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Essential Question: Is freedom dangerous?

CCLS Writing
1. Writing arguments focused on discipline-specific
content.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts.
3. Incorporate narrative accounts into essays and writing
pieces.
4. Produce clear and coherent writing appropriate to task.
5. Plan, revise, edit, rewrite.
6. Use technology to produce writing.
7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects.
8. Gather relevant information from multiple sources.
9. Draw evidence from informational texts.
10. Write routinely over extended and shorter time frames.

Lesson Title: Start of the Cold War


CCLS Reading
1. Cite specific textual evidence.
2. Determine the centra ideas of a primary or secondary
source.
3. Evaluate various explanations for events.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases.
5. Analyze how a complex primary source is structured.
6. Evaluate authors differing P.O.V.
7. Evaluate multiple sources of information.
8. Evaluate an authors evidence.
9. Integrate information from diverse sources.
10. Read and comprehend grade appropriate social studies
texts.

Instructional Objectives:
How did the end of WWII impact political, economic, and humanitarian ideas?
Materials:

The Start of the Cold War reading


The Cold War Outline notes
Early Cold War Time Line
Set of Four Primary Source Documents (see attached)

Do Now:

In your experience, do you find that the two biggest/toughest kids in school
actually fight each other? Explain.

Activities:

1. Do Now (3 min)
2. Discussion (4 min)
3. Mini Lesson (10 minutes)
Capitalism v. Communism Review
Eastern bloc - NATO vs. Warsaw Pact
Germany/Berlin Wall Diagram Activity
4. Activity (20 min)
Students move into leveled reading/writing groups to conduct
and small group reading in groups of three (10 min):
2 RED groups - The Iron Curtain - Vocabulary
Extensions; Novikov Telegram
3 GREEN groups - The Truman Doctrine; Novikov
Telegram
3 BLUE groups - Henry Wallace; Novikov Telegram
Students move back to their original heterogeneous groups to:
(1) Complete all DBQs
(2) Conduct an academic discussion in response to the
following prompt:
Who was primarily responsible for starting the Cold War?
Defend your response with evidence.
Extension Questions

Why, according to the author, had relations deteriorated between the United States and the Soviet Union?
Why, according to the author, did Americans distrust the Soviet Union?
Why, according to the author, did the Soviet Union distrust the United States?
What was the authors fear regarding Soviet-American relations?
What were the authors recommendations for how U.S. Policy toward the Soviet Union ought to be conducted?

As students are in groups reading, Ms. Hlawatsch will conference with Red Groups to address deficits in
understanding and pose questions to check for understanding.
Mr. Otto will conference with Green and Blue groups.
Vocabulary Extension List
Berlin Wall
- actual physical wall separating West Berlin from East Berlin.
Iron Curtain
- a figure of speech that describes the Soviet control of Eastern Europe.
Satellite
- a country in Eastern Europe that is actually controlled by the USSR.
Containment
- US policy of stopping the spread of communism.

Summary:
Exit Slip - Why did the Cold War occur following WWII?
Evaluation:
Reading Question/Discussion Participation Diagram