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Yolanda Nega

Professor: Jenifer Kalas


ECE: 260
March 29, 2015

An Evaluation Guide to Fiction/Folklore

Author: Margaret Wise Brown


Title: Goodnight Moon
Publisher: Harper Collins
Summary: There is a little bunny in his room, getting ready to go to bed. In each page he says
goodnight to something new, a mouse, kittens, a pair of mittens, until eventually the world is
resting and he drifts off to sleep. Some of the pages are in color, some are in black and white, and
each time we see the bunnys room it is growing darker and darker until the moon and the stars
are shining brightly outside.
Evaluation
Plot:
Believability (absence of coincidence, sentimentality, etc.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Comment: Major dramatic question (clear early in book?) YEs
emerging)
NO

YES (but slow

Comment: There is no major dramatic question this book presents.


Other considerations (satisfactory conclusion, tension, clear conflict, etc.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10
Comment: Style and Language (precise vocabulary, figurative language, dialogue, cadence,
understatement, unexpected insights, etc.)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Comment: A book that is easy to follow for the clear language.
Pacing:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: The book story takes the reader to a good conclusion.


Character (dynamic protagonist, characters ring true
[including cultural considerations], etc.)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment:
Setting (detail, texture)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: The story is narrated in a room where the rabbit says good night to everything that is
in the room. It is present good illustrations.
Theme: (absence of over didacticism?)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: This book can be used in bedtime for young children to sleep and to teach them to
say good night to parents or caregiver.
Other considerations (mood, tone, etc.)

1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 10

Comment:
It is a well-rounded piece?

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment:
OVERALL RATING (10 High; 1 low)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: A good book that is becoming a classic story or a folktale. It is show a slowly
transition of a bright and colorful room to a dark room, the bunny says goodnight to everything
in the room.
Recommended: Ages 1-3

Author: Mary Ann Hoberman


Title: There once was a man named Michael Finnegan
Publisher: Little Brown Co.
Summary: There Once Was a Man Named Michael Finnegan, adapted by Mary Ann Hoberman,
and illustrated by Nadine Bernard Westcott, is a silly song that instructs young singers to
""begin-igan"" at the end of each verse. On a vertical spread, ""Michael played the violin-igan, /
Tucked it underneath his chin-igan,/ Played so loud it was a sin-igan,/ Noisy Michael Finnegan,
begin-igan."" Westcott illustrates each lively scene with humorous details; the baby and the cat
look even more distressed than the rest of the family. Music and lyrics are included.
Evaluation
Plot:
Believability (absence of coincidence, sentimentality, etc.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Comment: Major dramatic question (clear early in book?) YEs
emerging)
NO

YES (but slow

Comment: They may be people who does not like how you do something, but some other may
like what you do. Dont give up.
Other considerations (satisfactory conclusion, tension, clear conflict, etc.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10
Comment: Style and Language (precise vocabulary, figurative language, dialogue, cadence,
understatement, unexpected insights, etc.)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Comment:
Pacing:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment:
Character (dynamic protagonist, characters ring true
[including cultural considerations], etc.)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: People might enjoy to do something a lot, but other people maybe hate what you like
to do. You can find someone who likes the same things that you like.
Setting (detail, texture)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: The story is colorful illustrated and is fun because of the rhythms
Theme: (absence of over didacticism?)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: The book teaches children to rhythm words that end in igan.
Other considerations (mood, tone, etc.)

1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: Comedy and humor


It is a well-rounded piece?

