: What part of the hexagon
would the parallelogram be? 1/3 The triangle? (1/6) Explain that this is fraction of a region Explain that the bottom
number of the fraction is called the denominator and tells how many equal parts make up the fraction. The top number is
called the numerator. It tells how many parts we are talking about. So, if we ask: What part of the hexagon is represented
by 2 parallelograms? They should answer 2/3
Ask: If the trapezoid represents one, one fractional part would a triangle represent? 1/3 Two triangles? 2/3 Have the
students work in groups to come up with some of their own fractional representations. Use pizza to further illustrate
regional fraction. See below.
5/6 of the pizza below is left. What fraction of it has been eaten?

Set Fraction: Model parts and whole relationships with the entire group of students in the class, boys in the class, and
girls. Students can model different fractions using the student sets above. Have them identify the denominator and
numerator for each fraction.
Have students participate in a gallery walk examining other students egg cartons to see all the different ways students
might have removed six.

Ask students what all the egg cartons have in common. [There are six remaining.]

What fraction of the entire set is 6? [6/12; accept 1/2 or other equivalent fractions.] If students do not make the
connection between equivalent fractions, e.g., 6/12 = ___, they have an opportunity to develop these
relationships in later lessons.

What fraction was removed? [6/12 or 1/2] Have students label their recording sheet as 6/12. Some students may
choose to label their sheet with an equivalent fraction, such as 1/2. If so, this provides an excellent opportunity to
introduce equivalent fractions.

Continue removing varying numbers of eggs. For example, suppose this time that we need eight eggs to bake our cake.
Have students remove eight eggs. Students should record their egg configuration on the Eggsactly Eggs activity sheet.
Have students go on another gallery walk to see all the different ways students might have removed eight.

Ask students what all the egg cartons have in common. [There are four remaining.]

What fraction of the entire set is 4? [4/12; accept 1/3 or 2/6.]

What fraction was removed? [8/12, 2/3, or 4/6.] For the remaining eggs, have students label their recording sheet
as 4/12. [Accept 1/3 or 2/6.]

Have students investigate the different ways they can arrange their eggs when given the fraction. For example, ask
students to show 1/4 of a dozen? (Use the Eggsactly Eggs (http://illuminations.nctm.org/unit.aspx?id=6095) activity sheet
to have students represent several different configurations all equivalent to 1/4 of a dozen.) Have students identify
fraction relationships associated with the set (e.g., 6 of the set of 12 eggs is the same as 6/12 of the set, OR when the
numerator stays the same and the denominator increases, the fractions become smaller 1/3 is smaller in area
than 1/2).
Have students work in pairs to continue the investigation as different numbers of eggs are used. Students should be
given time to investigate the variety of ways in which the eggs can be arranged. These arrangements should be recorded
on the Eggsactly Eggs (http://illuminations.nctm.org/unit.aspx?id=6095) activity sheet and the sheet should be labeled

according to the fraction. For example, students might use several images of the egg carton on the activity sheet to
record all the ways to show x of a dozen.
Have students investigate the different ways they can arrange their eggs when given the fraction. For example, ask
students to show 1/4 of a dozen? (Use the Eggsactly Eggs (http://illuminations.nctm.org/unit.aspx?id=6095) activity sheet
to have students represent several different configurations all equivalent to 1/4 of a dozen.) Have students identify
fraction relationships associated with the set (e.g., 1/2 of the set of 12 eggs is the same as 6/12 of the set, OR when the
numerator stays the same and the denominator increases, the fractions become smaller, e.g. 1/3 is smaller in area
than 1/2).
Convene the whole class to discuss the activities in this lesson. The guiding questions may be used to focus the class
discussion as they were used to focus individual students attention on the mathematics learning objectives of this lesson.
Print copies of the activity on this link for each student.http://illuminations.nctm.org/unit.aspx?id=6095
Fractions on a Number Line:
Introduce Linear Fraction: Explain that- When working with linear models, equal division depends on the distance
from one point to another. Snap 5 Unifix Cubes (1 red, 1 blue, 1 green, 1 white and 1 black) together to form a train.
Have students tell what fraction is red, blue, etc. Have students draw a six inch line on a sheet of paper and divide it into
equal three parts. Have them name the fractions. You may repeat this activity as necessary.
Have students look at the fraction strips on page 393 of Math Expressions. Explain that the strip in the top row shows the
whole. Point out that the number 1 is used to represent 1 whole. In each of the following rows, students need to divide the
strip into equal parts, and then shade one part. Have students explain the patterns they see in the fraction strips.
Display a number line on the board and circle one number at a time and have students tell what fraction the number
represents. Model this several time and provide opportunities for students to practice linear fraction. Ask them how linear
fraction is different from the set and regional fractions. (Set is based on equal number, region is based on equal area, and
linear is based on equal distance from one spot to another.
Go to http://www.ixl.com/math/grade/third/ Click on Q.1:Fractions review
This is an excellent review for fraction as a set, region, and linear fraction. You may need to set up a free 30 day trial
account.

See the example below.

