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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

TOOL BOX TALKS

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

NOTE:
A copy of the toolbox talk given together with a copy of attendance
record signed by those present at the talk is to be filed with the Safety
Records for audit purposes.

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INDEX

INTRODUCTION

- ADVICE TO SUPERVISORS
- CONSTRUCTION SITE BASIC CHECKLIST
- TOOLBOX MEETINGS

1 Labour Health and Safety Act


2 Advice to Employees
3 Responsibilities
4 Good Housekeeping
5 Personal Points
6 Working Dress
7 Eye Protection
8 Heads and Feet
9 Noise
10 Skin Care
11 Alcohol
12 Fire
13 Manual Handling
14 Safe Stacking
15 Hand Tools
16 Portable Electric Tools
17 Working Safely with Electricity
18 Welding Safely
19 The Safe Use of ladders
20 Step ladders
21 Trestle Scaffolds
22 Tower Scaffolds
23 Do’s and Don’ts on Scaffold
24 Openings and Edges
25 Working on Scaffolding
26 Work on Roofs
27 Cladding panels
28 Excavations
29 Demolition
30 Lifting Slings
31 Lifting Chains
32 Lifting Shackles
33 Lifting Hooks and Eye Bolts
34 Working with Compressed Air Tools
35 Banksmen/Rigger/Signalman
36 Compressed Gas Cylinders
37 Cartridge Hammers or Rivet Guns
38 Abrasive Wheels
39 Control of Substances Hazardous to Health(C.O.S.H.H.)
40 Health and Hygiene
41 Confined Spaces
42 Permit to Work
43 Storage of Materials
44 Danger to the 3rd Person

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45 Vehicles
46 Heatstroke
47 Heat Exhaustion
48 Shaft Top Safety
49 Tunnel Entry and Exit
50 Safety at the Shaft Bottom
51 Locomotive Operation
52 Personnel Movement inTunnel
53 Compressed Air works
54 Emergency Evacuation

INTRODUCTION

The need to ensure safety on construction Sites is essential.

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Sites by the very nature of activities on them are dangerous places to work, and it is every
person’s general duty to ensure that safe working practices are maintained at all times on the site.

It is the duty of both employer and employee to ensure safe practice is carried out.

The employer must provide such information, instruction and training as may be necessary to
ensure the health and safety at work of all their employees.

Individuals can be prosecuted for their acts or omissions at work if proved they put at risk the
Health Safety of themselves or others.

These toolbox talks are issued for use by site supervisors and the talks are to be given at the
workplace to workers under their control prior to the taking place of any work activity. The talks
given are to be applicable to the job or work activity to be carried out, and be of a length of
approximately 10 - 15 minutes.

Where particularly hazardous work activities are to take place (i.e. working at height); the
frequency of these talks should be increased to suit the situation.

A record is to be kept of these talks by completion of a copy of the certificate on each page of this
instruction. When completed a copy is to send to the Safety Section on the site for record
purposes.

This will be a valuable record in the event of an accident occurring.

Each toolbox talk is designed as a set of basic safety rules to be followed to try to ensure that
workers carry out their work task as safely as possible. Other topics will be prepared and issued
as required.

Any questions on this subject are to be referred to the site safety officer for explanation.

HELP TO KEEP YOUR SITE A SAFE WORKING PLACE

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ADVICE TO SUPERVISORS

1. Study the company’s Health & Safety Policy Statement, Safety Manual and Safety
Management System, which specify the organization and arrangements for the health and
safety.

2. As a supervisor you are the link between senior management and the site and you have a
direct responsibility for ensuring that the company’s Safety Standards are implemented by
yourself and personnel under your control.

3. When putting people to work, ensure that: -

a) There is a safe means of access to his workplace.

b) The workplace is safe.

c) There is a safe system of work.

d) Any plant and equipment required to do the work is safe and suitable.

e) The person has adequate information, training and/or instruction to carry out the work.

f) The person has all of the specified P.P.E. for the task in hand and is wearing it correctly.

4. When special protective clothing or equipment is needed, ensure that it is available, issued,
and used correctly.

5. In nearly all accidents unsafe conditions and/or unsafe acts play a prominent part.

Unsafe Conditions include the following:

a) Equipment improperly guarded

b) Defective equipment

c) Unsafe clothing, footwear, eye protection

d) Improper ventilation

e) Unsafe design or construction

f f) Improper storage of Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG)


g
f) Improper shoring
h
i g) Defective electrical installations

Unsafe Acts include the following:

a) Operating plant and equipment without authority

b) Operating at an unsafe speed

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c) Making safety devices inoperative

d) Using unsafe equipment, or using equipment unsafely

e) Loading or placing unsafely

f) Being in an unsafe position

g) Working on moving or dangerous equipment

h) Horseplay

i) Not using personal protective equipment

You have a responsibility to all personnel, including sub-contractors, to ensure that they
recognize and avoid any unsafe acts and conditions.

6. Dangerous occurrences, whether reported to you or not, must be immediately investigated and
remedial action taken where necessary.

7. Every injury, no matter how slight it may appear, should be immediately reported to you.
Ensure that the person nominated to administer first aid gives prompt first aid treatment, and
that an entry is made to the First Aid Register .

8. You have a responsibility to ensure that all reasonable precautions are taken to effect the
safety of the general public, particularly children, at all times, whether they are, or are not,
authorized to be on site.

9. Goods Hoists:
Is the hoist way fully enclosed with gates at every landing? Are gates kept shut? Has it been
inspected within the last seven days and results recorded.

10. Cranes & Lifting Appliances:


Is the crane regularly maintained, and has it been inspected prior to use and the results
recorded? Is it sited on a hard level base and clearly marked with safe working loads? Are the
driver and the slinger/banks man fully trained? Are SWL indictors working?

10. Electricity:
Are apparatus, wires, cables and connections all sound? Check the overhead electric lines or
underground cables and take appropriate action if present. Made maximum use of reduced
voltage equipment.

12. Manual Handling:


Ensure that loads are handled and lifted correctly, that gloves are used where necessary and
those loads are not too heavy to handle manually.

13. Trespassers:
Is the site secure against the public including children? Have all ladders been removed, or
rungs boarded, and plant immobilized? Are all other potential hazards safeguarded?

14. Health Risks:


Identify harmful materials and substitute if possible. Specify precautions and ensure that
suitable safety equipment is provided and properly used. Check atmosphere in confined work
places and provide air supply respirators if necessary.
15. Protective Clothing and Equipment (P.P.E.):

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Is protective clothing or equipment provided to the minimum standard required by law? Is it


being worked or used?

16. Fire Risks:


Are there adequate fire extinguishers and exits? Are proper precautions taken for storing and
handling highly inflammable liquids, compressed gases and other combustible materials? Are
fires and heaters put off at end of each working day?

17. Explosives:
Ensure that only authorized persons have charge of the transportation, storage handling or use
of explosives.

18. Storage:
All materials, which could cause injury if they fall, should be stacked or stored so as to prevent
easy displacement. Temporary but secure and stable racking should be used when
appropriate.

19. Noise:
Is ear protection supplied and worn in noisy surroundings? Are breakers fitted with mufflers
and noise from other plant or machinery minimized?

20. Falsework/Formwork:
Have the design and supports been checked: are props plumb, properly set out; firmly based
and fitted with correct pins? Is the condition of any timber forms or supports regularly checked?

21. Welfare:
Are the lavatories, washbasins and canteens clean? Can wet clothes be dried? Is there a
supply of drinking water? Are there appropriate first aid facilities? Are special precautions and
equipment available to evacuate an injured man from your location?

22. General:
Are all personnel who are required to operate power tools, plant or machinery adequately
trained and/or instructed in the correct techniques and procedures?

- Do you know what to do in an emergency?

- Are you in contact with the site office?

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

No. 1 Labour Health and Safety Act

General duties of employees at work.

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It shall be the duty of every employee while at work:

1) To take reasonable care for the health and safety of his own and other persons who may be
affected by his acts or omissions at work.

AND

2) To follow all Safety Instruction Rules and Procedures issued by the company.

No person shall intentionally or recklessly interfere with or misuse anything provided in the
interests of Health, Safety or Welfare in pursuance of any of the relevant statutory provisions

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________Company ___________________

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

No. 2 ADVICE TO EMPLOYEES

1. Study the company’s safety rules which explains the arrangements made for your health and

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safety.

2. You have a legal duty to take reasonable care of your own health and safety at work.

3. You also have a legal duty regarding the health and safety of the people you work with and
members of the public.

4. When protective clothing and/or equipment are issued for your use – wear and/or use it as
instructed.

5. Play your part in keeping the site TIDY AND SAFE.

6. Watch out for warning notices and OBEY the warnings given.

7. Always keep alert and advise the driver/operator of your position if you are working in the
vicinity of mobile plant.

8. Never attempt to operate a machine unless you have been trained and authorized to do so.

9. Never ride on machines which have no passenger seat, it is illegal.

10. Never interfere with ladders or alter scaffolding or move boards unless you are properly
authorized to do so.

11. Never throw anything from scaffolding or any height. Lower it properly.

12. Do not take short cuts, use the access provided.

13. Lifting heavy objects or materials can cause injury. Obtain assistance when necessary.

14. Report any defects or damage to ladders, scaffolding, plant or tools or any other unsafe
circumstances, to your supervisor at once.

15. Report all accidents involving injury, however slight, to your supervisor. Details of an
accident necessitating first aid treatment should be entered in the Accident Book.

16. If in doubt about your job, ask your supervisor.

17. Construction Sites are particularly inviting to young children. Your co-operation in
discouraging children from entering site will help to reduce accidents to them.

18. All materials that would be liable to cause injury if they fall should be stacked or stored so as
to prevent them falling. Temporary but secure and stable racking should be used when
appropriate.

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.
The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed ______________________ `Company __________________________

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 3 RESPONSIBILITIES

Labor Safety and Health Act Gives Everyone Responsibilities.

Where these responsibilities are not carried out people like you can be injured or killed, others
could be prosecuted.

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Many people are killed every year; several thousands are seriously injured. Fines can be
thousands of dollars for companies who break the regulations.

Employers: Your bosses must provide you with a safe place of work, safe equipment and the
necessary instruction and training to enable you to carry out your work safely.

Employees: You must take reasonable care to ensure that no person – yourself included –
suffers because of the way that you work.

You must help your employer to carry out his responsibilities by:

1. Not interfering with items provided for your safety.

2. By using equipment given to you protection and by not abusing it. For example, helmets,
goggles and hearing Protection.

3. By telling your supervisor of any hazards that you notice which could affect you on other
safety.

Some Examples:

1. If you work on a scaffold provided by another company, your supervisor must ensure that it is
safe for your use. Therefore, if you notice anything that you consider unsafe, point this out.

2. If you need a ladder or a pair of steps, do not remove from elsewhere without ensuring that
you are not putting someone else at risk.

3. If you remove shuttering which leaves an opening, make sure it is covered or guarded before
you leave it. The same applies if you are permitted to remove a guard-rail or cover for the
passage of materials or services, make sure it goes back – DO NOT LEAVE A TRAP FOR
OTHERS.

4. If you are working or having to pass alongside openings i.e. floors or excavations, which are
unguarded your supervisor must ensure that they are protected even though you may not
have been responsible for making the hazard.

CARRY OUT YOUR RESPONSIBLITIES AND GO HOME WITH A CLEAR CONSCIENCE.

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I have given Toolbox Talk No. ____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

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SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 4 GOOD HOUSEKEEPING

1. The following points are presented to assist Supervisors when giving Safety ToolBox Talks.
The particular points made here are in the interests of good housekeeping, throughout work
areas, in or out of work hours, whether at home, visiting friends or at places of amusement,
we expect our surroundings to be conformable, neat and tidy. When at work, the same
applies.

2. We should regard good housekeeping at work with the same importance as “at home”. Do
not always rely on others to clear things up. It’s just as easy to put tools away tidily as it is to
leave them laying around benches, on the floor, on scaffolding, resting on pipes or other
positions, where they can create a tripping hazard, fall onto a person or be damaged in a fall.
A place for everything and everything in it’s place.

3. If dismantling anything, stack parts away neatly and tidily. Do not leave materials in
gangways, they could cut off someone’s escape route or cause a tripping hazard. If
dismantling anything constructed of wood, make sure all nails are removed. If that is not
possible hammer nails flat, making sure that no parts are left protruding that could cause
injury to fellow employees. Damaged lengths or parts of wood should be guarded as these
also present hazards.

4. All rubbish should be placed in tidy bins or skips to be removed. In this way, should a fire
occur, it can be confined to small area and dealt with quickly and efficiently, thus preventing
the fire spreading, especially in high winds.

5. If tools get damaged, get them repaired or replaced. Do not leave them lying around to
cause hazards.

6. When finishing work, put personal overalls and other gear in lockers provided, don’t just
leave things lying about hoping they’ll be there when you return.