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment:
OVERALL RATING (10 High; 1 low)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: This rhyming picture book teaches children to keep doing things they love because it
doesn't matter what others think... if it make you happy continue. And if you're lucky, someone
(or something) else will come around that loves it too.
Recommended: Ages 4-8

Author: Steven Kellogg


Title: Jack and the beanstalk
Publisher: Morrow Junior Books
Summary: When Jack trades his mothers cow for five beans, he has no idea whats in store for
him. The beans turn into a beanstalk overnight, and lead up straight to an ogres house. Jack
makes a bold move and steals the giants gold, and since he escapes uncaught, soon comes back
for seconds and even thirds. But the third time around, the ogre is ready for him and charges at
Jack. But Jacks luck holds out, as well as his quick thinking. He speeds down the stalk, grabs
and axe, and chops down the beanstalk while the ogre is still half-way down. The ogre is
annihilated, the gold is Jacks for the keeping, and our incorrigible hero marries a princess.
Kelloggs illustrations fill the pages of Jack and the Beanstalk with color, mood, fine details
and imagination. Kelloggs animated characters are very expressive and action seems to flow
with lines and colors on every page. Each corner of every page of this book is filled with stars, or
stairs, or candles, or cats, or Jack poking his head out of an oven. The giant is illustrated as a
monstrous, angry, creature that is out for blood, while Jack is pictured as a handsome, happy
young man who is obviously out for adventure

Evaluation
Plot:
Believability (absence of coincidence, sentimentality, etc.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Comment: Major dramatic question (clear early in book?) YEs
emerging)
NO

YES (but slow

Comment: Do people can live forever poor, or things can turn good and get rich?
Other considerations (satisfactory conclusion, tension, clear conflict, etc.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10
Comment: Style and Language (precise vocabulary, figurative language, dialogue, cadence,
understatement, unexpected insights, etc.)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Comment: Precise vocabulary and easy to follow.
Pacing:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment:
Character (dynamic protagonist, characters ring true
[including cultural considerations], etc.)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: This is a ring true protagonist, who shows that even the poorest person can turn rich
and live happy forever.
Setting (detail, texture)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: Kelloggs illustrations fill the pages of Jack and the Beanstalk with color, mood,
fine details and imagination. Kelloggs animated characters are very expressive and action seems
to flow with lines and colors on every page. Each corner of every page of this book is filled with
stars, or stairs, or candles, or cats, or Jack poking his head out of an oven. The giant is illustrated
as a monstrous, angry, creature that is out for blood, while Jack is pictured as a handsome, happy
young man who is obviously out for adventure.
Theme: (absence of over didacticism?)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: When people think that things cannot get better with a little bit of hope and taking
the risk; Jack prove to the reader that negative things that happened in our lives can turn good.
Other considerations (mood, tone, etc.)

1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: humor
It is a well-rounded piece?

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: I personally do not like the story because Jack steal things from the Ogre, no once,
but three times. This book is for young reader that might think that if Jack steal things is okay for
them to do it, too. The moral of the story is good, but how Jack accomplished to be rich is not
good.
OVERALL RATING (10 High; 1 low)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: Jack a young boy steal things from an angry Ogre and Jack became rich after stealing
a hen that produces golden eggs. Stealing is no good and is not an appropriate book for young
readers.
Recommended: Ages 4-10

Author: David Vozar


Title: Rapunzel
Publisher: Bantam Doubleday Publishing Group.
Summary: Another traditional tale rendered in rap like rhyme and rhythm. This format, very
successful in Yo, Hungry Wolf (Doubleday, 1993), less so in Rapunzel. Funny illustrations depict
the witch as a gray dog with purplish hair and Rapunzel as a poodle with long, curly golden
tresses. Rap becomes a demanding teen, and Witch tires of providing for her: "Witch spent all
her time pleasing Rap./All Rap wanted, the witch would just zap!/She zapped braces for Rap's
crooked molars./When Rap wanted curls, Zap! Appeared rollers, but Rapunzel soon wanted
`More! More!'/whining and whining from noon to four." Fine Prince, a local dog (with a green
Mohawk) wants to visit, but Rap is busy filing her nails and washing her hair. Finally, Rap
becomes a hairdresser, marries Fine Prince, has two kids, and, in a trendsetting move, cuts off all
her hair.
Evaluation
Plot:
Believability (absence of coincidence, sentimentality, etc.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Comment: Major dramatic question (clear early in book?) YEs
emerging)
NO

