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Unit 2 Assignment 2A

11/9/2014

Instructional Plan for


Active Learning and Engagement Strategies

Lorand Irinyi

National University

Class: TED633603851411

Instructor: Robert Pacilio

Instructional Plan for Active Learning and Engagement Strategies:


Week one of Conservation of Energy two-week unit plan

September
Introduction to
scientific method,
notation and graphic
representation

January
Heat and
Thermodynamics

Unit layout for Year 2014


October
November
Motion and Forces;
Motion and Forces
Conservation of Energy
and Momentum

December
Conservation of Energy
and Momentum

Unit layout for Year 2015


February
March
April
Heat and
Waves;
Electric and
Thermodynamics;
Magnetic
Phenomena;
Electric and
Waves
Magnetic
Phenomena

May
Review and
Exams;
Final Projects;

Unit Overview
Content Area: Physics
Unit Title: Conservation of Energy
Target Grade Level: 10th grade
Time Frame: Conservation of Energy: 2 weeks of 55 minute classes (5 classes/week)
Rationale:
Science Content Standards for California Public Schools Grades Nine through Twelve,
Physics, Conservation of Energy and Momentum follow, and build on, the previous unit, namely,
Motion and Forces. This Conservation of Energy unit prepares students for the following segment of
the larger unit, namely Conservation of Momentum. The California State Common Core standards that
are being addressed and utilized in this unit, both the Language Arts and Mathematics, are integral and
indispensable to the content presentation and comprehension. The Language Arts part addresses the
reading and writing needed for the presentation of content, while the Mathematics part is indispensible
to solving the mathematical problems characteristic to the physics content. Both sets of Common Core
standards prepare students for the next sequence of standards that will be required for the successful
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presentation of the subsequent physics content material.


Unit Summary:
This two-week unit plan is titled Kinetic and Potential Energy; Conservation of Energy. Students
will define and identify Kinetic Energy and Potential Energy, using concepts learned in the previous
unit. Students will combine Kinetic Energy and Potential Energy into the concept and Conservation of
Energy of total energy of a closed unit. Students will view videos explicating and illustrating the
concepts of Kinetic Energy and Potential Energy, and Conservation of Energy in authentic, real life
context. Students will conduct lab experiments demonstrating and confirming the validity of Kinetic
Energy and Potential Energy. Students will take data from experiments and compare them to
theoretically calculated values algebraically and in graphic form. Students will perform experiments
demonstrating the validity of the concept of Conservation of Energy using gravitational potential
energy.
Unit Rationale:
Students will use their prior knowledge of Motion and Forces, plotting displacement vs. time, velocity
vs. time and force vs. distance as base for introduction to Kinetic Energy and Potential Energy.
Students will calculate objects Kinetic Energy and/or Gravitational Potential Energy. The concept that
each object has a constant total energy that is made up of kinetic and potential components will be
introduced and demonstrated to students. Students will perform experiments demonstrating and
confirming the physical validity of the concept of Conservation of Energy in small groups, providing
students opportunity to discuss and re-examine all new concepts and experiments among themselves.
Students will take and graph data to deepen their graphing and data interpretation skills from previous
units. By listening to lecture, and reading, interpreting and following written instructions in academic
English, students will practice and deepen their English listening and reading language skills. After
different lab experiments, conducted in small groups, students will demonstrate mastery of content,
their Algebra skills, as well as their English language skills.
Standards
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Science Content Standards for California Public Schools Grades Nine through Twelve,
Physics, Conservation of Energy and Momentum
2. The laws of conservation of energy and momentum provide a way to predict and describe the
movement of objects. As a basis for understanding this concept:
a. Students know how to calculate kinetic energy using the formula E=(1/2)mv2 .
b. Students know how to calculate changes in gravitational potential energy near Earth by
using the formula (change in potential energy)=mgh (h is the change in elevation).
c. Students know how to solve problems involving conservation of energy in simple
systems, such as falling objects.
h. Student know how to solve problems involving conservation of energy in simple systems
with various sources of potential energy, such as capacitors and springs.
California State Common Core Standards Covered in the Unit
English Language Arts & Literacy History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects
RST 3. Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking
measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the specific results based on
explanation in the text.
WHST 1. Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms
and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
Mathematics
M1. N-Q. Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.
1. Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step
problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the
scale and origin in graphs and data displays.
2. Define appropriate quantities for the purpose of descriptive modeling.
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3. Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations of measurement when reporting