7. If you notice rubbish piling up which you cannot remove, bring this to the attention of your
supervisor who will made arrangements to have it removed.

8. Should you be working at height and notice loose objects on boards or walkways, put them
somewhere where they cannot be dislodged. They could fall and injure someone.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

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NO. 5 PERSONAL POINTS

1. Don’t take chances – carry out instructions.

2. If you don’t know – ASK.

3. Rectify or report all unsafe conditions.

4. Use correct tools and equipment.

5. Help to keep the work place clean and tidy.

6. Have all injuries, however slight, properly attended to.

7. Don’t horseplay or distract others.

8. Wear the protective clothing and equipment provided for your safety.

9. Don’t start machinery unless authorized and without the guard being in place.

10. Obey all safety rules and signs.

11. Use only those tools you are authorized to use.

12. Don’t leave tools on the floor or where they can fall on people below.

YOU MAY BE ALRIGHT BUT THINK OF YOUR FRIENDS

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______Person
attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

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NO. 6 WORKING DRESS

1. Wear the right clothing for the job.

2. Always keep clothes clean. Dirty clothes can offer a fire or dermatitis risk.

3. Avoid loose ends. The loose clothing can trap you.

4. If protective clothing is provided, wear it.

5. Gloves will protect your hands.

6. Finger rings are dangerous near moving machinery.

7. A safety helmet will protect your head – and perhaps save your life.

8. Safety shoes save toes.

9. Danger can strike upwards. Be sure your boots or shoes have strong sole.

10. Remove contaminated clothing immediately and wash.

11. Remember cotton burns easier than wool.

12. It is worth dressing properly, even for a short job.

PROPER CLOTHING MEANS SAFER WORKING

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

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SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 7 EYE PROTECTION

1. A tiny fragment in your eye can cause disaster

2. Ensure first aid for attention to eyes – not a dirty handkerchief.

3. You have a legal obligation to wear or use the eye protection provided in accordance with
regulations.

4. Even if you are not carrying out one of the specified process for eye protection you may be at
risk, so use the eye protection provided.

5. Do not watch welding processes unless your eyes are properly protected.

6. Do not go into areas where eye protection is required unless you are wearing protective
equipment.

7. Take care of any protective equipment issued to you.

8. Have any damaged, lost or unserviceable protective equipment replaced immediately.

9. Make sure your eye protectors are suitable for you and for the work being done.

10. Ensure that eye protectors are comfortable to wear and keep them clean.

11. The place for eye protectors is over our eyes – not on your head or round your neck or inside
the helmet.

12. REMEMBER – eye protectors are replaceable, your eyes are not

A SENSIBLE WORKER VALUES HIS/HER SIGHT.

I have given Toolbox Talk No. _____ to all the men under my control. A Total of _____
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

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SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 8 HEADS AND FEET

Head and Feet

By wearing the correct head and footwear you can help prevent much discomfort, many injuries
and even DEATH.

Safety Helmets

Every year in the construction industry very many head injuries are reported. These are only the
most serious cases, 50% are fractures of the head, many are never reported, yet still cause much
pain and suffering.

You have a legal obligation to wear a safety helmet on construction sites.

Most head injuries can be prevented by wearing a safety helmet.

Safety helmets are designed to be strong enough to prevent most falling materials damaging your
brain. If your brain is damaged it is unlikely that you will be able to work as well as now.

Helmets can also prevent many of the minor head injuries from bumps and scrapes that occur on
construction sites.

Do not modify the shell or harness by cutting or drilling, as this weakens the overall effect. Some
spray paints also weaken the shell so unless you are certain do not use spray or cellulose paint.

REMEMBER YOUR LIFE MAY DEPEND ON IT

Your employer does not want you to be injured on this contract - BECAUSE WE NEED YOU.

Certain areas MAY allow some relaxation but unless you are told otherwise you MUST wear your
helmet at all times whilst on site.

You must be informed in writing of any relaxation of the wearing of helmets, this will be in the form
of written rules by your manager and posted on the canteen notice board.

Foot Protection

Many major injuries to feet and ankles are reported to the inspection authorities every year.
Sensible robust footwear will reduce this unnecessary loss of time and considerable pain, which

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follows these injuries.

Strong boots give support to, and prevent twisted ankles. Steel insoles prevent puncture wounds
from tying wires when working on reinforcement and also where nails are left in timber.

Steel toecaps prevent crushing of and possible loss of toes.

If wearing rubber boots in wet concrete, clean any wet concrete from inside the boots
immediately – wet concrete can burn you skin.

Wherever you work and whatever you do you are not free from the danger of foot injures.

GOOD FOOTWEAR SAVES FEET

WEAR YOUR SAFETY EQUIPMENT WITH PRIDE

I have given Toolbox Talk No. _____ to all the men under my control. A Total of _____ Person
attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

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NO. 9 NOISE

Excessive noise from plant and tools on site can cause, over a period of time, progressive and
irreversible loss of hearing, before this permanent loss, rushing or ringing noises in the ear can be
a constant source of annoyance. This is called “TINNITUS”.

If you work in areas where you need to shout to be heard then you require hearing protection.
This can be either earplugs or earmuffs. These give good protection if some simple rules are
observed.

1. Wear ear protection at all times if exposed to a noise hazard.

2. Do not use cotton wool for ear protection, it is not effective.

3. Made sure that ear plugs are a good fit in each ear and are properly inserted.

4. Regularly cleanse re-usable earplugs to the manufacturer’s instructions.

5. Use disposable earplugs once only.

6. Hands should be clean when handling all types of earplugs.

7. Earmuff should be a good fit to the head around the seal.

8. Ensure that ear muffs are worn the correct way round.

9. See that muff seals are always in a serviceable condition.

10. Do not alter the pressure of earmuffs by bending the headband.

If you work with compressed air tools ensure that –


a) Mufflers are fitted, where possible, to the tool.
b) Air lines do leak – this can cause unnecessary noise
c) Compressor access covers are kept shut.

Radios can increase the general level of noise and can cause annoyance, if these are allowed on
site be considerate to others.

Remember: There is no remedy for noise induced hearing loss so protect your ears -

Employers – have a responsibility to ensure that suitable hearing protection is provided at 85 DBA
and it must be worn at 90 DAB (as a guide, a noise level of 85 DAB makes normal speech difficult

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to hear at a range of 6 feet)

If excessive noise levels exist in the work place, it is your employer’s responsibility to assess this
and provide all necessary protection or procedures to avoid excessive exposure!

PROTECT YOUR HEARING

I have given Toolbox Talk No. _____ to all the men under my control. A Total of _____
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

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NO. 10 SKIN CARE

The following advice may help prevent you becoming affected.

Save Your Skin

Occupational contact dermatitis is a rash caused by substances used at work. It can look like
some common rashes not connected with work. Some people are more likely to get it than others
but it is not catching.

It is most commonly affects the hands, forearms and legs.

When it is caused by dust, mist or fumes, you may get it on the face, neck or chest.

Some Common Causes

• Pitch, tar or bitumen


• Brick, stone, plaster and dust
• Cement
• Paints, varnishes, lacquers and stains
• Certain woods
• Certain epoxy resins
• Acrylic and formaldehyde resins
• Chromate (in primer paint, cement)
• Organic solvents
• Petrol, white spirit and thinners
• Acids
• Alkalis
• Ionizing Radiation

Save Your Skin

Some substances take weeks, months or even years to cause dermatitis. This is because the skin
becomes allergic to them.

This type of dermatitis may also cause swelling of the eyes and lips.

Some Substances that can cause Allergic Contact Dermatitis are:

• Chrome and nickel compounds


• Some resins, glues and hardeners
• Some woods and plants
• Some chemicals

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LOOK FOR WARNING LABELS ON CONTAINERS

If you work with substances that can cause dermatitis:

Avoid skin contact with the substance.

Wear protective clothing, such as gloves. There are many types of gloves available depending
upon the usage. Make sure that you use the correct type.

Keep your skin clean and use after wash cream.

Keep your workplace clean.

Get first aid treatment for all cuts and grazes and keep them covered.

Do not use apperceives to clean your skin.

Do not let synthetic resins or glue harden on your skin.

Avoid work with irritant or allergic substances if you suffer from eczema or allergic rashes.

Keep an eye on your skin

If you notice a rash, tell your supervisor or family doctor AT ONCE.

UNTREATED DERMATITIS BECOMES SERIOUS

I have given Toolbox Talk No. _____ to all the men under my control. A Total of _____
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

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SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 11 ALCOHOL

Do you enjoy a drink? Most people do and alcohol gives great pleasure to millions of men and
women but there are times when drink leads to danger. In a high risk industry like ours alcohol
and work are not compatible.

Alcohol is a depressant drug, which depresses parts of the brain function. When you work at
heights or with machinery or are involved in moving large items you require all your brain functions
to save you from injury.

The company has, therefore, made it their policy and condition of employment on this site that if it
is suspected that anyone is intoxicated by drink, or is under the influence of drugs then they will
not be permitted on site.

Any alcohol you drink will affect your actions and it takes time for alcohol to work out of your
system – 1 unit of alcohol (0.5 pint of ordinary beer or lager, a single whiskey or glass of wine) will
take 1 hour to leave your body.

A few facts may alert you to the hazards of drink.

50% of all drivers killed are over the legal driving limit (very roughly equivalent to 5 units,
dependant on your weight, sex or recent food intake).

Do not rely on this approximation. If you drink “Don’t drive”.

35% of fatal accidents are related to alcohol.

Keep you head clear, leave your drinking sessions to sociable occasions, where you cannot cause
injury to yourself or others.

DO NOT DRINK ALCOHOL AT ANY TIME DURING THE WORKING DAY

I have given Toolbox Talk No. _____ to all the men under my control. A Total of _____
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

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NO. 12 FIRE

1. See that you know what to do in case of fire.

2. Make certain you know your escape route.

3. Keep fire doors and shutters clear and unobstructed.

4. Don’t obstruct access to fire extinguishers; learn how they operate – read the labels or ask.

5. Don’t hang clothing over or near heating equipment.

6. Don’t let paper, oily rags or other rubbish accumulate.

7. Do not smoke in forbidden areas.

8. Use proper containers for flammable liquids; not open tins or buckets.

9. Handle flammable liquids at a safe distance from possible sources ignition.

10. Check before and after using blowlamp, welding and cutting equipment.

11. Asphalt pots soldering irons and gas rings must be on non-combustible stands.

12. Switch off from the mains any electrical equipment when not in use.

PLAN IN ADVANCE – YOU WON’T HAVE TIME WHEN FIRE BREAKS OUT

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

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NO. 13 MANUAL HANDLING

1. Where possible gloves should be worn to protected against cuts, scratches or punctures.

2. Wear safety boots or shoes to protect toes from falling loads.

3. Size up the load and, if necessary, make a trial lift.

4. Do not attempt to lift alone any load that is too heavy, too large or awkward.

5. See that there are no obstructions in the direction you will be going.

6. Take up position, feet slightly spread apart, one foot slightly advanced pointing in direction if
is intended to move.

7. Bend the knees, back muscles should be relaxed.

8. Get a secure grip of the load.

9. Lift, keeping the back straight, arms close to body, leg muscles taking the strain.

10. Step off in direction advanced foot in pointing, load held close to body.

11. Do not carry a load which obscures the vision

12. When lifting to a height from the floor do it in tow stages.

13. When loading, off-loading, or stacking materials, be careful not to wedge hand or fingers
between components, trapping or crushing them.

14. When receiving materials, watch you hand/fingers are not trapped/jammed by or against
adjacent static objects.

USE MECHANICAL AIDS WHEREVER PRACTICABLE!

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

26
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

NO. 14 SAFE STACKING

Many accidents occur when materials have to be taken from stacks. In particular when this is
done by hand.

Care taken when material is stacked initially can help prevent many of these.

Safe Stacks save Injuries

1. When handling materials wear protective clothing i.e. helmet, gloves and steel toed boots.

2. Only stack material in authorized areas, never near doorways, access ways or on fire routes.

3. Stack on a level surface and provide packing to prevent movement of the stack.

4. Never make stacks higher than 3 times the minimum base width.

5. Materials stacked by machine may have to be removed by hand, consider this in the method
of placing.

MACHINES CAN LIFT GREATER LOADS AND TO A HIGHER LEVEL

6. When handling materials by hand, check weight, if in doubt ask

DO NOT ATTEMPT TO LIFT MORE THAN YU FEEL ABLE TO

7. If materials are being lowered by machine, keep hands clear of the load.

SAFE STACKING

SHEET MATERIAL

Stack flat where possible. If corners are sharp – PROTECT (examples: reinforcement mesh, steel
sheets).

If stacked vertically, use suitable racks to prevent collapse – material stacked vertically against
walls can collapse whilst being removed or may overload walls etc.

PIPES AND TUBES

Store small diameter pipes and tubes in racks or stillages.