Follow this link for interactive practice. http://www.mathsisfun.com/numbers/fractions-match-frac-line.html


Go to http://www.ixl.com/math/grade/third/ Click on Q.2: Fractions review (word problems)
inter Break
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 9
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
http://www.khanacademy.org/math/arithmetic/fractions/understanding_fractions/v/numerator-and-denominator-of-afraction Fraction Introduction Video
http://www.superteacherworksheets.com/fractions-mixed-numbers_QZRM.html
http://www.ixl.com/math/grade/third/ Click on Q.2: Fractions review (word problems)
http://www.primarygames.com/fractions/question1.htm
www.visualfractions.com
http://www.mathsisfun.com/numbers/fractions-match-frac-line.html
http://www.mathsisfun.com/numbers/fractions-match-frac-line.html
http://www.mathplayground.com/howto_comparefractions.html Comparing/Ordering Fractions video
Possible Activities for 3.NF2:
Fraction Strips
Make Your Own Fraction Strips
Number Line Roll
Possible Activities for 3.NF2b:
Fraction Number Lines
Possible Activities for 3.NF3:
Pizza for Dinner
Build a Hexagon
Possible Activities for 3.NF3b:
Exploring Equivalent Fractions
Creating Equivalent Fractions
Cuisenaire Equivalent Fractions
Possible Activity for 3.NF3c
Make One

Possible Activities for 3.NF3d:


Who Ate More?
Compare and Order
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
inter Break
Assessment
1 Imani colored of the picture below. How many triangles did she color?

A
B
C
D

1 triangle
2 triangles
3 triangles
4 triangle

Mark 1/2 on the number line and label it as .

3. Jada rode her bike 1/4 mile. Shade in the space and write at the correct spot on the number line below.

4. Jamie ate one sixth bag of cookies. Circle the correct amount that she ate.

5. Eve is thinking of a fraction. It has a numerator of 5. Its denominator is 3 more than that. What is Eves fraction?
A. 3/5
B. 5/3
C. 5/8
D. 5/15
1

Mrs. Hart used 1/6 of a box of chalk. There were 12 sticks of chalk in the box. Which shows how to put the sticks
of chalk into six equal parts to find how many sticks are in each part?

Week of Jan. 26th - Jan. 30th Mini Bite 4 Testing window: January 27th -30th
Jan. 26th - Jan. 30th
CCSS
3.NF1 Understand a fraction 1/b as a quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is portioned into b equal parts: understand
a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.
3.NF2 Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram. a. Represent
a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and portioning it into b equal
parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the
number line.
b. Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking off a lengths 1/b from 0. Recognize that the resulting
interval has size a/b and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line.
3.OA3 Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and
measurement quantities, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the
problem.
Instructional Strategies
Begin by reviewing regional, set, and number line fractions using questioning and examples.
Explain that you can use benchmark fractions to help you estimate parts. Benchmark fractions are 1/4, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, and
3/4. One way to think of benchmark fractions is to think of part of a clock. These fractions are represented on the clocks
below.

Improper Fractions: Use the strategies below to teach improper fractions.


An Improper fraction has a top number
larger than (or equal to) the bottom number,
It is "top-heavy"

/4
(seven-fourths or seven-quarters)
Examples
3

/2

/4

16

/15

15

/15

99

/5

See how the top number is bigger than (or equal to) the bottom number? That makes it an Improper Fraction, (but there
is nothing wrong about Improper Fractions).

Three Types of Fractions: There are three types of fraction:

A Fraction (such as 7/4) has two numbers:


Numerator
Denominator
The top number is the Numerator, it is the number of parts you have.
The bottom number is the Denominator; it is the number of parts the whole is divided into.
Example: 7/4 means:

We have 7 parts

Each part is a quarter (1/4) of a whole

So we can define the three types of fractions like this:


Proper The numerator is less than the
Fractions: denominator
Examples: 1/3, 3/4, 2/7
Improper The numerator is greater than
Fractions: (or equal to)
the denominator
Examples: 4/3, 11/4, 7/7
Mixed A whole number and proper
Fractions: fraction together
Examples: 1 1/3, 2 1/4, 16 2/5
Improper Fraction or Fraction greater than 1
So, an improper fraction is just a fraction where the top number (numerator) is greater than or equal to the bottom number
(denominator).
In other words, it is top-heavy.
It Can be Equal
What about when the numerator is equal to the denominator? For example 4/4 ?
Well, it is obviously the same as a whole, but it is written as a fraction, so most people agree it is a type of improper
fraction.

/4

Improper Fractions or Mixed Fractions


You can use either an improper fraction or a mixed fraction (fractions greater than 1) to show the same amount. For
example 1 3/4 = 7/4, shown here:
1 3 /4

/4

=
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 9
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
www.studyisland.com
http://www.ixl.com/math/grade-3/fractions-on-number-lines
http://www.superteacherworksheets.com/fractions-mixed-numbers_QZRM.html
http://teachingimage.com/fractions-worksheets/improper-fractions.pdf
Possible Activities for 3.NF2:
Fraction Strips
Make Your Own Fraction Strips
Number Line Roll
Possible Activities for 3.NF2b:
Fraction Number Lines
Possible Activities for 3.NF3:
Pizza for Dinner
Build a Hexagon
Possible Activities for 3.NF3b:
Exploring Equivalent Fractions
Creating Equivalent Fractions
Cuisenaire Equivalent Fractions
Possible Activity for 3.NF3c
Make One
Possible Activities for 3.NF3d:
Who Ate More?
Compare and Order
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
1 Which letter on the number line stands for 21/4 ?