YES (but slow

Comment: People never satisfied with what they have and always want more and more like
Rapunzel.
Other considerations (satisfactory conclusion, tension, clear conflict, etc.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10

Comment: Rapunzel story concludes when she married the prince and she has two kids with a
very long hair like her.
Style and Language (precise vocabulary, figurative language, dialogue, cadence,
understatement, unexpected insights, etc.)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: A rhythm text book


Pacing:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment:
Character (dynamic protagonist, characters ring true
[including cultural considerations], etc.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Comment:
Setting (detail, texture)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: Colorful illustration that brings the characterization of a poodle dog that lives a
modern life. Rapunzel watched TV, have manicure, listen to music, and she pampered with
massages. This story is similar to the Rapunzel folktale by this time is a dogs tale.
Theme: (absence of over didacticism?)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: Do people want more and more like Rapunzel that no matter how much her mother
tries to please her she got bored and want more and more because no matter how many materials
things she owes, it does not give her happiness.
Other considerations (mood, tone, etc.)

1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: Comedy and humor


It is a well-rounded piece?

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: The author presents Rapunzel not as the girl who suffered in the original story;
instead he brings humor as Rapunzel is a poodle and a mouse is the evil witch. At the end
Rapunzel escaped from her house and meet her prince, she married and have two children. I like
the book because bring the original story with a different characters and it can be less scary and
violent for young children. A book that is like a singing book because of the beat and rhythm on
the story.
OVERALL RATING (10 High; 1 low)
Comment: Age recommend 4-7

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Author: Heather Amery and Stephen Cartright


Title: Three Little Pigs
Publisher: EDC publishing
Summary: Once upon a time there were three little pigs. One pig built a house of straw while
the second pig built his house with sticks. They built their houses very quickly and then sang and
danced all day because they were lazy. The third little pig worked hard all day and built his house
with bricks.
A big bad wolf saw the two little pigs while they danced and played and thought, What juicy
tender meals they will make! He chased the two pigs and they ran and hid in their houses. The
big bad wolf went to the first house and huffed and puffed and blew the house down in minutes.
The frightened little pig ran to the second pigs house that was made of sticks. The big bad wolf
now came to this house and huffed and puffed and blew the house down in hardly any time.
Now, the two little pigs were terrified and ran to the third pigs house that was made of bricks.
The big bad wolf tried to huff and puff and blow the house down, but he could not. He kept
trying for hours but the house was very strong and the little pigs were safe inside. He tried to
enter through the chimney but the third little pig boiled a big pot of water and kept it below the
chimney. The wolf fell into it and died.

Evaluation

Plot:
Believability (absence of coincidence, sentimentality, etc.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Comment: Major dramatic question (clear early in book?) YEs
emerging)
NO

YES (but slow

Comment: Do people try to do bad things to others who is unaware of their bad intentions?
Other considerations (satisfactory conclusion, tension, clear conflict, etc.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10
Comment: Style and Language (precise vocabulary, figurative language, dialogue, cadence,
understatement, unexpected insights, etc.)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Comment: Clear language and easy to understand for young readers
Pacing:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: Easily to follow especially good for the intended audience


Character (dynamic protagonist, characters ring true
[including cultural considerations], etc.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Comment: No a true ring characters because wolves cannot destroy houses by blowing them.
But there are people with bad intentions that try to harm people like the wolf.
Setting (detail, texture)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: The story is narrated in the three different houses of the pigs
Theme: (absence of over didacticism?)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: The book teaches the young reader to be careful and dont trust people that might
have bad intentions and to make things with quality materials.
Other considerations (mood, tone, etc.)

1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: Comedy and humor


It is a well-rounded piece?

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Comment: The end is unexpected as the three pigs get to live together. They prepared a trap for
the bad wolf, who tried to eat them. The wolf fell down in the chimney of the last pig. The wolf
was cooked for dinner for the three pigs on the fireplace.
OVERALL RATING (10 High; 1 low)
Comment: Age recommended 4-7

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10