quantities.
Final Learning Objectives/Outcomes:
At the end of the unit Student Will Be Able To:
1. Explain the concept and significance of Conservation of Energy in writing and/or orally in one
minute without prompt from teacher.
2. Solve problems involving conservation of energy in simple systems in two minutes with 80%
accuracy.
3. Identify authentic applications of Conservation of Energy in real life context and recognize the
applications importance to their lives.
4. In small groups design and document experiments demonstrating the concept of Conservation
of Energy in twenty minutes scoring no less than 4 out of 5 on student created rubric.
Lesson Plans - Overview
Week 1
Review of Motion and Forces

MCAs
Motion and Forces

Introduction of Kinetic Energy

Kinetic Energy

Introduction of Potential Energy

Potential Energy

Introduction of Conservation of Energy


Week 2
Application of Conservation of Energy

Conservation of Energy
MCAs

Solving problems with Conservation of Energy

Conservation of Energy

Design and document experiments demonstrating


the concept of Conservation of Energy
Resources and Materials:
1. Head-up projector with computer and Internet connection.
2. Physics videos and links:
(PhET, Khan Academy, Teacher Tube, and Teachers' Domain educational sites).
3. Appropriate existing lab equipment (balls, marbles, inclined planes, stop watches, etc.).
4. Lab handouts.
5. Vocabulary handouts

Teaching and Learning Plan Instructional Strategies


Week 1
Day 1
Content Area: Physics
Lesson Title: Newtons Laws

Time frame: 55 minutes

Standards:
Science Content Standards for California Public Schools Grades Nine through Twelve, Physics
Motion and Forces 1.
c. Students know how to apply the law F=ma to solve one dimensional motion problems that involve
constant forces (Newtons second law).

California State Common Core Standards Covered: Mathematics


M1. N-Q. Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.
1. Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose
and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and origin in graphs and data
displays.
Learner Outcome:
Students will have accessed prior knowledge of Newtons Laws, velocity and momentum by the end of
the first class period.
Pre-Assessment Activity (10 minutes):
Students will observe teacher rolling a ball on the floor with different speeds and bouncing off the wall.
Students will observe lab collision cars collide with different speeds.
Procedure/Activities (35 minutes):
After having observed teacher rolling the ball on the floor and the collision of the lab cars students will

be assigned into groups of four and perform the same activities. Students will roll a hard rubber ball
against a book standing on its edge, and try to knock it over by slowly increasing the velocity with
which the rubber ball is rolled. Every group will have two collision cars on tracks and will roll the cars
against each other till one of the cars gets knocked off the track. Students will be asked to roll both cars,
and then only one car to have the same effect. Students will solve problems applying Newtons laws in
their lab books with given initial conditions.
Rationale: Students need to see that the two colliding cars can have the same effect whether both cars
were moving or one was stationary and only one was moving.
Assessment (10 minutes):
I will be circulating among groups and listen for discussion/conversation among students. I will query
groups about the observed results and the provided explanations. The explanation given by students will
be an accurate indicator of understanding of content. I will provide assistance, explanation as needed.
Students will discuss their findings among their group mates and write their findings into their lab
books. Teacher will ask students using name cards to read and explain their lab book entries. 4 out 5
students asked must produce accurate observations. Newtons Laws will be quoted/applied correctly in
no less than 4 out of 5 student lab book entries.
Differentiation, Adaptation & Accommodation Strategies
ELs:
I will provide handouts with academic vocabulary that will include usage of new vocabulary in proper
context. Students will be in small groups providing chance for clarification and practice of new
vocabulary in proper academic and practical context.

Learning Challenged:
Students will be appropriately grouped so that they will not be overwhelmed to learn and perform
appropriate group tasks. Preferential seating will be assigned to avoid distraction and for easy video
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observation. Will ask for understanding of concept with less emphasis on mathematical calculations.

Lower 1/3 of Class:


Students will be grouped with strong leaders and assigned capability-appropriate tasks. Questions will
be put in clear, simple, easy-to-understand language. Additional wait time will be allocated when asked a
question.

Upper 1/3 of Class:


Students will be given additional, more difficult problems to solve. When questioned, will be pressed for
answers using real life examples and more complex analogies to demonstrate understanding.