Write the missing fraction or mixed number for each number line.

Estimate the fractional part that is shaded.

Our class gets 7 chicken eggs. After 3 weeks, 2 eggs dont hatch. The rest of the eggs do hatch. Suppose that
pattern continues and our class gets 35 eggs. How many eggs most likely wont hatch?
Use the table below.

a
b
c
d
5

4
5
10
12
What fraction of the length of the 1 strip do the other strips show?

Week of Feb. 2nd - Feb. 6th


Feb. 2nd - Feb. 6th
CCSS
3.NF2 Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram. a. Represent
a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and portioning it into b equal
parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the
number line.
b. Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking off a lengths 1/b from 0. Recognize that the resulting
interval has size a/b and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line.
3.NF3 Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size. a.
Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line. b.
Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions e.g.., = 2/4, 4/6=2/3) Explain why the fractions are equivalent, by
using a visual model. c. Express whole numbers as fractions, and recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole
numbers. Examples: Express 3 in the form 3=3/1; recognize that 6/1 = 6; locate 4/4 and 1 at the same point of a number
line diagram d. Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator by reasoning about their size.
Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of
comparisons with the symbols >, =, or < and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
Winter Break
Instructional Strategies
Essential Understandings:
i. If two fractions have the same denominator, the fraction with the greater numerator is the greater fraction.
ii. If two fractions have the same numerator, the fraction with the greater denominator is the greater fraction.
iii. Fractions can be compared to each other by comparing them to benchmark numbers such as 0, , and 1.
iv. Number lines can be used to compare fractions with denominators or like numerators.
v. A fraction is relative to the size of the whole. Models can be used to compare fractional amounts.
vi. Number lines can be used to compare fractions with like denominators and like numerators.
vii. Equivalent fractions name the same point on a number line.
viii. If a fraction aligns with a whole number on a number line or to a whole number on fraction strip, the whole number is
equivalent to that fraction.
ix. Information in a problem can often be shown using a picture or diagram and used to understand and solve the
problem.

Instructional Strategies:
Begin by explaining that Making equivalent fractions is like splitting all the pieces further into a certain number of new
pieces. The visual model for equivalent fractions involves splitting the existing pieces into so many new ones, such as
splitting all of them into 4 new pieces. This is shown using the arrow notation with "x4" near the arrows, signifying that the
numerator and the denominator get multiplied by 4, because there are now four times as many colored pieces and four
times as many pieces in total. Please watch the video to see how to use idea. This is an important topic. You need to
understand equivalent fractions well before learning about adding unlike fractions.
Give each student a fraction strip.

Have students show using the fraction strips.

Ask your students to find how many fraction strips equal .

Have students share what they discovered, and record the picture and the fraction on chart paper.

Ask students to find how many 1/8 fraction strips equal .

Have students share what they discovered and the teacher posts this for the class to see.

As a group, students are to create using fourths, fifths, sixths, eighths, tenths, and twelfths.

Have students individually record their findings by illustrating three of the fractions in the math journal.

Students can share what they discovered.

Post this for the class to see.

Student Application
1
Direct students to work independently to see if they can make 1/3, , 1/5, 1/6 using fraction strips for fourths,
2

fifths, sixths, eighths, tenths and twelfths.

Students should share what they discovered. Results can be posted in a display.

Students will record their results as they did for .

Teacher Facilitation
1
Have the class examine the fractions on the chart paper in the box to reinforce that they are equal to .
2

Tell students that these fractions are called equivalent fractions because they are fractions that have the same

value.

Have students find equivalent fractions using fraction strips for 1/3 following the modeled process above.

Repeat the same process for the other fractions.

These two fractions are equivalent fractions because they picture the same amount. You could say that you get to
"eat" the same amount of "pie" either way. In the second picture each slice has just been split into two pieces.

=
1/3

2/6
Splitting the pieces

The arrows on top and below the equivalent fractions show into how many new pieces
each piece was split.

When all of the pieces are split the same way, both the number of colored pieces (numerator) and the total number of
pieces (denominator) get multiplied by the same number.
inter Break
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 10
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
http://www.homeschoolmath.net/teaching/f/equivalent_fractions.php Equivalent Fraction video
http://www.bgfl.org/bgfl/custom/resources_ftp/client_ftp/ks2/maths/fractions/level2.htm
http://www.nsa.gov/academia/_files/collected_learning/elementary/arithmetic/exp_equiv_fractions.pdf
Possible Activities for 3.NF2:
Fraction Strips
Make Your Own Fraction Strips
Number Line Roll
Possible Activities for 3.NF2b:
Fraction Number Lines
Possible Activities for 3.NF3:
Pizza for Dinner
Build a Hexagon
Possible Activities for 3.NF3b:
Exploring Equivalent Fractions
Creating Equivalent Fractions
Cuisenaire Equivalent Fractions
Possible Activity for 3.NF3c
Make One

Possible Activities for 3.NF3d:


Who Ate More?
Compare and Order
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Winter Break
Assessment
1. Connect those fractions that show the same amount. Write the name of each fraction beside it.

