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Miss Ashlee Britting

Curriculum Map: FIRST SEMESTER


WEEK OF
8/10/15 UNIT 1
Narrative Writing
8/17/15 UNIT 1
Narrative Writing
8/24/15 UNIT 1
Narrative Writing
8/31/15 UNIT 1
Narrative Writing
9/7/15
No School Monday
UNIT 1 Narrative Writing
9/14/15
No School Monday
UNIT 2
Centralized Power
9/21/15 UNIT 2
Centralized Power
9/28/15 UNIT 2
Centralized Power
10/5/15

*Progress reports

DUE
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 1
Icebreakers & Syllabus review
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 2
Introduction to narrative writing
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 3, **Thesis and
Prewriting due for destination research essay
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 4,
Rough drafts and revisions
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 5, **destination
research Essay final DUE
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 6, Frontloading of
The House of the Scorpion and begin
reading book
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 7, Reading of The
House of the Scorpion
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 8, **Narrative essay
prewriting DUE, Reading of The House of
the Scorpion
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 9, **Narrative essay
final DUE, Reading of The House of the
Scorpion
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 10, Finish reading
The House of the Scorpion

UNIT 2
Centralized Power
10/12/15
No School Monday
UNIT 2
Centralized Power
10/19/15
*Parent-Teacher Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 11, **Digital Story
Conferences
outline DUE
UNIT 3
Digital Story Telling
10/26/15
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 12
Working on presentations
UNIT 3
Digital Story Telling
11/2/15
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 13, **Digital Story and
UNIT 3
presentation DUE
Digital Story Telling
Begin presentations
11/9/15
No School Wednesday
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 14, **Group
UNIT 4
prewriting and outline DUE
Grammar
Working in groups on prewriting and outline
11/16/15
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 15,
UNIT 4
Working on group projects
Grammar

11/23/15

FALL BREAK NO SCHOOL

11/30/15
UNIT 4
Grammar
12/7/15
UNIT 4
Grammar
12/14/15
UNIT 4
Grammar
12/21/15
12/28/15

Bellwork, Vocab
Presentations begin

Course Calendar: SECOND SEMESTER


WEEK OF
1/4/16
School Starts
UNIT 1
Text and Technology

Quiz

16,

**Group

Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 17


Group presentations continued, project
reflections
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 18, *Grades Closed
and sent home
WINTER BREAK NO SCHOOL
WINTER BREAK NO SCHOOL

DUE
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 1
Reading The Yellow
discussing as a class

Wallpaper

and

1/11/16
UNIT 1
Text and Technology
1/18/16
No School Monday
UNIT 1
Text and Technology
1/25/16
UNIT 2
Persuasive Writing

Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 2,


Technology blueprints DUE
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 3,
Technology Final DUE

2/1/16
UNIT 2
Persuasive Writing

Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 5, **Persuasive Essay


thesis and prewriting DUE, writing thesis and
outline
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 6, **Persuasive Essay
DUE
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 7
Begin researching historical topics for History
essay
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 8, **History in
Literature topics DUE
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 9, **History in
Literature prewriting DUE

2/8/16
UNIT 2
Persuasive Writing
2/15/16
No School Monday

2/22/16
UNIT 3
History in Literature
2/29/16
*Progress reports
UNIT 3
History in Literature
3/7/16
UNIT 3
History in Literature

**Text

and

**Text

and

Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 4


Reading journal articles for persuasive essay

Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 10, **History in


Literature Rough draft DUE

3/14/16

*Parent-Teacher Conferences
UNIT 3
History in Literature
3/21/16
3/28/16
UNIT 4
Shakespeare
4/4/16
UNIT 4
Shakespeare
4/11/16
UNIT 4
Shakespeare
4/18/16
No School Friday
UNIT 5
Satire
4/25/16
No School Monday
UNIT 5
Satire
5/2/16
UNIT 5
Satire
5/9/16
UNIT 5
Satire
5/16/16
5/23/16
Last day of school on Thursday

Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 11, **History in


Literature Final draft DUE
SPRING BREAK NO SCHOOL
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 12, Acting
Shakespeares Hamlet
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 13, Acting
Shakespeares Hamlet
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 14, Acting
Shakespeares Hamlet
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 15, Acting
Shakespeares Hamlet

out
out
out
out

Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 16, **Satirical Essay


topic DUE
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 17, **Satirical Rough
Draft DUE
Bellwork, Vocab Quiz 18, **Satirical Final
essay DUE, Watch Hamlet
Bellwork, Watch Hamlet
Congratulations!!

Unit Map (5-6 Weeks)

Day 1
Frontloading
Bell work: How do you
feel about poetry and why?
Please explain in 3-4
sentences and be prepared
to share.
Short presentation from
instructor on poetry and the
importance of learning
about it.
We will read Anecdote of
a Jar by Wallace Stevens
and analyze as a class.
Students will takes notes,
write down their honest
feelings about the poem
and then we will do a ticket
out the door.
Closure: What is one way
that poetry can be used to
do?

Day 2
Frontloading
Styles and types of poetry
Bell Work: What is your
favorite poem? Why do you
like it? Is it the style, tone,
content? Explain in 2-3
sentences and be prepared
to share. Students will be
counted off and given an
informational text on
different styles and types of
poetry. They will then
jigsaw the information they
read to teach the rest of
their group. Students will
need to take notes as their
peers discuss their topics.
Analyze how a text uses structure to
emphasize key points or advance an
explanation or analysis. (910.RH.5)

Day 3
Frontloading
Students will complete the
jigsaw they began the day
prior.
After the jigsaw, the teacher
will show the different ways
poetry can be performed
like: poetry slams, readings,
songs, etc. The teacher will
model two poems with
reading them to the class and
the students will write good,
bad and suggestions for the
readings by the teacher.

Analyze how a text uses structure to


emphasize key points or advance an
explanation or analysis. (910.RH.5)

Evaluate a speakers point of view,


reasoning, and use of evidence and
rhetoric, identifying any fallacious
reasoning or exaggerated or distorted
evidence. (910.SL.3)

Day 5
Descriptive Language
Students will utilize their
descriptive language
worksheet and analyze four
poems for their descriptive
language. Students will do
this in pairs and when
finished the class will
discuss these examples.
Develop and strengthen writing as
needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions

Day 6
Vocabulary
Bell Work: List as many
poetry terms as you can in
two minutes.
Students will work on a
crossword puzzle with the
vocabulary words and
definitions for them to
solve. This will be a critical
thinking activity for the
students to become familiar
with the common terms in
poetry. The class will go

Day 7
Analyzing the Form
Students will be introduced
to iambic pentameter,
structure, rhythm and meter.
Many examples will be
displayed and practiced
within the lecture.

Day 4
Descriptive Language
Bell Work: Think back to
when you learned what
similes, metaphors and
imagery are. Write down one
example of each and be
prepared to share.
The class will begin working
on a descriptive language
worksheet for practice to use
in their own works in the
future.

Develop and strengthen writing as


needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions
should demonstrate command of
Language standards 13 up to and
including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

Day 8
Practicing the form
Students will practice iambic
pentameter with a meter and
rhythm activity. Marching,
ta tums and reading
Shakespeare aloud.

Develop and strengthen writing as


needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions
should demonstrate command of

should demonstrate command of


Language standards 13 up to and
including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

over the answers together.

Day 9
Historical Research
Students will get into
groups of three. The
instructor will have a list of
poets for each pair to sign
up for. The poet that they
sign up for is their
responsibility to research,
finding out their history,
values, education,
hardships and style. They
will be required to cite all
information within their
presentations.

Day 10
Historical Research
Students will continue their
research formulating a very
small presentation 3-5
slides with the information
they found.

Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word
relationships, and nuances in word
meanings. a. Interpret figures of
speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron)
in context and analyze their role in the
text. b. Analyze nuances in the
meaning of words with similar
denotations. (910.L.5)

Day 13
Modern Research
Students will continue their
research formulating a very
small presentation 3-5
slides with the information
they found.

Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word
relationships, and nuances in word
meanings. a. Interpret figures of
speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron)
in context and analyze their role in the
text. b. Analyze nuances in the
meaning of words with similar
denotations. (910.L.5)

Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word
relationships, and nuances in word
meanings. a. Interpret figures of
speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron)
in context and analyze their role in the
text. b. Analyze nuances in the
meaning of words with similar
denotations. (910.L.5)

Day 14
Sharing Modern Research
Students will have ten
minutes to wrap up their
research and presentation.
Threesomes will begin
sharing their research with
the class. Students in the
audience will take notes
about the poets and write
down any questions that
may have formulated

Analyze how a text uses structure to


emphasize key points or advance an
explanation or analysis. (910.RH.5)

Language standards 13 up to and


including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

Day 11
Sharing Historical
Research
Students will have ten
minutes to wrap up their
research and presentation.
Threesomes will begin
sharing their research with
the class. Students in the
audience will take notes
about the poets and write
down any questions that may
have formulated during the
presentation.

Day 12
Modern Research
Similar to historical
research, students will
perform the exact tasks just
with modern poets provided
on a list from the instructor.
Students will get into groups
of three. The instructor will
have a list of poets for each
pair to sign up for. The poet
that they sign up for is their
responsibility to research,
finding out their history,
values, education, hardships
and style. They will be
required to cite all
information within their
presentations.

Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word relationships,
and nuances in word meanings. a.
Interpret figures of speech (e.g.,
euphemism, oxymoron) in context and
analyze their role in the text. b. Analyze
nuances in the meaning of words with
similar denotations. (910.L.5)

Day 15
Acrostic Poem
Students will be given
multiple examples of an
acrostic poem. After
discussing the form, students
will practicing writing their
own acrostic poem with their
word of choice.

Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word relationships,
and nuances in word meanings. a.
Interpret figures of speech (e.g.,
euphemism, oxymoron) in context and
analyze their role in the text. b. Analyze
nuances in the meaning of words with
similar denotations. (910.L.5)

Day 16
Ode Poem
Class will read Ode to a
Nightingale by John Keats.
Students will discuss the
factors that go into an ode
and then create their own
with the instructors help.

Develop and strengthen writing as


needed by planning, revising, editing,

during the presentation.

rewriting, or trying a new approach,


focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions
should demonstrate command of
Language standards 13 up to and
including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word
relationships, and nuances in word
meanings. a. Interpret figures of
speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron)
in context and analyze their role in the
text. b. Analyze nuances in the
meaning of words with similar
denotations. (910.L.5)

Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word
relationships, and nuances in word
meanings. a. Interpret figures of
speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron)
in context and analyze their role in the
text. b. Analyze nuances in the
meaning of words with similar
denotations. (910.L.5)

Day 17
Concrete Poem
Students will be introduced
to the concrete style poem.
The instructor will explain
the formula and concept.
Students will read multiple
examples of concrete
poems to gain the visual
concept of a concrete poem,
then create their own.

Day 18
Haiku
Students will be introduced
to the haiku style poem.
The instructor will explain
the formula and concept.
Students will read multiple
examples in class provided
by the instructor, then
create their own.

Day 19
Free Verse
Students will be introduced
to the free verse style poem.
The instructor will explain
the formula and concept.
Students will read O
Captain! My Captain! by
Walt Whitman then create
their own free verse poem.

Day 20
Diamante
Students will be introduced
to the Diamante style poem.
The instructor will explain
the formula and concept.
Students will read War and
Peace by Angel Martinez
then create their own
diamante poem.