Day 2
Content Area: Physics
Lesson Title: Kinetic Energy
Standards:

Time frame: 55 minutes

Science Content Standards for California Public Schools Grades Nine through Twelve,
Physics, Conservation of Energy and Momentum
2. The laws of conservation of energy and momentum provide a way to predict and describe the
movement of objects. As a basis for understanding this concept:
a. Students know how to calculate kinetic energy using the formula E=(1/2)mv2 .

California State Common Core Standards Covered:


Mathematics
M1. N-Q. Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.
1. Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose
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and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and origin in graphs and data
displays.

English Language Arts & Literacy History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects
RST 3. Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking
measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the specific results based on
explanation in the text.
Learner Outcome:
Student will be able to define and explain the concept of kinetic energy.
Warm-up (5 minutes):
Prior knowledge from yesterdays lab car collisions will be activated. Students will be asked if they
know anyone who was in a car accident; or any of them ever ran into something/one; or something/one
ran into them.
Procedure/Activity (40 minutes):
A short video (http://ca.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/rr10.sci.phys.maf.motion.collision/collisions/)
will be shown with real life collisions with different velocities and their effects. The term kinetic energy
will be introduced, defined and the formula E=(1/2)mv2 elucidated.
A second short educational video (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/work-and-energy/workand-energy-tutorial/v/introduction-to-work-and-energy) will be shown with real life examples and
illustrations of kinetic energy with the new vocabulary and formula voiced and displayed prominently
throughout the video. Vocabulary handouts will be distributed with definitions.
Rationale: Students need to have the demonstrated/observed phenomenon defined verbally and
mathematically.
Assessment (10 minutes):
Each group will be given the mass of different objects/vehicles and the velocity with which they travel
and will calculate the kinetic energy of each object. Students will discuss and explain why a
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smaller/lighter object can have a larger kinetic energy than a much larger one. I will be circulating
among students and query students about their calculations. I will ask questions regarding the different
results if different parameters were changed. I will be taking note of the accuracy of answers. 4 out of 5
answers must be correct. I will ask students to explain concept to other students. 4 out of 5 explanations
must be correct. 80% of problems involving mathematical calculations must be correctly answered in
concept as well as algebraic calculations. Lab book entries will be checked and stamped.
Differentiation, Adaptation & Accommodation Strategies
ELs:
I will provide handouts with academic vocabulary that will include usage of new vocabulary in proper
context. Students will hear new vocabulary used in context and pronounced repeatedly in the videos and
will be able to hear and see new vocabulary displayed and enunciated by different commentators,
teacher and fellow students. Students will be called upon to give explanation of presented concepts
giving them opportunities to use new vocabulary in context.

Learning Challenged:
Students will be appropriately grouped so that they will not be overwhelmed to learn and perform
appropriate group tasks. Preferential seating will be assigned to avoid distraction and for easy video
observation. Will ask for understanding of concept with less emphasis on mathematical calculations.

Lower 1/3 of Class:


Videos will be paused to provide opportunity for Q&A. Questions will be put in clear, simple, easy-tounderstand language. Additional wait time will be allocated when asked a question.

Upper 1/3 of Class:


Students will be asked to provide additional, more complex real life examples to illustrate the presented
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concepts and demonstrate mastery of subject.


Day 3
Content Area: Physics
Lesson Title: Potential Energy
Standards:

Time frame: 55 minutes

Science Content Standards for California Public Schools Grades Nine through Twelve,
Physics, Conservation of Energy and Momentum
2. The laws of conservation of energy and momentum provide a way to predict and describe the
movement of objects. As a basis for understanding this concept:
b. Students know how to calculate changes in gravitational potential energy near Earth by
using the formula (change in potential energy)=mgh (h is the change in elevation).

California State Common Core Standards Covered:


Mathematics
M1. N-Q. Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.
1. Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose
and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and origin in graphs and data
displays.

English Language Arts & Literacy History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects
RST 3. Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking
measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the specific results based on
explanation in the text.
Learner Outcome:
Student will be able to define potential energy.