2. Split the pieces and draw the new pieces into the picture. Write down the equivalent
also the "helping arrows" above and below the fractions.

fractions. If you need help, draw

3. Make chains of equivalent fractions according to the model. Look at the patterns formed by
the denominators, and those formed by the numerators.

4. The three number lines have 12th parts, 3rd parts, and 24th parts.

inter Break
Week of Feb. 9th - Feb. 13th
Feb. 9th - Feb. 13th
CCSS
3.NF2 Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram. a. Represent
a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and portioning it into b equal
parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the
number line.
b. Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking off a lengths 1/b from 0. Recognize that the resulting
interval has size a/b and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line.
3.NF3 Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size. a.
Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line. b.
Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions e.g.., = 2/4, 4/6=2/3) Explain why the fractions are equivalent, by
using a visual model. c. Express whole numbers as fractions, and recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole
numbers. Examples: Express 3 in the form 3=3/1; recognize that 6/1 = 6; locate 4/4 and 1 at the same point of a number
line diagram d. Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator by reasoning about their size.
Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of
comparisons with the symbols >, =, or < and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
Instructional Strategies
Begin by reviewing equivalent fractions. Tell students that they will learn how to order and compare fractions.
To assess prior knowledge, invite students to reflect on the previous lesson. Ask them to describe what they learned from
creating fraction strips and ideas for using them in practical ways.
To begin the lesson, have students take out their fraction strips from the previous lesson.
Students should use their fraction strips to model each fraction being compared. Fraction strips representing each
fraction should be lined up so that they can be compared directly.
For example, when comparing 1/2 and 2/4, the fractions should be modeled and lined up as follows:

Guide students through comparing another example or two from the Investigating Fraction Relationships. When students
feel confident with the task, ask them to continue comparing fractions. Answers should be checked with a partner.
Discuss answers, and have students correct any responses that were incorrect.
Next, have students order their fractions by lining up each set (1/2s, 1/3s, 1/4s, 1/6s, and 1/8s) with the whole strip.

Place the "whole" strip at the top, then the 1/2s underneath the whole, then 1/3s, 1/4s, 1/6s, and 1/8s, respectively.
Have students record the order from greatest to least. Ask them if they notice any patterns as the fractions get smaller.
Prompt students to notice that there is an inverse relationship between the size of the fraction and the denominator when
the numerator is one.
Students might express this concept as follows: As the fractions get smaller, the denominator gets larger. Students should
record this relationship.
Ask students if they believe this relationship always holds true. Have them investigate this question by using their fraction
strips to order the fractions in Part II of the Comparing and Ordering Fractions Activity Sheet. This sheet includes a variety
of fractions where the numerator is not always one.
Students should come to the conclusion that this pattern only consistently occurs when the numerator is constant.
Discuss answers and have students correct any responses that were incorrect.

Represent fractions that have denominators of 2, 4, and 8 as parts of a whole, parts of a set, and points on the number
line.
The focus is on numbers less than or equal to 1. Students should be familiar with using words, pictures, physical
objects, and equations to represent fractions.
Represent and identify equivalent fractions with denominators of 2, 4, and 8.
The Fraction Kit #2 and #3 PDF
1/3s, 1/6s, 1/9s, 1/12s, 1/5s, and 1/10s.
A Represent fractions that have denominators of 3, 6, 9, 12, 5, and 10 as parts of a whole, parts of a set, and points on
the number line.
The focus is on numbers less than or equal to 1. Students should be familiar with using words, pictures, physical
objects, and equations to represent fractions.
Represent and identify equivalent fractions with denominators of 3, 6, 9, 12, 5, and 10.
Rock Paper Scissors to One Whole PDF
Compare Fractions with Same Denominators.
Fractions with common denominators may be compared and ordered using the numerators
Add and Subtract Fractions with Same Denominators PDF
Students should be familiar with using equations to represent fractions.
Uncover (Teaching Mathematics by Marilyn Burns) PDF
Compare and order fractions that have common numerators and denominators of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10 and 12.
Equivalent Fractions
Wipe Out (Teaching Mathematics by Marilyn Burns) PDF
Compare and order fractions that have denominators of 2, 3, and 6.
Compare Fractions with Same Numerators.
Equivalent Fractions.
Closest to 0, , or 1 (Teaching Mathematics by Marilyn Burns) PDF
Fractions may be compared using as a benchmark.
Equivalent Fractions.
Fractions with Two Color Counters (Teaching Mathematics by Marilyn Burns) PDF
Solve single and multi step word problems and verify the solution.
Represent the fractions with using words pictures, and physical objects.
Sharing Brownies PDF
Solve single and multi step word problems and verify the solution.
Represent the fractions with using words pictures, and physical objects.
Reduction to Common Denominator PDF
Compare Fractions that have different denominators.

Add and subtract fractions by using common denominators.