If stacking large diameter pipes or tubes they should be securely checked at the base and at

27
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

subsequent cross bearers. Pyramid stacks can quickly spread and “a rolling tube damages toes”.

BRICKS/BLOCKS/PALLETED MATERIALS

Take care, ensure level base and restrict height of stack – many of these are removed by hand.

If banding is damaged or materials are displaced in the pack do not stack other material on top.

Leave sufficient space between different materials for safe removal.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

28
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

NO. 15 HAND TOOLS

1. Use the right size spanner for the nut. Where adjustable spanners are used take extra care
as these slip more easily.

2. Files must be fitted with handles to prevent hand injuries and files must not be used as
punches or for levering as they break easily.

3. Chisels and punches with mushroomed heads must be ground down to prevent splinters or
metal flying off.

4. Keep hammerheads tightly wedged on their shafts.

5. Replace split or damaged wooden handles, do not tape up.

6. Keep edges of cutting tools sharp.

7. Keep hands behind the cutting edge when working.

8. Do not use screwdrivers as chisels – handles fracture.

9. Keep tools in racks or boxes when not in use.

10. Protect sharp edges of tools that are to be stored or covered Construction Knives cause
many hand injuries.

11. Dispose of tools when they become broken or damaged beyond repair.

12. Always use the correct tool for the job. Do not improvise i.e. by using tubes to extend
spanners, as the extra leverage may open the jaws and allow slipping.

GOOD TOOLS MEAN FASTER AND SAFER WORK

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)


Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

29
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 16 PORTABLE ELECTRIC TOOLS

1. Before using a portable electric tool check to see it is properly earthed, unless it is an
approved type that doe not require earthing.

2. Before using an electric tool, make sure that the casing is undamaged. If it is damaged, do
not use the tool.

3. Make sure that all cables, plugs or connectors are sound and properly wired up.

4. Use tools only on the correct power supply as instructed on the maker’s label. Only 110 volt
tools with earth protection are recommended on site.

5. Make sure that the power cable is long enough to reach your working place without straining
it.

6. Keep power cables off the floor. They may get damaged or trip somebody.

7. Never stand on a damp or wet surface when using electrical equipment and keep equipment
clean and tidy.

8. Portable electric tools should only be used for their designed purpose. Do not improvise.

9. Never connect a portable electric tool to a lighting socket or connect using open wires.

10. Never use worn, blunt or damaged bits or other accessories.

11. Disconnect tools when not in use.

12. Electric power tools should be regularly inspected and maintained by a competent electrician.

REPORT ALL DEFECTS IMMEDIATELY

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

30
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 17 WORKING SAFELY WITH ELECTRICITY

1. There is a very tragic way to learn about the dangers of misusing electrical tools and
equipment – it is called electrocution.

2. Electricity is so much part of our modern way of life, pushing in a plug is so familiar to us. All
items of electrical equipment are produced to strict safety standards, so if they are used
correctly, they ARE safe. Why then do so many people suffer electric shocks? Everyone
knows electricity can and does KILL and still people continue to take stupid risks with it which
can lead to electric shock, serious burn injury or even a horrible death!

3. The dangers are increased at work – where electrical equipment is used in wet or damp areas.

4. Read this guide, know your ABV, follow these simply safety rules in your working situation and
if in doubt about the safety of an electrical equipment – report it, get an electrician or the
proper maintenance people for the job IMMEDIATELY!

5. Always check plugs, cables, sockets and connections before using any electrical equipment!
Make sure it is in good condition.

6. Be sure that cables are long enough to reach your working place without straining or pulling!

7. Correct power supply is important for all equipment – check that it is correct!

ELECTRICITY KILLS – NEVER FORGET IT!

8. Fuses should always be appropriate to the equipment to which they are fitted!

9. Get all blown fuses replaced promptly and correctly. Never Make-Do!!

10. Test the “EMERGENCY STOP” switches on all machinery before you use it!

11. Only qualified technician to install electrical wiring.

12. Taped joints are prohibited. Check cables every day. Destroy damaged cables.

31
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

13. Keep electrical circuits in good condition, have an approved technician check them regularly.

14. Do not connect electrical tools to light fittings.

15. Domestic cable extensions and connectors are prohibited.

16. Portable power tools must never be used near flammable vapors or gases!

17. Get qualified help to repair any electrical problems! Never touch or tamper yourself!

18. Report all defective tools and equipment!

19. Under no circumstances should you touch plugs, sockets or electrical equipment with wet
Hands.

20. Water should be kept away from all electrical equipment and tools should not be used in wet
or damp conditions!

21. Extra care should be taken when attaching plugs to be sure that all wires are well connected
to the right terminals and that the flex is held securely.

22. You are responsible for seeing that all of these safety rules are observed to ensure the safety
of yourself and others!

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

32
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 18 WELDING SAFELY

There are several potential hazards when undertaking welding and cutting operations, by your
safe actions you can prevent these hazards, protect yourself and protect others.

The general hazards and their solutions are as follows:

1. Radiation

Infra Red, Visible Light and Ultra Violet radiation cause eye damage and can burn the skin.
Therefore wear correct eye filters + skin protection.

Impact + Burn Protection

Most welding and cutting operations produce sparks and hot metal splash in such eyes
suitable protection must be worn.

Clothing

Flame resistant materials are required for body, hand and foot protection, and leather being
the favorite for heavy works. Clothing should not retain sparks and synthetic fabrics should
not be used. These melt when contacted by sparks.

2. Fumes and Gases

Welding and cutting of all metals produces fumes which can harm the respiratory system.
Fumes from galvanized, lead or toxic coated materials can also affect the rest of the body.

Protection

Wear correctly filtered respirators for low volume works, use an exhaust ventilation system for
large concentrations of welders or where working in “confined spaces” (additional precautions
may be necessary – see your supervisor).

3. Compressed Gases

Compressed Gases can cause fires or explosions due to their being either highly flammable
or under pressure. They should not be taken into a tunnel or confined space without
authorization.

Precaution

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

Only have the required amount of cylinders at work position (1 days supply). Store spares
correctly in a compound.

Use a bottle trolley to secure cylinders upright.

Flash back arrestors must be fitted at cylinder gauge ends and non-return valves at the inlets
to the blowpipe.

Close valves before moving cylinders and after use.

Do not allow cylinders to become heated keep oil away from oxygen cylinders, valves etc. If
you suspect a leak, move the cylinder into the open air and notify suppliers.

4. Electricity

When electric are welding, the greatest danger it’s from electric shock.

Precautions

Never touch live metal parts with bare skin or wet clothing.

Ensure cables electrode holders and cable connections are in good conditions and insulation
is complete.

Ensure welding machine is correctly earthed.

Do not weld whilst standing in water or changing electrodes whilst on a wet or earth surface.

Do not connect earth lead to electrical circuits or pipes containing flammable materials.

34
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

5. Fire Precautions

Welding and cutting operations cause many fires on construction sites.

Precautions

Check whether a “Hot Work” permits is required.

Ensure the area is free of flammable materials before starting work and check area after
completion for likely smouldering materials.

Carry a fire extinguisher suitable for materials being welded and for gases used (CO2 or dry
powder are most usual).

Dispose of used welding rods, electrodes and hot metal safely.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

35
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 19 THE SAFE USE OF LADDERS

Why do people fall from ladders?

A recent study of 433 falls from fixed and portable ladders disclosed:

277 cases where the ladder slipped, 180 cases where the ladder remained stable, 24 cases where
there was a structural defect in the ladder or its anchorage, 2 cases where the ladder was struck
by a vehicle.

The dominating factors where a ladder remained stable were:

81 Foot slipped on rung 36 Carrying tools or materials


18 Missed footing 5 Obstruction part way up ladder
5 lost footing 2 Struck by falling material
14 Overbalanced 7 Jumped off to avoid hazards
12 Overreached

What Can Be Done to Reduce the Risk?

1. Ensure that the ladder cannot slip

2. Ensure ladders are tied near the top

3. Keep rungs and footwear clean

4. Use both hands when climbing or descending

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

5. Ladders secured to prevent slipping outwards and sideways

6. Set ladders at the correct angle 300mm out to every 1,200mm up. (1 in 4)

7. Always check ladders before and after use, report any defects immediately.

8. Never use a home-made ladder

9. Do not use ladders with cracked or broken rungs or other defects

10. Do not over reach from a ladder – always move it

11. Do not stand a ladder on a drum, box or other unsteady base

12. Never overload a ladder or support it on its bottom rung on a plank

13. Do not use ladders that are too short

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

37
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 20 STEP LADDERS

Before using a step ladder check the condition of:

1. Treads

2. Stiles

3. Hinge arrangement

4. Restraining rope between legs

Damaged stepladders to be taken out of use and either destroyed or returned to the supplier.

Working from Step ladders

1. Film level base.

2. Type of operation – should a mobile platform be used instead?

3. Work from no further than two thirds up step ladders (hand hold required)

4. Boards not to be slung between treads on steps to provide working platform (treads not
designed for this loading, a one board wide platform is not a safe working place).

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

38
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 21 TRESTLE SCAFFOLDS

Two types of trestle scaffolds are used to construction sites:

1. Folding wooden or metal trestles

2. Fixed metal trestles or bandstands

Trestles must only be on firm level surfaces. Both types are frequently misused and several
accidents have occurred – OBSERVE THE RULES AND PREVENT A FALL.

Folding Trestles

1. Use for work of a light nature and SHORT DURATION only.

2. Examine for damaged cross bearers, broken or damaged hinges or damaged stiles.

3. Use lightweight staging for the platform: If normal scaffold boards are used support at
1.2metre center.

4. Do not stand on the top of the trestle.

5. Do not attempt to increase the height of the platform by the use of hop-ups.

6. Must not be used if it is possible to fall more than 4.5 metres.

7. Platform must be at least 430mm wide (17 inches).

Fixed Trestles

1. Ensure correct pins are used when height is raised (not reinforcement or nails)

2. If used with normal scaffold boards, space stands 1.2 meters apart (4 feet).

3. If used with lightweight staging – check allowable loads.

4. Where it is possible to fall down from the height of 2 meters or more, guardrails and toe
boards must be fitted. This is generally difficult and will require a scaffold.

39
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

5. Safe access – a tied ladder must always be provided.

Particular care must be taken when trestle scaffolds are erected near floor edges or on existing
scaffold platforms to ensure that guarding is provided.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

40
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 22 TOWER SCAFFOLDS

1. Prefabricated access towers must be erected in accordance with the manufacturer


instructions by competent operatives, erection instruction must be available on site.

2. Towers must only be used on firm surfaces. If the ground is soft or sloping, adequate support
must be provided to ensure firm and level footing.

3. The platform height should not be more than 3 times the length of the shortest side of the
tower (Example: shorter side of tower is 1.5 meters multiplied by 3 giving a maximum
platform height of 4.5 meters). This height can be increased by the use of outriggers, to
extend the base stability.

4. Manufacturer instructions on safe loading levels must not be exceeded.

5. Care must be taken when working from the platform that pulling or pushing actions does not
overturn the tower.

6. Do not pull heavy items up the side of the tower, use lifting devices.

7. Do not use ladders from platforms of towers, this causes high overturning forces.

8. Proprietary steel or aluminum alloy towers have a variety of means of access, these being:

a) Integral diagonal stairway. As well as providing access this will form part of the bracing of
the tower.

b) Ladder units, which slip onto the end frame or inclined ladders, securely fixed, inside the
scaffold frame.

c) Climbing a ladder section that is incorporated within the end frame. Such a ladder
section will have rungs no more than 300 MM apart, and with stiles more than 480 MM
apart. Climbing horizontal members of other types of end frame is not to be accepted as
a safe means of access.

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

Note

 Access is always from the inside of the tower frame to avoid eccentric loading of the tower.
Working platforms are to be provided with trap doors to facilitate access.

Working Platforms

9. Working platforms are to be fully boarded and fitted with guardrails and toe boards. Mobile
towers are to have only one working platform.

Moving Mobile Towers

10. Towers must NEVER be moved with men or materials upon the platform and must only be
moved by applying a horizontal force at or near to the base.

Prior to moving a tower, ensure that the route to the new location is free of obstructions. In
particular, ensure any holes, pits, ducts or gratings are securely covered and that also no
overhead obstructions such as electric cables or beams are present.

When towers are to be moved and outriggers with adjustable feet are fitted, they must first be
raised to allow movement. The tower must be reduced in height to ensure that it is not more
than 2.5 times minimum base dimension.

After moving and before use, wheels must be locked.

42
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

43
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALKS

NO. 23 DO’S AND DON’T ON SCAFFOLD

DO NOT climb scaffold unless you are a trained scaffolder.

DO use the ladder access or the stairs.

DO NOT remove any scaffold tie or bracing, unless you are a scaffolder.

DO get a scaffold to do it, so that he can position the alternative tie and ensure stability.

DO NOT use unsafe platforms.

DO use a properly constructed platform.

DO NOT leave a section of a scaffold platform without guardrail and toe-board.