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Students will be able to define the difference between kinetic and potential energy.
Warm-up (10 minutes):
Teacher will drop different objects from different heights on table and floor. Then teacher will drop
objects from the same height on table and floor. Teacher will drop hard rubber ball on table and floor.
Students working in groups of four will discuss what they observed. Teacher will call on random
students using calling cards to explain what was observed. Teacher will call attention to the fact that no
object was pushed or otherwise given speed by him, yet they started to move/fall. Students write their
explanations individually in their lab books.
Procedure/Activity (35 minutes):
Various videos (http://ca.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/arct14.sci.dspoten/how-can-potential-energybe-used-to-do-work/, http://www.teachertube.com/video/potential-and-kinetic-energy-that-moves-us146719, http://www.teachertube.com/video/story-of-kinetic-and-potential-energy-127812), and
http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/physical-processes/work-and-energy-mcat/v/introductionto-work-and-energy), elucidating and demonstrating potential energy will be shown. Prior knowledge
will be activated about kinetic energy. New non-kinetic energy will be named potential energy.
Rationale: Students must be able to differentiate between kinetic energy and potential energy.
Assessment (10 minutes):
Students will adduce and elucidate examples of kinetic energy and potential energy from real life and
from personal experiences correctly. Students will be given examples of energies and 4 out of 5 students
will be able to identify potential energy and kinetic energy correctly orally and in written form in their
lab books. Lab book entries will be checked and stamped.
Differentiation, Adaptation & Accommodation Strategies
ELs:
I will provide handouts with academic vocabulary that will include usage of new vocabulary in proper
context. Students will hear new vocabulary used in context and pronounced repeatedly in the videos and
will be able to hear and see new vocabulary displayed and enunciated by different commentators,
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teacher and fellow students. Students will be called upon to give explanation of presented concepts
giving them opportunities to use new vocabulary in context.

Learning Challenged:
Preferential seating will be assigned to avoid distraction and for easy video observation. Will ask for
understanding of concept with less emphasis on mathematical calculations.

Lower 1/3 of Class:


Videos will be paused to provide opportunity for Q&A. Questions will be put in clear, simple, easy-tounderstand language. Additional wait time will be allocated when asked a question.

Upper 1/3 of Class:


Students will be asked to provide additional, more complex real life examples to illustrate the presented
concepts and demonstrate mastery of subject. Students will be asked to do ballpark figure calculations
for different real life examples of potential and kinetic energy models.
Day 4
Content Area: Physics
Lesson title: Potential Energy
Standards:

Time Frame: 55 minutes

Science Content Standards for California Public Schools Grades Nine through Twelve,
Physics, Conservation of Energy and Momentum
2. The laws of conservation of energy and momentum provide a way to predict and describe the
movement of objects. As a basis for understanding this concept:
b. Students know how to calculate changes in gravitational potential energy near Earth by
using the formula (change in potential energy)=mgh (h is the change in elevation).
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California State Common Core Standards Covered:


Mathematics
M1. N-Q. Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.
1. Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose
and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and origin in graphs and data
displays.

English Language Arts & Literacy History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects
RST 3. Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking
measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the specific results based on
explanation in the text.
WHST 1. Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms
and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
Learner Outcome:
Student will be able to calculate changes in gravitational potential energy near Earth by using the
formula (change in potential energy)=mgh (h is the change in elevation).
Student will be able identify different forms of potential energy.
Student will be able to justify mathematical solutions involving potential energy in writing.
Warm-up (10 minutes):
Students will activate prior knowledge about motion and forces. Students will know that there is
gravitational force acting on every object on the surface of the Earth (F=mg). This force acts along the
distance the falling objects travel. The gravitational force times the distance is the potential energy
(mgh). Teacher will demonstrate the increase of potential energy by dropping a textbook onto the table
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from increasing heights. The increase in drop heights will result in lauder thud/thump the dropped book
will create/generate. Students working in small lab groups (4 students) will conduct small experiments
of their own demonstrating the direct relationship between height and potential energy. Potential energy
will be defined as the factor of the gravitational force acting on every object at the surface of the Earth
and the distance from the surface of the Earth.
Procedure/Activity (35 minutes):
Handouts will be distributed with various problems involving gravitational potential problems, with
initial conditions given, and students will calculate the change in gravitational potential energy working
individually. Students will write their reasoning and calculations in their lab books.
Various videos (http://ca.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/hew06.sci.phys.maf.trebuchet/energy-transferin-a-trebuchet/, http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/physical-processes/work-and-energymcat/v/potential-energy-stored-in-a-spring and
http://ca.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/hew06.sci.phys.maf.springmass/masses-and-springs/) will be
shown that demonstrate that gravitational potential energy can be stored in ways that lend themselves to
easy access and can be utilized in many form and manner, where the energy mgh will be converted to
kinetic energy, as well as potential energy can be stored in different ways and accessed at will.
Assessment (10 minutes):
Teacher will walk around among students and check for accuracy of calculations. Teacher will provide
assistance/help as needed. Problems will be checked for accuracy in lab books and stamped for having
checked them. 4 out of 5 problems must be accurate. Students will be continuously queried about
application of concept and reasoning for calculations. 4 out of 5 answers must be correct. Videos will be
paused to give students opportunities to ask questions, or for teacher to ask questions to check for
demonstration of understanding.
Differentiation, Adaptation & Accommodation Strategies
ELs:
I will provide handouts with academic vocabulary that will include usage of new vocabulary in proper
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context. Students will hear new vocabulary used in context and pronounced repeatedly in the videos and
will be able to hear and see new vocabulary displayed and enunciated by different commentators,
teacher and fellow students. Students will be called upon to give explanation of presented concepts
giving them opportunities to use new vocabulary in context. Students will write explanations for
solutions of problems in lab books giving them chance to practice written form of using/employing new
academic vocabulary. Teacher will read lab book entries for correct English usage and provide assistance
as needed.