Develop and strengthen writing as


needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions
should demonstrate command of
Language standards 13 up to and
including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

Develop and strengthen writing as


needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions
should demonstrate command of
Language standards 13 up to and
including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

Develop and strengthen writing as


needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions
should demonstrate command of
Language standards 13 up to and
including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

Day 22
Culture in Poetry
This class period will begin
with a small lecture on
African poetry showing the
style, motif and feel. The
class will then have the
remainder of the period to
research a culture of their
choosing, making a poster
about their findings.

Day 23
War in poetry Bell Work:
Can you think of any poems
written during a time of war,
or about war? What are
they?
Students will learn the
impact of environment,
government, war, etc. on
poetry. They will explore
different poems written
during various eras.

Day 24
War in Poetry
Students will continue their
research on different poetry
written during wars and
record their findings on a
worksheet which will be
turned in. Students are
encouraged to work in pairs.

Develop and strengthen writing as


needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions
should demonstrate command of
Language standards 13 up to and
including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

Day 21
Women in Poetry
This class period will focus
on historical and modern
women who have impacted
the poetry scene. This will
be lecture based with small
discussion to keep focus.

Initiate and participate effectively in a


range of collaborative discussions
(oneon one, in groups, and teacher
led) with diverse partners on grades
910 topics, texts, and issues, building
on others' ideas and expressing their
own clearly and persuasively.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse
perspectives, summarize points of
agreement and disagreement, and,
when warranted, qualify or justify
their own views and understanding

Initiate and participate effectively in a


range of collaborative discussions
(oneon one, in groups, and teacher
led) with diverse partners on grades
910 topics, texts, and issues, building
on others' ideas and expressing their
own clearly and persuasively.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse
perspectives, summarize points of
agreement and disagreement, and,
when warranted, qualify or justify
their own views and understanding
and make new connections in light of

Develop and strengthen writing as


needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions
should demonstrate command of
Language standards 13 up to and
including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

Initiate and participate effectively in a


range of collaborative discussions (one
on one, in groups, and teacherled)
with diverse partners on grades 910
topics, texts, and issues, building on
others' ideas and expressing their own
clearly and persuasively.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse
perspectives, summarize points of
agreement and disagreement, and, when

Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word relationships,
and nuances in word meanings. a.
Interpret figures of speech (e.g.,
euphemism, oxymoron) in context and
analyze their role in the text. b. Analyze

and make new connections in light of


the evidence and reasoning presented.
(910.SL.1)

the evidence and reasoning presented.


(910.SL.1)

warranted, qualify or justify their own


views and understanding and make new
connections in light of the evidence and
reasoning presented. (910.SL.1)

nuances in the meaning of words with


similar denotations. (910.L.5)

Day 25
Voice
Students will view Dead
Poets Society with all
concepts from the unit
learned so far in mind.
They will take notes on a
Know, Want to Know and
Learn chart.

Day 26
Voice
Students will finish viewing
Dead Poets Society with
all concepts from the unit
learned so far in mind.
They will take notes on a
Know, Want to Know and
Learn chart.

Day 27
Students will be
introduced to their Poetry
Portfolio project
The instructor will take the
class period to explain the
poetry portfolio along with
showing examples and
answering questions.

Day 28
Beginning their portfolio
Students will begin crafting
their cover and About the
Author Page for their Poetry
Portfolio.

Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word
relationships, and nuances in word
meanings. a. Interpret figures of
speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron)
in context and analyze their role in the
text. b. Analyze nuances in the
meaning of words with similar
denotations. (910.L.5)

Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word relationships,
and nuances in word meanings. a.
Interpret figures of speech (e.g.,
euphemism, oxymoron) in context and
analyze their role in the text. b. Analyze
nuances in the meaning of words with
similar denotations. (910.L.5)

Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word
relationships, and nuances in word
meanings. a. Interpret figures of
speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron)
in context and analyze their role in the
text. b. Analyze nuances in the
meaning of words with similar
denotations. (910.L.5)

Day 29
Portfolio work
Students will have the class
to work on their first two
poems for their portfolio.
They will be able to discuss
strategy with the instructor
and each other but the class
will be moderately silent to
ensure focus.