DO make sure that the gap is closed with a short guardrail and toe-board. If in doubt, ask your
supervisor to get a scaffold to do it.

DO NOT remove boards from the platform for any purpose.

DO report any gaps or “traps” in the scaffold to your supervisor.

DO NOT stack materials in center of bays or above guardrail height.

DO stack adjacent to the standards uprights and consider the weights.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

44
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 24 OPENINGS AND EDGES

Every year in our industry hundreds of people are killed or injured when they fall from an
unprotected area or are struck by materials or tools falling from above.

Over half of all accidents reported to the inspection authorities are of these two types.

A) Falls of persons, and

B) Falls of materials.

If you work where it is possible for you to fall more than 2 meters then edge protection must be
provided.

The following list gives an idea of the required protection:

1. Scaffolds

Guardrails and toe boards must be provided to all working levels, also secured ladders are
required.

2. Floors

Protection must be provided to all floor edges, lift openings, stairways and duct openings.

3. Roofs

Edge protection must be given at all open edges.

If the roof is of a fragile material, crawling boards or ladders must be used. Where openings
or fragile skylights occur in the roof, these must be guarded or securely covered.

4. Excavations

All excavations require warning barriers or guardrails. Where the sides are sloping, barriers

45
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

may be sufficient but if sides are vertical then more rigid + strong guarding is needed.

46
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

5. Working Alongside or Over Water

Guardrails and life belts are required where work is carried out alongside rivers, docks etc.

6. Manholes, Road Gullies etc.

Strong secured covers are required here as vehicles damage covers and leave traps. At
times protection will need to be moved to allow work to progress but this must be done in a
controlled manner so that protection is refixed immediately the work is completed.

Serious accidents have occurred where covers have been removed from openings in floors or
guarding has been removed from service ducts. If you must remove such protection make
sure it is replaced.

Where edge protection is not practical, safety harnesses and restraints wire may be suitable,
see your Supervisor for instructions.

IF YOU ARE WORKING ALONGSIDE AN UNGUARDED EDGE OR OPENING TELL YOUR


SUPERVISOR NOW

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

47
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 25 WORKING ON SCAFFOLDING

1. Do not remove or interfere with the scaffolding in any way-especially ties, guardrails, toe-
boards and ladders. Alterations to scaffolding should only be made by authorized persons.

2. Do not use a scaffold while it is being erected or dismantled or in any way incomplete. Look
out for warning notices.

3. Report any deficient scaffolding as soon as possible.

4. When stacking materials, always leave a passageway at least two boards wide for other
people to pass.

5. See that materials are always properly stacked and not in danger of falling. Erect material fall
guards when required.

6. Do not overload a scaffold. Position loads by the standards, not between them.

7. Do not leave tools or materials lying around on platform.

8. Materials should never be thrown, tipped or dropped from heights. They should always be
lowered or disposed of through a properly constructed chute.

9. Never climb up or down scaffolding. Always use the ladders or stairs provided.

10. Ensure that ladders are properly secured at the top, have a firm base, extend at least 1..10
M above the platform and are at an angle or approximately 1 out of 4 up.

11. If a ladder has any damage, report the fact to your supervisor and see that it is replaced. Do
not climb the ladder.

12. Ladder rungs should not be used to support either the ladder or run-up boards.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

48
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 26 WORK ON ROOFS

Working on roofs give rise to a substantial number of fatal and serious accidents every year.

STATISTICS

In a typical year 20 men are killed in roof accidents, 250 are injured falling through fragile materials
and 170 by falling from roofs.

STICK TO TEN RULES

1. Only properly trained operatives may be used for working on roofs.

2. A safe method of working must be agreed before work starts.

3. Suitable crawling boards or roof ladders must be used on fragile materials or sloping roofs.

4. Where crawling boards are used for access over fragile material or near roof edges guardrail
are required.

5. Roof edge barriers (or scaffolds) must be erected to prevent men and materials falling.

6. Openings in the roof must be securely covered or guarded.

7. Covering or guarding may be removed to allow the passage of men or material but must be
replaced immediately after that operation.

8. Access ladders must rise at least 1.1m above the stepping off point and must be secured.

9. Where the access ladders rise above 9 meters an intermediate rest platform with guardrails
and toe-boards must be provided.

10. Wet, windy weather can seriously affect your safety during roofing works, ask if in doubt.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______

49
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

50
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 27 CLADDING PANELS

1. All delivers must be pre-arranged and agreed with materials controller.

2. All deliveries must be on site within the site perimeter hoarding, prior to slinging commencing
– where lifting from outside the boarding line a Method Statement on procedure must be
agreed.

3. Only approved lifting equipment to be used on cladding operations.

4. Safe access must be provided to the sling attachment position.

5. Ensure that any packing is clear of the panel to be lifted and that adjacent panels are
independently secured in place.

6. Radio contact or signaling system to be checked out with the crane operator/banks
man/coordinator prior to lifting.

7. Tag ropes to be attached to cladding unit for operatives to maintain safe handling in tight
situations.

8. All lifting operations must be safely routed and contained within the site perimeter hoarding.

9. Lowering zone to be condoned off.

10. Safe working position must be provided for securing of panels in pace. If harnesses are used
the attachment point must be agreed.

11. Crane must not be released until panel is securely fixed and checked.

12. Operations to have sufficient management/supervisory control.

13. Rigger /signalman to be responsible for liaison with crane coordinator.

14. Management to be accountable for any deviations from or improvisations to this safety
working procedures.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

51
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 28 EXCAVATIONS

1. Before digging made sure that the electric, water, gas and other services have been located
and marked clearly.

2. All excavations deeper than 1.2 meters (4 feet) MUST be either timbered or the sides must be
sloped to a safe angle. IF IN DOUBT ASK.

3. Ladders must be used for access and egress from excavations, do not climb on the supports.

4. Warning barriers must be placed around all shallow excavations and scaffold or adequate
timber barriers must be provided around deep excavations i.e. deeper than 2 meters.

5. All reinforcement starter bars in excavations (any depth) must be protected to prevent the
possibility of puncture injuries.

6. Keep spoil heaps, materials, tools and vehicles away from edges of excavations.

7. Ensure that helmets are worn at all times.

8. When tipping into excavations, secured stop blocks are load spreading platforms are required
to prevent vehicle running into or collapsing the excavation.

9. Do not jump across excavations, provide bridge access ways with guardrails.

10. Do not alter or remove any supporting members unless you are authorized.

A CUBIC METRE OF EARTH AT LEAST WEIGHS 1 TON.

THE ONLY BODY THAT CAN SUPPORT SUCH A WEIGHT IS A DEAD BODY

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Personnel attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

52
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 29 DEMOLITION

Demolition operations can be very hazardous, both to members of the public and yourself.

They can also be very annoying to adjoining owners.

By your actions you can prevent accidents and improve the wrong conditions.

The following points must apply:

Personal Protection

To protect yourself you need; a helmet at all times, strong boots with ankle support, gloves to
prevent cuts and goggles to save your eyes. Respirators or facemask may also be required in
dusty conditions.

Protection from falls

A safe place of work is required:

1. Protected areas of the structure, for example – floors.

2. Correctly erected scaffold platforms or towers and hydraulic or crane handled workbaskets.

3. Where it is not practical to provide full protection, a safety harness may be used.

Working from A Wall Is Not Permitted

All work places must have a safe means of access.

Protection from Falling Materials

Make sure you follow the agreed method of demolition so that:

1. Walls and floors are not demolished adjacent to other workers – create a safe area.

2. Chute openings are well protected.

3. Access ways are clear of demolition operations or are covered to give protection from falling
debris.

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

4. Floors are not overloaded with material to the point of collapse.

Fire Precautions

Generally burning of rubbish on site is not permitted.

When cutting structural steel, secure gas bottles, use flash back arrestor equipment, store spare
bottles in the safe compound, take care with gas hoses and provide means of fire fighting.

Hot work permit must be in place before any such works.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

54
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

NO. 30 LIFTING SLINGS

1. Use only approved and tested slings for the job.

2. Check the safe working load (marked on the sling).

3. Check the safe working load against the load to be lifted.

4. See that the sling is in good condition – splices, rings and thimbles

5. See that there are no broken ends in wires.

6. No chafing on fiber ropes.

7. Be sure that the chains have been annealed and examined.

8. Do not stand under loads.

9. Rigger/signalman to ensure the sling is properly adjusted on the load.

10. Signalman must use proper signals to safeguard your fellow workers,

11. Return the sling to store after use. Report any defects.

12. Protect wire rope or nylon belt slings from sharp edges.

ALWAYS WORK SAFELY

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 31 LIFTING CHAINS

1. Select the chain for the job. If in doubt ask.

2. Check all chains before using. Report immediately if you find lifting chain with deformed,
corroded cracked or cut links.

3. Make sure that the chain approved and tested and is marked with its safe working load.

4. Make sure that the chain is not knitted or twisted when in use.

5. Immediately after use, return chains to store where they should be properly racked.

6. Use packing for chain slings when lifting anything with sharp edges.

DO NOT –

7. Shorten a chain by knotting it.

8. Lengthen a chain by joining pieces together.

9. Lubricate chain slings, or hoist chains if the lubricant is liable to pick up sand or grit.

10. Drop chains on hard surfaces.

11. Leave chains where they can be run over or otherwise ill treated.

12. Expose chains to acids or other corrosive substances.

REMEMBER A CHAIN IS ONLY AS STRONG AS ITS WEAKEST LINK

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 32 LIFTING SHACKLES

1. Use the right type of shackle for the job in hand.

2. Ensure the shackle has been tested and approved.

3. Check the safe working load of the shackle before use.

4. Do not use any shackle that is not marked with the safe working load.

5. Examine bow and pin for damage or distortion. Destroy if doubtful.

6. Check bow and pin for excessive wear. Destroy when wear is 1/10th or more of the original
diameter.

7. Make sure pin is free, but not loose, in tapped hole.

8. Threads should be undamaged and without flats or appreciable wear.

9. Check alignment of holes. The untapped hole should not be too large or worn.

10. When using a shackle with “nut and bolt” pin, should be free to rotate when nut is tight.

11. Undamaged shackles should have a clear ring. To test, suspend and tap lightly with a
hammer.

12. To prevent pins unscrewing, secure with a split pin, if possible. Alternatively, secure with wire.

13. Do not use a shackle where the pin can unscrew by “rolling” under the load.

NEVER USE SHACKLES THAT DO NOT MEET RECOGNISED STANDARDS

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 33 LIFTING HOOKS AND EYE BOLTS

Hooks

1. Check for distortion. If in doubt, check dimensions against standard tables or drawings.

2. If a hook has opened by more than 1/5th of original dimension, destroy it.

3. Examine carefully for cracks, cuts, dents and corrosion pits.

4. Swivel hooks should rotate freely. Nut securing hood to trunnion should be split pinned or
otherwise secured.

5. If swivel hook is welded in trunnion, check shank for excessive wear and the weld for
deterioration.

6. Always use hooks fitted with safety catch. Make sure the catch operates freely.

Eye Bolts

1. Examine for damaged threads. If in doubt, check with thread gauge.

2. Check thread if standard tapped hole. Fit is most important.

3. Shoulder or collar should be flat, free from damage and at right angles to threaded portion.

4. Check that centerline of eye is central with threaded portion.

5. Examine for cracks, cuts, dents and corrosion pits.

6. Check eyes for wear, if 1/10th or more of original diameter destroy it.

NEVER USE HOOKS THAT DO NOT MEET RECOGNISED STANDARDS

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

58
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

NO. 34 WORKING WITH COMPRESSED AIR TOOLS

1. Ensure that the hose is clear of dirt or moisture before starting work.

2. Ensure that tools are regularly maintained and serviced and matching connections are used.

3. See that, where applicable, the proper protective guard is correctly fitted before use.

4. Always use attachments, which are correct for the speed of the tool.

5. When using paving breakers, clay spades etc., always check your hose connection before
starting work.

6. Wear protective footwear when using paving breakers and stand with feet apart.

7. Operators of air cutting, drilling or impact breaking tools must wear eye protectors and are
advised to use ear protectors also.

8. Before disconnecting any air tool, turn off the compressed air supply on the main air pipe to
which your air hose is connected. The air should be exhausted in the line at the tool end.

9. The air tool control lever should be released before moving the tool in a horizontal position.
Do not use blunt points.

10. Ensure that points (jackhammer) are securely seated before operating tool.

11. In the case of air operated cutting wheels and discs, only persons in possession of a
certificate of training are permitted to change an abrasive wheel or disc.

12. Report all defects immediately.

13. Keep away all persons not directly involved in the activity, particularly children and general
public.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 35 BANKSMAN/ RIGGER/ SIGNALMAN (Lifting Supervisors)

1. All banks man/slingers should be trained and authorized.

2. Check lifting gear daily and examine all wire ropes at frequent internals for kinks, frays and
projecting broken wires.

