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WVSU LESSON PLAN FORMAT (Updated 1/13)

Teacher Candidate: Haley Harrison


Date: March 24, 2016
School: WVSU
Grade/Subject: K
Lesson Title: Wants and Needs
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES/ STUDENT OUTCOMES
Students will
1. Construct an understanding between wants and needs
2. Discuss the basic needs for people to live
WV CSOS
1. SS.K.E.2 discover the basic needs of people and give examples of each.
2. SS.K.E.4 distinguish between wants and needs
NATIONAL STANDARDS
1. VII: Production, Distribution, and Consumption
MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK
Overall Time: 30 minutes
Time Frame:
1. 8 minute video of two books
2. 4 minute discussion on definition and examples of wants and needs
3. 8 minute Venn diagram activity
4. 10 minute construction of pigeon with wants and needs
STRATEGIES
1. Teacher led discussion
2. Whole group practice
3. Hands on diagram/kinesthetic
4. Independent working
5. Visual/auditory video
DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION/ ADAPTATIONS/ INTERVENTIONS
1. Teacher will pass out materials if necessary.
2. Disruptive students will sit closer to the teacher during carpet time.
3. Teacher will acknowledge/ask students who are shy to share a personal story
during open discussion
4. The advanced students will help the others at their table while constructing a
flower.
5. The slower learners will have more one on one help from the teacher and the
aid.
PROCEDURES: Introduction/ Lesson Set
1. Bring all students down to the carpet.

2. Read The Pigeon Wants A Puppy and The Pigeon Needs A Bath on YouTube.
3. Discuss with students different scenarios that happened in book; open ended
questioning, HOTS.
4. Start a chart to define wants and needs.
5. Differentiate items to put under each column.
PROCEDURES: Body & Transitions
1. Make a Venn diagram on the carpet labeled wants, needs, or both.
2. Have students come up one by one to grab an item out of the bag. The
student will have to decide if the item is a need or a want.
3. When complete, ask students if there is anything they think should be added
to the diagram.
PROCEDURES: Closure
1. Have students return to their desks with their pencil boxes.
2. Students will receive their sheet of construction paper labeled My pigeon
wants ______________ but needs ________________. (DAY BEFORE: have
students make their hand print using paint on construction paper. This will
allow the paint to be 100% dry.)
3. The students will fill in the blanks with any ideas they may have.
4. They will then construct their pigeon with pre-cut shapes and their blue hand
print.
5. After student completes the pigeon, they will draw the one thing their pigeon
needs and the one their pigeon wants.
ASSESSMENT: Diagnostic
1. Open discussion on certain things that occurred in the books
2. Differentiation between wants and needs and what they actually are.
ASSESSMENT: Formative
1. Observe students as they place their item inside the Venn diagram.
2. Open discussion on why certain things could be both.
ASSESSMENT: Summative
1. Observe students while constructing their pigeon.
2. Assess students knowledge on wants and needs based on their pigeon
construction.
MATERIALS
1. Dry erase marker
2. Yarn
3. Items to use on Venn diagram
4. Construction paper
5. Paint
6. Glue
7. Colored pencils
8. Stapler
9. YoutTube
EXTENDED ACTIVITIES
1. If Student Finishes Early: They can take turns re-reading the book to each
other changing the ending of the story.
2. If Lesson Finishes Early: Go over wants and needs in the large school
provided book.
3. If Technology Fails: Have the books handy instead of watching them online
through YouTube.
POST-TEACHING