Develop and strengthen writing as


needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions
should demonstrate command of
Language standards 13 up to and
including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

Day 30
Portfolio work
Students will have the class
to work on the remaining
two poems for their
portfolio. They will be able
to discuss strategy with the
instructor and each other
but the class will be
moderately silent to ensure
focus.

Develop and strengthen writing as


needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions
should demonstrate command of
Language standards 13 up to and
including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

Day 31
Revising
Bell Work: What was the
toughest part in writing your
poem? Explain in 1-2
sentences and be prepared to
share.
Students will be doing a peer
editing workshop. Students
will be divided into groups
of four where they will hide
the names on their poems
and pass them counterclockwise. Students will
write on the poem both good
things and revisions for the
author. At the end of the
rotation the students will talk
about common mistakes and
have time to ask questions.
Closure: What do you feel
benefitted you most from
this workshop?
Develop and strengthen writing as
needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions
should demonstrate command of

Develop and strengthen writing as


needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions
should demonstrate command of
Language standards 13 up to and
including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

Day 32
Conferences/Revising
Students will come into class
and have the opportunity

to have a one on one


conference with the
instructor. While students
are not meeting with the
instructor, they are
expected to be working on
their final draft of their
portfolio.

Develop and strengthen writing as


needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and
audience. (Editing for conventions
should demonstrate command of
Language standards 13 up to and
including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

Language standards 13 up to and


including grades 910.) (910.W.5)

Day 33
Portfolio Revising
Students will have the
entire class period to
finalize and revise their
final poems.
The instructor will be
mobile amongst the
classroom checking on
students rough drafts to
ensure they are prepared to
turn their final drafts in.

Demonstrate understanding of
figurative language, word
relationships, and nuances in word
meanings. a. Interpret figures of
speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron)
in context and analyze their role in the
text. b. Analyze nuances in the
meaning of words with similar
denotations. (910.L.5)

Day 34
Presenting Portfolios
Presenting student poems
all class period.
Reinforcements and
refinements from
classmates and instructor.

Initiate and participate effectively in a


range of collaborative discussions
(oneon one, in groups, and teacher
led) with diverse partners on grades
910 topics, texts, and issues, building
on others' ideas and expressing their
own clearly and persuasively.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse
perspectives, summarize points of
agreement and disagreement, and,
when warranted, qualify or justify
their own views and understanding
and make new connections in light of
the evidence and reasoning presented.
(910.SL.1)

Day 35
Presenting Portfolios
Final day of Presenting
Poems all class period.
Reinforcements and
refinements from classmates
and instructor. All final
copies of poems are due
today.

Initiate and participate effectively in a


range of collaborative discussions (one
on one, in groups, and teacherled)
with diverse partners on grades 910
topics, texts, and issues, building on
others' ideas and expressing their own
clearly and persuasively.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse
perspectives, summarize points of
agreement and disagreement, and, when
warranted, qualify or justify their own
views and understanding and make new
connections in light of the evidence and
reasoning presented. (910.SL.1)

55-Minute Lesson Plan


Ashlee Britting
Language Arts/Grade 9
Figurative Language: The Scarlet Ibis
Objective: Students will be able to apply figurative language by producing their own sentences
using imagery, personification, similes and metaphors.
Common Core Standard: ELA-L-9.5a -c (English Language Arts, Language, Grade 9, 5ac)
Language Standards 9.5a-c
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in
word meanings.
a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.
b. Use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the
words.
c. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar
denotations (definitions) (e.g., bullheaded, willful, firm, persistent, resolute).