3. Lifting gear must not be used unless approved, tested and its safe working load is marked.
The combined weight of load to be lifted and lifting gear must never exceed the safe working
load of the crane.

4. Use only slings and lifting gear provided by your employer. Never use improvised slings.

5. Loads should be landed on to suitable bearers to avoid damage to lifting gear and to facilitate
its removal.

6. Never tie knots in chains to shorten them – get shorter slings.

7. Make sure the right pin is used in all shackles and that the pin is properly screwed home.

8. All hooks must either be an approved “C” type or fitted with an effect safety catch to prevent
displacement of the lifting gear.

9. Use softwood or other suitable packing material to protect the lifting gears from the sharp
edges of the load.

10. Always check that the crane hook is centrally placed over the load to prevent swinging when
the load is being raised.

11. Take your hands away from chains and ropes before the crane takes the load and stand
clear.

12. When signaling, stand where you can see the load clearly and where the operator can see
you. Whenever possible face the operator.

13. Ensure that the load is lifted off the ground to see that it is free and correctly slung before
hoisting.

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

14. Wear a safety helmet and high visibility clothing..

15. Make your signals clearly and distinctly and always use the approved Code Signals.

16. When the crane is operating, do not leave the area unless you have been relieved by a
trained replacement.

17. When the crane is traveling, ensure that you signal to the operator to warn him of
obstructions on the route or awkward corners.

18. Riding on loads is strictly prohibited.

19. Back sling hooks when no load is carried.

20. Do not allow lifting gear to be used for other purposes, e.g. towing.

21. When not in use, store your lifting gear tidily do not leave it lying on the ground.

22. Keep all persons not involved in the lifting operations away from the immediate vicinity
particularly children and the general public.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 36 COMPRESSED GAS CYLINDERS

1. Treat every cylinder as “full” and handle carefully.

2. Always use a carrier and secure the cylinder into it.

3. Always secure acetylene cylinders in an upright position both in use and in storage.

4. Store ALL cylinders so that they cannot fall.

5. Keep them away from sun, artificial heat, flammable materials, corrosive chemicals and
fumes.

6. Avoid damage to valves and fittings. Do not use them for lifting or carrying.

7. Keep valves and fittings of oxygen cylinders free from oil and grease.

8. Open cylinder valves slowly and close sufficiently to shut off gas – never use force.

9. Always lift cylinders from trucks – do not drop or slide them.

10. Keep hose lines clear of traffic lanes.

11. REMEMBER: Handling cylinders is a two- man job.

REPORT ANY DAMAGE OR DEFECTS IMMEDIATELY

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

62
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 37 CARTRIDGE HAMMERS OR RIVET GUNS

Only to Be Used by Trained Persons Issued with a Certificate

1. Read maker’s instructions carefully before using the gun.

2. Before handling the gun, make sure it is NOT LOADED.

3. Load the gun with barrel pointing in safe position – away from you.

4. Never place your hand over the end of the barrel.

5. Never walk around with a loaded gun – load on site immediately prior to use.

6. Check the strength of the material into which bolt is to be fired.

7. Allow at least 3” from edges of concrete or brickwork to prevent spalling.

8. Hold the gun at right angles to the job when firing.

9. Wear eye protection when using the gun.

10. In the event of a misfire wait a minute before unloading.

11. Keep the guns clean and well oiled.

12. Never leave the gun loaded when not in use.

TREAT CARTRIDGE HAMMERS WITH RESPECT – ALWAYS

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 38 ABRASIVE WHEELS

1. Wear goggles when using an abrasive wheel.

2. Adjust the guard to expose the minimum wheel surface necessary for the operation.

3. Keep the glass screen in the safety position.

4. Adjust the tool rest as close as possible to the face of the wheel.

5. Keep your fingers below the tool rest level.

6. Take care to ensure that work does not slip off the rest.

7. Use the correct grade of wheel for the work in hand.

8. Keep the face of the wheel flat and clean.

9. Never use the side of the wheel.

10. Do not exert heavy pressure on the wheel.

11. Run a replacement wheel for a full minute after fitting before attempting to use it. Stand clear
during the test.

12. Stop the wheel when not in use.

PROTECT YOUR EYES FROM FLYING FRAGMENTS

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

64
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 39 CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES

It is essential that you understand the basic statutory requirements of the use of substances at the
workplace and the hazards, risks and any controls necessary in their use.

1. Your employer must make a written assessment of “Substances Hazardous to Health”, this
includes dusts, fumes, and vapor levels.

2. Never use a substance until you understand what protection and controls must be used. Your
employer must provide you with information, instruction and training for substances you use.

3. Read all labels on containers etc., before use and follow their instructions.

4. Never use substances in unmarked containers.

5. Report any noticeable effects to your health at once.

6. You are required to cooperate with your employer if medical checks are necessary.

7. Always wash your hands thoroughly after use of substances.

8. Ensure you use any protective equipment and wear protective clothing provided.

9. Avoid spillage and clean up after use.

10. Smoking whilst using some substances can have an added risk to your health.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

65
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 40 HEALTH AND HYGIENE

It is essential that you play your part in protecting your health at work as it is your statutory duty.

Dangers to health fall into 3 categories as follows:

a) Inhalation – through the nose and mouth


b) Ingestion - by swallowing through the mouth
c) Absorption – by contact with the skin

The following general points apply:

1. Always wear protective clothing and equipment provided.

2. Always wash thoroughly before meals and after work.

3. Report at once any noticeable affects when using substances or working on contaminated
sites.

4. Follow strictly any information or instructions given to you.

5. Do not take meal breaks in work area use the welfare facilities provided.

6. Change clothing regularly.

7. Play your part in keeping welfare facilities clean and tidy, they are provided for your benefit.

8. Do not smoke whilst using substances

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

66
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 41 CONFINED SPACES

What is a confined space?

It is any area with limited access, where gases, vapor and physical hazards can threaten safety.

For example, tanks, ducts, vessels – these are obvious, but what about an open top tank. What
about a roof void, a room with doors and windows closed. Working in confined spaces can involve
serious risks.

Poor ventilation is the major source of danger. The build up of harmful gases or vapors can cause
suffocation, poisoning or explosion.

Escape or rescue from a confined space can be very difficult.

Prior to working in any confined space, you will be properly trained for that job; this talk is to
provide general information only.

Why should you know about confined spaces?

For Your Own Safety

Every year, hundreds of workers are injured, or killed, in confined spaces.

Accidents often happen quickly and silently.

Ignorance or over-confidence is usually the cause of such accidents. Workers who do not know or
underrate the dangers are at risk.

Yet confined space accidents can be prevented.

You Must:

a) Know the hazards you face in the job


b) Learn how to detect and deal with these hazards
c) Follow established safety procedures for work in confined areas

Here are the facts

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

TYPES OF CONFINED SPACES

Confined spaces exist in many settings, but especially common in storage and transportation
facilities, for example:

Tunnels Basements Sewers


Pipes Vaults Storage Rooms
Manholes Silos Ships Holds
Tanks

Underground areas and enclosed spaces are the most recognizable confined spaces.

But any place can become a confined space under certain conditions, for example:

An open ditch or open topped tank becomes a confined space if air circulation inside is poor, and a
gas or solvent vapour that is heavier than air accumulates at the bottom.

A structure of irregular shape, becomes a confined space if pockets of gas or solvent vapor
accumulate where air doesn’t circulate.

When Do Confined Spaces Pose A Risk?

Wherever you have to enter them - Danger is present during:

a) Routine tasks
Inspecting, testing, maintenance
Cleaning or repairing the inside of vats, tanks, holds, silos, etc.

b) Emergency Situations
Repairing leaks, mechanical failures, etc.
Helping co-workers who have been overcome by gases, injured by accidents, etc.

Every Time You Enter A Confined Space, A Healthy Respect for the Potential Hazards Is
Essential.

It is especially dangerous when the atmosphere is low in oxygen because it can cause drowsiness
or euphoria that keeps you from realizing the danger in time to escape. Oxygen concentration
should be between 19 – 21%.

Other Hazards may include:

Heat, which can cause heat exhaustion, cramps etc.

Noise, which may be intensified in small spaces and interfere with communication.

Contact with irritating solvents, residue or scale in tanks, etc.

Mechanical equipment which can cause sparks or physical injury.

Falling

What Safety Procedures Should You Follow?

Though situations differ, here is some basic safety measures you should always take.

68
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

1. BEFORE YOU ENTER, GET READY

(a) Review company Method Statement


Find out what potential hazards you face, what safety equipment is required, and what to do in
an emergency. Follow all Company and client rules and Regulations.

(b) Permit to Work


This document indicates what work is to be done, what precautions to take, etc. It may itself
authorize entry to the space, or you may need a separate entry certificate.

The Permit to Work is your safeguard, and you must follow its conditions.

Before work starts, display the permit at the work site.

(c) Block Sources of Danger


Withdraw the confined space from service. Ensure that no one can open valves, or activate
machinery while others are inside. Certify that the withdrawal has been completed with an
entry to the Permit to Work.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

69
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 42 PERMIT TO WORK

Check with Acceptor

The Acceptor of the permit to Work may have information/expertise, which would help to improve
the certificate issued. The following points should be checked through with the Acceptor.

1. Is the description of the job to be done accurate enough do you understand the
requirements?

2. Is the plant item on which work is to be done clearly identified?

3. Will the job require any special equipment, e.g. vehicles, petrol or diesel engines, electrical
equipment, cartridge tools, noisy equipment?

4. Will anyone not familiar with the plant be involved in the job?

5. If contractors are unsure has a work authorization been issued and read?

6. Will anyone be involved in the job and does not know that entry into vessels, use of
radioactive sources, or any form of excavation work, is prohibited unless a special clearance
has been obtained.

7. Are there any special features of the way the job will be done which the Issuer needs to know
about?

8. Are people working above, below or adjacent to the job in hand? Are the activities likely to
affect each other? Are all parties aware of all jobs being undertaken in the area?

9. Is there any fragile pipe work/equipment in the area of the job being undertaken? Is the
Acceptor aware of them?

HAZARD CHECK LIST

Assessing the Hazards:


• Are there any toxic, flammable or corrosive chemicals involved?
• Is there any risk from high or low temperature or pressure?
• Is the oxygen content of the atmosphere normal?
• Is the work near to railways, cranes, or overhead power lines?
• Is the work purely maintenance or does it introduce a modification?
• Is a working at height permit needed?
• Is there any asbestos removal?
• Is tenting required?

Removing the Hazards:


• Is de-pressurization necessary?
• Is it necessary to drain or vent to a safe place?
• Is purging required?

Checking for Effective Removal of Hazards:


• Are pressure gauges in the right places, and are they working?
• Is there any test points, drains or vents available?

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

• Is it necessary to have an analysis done?

Keeping the System Free of Hazards:


• Which valve must be shut and which open?
• What will stop someone unknowingly interfering with a vital valve?
• What slip-plate or blanks are needed, i.e. where is it risky if a valve passes?
• Is there any risk of back flow through a common vent or drain system?

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

71
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 43 STORAGE OF MATERIALS

Points to Watch

1. Keep storage areas clean and tidy.

2. Keep materials in clean and tidy condition

3. Made maximum use of mechanical handling techniques.

4. Store elements of material are readily counted.

5. Where manual handling is necessary, ensure material is stored at convenient lifting/laying


height and can be readily lifted/laid.

6. Design storage space to suit access/egress of F/L trucks, vehicles, trolleys etc.

7. Ensure all personnel are properly briefed on manual and/or mechanical handling techniques,
and where appropriate are properly trained and qualified.

8. Ensure that alien material (i.e. competitor’s equipment, non-scaffolding equipment) is placed
in a separate quarantine area.

9. Ensure that all equipment leaving storage area is properly maintained.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

72
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

NO. 44 DANGER TO 3RD PARTIES

Points to Watch

1. It is our responsibility to ensure that 3rd persons, who have nothing to do with our work, are
not caused harm arising from our work.

2. It is your responsibility to make sure no such harm occurs, so work SAFELY.

3. Before and during a job – make sure no 3rd party can be affected. If they can, take steps to
ensure they are protected from harm.

4. Fix appropriate notices, signs, barriers etc. to warn off and exclude 3rd parties from your work
area. If they ignore them, then advise them in a non-confrontational way.

5. If you cannot avoid risk to 3rd parties without stopping the job, STOP THE JOB and consult
your supervisor.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

73
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOX BOX TALK

NO. 45 VEHICLES

Check Before Driving :

1. Tyres

2. Steering

3. Brakes

4. Electronics

5. Water

6. Oil

7. Fuel

8. General Condition

9. Towing Attachments (i.e. All as Vehicle Check List – Weekly)

10 Windscreens / Headlamp Rear light condition.

11 Wing Mirrors.

TRACTORS/TRAILERS

Ensure

12 Safe Loading

13 Speed to Suit Site Conditions

14 No Reckless Driving

15 Drivers Qualifications

I have given Toolbox Talk No. to all the men under my control. A Total of-______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on……………………………… (Date)

Signed……………………………………Company……………………………………….

