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EATING 101 RU DINING HEALTHY? A WEEKLY NEWSLETTER BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE RU HEALTHY

EATING 101

RU DINING HEALTHY?

EATING 101 RU DINING HEALTHY? A WEEKLY NEWSLETTER BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE RU HEALTHY DINING

A WEEKLY NEWSLETTER BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE RU HEALTHY DINING TEAM

A Joint Program Between RU Dining Services and the Department of Nutritional Sciences

Food Pairings: A Love Story

In the early 20 th century, by forces unknown, two unlikely condiments met and it was love at first bite. This love story for the ages is none other than the peanut butter and jelly sandwich. When the harmonious flavors of peanut butter joined jelly, something very beautiful happened and not by chance or fate, but by science. Do you know what

important factors make food pairings

science behind your favorite food pairings and how you can use them to experience food in a new way!

well

pair? It may be on the tip of your tongue. Read on to learn the sweet

may be on the tip of your tongue. Read on to learn the sweet Do Us

Do Us a Flavor

Your tongue can detect 5 tastes:

sweet, salty, sour, bitter and umami. Each taste alone tantalizes our taste buds in a particular way, but when paired, they elicit a unique experience. Bitter flavors can be rounded out with sweet; sour foods can cut through savory umami flavors and salt can enhance any food it’s paired with.

Try it Out!

Combine bitter sautéed greens like

kale or spinach with a drizzle of sweet

honey

Pour a small drizzle of sour balsamic vinegar over sweet strawberries

Try a salad of salty feta with sweet watermelon

Pair umami chicken and parmesan with a squeeze of sour lemon

Your Nose Just Knows

While your tongue senses 5 tastes, your nose can detect up to 1 trillion smells. It turns out the nose actually has a bigger influence on the perception of flavor than your tongue. Test it yourself! Take a swig of your morning coffee and hold your nose. Your tongue will detect the bitterness, but beyond that, you can’t tell what you’re drinking. The nuances of your coffee come from its enticing aromas. So how does that play into food pairings? Some molecular gastronomists believe foods with the same smells can be used to replace one another in recipes.

Try it Out! Consider that PB&J: grape jelly smells very fruity, right? Try replacing high sugar jelly with fresh fruits such as bananas, strawberries or blueberries. Those fruity smells will still pair well with your peanut butter, but have less sugar.

Love is in the pair!

peanut butter, but have less sugar. Love is in the pair! Mi Flavor, Su Flavor? Have

Mi Flavor, Su Flavor?

Have you ever thought about putting cinnamon in your tomato sauce? How about peanuts on your noodles? Fermented cabbage in your rice? We bet those pairings never really crossed your mind. The reason? You probably didn’t grow up eating these combinations. Most of the food pairings we think of have a base in what we are accustomed to culturally. These interesting food parings would not sound so strange in Greece, Thailand or Korea, respectively. This only goes to show that foods you may not expect can taste great together! Try it Out! Get creative with your food pairings; there’s a world of possibilities.

Authored By: Taylor Palm

References: Chartier, F. (2012). Taste buds and molecules: The art and science of food, wine, and flavor(p. 109). Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley. Klepper, M. (2011). Food Pairing Theory: A European Fad. Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture, 11(4), 55-58. Bray, N. (2014). The nose knows one trillion smells. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 15(281). Berg JM, Tymoczko JL, Stryer L.(2002) Biochemistry, 5 th edition.

New York, NY.: W.H. Freeman.

Reviewed By: Rutgers Dining Services Chef Ian Keith, Culinary Institute of America Graduate