Reduction to Common Denominator #2 PDF
Compare Fractions that have different denominators.
Add and subtract fractions by using common denominator.
Variety of Fractions PDF
Identify proper fraction, improper fraction, and mixed fraction.
Solve Word Problems PDF
Solve single and multi-step word problems involving comparison of fractions and verify the solution.
Possible Activities for 3.NF2:
Fraction Strips
Make Your Own Fraction Strips
Number Line Roll
Possible Activities for 3.NF2b:
Fraction Number Lines
Possible Activities for 3.NF3:
Pizza for Dinner
Build a Hexagon
Possible Activities for 3.NF3b:
Exploring Equivalent Fractions
Creating Equivalent Fractions
Cuisenaire Equivalent Fractions
Possible Activity for 3.NF3c
Make One
Possible Activities for 3.NF3d:
Who Ate More?
Compare and Order
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 10
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
Comparing Fractions videos
http://www.bing.com/videos/search?
q=comparing+and+ordering+fractions+video&mid=E6BD336F4BFE74DBB521E6BD336F4BFE74DBB521&view=detail&
FORM=VIRE1
(Teaching Mathematics by Marilyn Burns) PDF
http://illuminations.nctm.org/LessonDetail.aspx?ID=L541
http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/Lessons/2056.htm
http://www.aaamath.com/fra42ax2.htm , http://www.aaamath.com/fra43bx2.htm ,
http://www.aaamath.com/fra43ax2.htm , http://www.aaamath.com/fra43cx2.htm
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
1 Kirsten goes to school 180 days each year. There have been 105 school days so far this year. How many more
school days are there this year?
A 80
B 75
C 70
D 65
2

Randy walks his dog 2/4 mile. Laura walks her dog a shorter distance than Randy. Which of these fractions is
less than 2/4?

a.

b. 5/8

c. 2/6

d. 2/4

3. Two friends want to equally share 6/8 feet of ribbon. What amount of ribbon should each friend get?
A. 1/8 feet
B. 2/8 feet
C. 3/8 feet
D. 4/8 feet
4. Writing to Explain Martin drew a picture to solve this problem: Helen is painting a wall that is 16 feet long. She drew a
mark at the left edge and at the right edge of the wall. She also drew a mark every 4 feet between the edges. How many
marks did she draw?

Explain why Martins picture is not correct. Then draw a correct picture. Explain why your picture correctly represents the
story.
5. A square garden is 12 feet long on each side. Janet needs to put a post at each corner. She also needs to put a post
every 3 feet on each side. How many posts does Janet need?
A 12

B 16

C 20

D 24

Feb. 17th - Feb. 20th


CCSS
3.G1 Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g.,
having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g. quadrilaterals). Recognize
rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not
belong to any of these subcategories.
3.G2 Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole. For
example, partition a shape into 4 parts with equal area, and describe the area of each part as 1/4 of the area of the
shape.
Break
Assessment
1. Chenoa made a place mat in the shape of a pentagon. Which one shows the shape of Chenoas
place mat?

2. Which polygon describes the shape of this stop sign?

A Pentagon
B Octagon
C Hexagon
D Quadrilateral
3. Explain why this shape cannot be called a square.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
4. Name three different types of quadrilaterals that have two pairs of parallel sides.
___________________________, ______________________________, and _________________________________
5. Draw a picture of each below.
Parallel lines

________________

Intersecting lines

________________

Line

_______________

6.. Look at the map of the town below. Which two streets intersect?

Winter Break

Line segment

_____________________

Week of Feb. 23rd - Feb. 27th Benchmark Testing window: February 25th March 5th
Feb. 23rd Feb. 27th
CCSS
3.G1 Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g.,
having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g. quadrilaterals). Recognize
rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not
belong to any of these subcategories.
3.G2 Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole. For
example, partition a shape into 4 parts with equal area, and describe the area of each part as 1/4 of the area of the
shape.
Instructional Strategies
Begin by discussing the attributes of polygons. Use the examples below.

1. Use Power Polygons or precut shapes to have the students sort and classify shapes based on attributes. Ask
questions such as:
Why did you choose to group that way?
What do the shapes in this group have in common?

What makes the groups different?


2. Warm up: review basic shapes: circle, square, triangle, and rectangle and describe the attributes of the basic shapes.
3. Define polygons as shapes with three or more sides. Have students create some polygons using toothpicks or
strings.
4. Supply the attributes that classify the shapes. Have the students display them under the correct classification.
Triangles