Learning Challenged:
Preferential seating will be assigned to avoid distraction and for easy video observation. Will ask for
understanding of concept with less emphasis on mathematical calculations. Student could give simple
oral explanation instead of written one, if preferred.

Lower 1/3 of Class:


Videos will be paused to provide opportunity for Q&A. Questions will be put in clear, simple, easy-tounderstand language. Additional wait time will be allocated when asked a question. Written lab book
entries can be simple sentences.

Upper 1/3 of Class:


Students will be asked to provide additional, more complex real life examples to illustrate the presented
concepts and demonstrate mastery of subject. Written lab book entries to be in correct academic English
using scientific vernacular. More complex problems involving relative change in elevation, as opposed
to absolute change, will be given to calculate change in potential energy. Will be asked to provide as
many forms of potential energies as they can think of beyond the demonstrated ones.

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Day 5
Content Area: Physics
Lesson Title: Conservation of Energy
Standards:

Time frame: 55 minutes

Science Content Standards for California Public Schools Grades Nine through Twelve,
Physics, Conservation of Energy and Momentum
2. The laws of conservation of energy and momentum provide a way to predict and describe the
movement of objects. As a basis for understanding this concept:
a. Students know how to calculate kinetic energy using the formula E=(1/2)mv2 .
b. Students know how to calculate changes in gravitational potential energy near Earth by
using the formula (change in potential energy)=mgh (h is the change in elevation).
c. Students know how to solve problems involving conservation of energy in simple
systems, such as falling objects.

California State Common Core Standards Covered: Mathematics


M1. N-Q. Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.
1. Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose
and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and origin in graphs and data
displays.
California State Common Core Standards Covered:
English Language Arts & Literacy History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects
RST 3. Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking
measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the specific results based on
explanation in the text.
WHST 1. Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms
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and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.