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WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

HEAT STROKE

1 Introduction

Heatstroke is a serious condition which can and does have fatal consequences.
The condition occurs when the body temperature rises to dangerous levels and the body heat
regulating mechanism breaks down.

2 Causes

Heatstroke occurs when an individual is exposed to long periods of high temperature and lack
of adequate body fluids.(e.g. water)
This includes high humidity.

3 Symptoms

“Removing the Patient to Hospital is Essential”

• The individual feels unwell


• The individual does not perspire very much if at all and has a high body
temperature (39 degrees C to 41degrees C or 102 degrees F to 106 degrees F ).
• Where no perspiration is evident the skin becomes flushed and red.
• The individual suffers severe throbbing headaches and lack of co ordination.
• The individual becomes confused ,disorientated and even aggressive
• Eventually the individual will become delirious or convulse.

4 Treatment

• Remove the patient to a shaded and if possible cool area.


• Remove their clothing and cover them with a wet sheet towel or like material.
• Cool them constantly with cool water and fan them.
• If conscious administer fluids constantly. This is essential. Note : Not any alcohol

SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION AS SOON AS POSSIBLE

I have given Toolbox Talk No. to all the men under my control. A Total of-______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on……………………………… (Date)

Signed……………………………………Company……………………………………….

75
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

HEAT EXHAUSTION

1 Introduction

Loss or deficiency of water in the human body is the primary cause of Heat Exhaustion. Excessive
exertion in hot humid weather combined with insufficient body fluid intake or removal of fluid from
the body such as by perspiring or vomiting can cause the condition. Normally water depletion is
evident by thirst and is replenished by the intake of fluids such as water.

The condition leading to Heat Stroke can be fatal if not controlled. If fluid lost is not controlled
within a few hours or even day’s severe dehydration develops and this is considered a medical
emergency.

2 Symptoms - The following can be evident for heat exhaustion:


• Fatigue and Lethargy • Mild to Severe Thirst
• Dry Lips and tongue (lips can be white) • Headaches
• Muscle Cramps • Sunken Eyes
3 Causes
• Dehydration caused by insufficient body fluids. • Salt deficiency.
• Excessive exertion in hot humid weather.
4 Treatment
• Remove individual to a cool area out of the • Administer plenty of fluid
sun
• If the symptoms persist seek medical attention • Take rest
5 Possible problems
• Kidney damage • Shock
• Eventual Death
6 Avoidance
• Drink plenty of fluids • Use dehydration kits
• Add extra salt to food • Take frequent short rests
• Do not over exert yourself

I have given Toolbox Talk No. to all the men under my control. A Total of-______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on……………………………… (Date)

Signed……………………………………Company……………………………………….

76
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOLBOX TALK

NO. 48 SHAFT TOP SAFETY

The shaft top area is a busy place during tunnelling operations. When in the Shaft Top Area, the
following rules should be followed:

1. Never loiter around the Shaft Top Area if you have no work there.
2. Do not remove or damage any of the barricades in place around the Shaft. They are there
to prevent any person or materials from falling into the shaft bottom.
3. Never climb up the barricades or step on the lower guardrail and lean forward to look into
the shaft.
4. Do not throw materials or tools down to the Shaft bottom. Falling objects can KILL.
5. Always stack or store materials away from the from the shaft edge ( at least 610mm-bowec
requirements) to prevent any falling hazards.
6. Look out for overhead loads as Gantry Crane will be in operation.
7. Never stand or walk below suspended loads.
8. If you have to send something down to the shaft bottom, inform the lifting supervisor or
rigger /signalman.
9. Never give signals to the crane operator if you are not the designated rigger/signalman.
10. Stay away from the muck pit when crane is in operation or tipping of the muck buckets is in
progress. The muck is bound to scatter and flying muck can cause facial or bodily injury.
11. Follow and obey the instruction of the Shaft top foreman and all safety signs and rules.
12. If in doubt ASK.

I have given Toolbox Talk No. to all the men under my control. A Total of-______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on……………………………… (Date)

Signed……………………………………Company……………………………………….

77
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOLBOX TALK

NO. 49 TUNNEL ENTRY AND EXIT

When entering or exiting the tunnel, comply with the following;

1. Wear or use your personal protective equipment PPE.


2. Display your security pass.
3. If you are feeling unwell, do not enter the Shaft or tunnel.
4. Approach the Tally Board on the shaft top. – The tally board will be divided into 4 sections,
EPB 1, EPB 2, Slurry 1, Slurry 2.
5. Look out for your name or worker number displayed on the board just below where the Tag
is hung. For visitors, look for the visitor row.
6. All visitors must attended the tunnel safety induction and fill up the Visitor Tunnel Safety
Induction Acknowledgement form before entering the shaft or tunnel. ( see form attached)
7. The Tag is in a form of a circular disc. It is painted RED on one side and WHITE on the
other site.
8. Read the Gas Monitoring Report which is also displayed. Do not enter if no reading have
been taken or if it not safe to. If in doubts, ask your superiors or the tunnel EHS
supervisors.
9. Turn your Tag to RED colour and then enter the shaft or tunnel.
10. Once inside the shaft or tunnel follow all safety signs and rules.
11. When you leave the shaft or tunnel, approach the tally board again .
12. Turn your tag to white and leave.
13. Compliance to this routine is a must. Failure to comply will lead to disciplinary action.
14. Random checks will be made to ensure the compliance of this tally board system.
15. This procedure is intended to control and also keep track of the personnel working
in the tunnel. It is very critical especially in an emergency requiring emergency
evacuation or search and rescue.

I have given Toolbox Talk No. to all the men under my control. A Total of-______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on……………………………… (Date)

Signed……………………………………Company……………………………………….

78
WEEKLY MASS SAFETY TALK

SAFETY TOOLBOX TALK

NO. 50 SAFETY AT THE SHAFT BOTTOM.

The shaft bottom is a restricted space with much activities. When in the shaft bottom, follow the
following rules diligently:

1. Use the hand rails on the staircase.


2. Exert firm grip over the rungs on the cat ladder.
3. Be alert of the materials handling operations in progress in the shaft bottom.
4. Look out for the lifting operations and materials being hoisted up and down.
5. Do not stand or walk under a suspended load.
6. Stay clear of the locomotive movement in the shaft bottom.
7. Follow the instruction given by the foreman, banksmen or rigger/signalman in the shaft
bottom.
8. Keep the shaft bottom area dry and clean as far as possible.
9. Clean up and oil spills if any
10. Report any unsafe condition immediately to your superior.
11. Never do anything foolish that can lead to an incident or accident.

I have given Toolbox Talk No. to all the men under my control. A Total of-______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on……………………………… (Date)

Signed……………………………………Company……………………………………….

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SAFETY TOOLBOX TALK

NO. 51 LOCOMOTIVE OPERATION

Locomotives can be dangerous. They can Kill if not used safely.

1. No personnel shall operate a locomotive unless he has undergone and passed the
required training and acknowledge as competent by the JV.
2. Only the designated operator shall operate the loco. Unauthorised personnel being caught
operating the loco will be dismissed from site.
3. No one except the loco operator is allowed in the loco driver cabin.
4. Do not stand in the way of an approaching or reversing locomotive.
5. Never try to cross through the gap between the locomotive and its’ carriages.
6. Always look out for the locomotive rotating light and horn which are an indication of the
locomotive intended movements.
7. Locomotive must never be used as a personnel transport unless there is a manrider
present.
8. Never attempt to cross over the tracks if the locomotive is in motion. It may not be able to
stop in time.
9. If you have to carry out some rail maintenance, ensure that the banksmen, shaft bottom
supervisor and locomotive drivers are aware. Special safety measures are to be taken too.
10. All loads on the locomotive carriages must be secured.

I have given Toolbox Talk No. to all the men under my control. A Total of-______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on……………………………… (Date)

Signed……………………………………Company……………………………………….

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SAFETY TOOLBOX TALK

NO.52 PERSONNEL MOVEMENT IN TUNNEL

1. Reflective clothing must be worn when in the tunnel.


2. No one is allowed to walk on the invert unless special permission has been obtained to
carry out rail maintenance works.
3. Use the designated walk way and stay still when the locomotive is passing you.
4. The walk way must be kept unobstructed at all times.
5. No materials should be left on the walkway. They may create a tripping and falling hazard.

I have given Toolbox Talk No. to all the men under my control. A Total of-______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on……………………………… (Date)

Signed……………………………………Company……………………………………….

SAFETY TOOLBOX TALK

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NO.53 COMPRESSED AIR WORKS

1. Only Compressed Air Workers who have been medically cleared are allowed to work in the
compressed air environment.
2. Any compressed air worker who is unwell, should report to his superior and not work in
compressed air.
3. Compressed air worker will be given a training and provided with an instruction sheet
before beginning compressed air works.
4. No works that may endanger personnel in the compressed air works should be carried out.
5. If you are not involved in the compressed air works, refrain from entering the compressed
air work area.
6. Do not tamper with any fittings, valves, levers or emergency gadgets whilst compressed air
is in progress.

I have given Toolbox Talk No. to all the men under my control. A Total of-______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on……………………………… (Date)

Signed……………………………………Company……………………………………….

SAFETY TOOLBOX TALK

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NO.54 EMERGENCY EVACUATION

1. On hearing the siren, or being instructed by the senior person present, all personnel at the
tunnel face including visitors will move to the rear of the TBM to collect the self rescue packs.

2. If fire is suspected or smoke is seen or smelt, the senior person present will instruct all
personnel to use the self rescue packs. In any case, the self rescue packs will be carried by
persons during the evacuation.

3. All persons will then walk in an orderly fashion to the shaft or ride in the manrider to exit the
tunnel.

4. If siren is sounded while travelling towards the tunnel face, personnel is to turn back to the shaft
and exit the tunnel.

5. When personnel exit the shaft, they are to turn back their disc to white and proceed to the
assembly point. Al personnel are to remain at the assembly point until instructed to do
otherwise.

6. At the assembly point the tunnel foreman will do a head count and report all attendance to the
incident coordinator and confirm any absentees. Tunnel rescue team or the emergency service
will be deployed to seek out the missing persons.

7. The emergency procedure can be found on the safety notice boards.

8. The WSA JV will conduct quarterly in house emergency drill. All personnel are to attend the drill
to familiarize themselves with the procedures and assembly points.

I have given Toolbox Talk No. to all the men under my control. A Total of-______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on……………………………… (Date)

Signed……………………………………Company……………………………………….

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Dangers of Powerline Contact


Each year, workers are killed by electrocution from contact with overhead power
lines. Over 90 percent of the contacts involved overhead distribution lines. These are the
same lines that run in front of our houses and through our job sites. Since they are so
common to us, they seem harmless. This serious mistake is fueled by two common
misconceptions: the belief that some overhead lines don't carry enough power to kill, and
the belief that power lines are well-insulated. Both are dead wrong.

The leading category of contact involves heavy equipment--cranes, drilling rigs,


concrete pumps, aerial buckets, and backhoes. Of all heavy equipment contacts,
cranes--either mobile or boom trucks--account for 57 percent of electrocutions.

The type of crane most likely to kill the operator is the boom-truck. Contact typically
occurs with the rig's boom or load line. Boom trucks are designed with the controls located
on the side of the truck chassis, or in some cases attached to a tether. With both designs
the operator is in direct contact with the ground. When contact occurs between the
equipment and the power line, the electricity looks for the shortest distance to ground. The
operator is almost always in this path, and is electrocuted.
But when a mobile crane contacts a power line, it is usually the rigger or ground worker
who is electrocuted. Unlike the operator sitting in the cab, they are not isolated from the
ground. If a contact occurs while the rigger is attaching a load, or guiding it with a tag line,
electricity passes through the load line to the worker on the ground.

Drilling rigs, aerial buckets, backhoes, concrete pumps, and other high-reaching
equipment account for another 29 percent of power line contacts. Fatalities
associated with high-reach aerial baskets usually occur when the basket makes direct
contact with the power line. Accidents involving drilling rigs, however, usually affect the
ground workers. With most equipment, the largest number of contacts happen during
machinery movement, and not during the setup or take-down phase. The exception is
concrete pumps, when incidents tend to occur during the take-down phase. Apparently,
during setup and use of the pump operators are more careful. But when the work is
completed, they use less caution retracting and storing the boom.

The use of metal extension ladders around power lines is also a frequent cause of
fatalities. One study on ladder electrocutions found that virtually all fatalities involved
metal ladders. Ladder contacts usually occur during erection, lowering or relocation of the
ladder.

Protect yourself from live power lines; look around your work area and identify the
location of all power lines before you move or erect any equipment. Make certain
that no part of any equipment can come within a minimum of 10 feet from the power line.
And remember, this distance is greater for voltages above 50kV. Don't operate equipment
around overhead lines unless you are authorized and trained to do so. Contrary to what
many people think, overhead power lines do carry enough voltage to kill and most are not
insulated.