Quadrilaterals

Pentagons

Hexagons

Octagons

5. Give each student a sticky note. Have the students use the sticky notes to find and label polygons around the room
with
up to eight sides.
6. Read and discuss Literature Link: Greedy Triangle by Marilyn Burns.
7. Read descriptions of polygons aloud. Have the students draw and label the shape in their journals. Then make
statements and answer questions such as those in the following:
The shape has four-corners. Is the shape a square?
No, all the sides are note the same length. Is the shape a rectangle?
Yes, it is.
8. Use Q-tips and glue them to a piece of construction paper to represent squares, hexagons, octagons, etc. Use pipe
cleaners to represent circles. Label and display the shapes in the room.
9. Trace and label representations of two-dimensional shapes. Use sides of books, tissue boxes, and lids of milk jugs,
etc.
10. Make match cards using the example. Pair the students with a set of five attribute cards and five polygons drawn.
Students place the cards face down. Students turn the cards over two at a time to see if they match. If the cards
match, students keep them and try again. If the cards dont match, it is the next persons turn.
11. Read attribute cards aloud and have the students see if they can tell which shape you are describing.
12. Use Geoboards (nails or pegs spaced evenly in rows on boards) and have the students make the shape you indicate
in varying sizes.
13. Have students make a Poster Collage of shapes cut out of magazines.
14. Use a Venn diagram and attribute blocks to classify shapes.
15. Pass out shapes to the students. Students find another student with a similar shape. They explain how their shapes
are alike and different.
Geometric Subdivision:
1. Give each student a 3-inch square of paper. Show students how to fold and then cut the square into two pieces (Fold
the square in half on the diagonal, open it and cut along the diagonal into two triangles.) Students place their triangles
back together to make a square. Then they put triangles together to make a different shape. One rule must be
followed: triangles must be placed so that two sides are touching, and those two sides have to be the same length.
Demonstrate for students. Check students shapes. Students paste new shape on newsprint paper. Quadrant B
2. Students work with a partner. One will have a green square; the other a purple square. Cut the square on the
diagonal (as explained above) to make two new pieces. Partners put all four pieces together to make a new shape
following the same rule as before - the sides have to be even and they have to touch. Post on board to create a graph.
Quadrant C
3. Use Geoboards to make various polygons then give the students extra rubber bands to subdivide the polygons and

identify the shapes that are formed. To extend the activity, specify the number of smaller shapes the students need
to form.
Ex:
3 triangles all same

4 triangles

Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 11
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
Daily Oral Math
Web Sites: http://mathresources.anderson5.net , http://www.studyisland.com/ , http://vmathlive.com/
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Possible Activities for 3.G1
2D Shape Sort
Comparing Quadrilaterals
Possible Activities for 3.G2:
Geoboard Fourths
Congruent Eighths
Fractions with Color Tiles
Assessment
Benchmark Testing window: February 25th March 5th

2. For the next 3 shapes, draw one or more diagonals to make the new shape named.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Week of Mar. 2nd - Mar. 6th


Mar. 2nd - Mar. 6th
CCSS
3.MD1 Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving
addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram.

Instructional Strategies
1. Discuss clocks and parts; hour hand, minute hand, counting minutes on the clock.
2. Show students a time using a large Judy Clock. Students write the corresponding digital time on white boards. This
activity can also be reversed to writing a digital time on a white board and students use small Judy Clocks to show
corresponding analog time.
3. Students (or pairs of students) make an analog clock out of paper plates, paper arrows, and brads, showing each
minute. Give them specific times (or have their partner choose specific times) to represent with their clock. Write a
word problem (or student partner writes a word problem) to answer using their clock.
4. Have students draw hands on a clock to show specific times. You will need this online clock for demonstration and
practice: http://www.teachingtime.co.uk/clock/clockres.html
5. Give students a Time-O grid to play time bingo. They fill in the blanks with times of their choice to the minute or
show times on an analog clock for students to play the game. Teacher may need to limit the range of times. Call out
the times (variation is for times used to the nearest 5 minute, quarter, hourly intervals).
6. Give students specific times and have them drag the hand on the online clock below to show the time.
http://www.cambridge.org/elt/resources/young/interactive/clock/index.htm
7. Reverse the process and show different times on a digital clock (drawn on the board) and have students show the
same time on an analog clock.
For interactive practice of matching digital and analog clocks, go to:
http://www.oswego.org/ocsd-web/games/StopTheClock/sthec5.html

http://www.apples4theteacher.com/clocks.html
8. Show students different ways to tell time:

Have them practice telling time in each of the ways shown above.
Winter Break
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 12
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
Web Sites: http://www.studyisland.com/ , http://vmathlive.com/
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
http://www.cambridge.org/elt/resources/young/interactive/clock/index.htm
http://www.oswego.org/ocsd-web/games/StopTheClock/sthec5.html
http://www.apples4theteacher.com/clocks.html
http://www.teachingtime.co.uk/clock/clockres.html
Winter Break
Assessment
1 Match the digital clock with the correct analog clock.

10:04
2

Pablo arrives for soccer practice at the time shown on the clock below.
At what time does Pablo arrive at soccer practice?

A 10:43

C 11:17

B 11:05

D 12:43

Jans alarm clock rang at the time shown on the clock below. At what time did the alarm clock ring?