Planning:
The way I go about planning a lesson now compared to the way I did it in 316 has
totally flip flopped, but for the better. I first started planning lessons by finding cute,
cool activities on Pinterest and trying to find a standard to align it with. Which was
often complicated, considering there isnt a standard for every activity out there.
Now, I look at the standards FIRST to decide what I want to teach. For wants and
needs, I printed off all the standards for Kindergarten. Mrs. Barker is extremely open
to anything I want to teach. I just selected two standards, asked if they had covered
them yet, and then go from there. Thankfully, they werent taught yet. This was my
second lesson I taught to the class, so I have a pretty decent understanding of how
they learn best. They LOVE carpet time, so incorporating that into my lesson was a
must. So the planning for this lesson was extremely smooth.
Implementation:
My lesson certainly went a lot better than my first one did. My first lesson wasnt a
bad lesson; it was just too long for Kindergarteners. Now that I have a feel for the
class, I knew exactly what to do. The students were so excited that we were reading
the Pigeon Books. The video of the book readings kept their attention and
engagement the entire time.
The students were also very focused during the questioning about the books. During
our hands on activity, I had a couple students who would go a few steps ahead and
we would have to move their construction of a pigeon around. That was the only
problem I encountered while teaching the lesson.
Clarity of Presentation:
I was pleased with the overall lesson. The students participated effectively, shared
responses, and had excellent behavior. I only had a few side chats that I had to
interrupt to get their focus again. As stated previously, the only issue I had was
minor and a quick fix.
Attention to Individual Differences:
To ensure that all my students were learning at their highest capabilities, I included
several different learning strategies. I know the majority of my students learn at
their full potential with a visual; therefore, I used the book videos on YouTube. By
using the smart board, videos, individual activities, and hands on activities, there
were multiple opportunities for enhanced learning. While the students were
constructing their pigeon with its want and need, I left the class-made list of wants
and needs on the white board. So if a child couldnt think of something on their own
that their pigeon may have wanted or needed, all they had to do was glance up at
the board.
Focus on Relationships and Student Responses:
For the most part, the kindergarteners are so outgoing without a care in the world.
They all want to share their answer (or story) and give their opinion. However, I do
have about two students who rarely raise their hands to answer questions. To
enhance this, I made it a point to have them answer a question, whether their hand
was up or not. I did this especially on opinion and/or personal experience based
questions. However, I made it imperative to balance the answering between the few
shy students and the outgoing students.

Planning and Implementing Higher Order Skills:


I definitely used higher order thinking skills in my lesson. After each book reading, I
made sure to ask the students various levels of questions. Before delivering the
lesson, I watched the videos the day before and jotted down some planned
questions to ask the students. Of course the conversation started out with the
questions I had planned to ask, but with the students responses, we often drifted
into more questions, which was great. I would of course gear the discussion in the
direction it needed to go, but planning my questions before delivering the lesson
was a great technique that I will certainly use again.
Assessment:
The majority of my assessment throughout the lesson was informal, however it was
constantly occurring. By having students give me examples of wants and needs for
the diagnostic assessment, I was able to tap into their prior knowledge and figure
out just how much the students know. By doing this, I was able to depict what we
would need to spend the most amount of time on. My formative assessment
focused on the Venn diagram. Each child chose an item to place in the Venn
diagram, without the help of his/her classmates. At the end, we discussed why
certain things were wants, needs, or both. The students said a book was a need,
which made me extremely happy; it demonstrated their desire to learn. For my
summative assessment, I observed the students as they constructed their pigeon.
Their pigeon had to have one want and one need. I walked around the room to see
who achieved the description.
Data Base Decision Making
Ava
Noah B
Sarah
Skylar
Jesse
Gabby
Chloe
Creed
Cyrus
Autumn
Kasen
Sophia
Noah R
Carter
Nathaniel
Amayleah
CORRECT ANSWERS

Want
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
14/16

Need
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
13/16

By looking at the graphs, I can see that the majority of the class excelled in the
wants and needs lesson. Although not everyone got a perfect score, I know that
they all learned the content. For the students who missed one, I went over to their
desk and asked them what they had drawn. For example, one student only had a
want without a need. I asked the student what is something that their pigeon would

need in order to live, and they immediately gave me an answer. That was the
problem for the majority of the students who missed one; they got distracted or too
wrapped up in their drawing that they forgot the guidelines. To improve this lesson
next time, I would write down the guidelines on the board to make sure each
student remembers what is expected. It may be a good idea too, for
kindergarteners, to write their name on the white board after they completed their
want so that way I could keep track of who is on task.

Wants

13%
Yes
No

88%

Needs

19%
Yes
No

81%