Anticipatory Set: (5 minutes)


The students will come into class with a slide on the board. It will have the following:
Please think about the following questions: What is a simile? What is a metaphor? What is
imagery? What is personification?
The students will have one minute to think about their answers. After one minute, the teacher
will use the signal of POWER CLAP 1,2,3! and Ask, Pause, Call as a pretest to see what the
students know.
ASK:
1. Think about what a simile is and give me the definition. Pause. (Use Popsicle sticks
to choose someone.)
A figure of speech that makes an implied comparison between two things or objects that
are mostly different, but has some characteristic in common, using like or as.
2. Think about what a metaphor is and give me the definition. Pause. (Use Popsicle
sticks to choose someone.)
A figure of speech that makes a direct, implied, or hidden comparison between two things
or objects that are mostly different, but has some characteristic in common.
ASK: Does a metaphor use like or as?
3. Think about what we mean by imagery and give me the definition. Pause. (Use
Popsicle sticks to choose someone.)
Imagery is the use of vivid and descriptive language using any of the five senses to add
depth of feeling to writing.
4. Think about what personification is and give me the definition. Pause. (Use Popsicle
sticks to choose someone.)
Personification is when non-human objects take on human characteristics.
*Segue into Lesson: (5 minutes)
Students will be asked to take out their Scarlet Ibis story and a writing utensil. They will then
be asked to quickly summarize the story with their shoulder partners. The teacher will ask groups
to share their summarizations with the class.
Information: (10 minutes)
Since the students read The Scarlet Ibis the day before, the figurative language activity will tie
together the purpose of reading it. The students are expected to have some background
knowledge of figurative language. The teacher will present a Powerpoint presentation for the
students to take notes. The teacher will present one figure of speech at a time. The students will
write the definition and example down in their notes. The teacher will quickly check for
understanding on each slide by randomly calling on a student to give an example. Class
understanding will follow by asking for a thumbs up, thumbs down indicator.
Simile: A figure of speech involving the comparison of one thing with another using like or
as.

Example: This house is as clean as a whistle.


Metaphor: A figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which
it is not literally applicable.
Example: Time is a thief
Personification: When non-human objects take on human characteristics.
Example: The moon winked at me through the clouds above.
Imagery: The use of vivid and descriptive language using any of the five senses to add depth of
feeling.
Example: He could hear the clunking footsteps of doom echoing through the still, cold hall.
*Important to Note!: A sentence with a metaphor in it, or simile, or personification is still
considered imagery! Look for those figurative language terms first. If none of those terms are
present, then check to see if the sentence evokes an image or feelings using the five senses. That
is purely imagery!
Check for Understanding: Teacher will check for understanding using thumbs up, thumbs
down after each term is explained, a total of four times.
*Description of the Activity:
Students will practice identifying figurative language with a multiple choice worksheet, using
Think-Pair-Share. This active participation will show the teacher how well the students are
comprehending the figurative language present within the lesson.
Think, Pair, Share (6 minutes)
The teacher will pass out a worksheet with eight examples of the figurative language just
discussed. It will be multiple choice, and the students will be working with their elbow partners
on this activity. The students will take turns choosing which answer is correct, initialing after
each response. They will also need to underline the contextual proof within the sentence as to
why they chose that answer. The teacher will walk around the room assisting students with any
questions and ensuring they stay on task. After three minutes, the teacher will use the signal of
POWER CLAP 1, 2, 3! followed by a simultaneous clap from all students. The teacher will ask
if more time is needed. If yes, give one more minute to wrap up. After the students finish the
worksheet, the teacher will ask the students to share what their answers were, and the class will
quickly go over the answers.
The teacher will check for understanding before giving partners and beginning the activity.
Ask:

How will partners be assigned?


How long do you have to complete the worksheet?
Who is writing on the worksheet?
Someone please summarize for us what we are about to do.

The teacher will walk around the room to answer questions and check for correct answers.