A. six ten

B. six thirty-eight

C. six twenty-two

D. seven twenty-two

Winter Break

Week of Mar. 9th - Mar. 13th


Mar. 9th - Mar. 13th
CCSS
3.MD1 Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving
addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram.
Instructional Strategies
Teaching Elapsed Time
1. Students must be encouraged to think about durations in daily living
2. Make your sample problems relatable to your students. Use times and situations that matter to them, such as how long
it is until lunch or when Mom needs to pick them up at the movies.
3. Ask a time question every day. They work seamlessly into your transitions. Ask students how long they have until the
end of the day or to figure out what time they started working. Simple and quick, but effective.
4. Use book characters and events to create questions. Books with time in the plot, such as Time Remote, are especially
fun.
5. Incorporate the reading of functional texts and science projects. Cross-curricular ties strengthen memory.
Elapsed Time With Number Line
Begin by drawing out a number-line. Place the beginning time on the left side and the ending time on the right. Then,

starting on the left hand side, Find out what the next whole hour would be. Put how long it would take to get from the
beginning time to the next hour on our number-line. Then jump to the ending time and go backwards to the previous hour.
In-between that, put how much time is between those. Then, finally, write down how much time is in between those two
hours in the middle. Add up all of our time and you have the amount of time that has elapsed from the beginning until the
end!
Here are a few examples.
1 Jenna got home at 3:40 p.m. She went to bed at 9:25 p.m. How long was she home before she went to
bed?

Ben's basketball tournament starts at 11:52 a.m. The tournament ends at 4:11 p.m. How long was his
tournament?

Elapsed Time T-Chart Strategy


Create a T-Chart with the start time and end time. Then you will work in increments, listing the amount of elapsed time on
the side. Add up the times when you are finished.
Sample Problem: Jane takes off from the Mobile airport at 8:43am. She arrives in Chicago at 11:47am. How long
was Janes flight? (Mobile and Chicago are both in the Central Time Zone.)
1. Put your start time and end time on the top of the chart for reference.

2. List your start time in the left-hand column. In the right-hand column, list a new ending time based on how much time
you want to elapse at once. List the time you have elapsed on the right. Teacher tips: Using lined paper helps
students keep their work organized. Make sure they write the times as they go. Using a consistent strategy, like
always getting up to a 0 or 5 minute time first, or always moving by the hours first, can help students get started.

3. Continue until your end time matches the end time at the top of the T-chart. Then add the minutes and hours you have
written on the right-hand side. That is your elapsed time!

Things to consider: If the minutes equal 60 or more, students will need to convert them to another whole hour. If the
problem requires students to find an end time, listing the time moved in the middle column is sometimes easier visually
for students.
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 12
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
http://mravery.edublogs.org/2011/01/07/elapsedtime/
www.studyisland.com
www.ixl.com

Elapsed Time video

Possible Activities for3.MD1


Elapsed Time Ruler
Elapsed Time Word Problems
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
Find the elapsed time.

Start Time: 6:00 P.M. End Time: 7:15 P.M. ____________________________

Start Time: 7:30 A.M. End Time: 10:50 A.M. _________________________

Edie is 1 year old. She naps from 12:45 P.M. to 2:30 P.M. each day. How long is Edies nap? ______________

The test that Keyshawns class took finished at 10:30 A.M. The first part of the test took 30 minutes. There was a
15- minute break. The second part of the test also took 30 minutes. At what time did the test start?
______________________________________________________________________________________

Elliot finished studying at 4:45 P.M. He spent 30 minutes reading a social studies chapter. He spent 45 minutes
on his math homework. In between studying, Elliot took a 20-minute break. At what time did Elliot begin studying?
A. 3:00 P.M.

B. 3:10 P.M.

C. 3:30 P.M.

D. 6:20 P.M.

Week of Mar. 16th - Mar. 20th


Mar. 16th - Mar. 20th
CCSS
3.MD8 Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter
given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different
areas or with the same area and different perimeters.
inter Break
Instructional Strategies

Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 13
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
Possible Activities 3.MD8:
Measuring Perimeter
Perimeter on the Geoboard
Perimeter with Color Tiles
Designing a Rabbit Enclosure
The Perimeter Stays the Same
The Area Stays the Same
Perimeter Word Problems
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
inter Break
Assessment
1 Marci makes a design with tiles on a tabletop shown in the diagram. What is the perimeter of the design?

A. 64 inches
B. 36 inches
C. 32 inches

D. 28 inches
2

A drawing of Brians patio is shown. What is the perimeter of the patio?

Luanne has a small jewelry box like the one shown below. She wants to cover the bottom with felt. She needs to
measure the perimeter of the bottom to cut the right size piece of felt. Which tool and unit of measure would be
her best choice?

A
B
C
D

Ruler and inches


Tape measure and feet
Yardstick and feet
Yardstick and yards

Week of Mar. 23rd - Mar. 27th


Mar. 23rd - Mar. 26th
CCSS
3.MD 5 Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area measurement.
a. A square with side length 1 unit, called a unit square, is said to have one square unit of area, and can be used to
measure area.
b. A plane figure which can be covered without gaps or overlaps by n unit squares is said to have an area of n square
units.
3.MD6 Measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units.
3.MD7 Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition.
a. Find the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by tiling it, and show that the area is the same as would
be found by multiplying the side lengths.
b. Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles with whole-number side lengths in the context of solving real world and
mathematical problems, and represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning.
c. Use tiling to show in a concrete case that the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths a and b + c is the
sum of axb and axc. Use area models to represent the distributive property in mathematical reasoning.
d. Recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and
adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems.
3.MD8 Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter
given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different
areas or with the same area and different perimeters.
Instructional Strategies

Resources

Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 14


Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
Possible Activities 3.MD 5:
Exploring Area
Area on the Geoboard
Possible Activities for 3.MD6
Find the Area
Area Compare
Rectangles with Color Tiles
Comparing Rectangles
Rectangular Area Cards
Possible Activities for 3.MD7:
Developing a Formula for the Area of a Rectangle
Area Word Problems
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Assessment
1 Priya is making a book cover with an area of 28 square inches. Sapna is making a book cover with an area of 28
square centimeters. Maya thinks that Sapnas book cover will have a smaller area. Is she correct? Explain.
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
2

A rug is 9 feet long and 6 feet wide. What is its area?