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Heat Stress at Work


HEAT STRESS AND WORKING IN HOT TEMPERATURES

The effects of heat stress range from simple discomfort to life threatening illness such as
heat stroke.

What causes heat stress?


It may occur as result of a heat wave or constant source of heat at the workplace. Six
main factors involved are temperature, humidity, and movement of air, radiant
temperature of surroundings, person’s clothing and physical activity. Working in high
temperatures can cause heat stress when more heat is absorbed by the body than can be
released through the skin.

Warning signs of heat stress include:


 Increased sweating causing depletion of the body fluid and causing heat intolerance.
 Rapid pulse
 Light-headedness or feeling dizzy, fainting
 Nausea slurred speech vomiting
 Fatigue weakness muscular cramps
 Loss of concentration

These factors could increase the risk of you having an accident.

How to avoid heat stress?


 Drink more fluids (water) frequently to replace fluid.
 Drinking 100 – 200 ml of water at frequent intervals will be adequate to reduce fluid
loss in sweating;
 Have rest pauses in a cool place
 Wearing suitable work clothing
- loose clothing of natural fabric (where clothing is not a safety hazard)
- Wide brim hats to protect from direct sunlight
 Use sunscreen creams and adequate instructions.

 Maintain a healthy life style.

How should heat stress be treated?


 Take the person/ sufferer to a cooler place to rest (Eg. building or vehicle)
 Loosen tight clothing, remove hats or boots if required
 Give person water to drink – sip small amounts
 Use a wet sponge or cloth (cold compress) to cool them down

If the person has painful muscular cramps, a quick source of salt replacement is to add a
teaspoon of common salt to 1 litre of water for the person to drink. (Salt tablets should not
be taken).

Contact a first aid officer and your manager if the person does not improve.

If heat stroke is suspected (person stopped sweating, high body temperature, hot and dry
skin, loss of consciousness) medical attention is required urgently! Until medical aid is
available, cool the person by soaking the person’s clothing in cold water, giving fluid (if

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conscious) and fanning the person to increase air movement.

Report incidents to your Manager and to the Safety Manager/ Safety Co-ordinator.

Electrical Safety in Construction


Electric shock is a primary cause of death on the construction site.

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Electric shock can paralyze the heart, cause serious burns, and cause involuntary reactions that
can lead to serious injuries.
Observe these tips for working safely with electricity:
1  Treat all wires as live wires.
2 Never touch dangling wires, but report them to your supervisor.
3 Unless you are a qualified electrician, do not attempt electrical repairs.
4 Never use electrical equipment if your hands are wet or you are standing in water.
5 If electrical equipment is sparking or smoking, turn the power off and report the
condition to your supervisor.
6 Report tripped circuits immediately. Tripped circuits may indicate an overload or short in
the system.
7 Never use electrical cords that have physical damage. Destroy damaged cords and
discard!
8 Never drag cords over sharp edges.
9 Never allow equipment or traffic to run over cords. This can damage them internally.
10 Verify that the extension cord has the designation “S” (e.g., SF, SJO, SJT, SJTO, etc.)
in the cord marking to indicate that it is approved for hard service.
11 Protect extension cords with bushings or fittings when passing them through holes that
have jagged or sharp edges.

REMEMBER…
1  When it is used as intended, electricity is a labor saving service.

1 When it is released in an uncontrolled manner, or when it is used with ignorance, it can


injure, maim and kill.

1 Always treat electricity with the respect it deserves.

1 If you do not know what you are doing, leave electricity alone.

Use Care with Compressed Air

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Injuries caused by the misuse of compressed air have occurred since this energy source was developed. In
fact, compressed air is used so much that too many of us take it for granted, ignoring the hazards involved in
its use.

In addition to the danger of air bubbles entering the bloodstream through a cut, a stream of compressed air
can damage an eardrum or eye or inflate a part of the body.

Many people blow dust and dirt from their clothing, body or hair with compressed air. Even if the pressure is
as low as 20 to 25 psi, when directed toward openings in the skin or body, air can penetrate causing serious
injuries.

To prevent accidental injury when working with compressed air, here are several precautions to follow:

• Before operating an air hose, examine all connections to make sure they are tight
and will not come loose under pressure; hold the nozzle when turning the air on or
off.

• Don't kink the hose to stop the air flow; always turn off the air at the control valve.

• Check the air hose carefully to make sure it is in good condition before opening the
valve to let air into the hose; when the job is finished, turn off the valves on both the
tool and the air-line.

• Keep air hoses out of aisleways where they can be damaged by traffic or be a
tripping hazard.

• Never point a compressed air hose nozzle at any part of your body or at another
person; never use compressed air for a practical joke. There have been cases in
which a blast of air playfully directed behind a worker startled him, and caused him
to fall against moving machinery.

• Before turning on the air pressure, make sure that dirt from the machinery being
cleaned will not be blown onto other workers; to prevent dirt from flying about, cover
the equipment with canvas; only the operator should be in the immediate cleaning
area.

The operator and any other workers who must be in the immediate cleaning area must wear eye protection
and other necessary personal protective equipment.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________Company _________

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO PREVENT ACCIDENTS

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Have you ever wondered what you can do to prevent accidents? Maybe, like many people, you believe accidents are
bound to happen and there's not much you can do about them. Or, you may think that they only happen to the other
person. Well, the truth is that accidents do happen to everyone and often can be prevented.

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT

Here's something to think about. Statistics show that in many cases an accident could have been prevented by the
victim. And, in other cases, by a co-worker. Think of accidents that happened to people you know. Usually it was a
stupid mistake. Right? In other words, that person or someone else working on the job could have prevented it.

SEVEN EXCELLENT SUGGESTIONS

Here are seven ways you, personally, can do something about preventing accidents:

1. Make accident prevention a part of your daily routine: Plan safety in advance. Before beginning a job, be sure your
tools are in good condition. Also, see that you have the required protective equipment.

2. Report unsafe acts or conditions to your supervisor: If you see something that's dangerous or someone working in an
unsafe way, do something about it. If it's an unsafe condition, correct it if you can. Otherwise, report it to someone who
has the authority or ability to do so. If you see someone committing an unsafe act, warn that person in a friendly way.

3. Avoid horseplay: Aren't you always telling your kids to knock off fooling around before someone gets hurt? Well,
horse- play is dangerous for kids of any age. On a construction job you can easily be injured if you're not strictly
business all of the time. Often a person is killed or hurt when a "harmless" prank or a practical joke backfires.

4. Follow instructions: You'd follow instructions if you were dismantling a time bomb - and very carefully at that. Well,
take the same attitude on the job. When we give you instructions, it's only after we've considered the safest and best
way to do it. Sometimes doing something just a little different from what you were told can get you or someone else in
a lot of trouble.

5. Make suggestions: If you see a quicker or a better way to do something, let us know. We'll check it out and if it's
practical, we'll use it. But first we'll make sure it's safe. And if you see a safer way of doing some-thing, bring it to our
attention, by all means.

6. Practice good housekeeping: Nobody likes a slob .its upsetting to see someone with a messy work area. And it goes
even further than that. A sloppy work area is not only hard on the eyes, but a breeding ground for accidents. Trash and
materials strewn around can result in trips, falls, and fires.

7. Dress for the job: In addition to wearing protective equipment, dress so that you won't get hurt. Don't wear floppy
clothing (such as loose sleeves or cuffs) or jewelry that can catch on something or become entangled in machinery

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________Company _________

Scaffolding

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It's a terrible thing to realize that hardly a work day goes by without a construction worker falling off
a scaffold to his death. And those who survive scaffold falls are often crippled for the remainder of
their lives.

These tragedies are sometimes caused by faulty design or poor construction. But in most cases the
basic cause is poor maintenance or improper use — something that you can do something about.

Practical, foresighted people "keep both feet on the ground." And practical foresighted construction
workers keep both feet on the scaffold. Here's how you can be sure to keep your feet there:

• Inspect scaffolds daily before you trust your life to them. Check guardrails,
connectors, fastenings, footings, tie-ins, and bracing.

• Check to see that platforms are closely boarded, fenced, and securely
fastened.

• Don't stockpile materials on scaffolds. Remove all tools and left-over


materials at the end of the day.

• Never overload scaffolds. Pile necessary materials over ledger and bearer
points.

• Ground yourself during storms or high winds. In winter, clear platforms of all
ice and snow before using. Sand wet planking for sure footing.

• Help protect scaffolds; don't bang into them with equipment or materials.
When hoisting material from the ground, control it with a tagline.

• Keep platforms and area near scaffold clear of debris, unneeded equipment or
material, and anything else that might cause you to slip or trip.

Give a scaffold the respect it deserves and it'll serve you as a convenient work-platform — not as a
launching pad to send you hurtling to "The Great Beyond."

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________Company _________

SHORTCUTS ARE KILLERS

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Most of us have the necessary skills and knowledge to do our jobs well, and most of us don't want to hurt ourselves or
anyone else. Why then do we take 'shortcuts,' setting up ourselves and others for injury? The following is a list of
things we often do, even though we know we shouldn't!

1. You can't fool safety devices - but we remove or wedge back safety guards so they won't protect us!

2. We shouldn't take a chance when operating heavy equipment - but we don't use the seat belt that is provided!

3. We know that flames or sparks are not permitted around flammable liquids - but some of us smoke around them!

4. A protruding nail in a guard rail can cause an injury - but we don't bother to remove it or bend it over.

5. Horseplay causes a lot of injuries on the job - but many of us continue to play practical jokes.

6. A circular saw can amputate a finger - but we insist on using the saw without a guard!

7. We know the safe way to climb a ladder - but we climb it with one hand full of tools!

8. We should wear our personal protective equipment - but we leave our goggles strapped up on our hard hats!

9. We know better than to use chemicals without reading the MSDS - but we use the chemical anyway!

10. We should wear a life jacket when working over water - but we go out over the water without one!

11. A bump or bruise to the head ran realty hurt - but we continue to work without our hard hats.

12. It's dangerous to block fire fighting equipment - but we stack boxes of material in front of fire extinguishers!

13. We know not to work within 10 feet of a power line - but there's just one more load of steel to be unloaded and it
won't happen to me!

This is a short list, you can probably think of a lot more because we all, at one time or another, have been guilty of
taking shortcuts. Usually it's because we are attempting to save some time. Occasionally someone comes up with an
idea that works, and is a time-saver. That's great, as long as safety is not sacrificed. Your life and your health are too
important to risk by taking stupid chances, and that is exactly what 999 out of 1000 shortcuts are - stupid! Get smart -
think safety first - always!

Don't take Shortcuts! If you're injured, the minute you saved may cost you days, weeks, or months
of recovery time.

HEAT ILLNESSES

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Heat rash is mild discomfort and can be treated by changing clothes and using powder or medicated
cream.

Heat cramps are in muscle groups such as legs, back and in the abdomen. Treat cramps by putting
electrolytes back into your body with sports drinks or even eating snacks like pretzels or potato
chips.

Heat exhaustion is serious with signs like profuse sweating, dizziness, weakness, fatigue, nausea,
intense headaches, and even ringing in the ears. Treatment should be immediate and includes
drinking plenty of water and resting in shade or air conditioning.

Heat stroke is severe and could result in death. Signs and symptoms include excessive body
temperature (over 104 degrees), increasing disorientation, red patchy and dry skin (not sweating)
and even altered behavior. Medical treatment should be called for immediately. Until treatment
arrives, cool the victim in air conditioning, shade, and remove or wet the clothing.

Ways to avoid heat illnesses include avoid drinking caffeine in the morning and alcohol the night
before. Get plenty of sleep and eat well. Take breaks and drink plenty of water during the day.
Remember it takes about two weeks to get used to working in a hot

Safe Use of Hand Tools

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Of all the equipment placed at our disposal, the common hand tools, which we take for granted, are
the most useful and the most often abused.

A recent review of construction injuries reveals quite a number of minor accidents involving the use
of hand tools. To counteract this trend, it would be wise to review the basic rules governing the use
of hand tools.

1. Choose the right tool for the job. Never use a makeshift.

2. Use only tools in good condition - no tools with cracked or broken handles, none
without handles, none with mushroomed or broken heads.

3. Keep keen-edged blades sharp; store them safely when not in use.

4. Do not use a hammer with a hardened face on a highly tempered tool such as a
drill, file, or die or jig. Chips may fly.

5. Use wrenches of the right size for the job. Face the jaws on an adjustable wrench
in the direction of the pull.

6. Never apply a wrench to moving machinery; stop the machine, then remove all
tools before starting it again.

7. See that pipe wrench jaws are sharp and chains in good condition so they will not
slip.

8. Never use any tool in such a way that you will be injured by it if it slips. Preanalyze
your movements and position your body accordingly.

9. The construction industry calls for the use of many types of hand tools. Handle them with
care; treat them carefully and use them exactly for the purpose for which they were made.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________Company _________

- HOW CAN I HELP REDUCE INJURIES TO OTHERS?