*Instructional Content: (5 min. to explain, 5 min. for TPS work, 10 minutes to share
answers and discuss)
Our objective today is to identify and explain each of these figurative language terms in The
Scarlet Ibis and discuss how this kind of writing enhances our understanding of a story and
makes it more interesting.
*Activity:
For this activity, you will keep your TPS partners. There are six pages to our story. I will
give each pair a page number and that is where I want you and your partner to hunt for examples
of figurative language. When I give you your page number, turn to that page.
Ask: 1. Who is your partner?
2. What are you going to do with the page number I give you?
(This should take about one minute)
I need one person to pull out a clean sheet of paper and fold it in half, then in half again,
so that when unfolded, it makes four squares. (I will model in front of class.) I want you to label
each of the squares with our four figurative language terms and put your names at the top right
corner. This paper will be handed in to me at the end of the activity for participation points.
Now look at your page of the story. You are both responsible for finding at least one
example of each figurative term from the story and writing the sentence on your paper. Each
person should initial the examples that they find, which means each of you are going to find two
sentences per person. Remember to cite the page number and paragraph of your sentence. No
points earned if you dont cite! Be prepared to explain why you chose your examples! I will
show them a model of how their paper might look when they are done.
*Guided Practice:
I do: From page 1, I look for an example of imagery. I find it, ask my partner if he agrees with
my finding (I will choose a student to role play with me), and write it down with the page
number and paragraph number. Then I initial it. (I will show this on a PPT slide.)
We do: Then I will have everyone turn to page 4 and ask them to start searching for any
figurative language term and raise their hand as soon as they find one. Once they share it, I will
call upon someone (using Popsicle sticks) to tell me what they are going to do next?
You do: I will check to see that everyone understands what to do and explain they will have 5
minutes to accomplish it.
Ask:
1. How many examples does each person in the group have to find?
2. After you write your example, what are you also going to write after it?
3. What are you going to initial?
4. How much time do you have?
Any other questions?
Set timer and Go!

Now I will ask three students what they found for imagery, have them share it, and then explain
why it is a good example of imagery. I will go through this procedure for each figurative
language element. I will check for understanding from the entire class if they are in agreement
with their findings. (Thumbs up, thumbs down). They will then hand in their papers for credit.
The objective will be revisited to see if they feel they have met the objective for this lesson.
*Extended Practice: (1 minute)
Students will be asked to spend 20 min. for homework doing the following:
1. List each figurative language term and write its definition.
2. Create two written examples of their own for each term.
3. Tell me why figurative language is important when writing narratives.
Homework is to be turned in to the teacher at the door for points before the next class starts.
*Closure: (2 minutes)
Ticket to Leave Instructions1. Please take out a piece of paper and split it in half with the person next to you.
2. Write down two examples of the figurative language we discussed today. It can be a
simile, metaphor, personification or imagery.
3. You will need to turn this in before you can leave.
Materials Needed:
PPT presentation
Notes
Multiple Choice worksheet
The Scarlet Ibis
Writing utensil
Piece of paper
*Assessment:
1.
He seemed all head, with a tiny body which was red and shriveled like an old mans. Is
an example of what figure of speech?
a.
Metaphor
c. Personification
b.
Simile
d. Imagery
2.

The last graveyard flowers were blooming, and their smell drifted across the cotton
field and through every room of our house, speaking softly the names of our dead. Is an
example of what figure of speech?
a.
Metaphor
c. Personification
b.
Simile
d. Imagery
3.

For a long time, it seemed forever, I lay there crying, sheltering my fallen scarlet ibis
from the heresy of rain. Is an example of what figure of speech?
a.
Metaphor
c. Personification
b.
Simile
d. Imagery

Match the figurative language terms below with their definitions by drawing a line.
4. Personification

The use of vivid and descriptive language


using any of the five senses to add depth of
feeling to writing.

5. Metaphor

Makes an implied comparison between two


things or objects that are mostly different,
but has some characteristic in common,
using like or as.

6. Simile

When non-human objects take on human


characteristics.

7. How was imagery and personification an aide to comprehending The Scarlet Ibis?
8. Provide one example of a figure of speech in The Scarlet Ibis. Label what figure of
speech it is. Why is it important to the text?