A
B
C
D

15 square feet
27 square feet
30 square feet
54 square feet

Ahmed has a corkboard on his bedroom wall that measures 2 feet by 4 feet as shown below. What is the area of
the corkboard?

A 6 feet
B 8 feet
C 6 square feet
D 8 square feet
4. Which shape has the greatest area?

5. What is a good estimate of the area covered by the triangle below?

A About 4 square units


B About 6 square units
C About 8 square units
D About 12 square units

Week of Mar. 30th - Apr. 3rd


Mar. 30th - Apr. 2nd
CCSS
3.MD 5 Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area measurement.
a. A square with side length 1 unit, called a unit square, is said to have one square unit of area, and can be used to
measure area.
b. A plane figure which can be covered without gaps or overlaps by n unit squares is said to have an area of n square
units.
3.MD6 Measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units.
3.MD7 Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition.
a. Find the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by tiling it, and show that the area is the same as would
be found by multiplying the side lengths.
b. Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles with whole-number side lengths in the context of solving real world and
mathematical problems, and represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning.
c. Use tiling to show in a concrete case that the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths a and b + c is the
sum of axb and axc. Use area models to represent the distributive property in mathematical reasoning.
d. Recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and
adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems.
3.MD8 Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter
given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different
areas or with the same area and different perimeters.
Instructional Strategies

Reading Comprehension and Problem Solving

Winter Break
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 14
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
Possible Activities 3.MD 5:
Exploring Area
Area on the Geoboard
Possible Activities for 3.MD6
Find the Area
Area Compare
Rectangles with Color Tiles
Comparing Rectangles
Rectangular Area Cards
Possible Activities for 3.MD7:
Developing a Formula for the Area of a Rectangle
Area Word Problems
Winter Break
Assessment
1 Which measurement tool is the best choice for measuring the area of a small picture frame?
A
B
C
D

Balance scale
Meter stick
Yardstick
Inch ruler

A diagram of a stage is shown below. What is the area of the stage?

A
B
C
D

20 square feet
28 square feet
32 square feet
36 square feet

Which unit of measurement is the best to use to measure the area of a school playground?

A. Square feet
B. Square centimeters
C. Square inches
D. Square miles

Week of Apr. 13th - Apr. 17th


Apr. - Apr.
CCSS
3.MD2 Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg),
and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are
given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.k
Instructional Strategies

Winter Break
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 15
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
Possible Activities for 3.MD2

Measuring One Liter


Weigh it Twice
Volume and Mass Word Problems
Estimating Weight
More or Less than a Liter?
Capacity Lineup
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
inter Break
Assessment
1 Which unit would be best to measure the mass of an elephant?
A
B
C
D
2

Which of the following best describes the mass of a piano?


A
B
C
D

Liters
Milliliters
Grams
Kilograms

25 kilograms
250 kilograms
25 grams
250 grams

Which of the following would you measure in milliliters?


A
B
C
D

Capacity of a kitchen sink


Capacity of a swimming pool
Capacity of a water pitcher
Capacity of a juice box
inter Break

Week of Apr. 20th - Apr. 24th


Apr. 20th - Apr. 24th
CCSS
3.MD3 Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a date set with several categories. Solve oneand two step how many more and how many less problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For
example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets.

3.MD4 Generate measurement data by measuring lengths using rulers marked with halves and fourths of an inch. Show
data by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in appropriate units- whole numbers, halves, or
quarters.
Instructional Strategies

inter Break
Resources
Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Envision Math Topic 16
Web Resources:
www.pearsonsuccess.net
http://commoncoresheets.com/Pictographs.php
http://www.k-5mathteachingresources.com/3rd-grade-measurement-and-data.html
Possible Activities for 3.MD3:

Button Bar Graph


Button Pictograph
Jake's Survey
Collecting and Representing Data

Team Data Project

Possible Activities for 3.MD4:


Measuring to the Nearest Half Inch
Measuring to the Nearest Quarter Inch
Measuring Strips Line Plot
S3Curriculum Link: http://www.s2temsc.org/library/s3curriculum/s3math/s3mathematics
Break
Assessment
Use the pictograph for 1 through 3.
Favorite Outdoor Activity

1. How many people like swimming as their favorite sport? (16-3)


A. 70
B. 40
C. 10
D. 4
2. How many more people like hiking than swimming? (16-3)
A. 110
B. 70
C. 40
D. 30
3. If Simone knows that there are 60 people who like biking as their favorite sport, how many symbols should she draw
for biking?
A. 6
B. 10
C. 12
D. 60
Winter Break