Learner Outcome:
Individually, SWAT orally define kinetic energy, potential energy and the concept of conservation of
energy within 2 minutes with no more than one prompt from teacher.
SWAT write the definition and correct formulae of kinetic energy, potential energy and the concept of
conservation of energy in own words within 2 minutes with no conceptual errors.
Warm-up (10 minutes):
Students will activate prior knowledge about motion and forces. Teacher will drop objects from different
heights and will ask students to calculate the velocity of objects at the point of impact. Problems of this
kind are familiar to students and have solved them before.
Procedure/Activity (35 minutes):
Teacher will solve guided problems to solve for velocity applying prior knowledge of motion and forces.
Students will work in small groups (four students) and will help each other to solve the problems, or
teacher will help as needed. Having found the velocity of objects at impact, teacher will ask to solve for
the kinetic energy of objects. Prior knowledge about kinetic energy will be activated.
Teacher will distribute handouts to students with sufficient data and students will calculate kinetic
energy of objects on handouts. Teacher will hold same objects at measured heights and ask students the
potential energy of objects. Prior knowledge of potential energy will be activated and students will
calculate potential energy of objects. Teacher will distribute another handout with sufficient initial
conditions to calculate objects kinetic and potential energy. Students will be asked if they noticed
anything regarding the objects kinetic and potential energy. Students will note that the two values are
the same (almost impossible to miss). Teacher will ask students in small groups to provide an
explanation for this. Students will discuss this among themselves. Teacher will ask students from
different groups to give their explanations to the class without teacher making any comment.
Short videos (http://www.teachertube.com/video/kinetic-and-potential-energy-53066,
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http://ca.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/9d0b4d0e-52e5-4a4e-a820-a9323a2a24a5/9d0b4d0e-52e5-4a4ea820-a9323a2a24a5/, http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/physical-processes/work-and-energymcat/v/conservation-of-energy,
http://ca.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/hew06.sci.phys.maf.trebuchet/energy-transfer-in-a-trebuchet/)
will be shown about the concept of conservation of energy with all vocabulary prominently displayed
during the videos and clearly enunciated by the narrators. Students will watch two videos
(http://ca.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/hew06.sci.phys.maf.rollercoaster/energy-in-a-roller-coasterride/, http://www.teachertube.com/video/roller-coaster-physics-43769) on the concept of conservation of
energy being demonstrated by roller coasters.
Teacher will drop objects again and redefines the concept of conservation of energy while dropping
objects to illustrate the concept in action.
Rationale: Students calculated objects kinetic and potential energy at maximum points (release and
impact) to see that the values were equal. It was demonstrated that energy was not created or destroyed,
but merely transformed/conserved.

Assessment (10 minutes):


Teacher walked among groups and observed work done by students. Where needed, teacher activated
prior knowledge and clarified concepts. Teacher was observing ease/difficulty encountered by groups;
and provided assistance/clarification as needed. Before the end of class period students were asked
individually to explain to class the concepts of kinetic energy, potential energy and conservation of
energy. Students are able to calculate the whole systems energy by adding up the component energies.
Students will be able to calculate problems involving conservation of energy. Before the end of class
period students were asked individually to explain to class the concepts of kinetic energy, potential
energy and conservation of energy with no less than 4 out of 5 answers correct.

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Differentiation, Adaptation & Accommodation Strategies


ELs:
I will provide handouts with academic vocabulary that will include usage of new vocabulary in proper
context. Students will hear new vocabulary used in context and pronounced repeatedly in the videos and
will be able to hear and see new vocabulary displayed and enunciated by different commentators,
teacher and fellow students. Students will be called upon to give explanation of presented concepts
giving them opportunities to use new vocabulary in context. Students will write explanations for
solutions of problems in lab books giving them chance to practice written form of using/employing new
academic vocabulary. Teacher will read lab book entries for correct English usage and provide assistance
as needed.

Learning Challenged:
Preferential seating will be assigned to avoid distraction and for easy video observation. Will ask for
understanding of concept with less emphasis on mathematical calculations. Student could give simple
oral explanation instead of written one, if preferred. Student will be able to explain kinetic energy,
potential energy and conservation of energy orally in own words

Lower 1/3 of Class:


Videos will be paused to provide opportunity for Q&A. Questions will be put in clear, simple, easy-tounderstand language. Additional wait time will be allocated when asked a question. Written lab book
entries can be simple sentences.

Upper 1/3 of Class:


Students will be allowed to enter the site http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/energy-skate-park-basics
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to manipulate it at will to demonstrate conservation of energy and the continuous transformation of


energy between kinetic and potential. Students will be asked to provide additional, more complex real
life examples to illustrate the presented concepts and demonstrate mastery of subject. Written lab book
entries to be in correct academic English using scientific vernacular. More complex problems involving
relative change in elevation, as opposed to absolute change, will be given to calculate change in potential
energy. Will be asked to provide as many forms of potential energies as they can think of beyond the
demonstrated ones

References

Rutheford, Paula. (2012). Active Learning and Engagement Strategies.


Alexandria, Virginia: Just ASK Publications
Science Content Standards for California Public Schools Kindergarten through Grade Twelve.
Retrieved from http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/sciencestnd.pdf
California Common Core State Standards English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social
Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. Retrieved from
http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/finalelaccssstandards.pdf
California Common Core State Standards Mathematics. Retrieved from
http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/ccssmathstandardaug2013.pdf

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