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We all want to keep from getting hurt on the job. Each of us has a responsibility to look after the guy who may follow along after
us or use the same tools, equipment or material.

We can’t pass the buck about safety because it isn't a one-worker job. Never say, "I'll take care of me and let the other guy take
care of himself."

If one of the other workers is working in a dangerous position, warn him about it. He may not be trained enough to recognize
the hazard, or he might have problems that are distracting him.

Worrying about being considered a "wise guy" should not keep you from offering advice on safety. Advise in a helpful, sincere
way and your interest will usually be appreciated.

Here are some ways we can help each other work safely:

• » Set an example in the safe method of using tools and equipment. Help the inexperienced worker learn the right way.
• » Keep machine guards in place and don't leave a trap for the "other guy."
• » Report tool/equipment defects or accident hazards to your supervisor promptly.
• » Encourage everyone to report every injury, no matter how slight.
• » Encourage the wearing of proper clothing and personal protective equipment.
• » Ask questions if you don’t fully understand your job.

WELDING FIRES

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HOW WELDING FIRES START

Fires from welding operations are started by sparks, hot slag, and flame from the torch. Sparks
often drop or are carried long distances by the wind. Slag falls on surfaces or materials below. And
a welding torch flame can ignite many substances within a radius of several feet. Be familiar with
the standard safety rules for welding so you can spot and report any problems.

THE WELDERS' RESPONSIBILITY

When a welding operation moves into a work area, it's primarily the welders' duty to guard against
fire. This means making sure there's no flammable material within range of the flame. Wood, paper
or other combustibles should be removed. The welders also are responsible to see that no sparks or
slag fall on combustible materials. Keep extinguishing materials, such as water or sand, on hand if
you must weld near combustibles. You may even find it necessary to assign a worker with a fire
extinguisher to stand by and put out sparks.

FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS

Welders should not begin working in any area where there are flammable liquids before checking
with the supervisor. If you have to weld or touch any tank or drum that has contained flammable
liquids or gas, don't start your work until an approved test shows that there's no danger of vapors
present. Don't take anyone's word that the tank or drum was tested previously. Insist on a test just
before starting your work.

COMBUSTIBLES

Where floors are combustible, welders must place fire resistant material beneath the work area, so
that hot slag cannot contact the floor. Wood floors should be swept clean before welding over them,
and should be covered with metal or some other material that won't burn. In some cases, it is
advisable to wet the floor down. But remember that this adds a shock hazard, which must be
guarded against if you are arc welding. Be sure there are no cracks into which sparks or slag may
fall, and never allow this hot material to fall into concealed spaces between walls and floors.

You may have to protect openings, such as open doorways, with a non-combustible curtain. Be sure
this curtain reaches to the floor, so that the hot slag can't roll under it. Ask yourself also if wind can
carry sparks or slag over the side and down onto storage areas or adjacent property.

WELDING EQUIPMENT

Welders must keep cylinders a safe distance from where they are working, which means that hoses
must be completely uncoiled. You should keep the tanks and hoses behind you, never in front
where flame, heat, or slag will strike them. Hoses must be protected to keep trucks from running
over them, and people from walking into them or dragging things across them. Cylinders must be
properly secured when in use and the caps in place during transportation.

VENTILATION

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Good ventilation is a must for all welding operations. Many of these operations produce fumes that
are harmful in heavy concentrations, and good ventilation is the only method of protecting yourself
against this hazard. Screens around your work must be placed so as not to prevent good air
circulation. Sometimes special ventilating equipment is necessary. If you have any doubt about the
adequacy of ventilation on a job, ask the supervisor for his opinion. Don't weld in a small room or
tank or other closed place without first making sure the ventilation is good.

When welders leave their equipment or stop work, they must shut off the oxygen and acetylene at
the cylinders, so that no gas can enter either hose. And, of course, the rule for everyone except the
welders is: "Hands Off All Welding Gear."

EYE PROTECTION

Eye protection is necessary on all welding jobs, and full face protection is needed on many jobs.
The type of protection you've been told to wear on your operations has been proven necessary by
experience.

Face and eye protection are needed in many operations performed by welders besides actual cutting
and welding. That's why, for instance, electric welders need goggles as well as the regular helmet.
Any welder may have to do a good deal of chipping. And this work, usually done with the helmet
raised, can throw particles of metal into your eyes.

Basically, however, eye protection is designed to protect you against sparks, slag, molten metal,
and flash burns caused by radiation from the welding equipment. If you follow the rules for
wearing face and eye protection you won't have any face and eye injuries from cutting or welding
work.

EVERYONE'S RESPONSIBILITY

Remember that preventing welding fires is everyone's responsibility, whether doing the actual
welding or not.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed _____________________ Company ___________________

SAFETY TOOL BOX TALK

No. 2 ADVICE TO EMPLOYEES

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5. Study the company’s safety rules which explains the arrangements made for your health and
safety.

6. You have a legal duty to take reasonable care of your own health and safety at work.

7. You also have a legal duty regarding the health and safety of the people you work with and
members of the public.

8. When protective clothing and/or equipment are issued for your use – wear and/or use it as
instructed.

5. Play your part in keeping the site TIDY AND SAFE.

6. Watch out for warning notices and OBEY the warnings given.

19. Always keep alert and advise the driver/operator of your position if you are working in the
vicinity of mobile plant.

20. Never attempt to operate a machine unless you have been trained and authorized to do so.

21. Never ride on machines which have no passenger seat, it is illegal.

22. Never interfere with ladders or alter scaffolding or move boards unless you are properly
authorized to do so.

23. Never throw anything from scaffolding or any height. Lower it properly.

24. Do not take short cuts, use the access provided.

25. Lifting heavy objects or materials can cause injury. Obtain assistance when necessary.

26. Report any defects or damage to ladders, scaffolding, plant or tools or any other unsafe
circumstances, to your supervisor at once.

27. Report all accidents involving injury, however slight, to your supervisor. Details of an
accident necessitating first aid treatment should be entered in the Accident Book.

28. If in doubt about your job, ask your supervisor.

29. Construction Sites are particularly inviting to young children. Your co-operation in
discouraging children from entering site will help to reduce accidents to them.

30. All materials that would be liable to cause injury if they fall should be stacked or stored so as
to prevent them falling. Temporary but secure and stable racking should be used when
appropriate.

FIRST AID – INFECTION


Many workers consider injuries such as burns, cuts, bruises, punctures, etc. of so little importance
that they do not bother to get first aid. Actually it is dangerous to neglect these seemingly minor

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injuries since they are very easily infected. A knife cut, nail jab or scraped shin, for instance, can
bring serious consequences if infection develops.
What is infection? The unbroken skin acts as a protective shield for the body. However, it is
exposed to countless germs that are harmless as long as they remain on the surface. When the
skin is broken as the result of an injury, the barrier is down and germs swarm into the open wound
to multiply and infect it. Once infection develops, unless properly treated, it can spread rapidly,
causing severe pain, sometimes permanent disability and even death.
An injury should never be neglected because it doesn't seem serious enough to need first aid. The
safe, sensible thing to do is to get first aid for all injuries. Sometimes we tend to take the attitude, "I
nicked myself like this before and never had any trouble." If so, we have just been lucky. Infections
or other complications do not always follow slight injuries, but the fellow who thinks he can escape
infection time after time is gambling. Some day his luck is going to run out - he can't win all the
time.
The recommended treatment for small cuts, abrasions, scratches, etc., is to:

1. Cleanse the wound with soap and water, and pat dry.
2. Apply a first aid anti-bacterial ointment.
3. Apply sterile gauze compress and bandage loosely.
4. Refer to the doctor if there is any foreign manner in the wound.

Refer to the doctor if any sign of infection (pain, swelling, redness) develops.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.
The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed ______________________ `Company _____

The Deadly Dozen

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We all know that there must be a cause for an accident to happen. In order to avoid accidents, we
must remove the cause. Every cause is a result of an unsafe act or unsafe condition. By recognizing
the unsafe act or condition, we can effectively remove the exposure to them. The following “deadly
dozen” are reminders to help you recognize unsafe acts or conditions.

Guide for Discussion


Unsafe Acts
1 1. Unauthorized use or operation of equipment.
2 2. Failure to secure or tie down materials to prevent unexpected movement.
3 3. Working or operating equipment too fast.
4 4. Failure to issue warnings or signals as required.
5 5. Using defective tools or equipment.
6 6. Removing guards.
7 7. Improperly using tools or equipment.
8 8. Standing in an unsafe place or assuming an improper posture (as in lifting).
9 9. Servicing moving equipment.
10 10. Riding equipment not designed for passengers.
11 11. Horseplay.
12 12. Failure to wear the proper personal protective equipment.

Unsafe Conditions
1 1. Lack of proper guards.
2 2. Lack of a proper warning system.
3 3. Fire and explosion hazards.
4 4. Poor housekeeping.
5 5. Unexpected movements.
6 6. Protruding objects such as nails, wire, or other metals.
7 7. Improper clearance or congestion at aisles or passageways.
8 8. Poor placement, storage or arrangement of materials.
9 9. Hazardous tools, equipment or materials.
10 10. Poor lighting, high noise levels.
11 11. Hazardous atmospheric conditions.
12 12. Improper personal attire.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed ______________________ `Company _____

Accidents Are Avoidable

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Each time someone is injured, we need to ask ourselves “how did it happen?” Accidents just don’t
happen, they are caused. Accidents are usually a result of someone not paying attention or not
knowing how to recognize a job (or home or automobile) safety hazard. Jobs with effective safety
attitudes have about a fifth as many injuries compared to those without the safety attitude. Today
we will discuss some general rules to follow and the four hazard avoidance rules.

Guide for Discussion


General Rules
Learn the safe way to do your job.
Don’t jump from one elevation to another.
Don’t work under suspended loads.
Remove protruding nails or bend them over.
Keep the work area clear of debris.
Use the personal protective equipment required for the job.
Treat all electrical wires as being “live.”
Use the right tool for the right job.
Be sure all tools are in good shape.

Four Hazard Avoidance Rules


Know the safe way to work, and then follow the safe way all the time.
Maintain safe working conditions – for yourself and others around you.
Work safely, setting the example, and encourage others to do so.
Report all accidents and near misses.

Additional Discussion Notes:


Keep scaffolds free of excess weight.
Other ways to avoid hazards.
Report accidents and near misses to Employer.

Remember: Remember to ask yourself if you are following the basic common sense rules? If you
aren’t following them, then take the chance and you will have or cause an accident. Keep asking
yourself “how can I make my work safer?” Doing so and you’ll probably not have a serious
accident, and help prevent a serious accident for a fellow worker.

I have given Toolbox Talk No._____ to all the men under my control. A Total of ______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on _______________________ (date)

Signed ______________________ `Company _____

Foresight Preserves Eyesight

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There are all kinds of eye hazards in construction work—and there's excellent protection for
every eye hazard you'll find on a project. Just remember: there's every kind of eye protective
device readily available—but you're using your one and only pair of eyes right now.

Here are some of the more common operations where eye protection is an absolute must:

• Chipping, sledging and hammering on metal, stone or concrete.


• Using manual, pneumatic and power impact tools.
• Caulking, brushing and grinding.
• Drilling, scaling and scraping.
• Soldering and casting hot metals.
• Handling hot tar, oils, liquids, and molten substances.
• Handling acids, caustics and creosoted materials.
• Gas welding, cutting and brazing.
• Electric arc welding and cutting; also, any operations that may expose the eyes to
dust, gases, fumes or liquids.
• Drilling overhead.
• Working where there's dust blowing around.

Eye protection can be comfortable when you get a good fit. True, goggles can fog up, but you
can wear a sweat-band if you sweat a lot—and there are anti-fog liquids, too. Maybe there's
some inconvenience involved sometimes in using eye protection—but what's that compared
with the "inconvenience" of having to learn how to read braille?

Electrical Hazards
Electrical hazards are doubly hazardous in that there is not only the chance of electrocution but
also, there is the probability that any electric shock will cause a loss of consciousness that may well

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result in a fall of some sort. Today we will discuss methods of receiving an electric shock and ways
to avoid electrical hazards.

Guide for Discussion


Methods of Receiving an Electric Shock
From a defective power tool.
From defective extension cords.
From overloading a switch or over-riding a by-pass.
By not grounding electrical equipment.
By coming in close contact with live electric lines.
By coming too close to high power lines with the power arching over and making contact.

Ways to Avoid Electric Hazards

Always inspect tools and equipment for frayed cords and defective plugs before using them.
Never use a power tool that has had the ground plug removed; inspect the plug.
Never stand in water and operate a power tool without proper (i.e., insulated) footwear.
Keep extension cords out of water when in use.
Consider all power lines “live” and avoid contact with them.
Follow the company assured grounding/electrical protection program.
Disconnect all electrical tools and cords when not in use.
Be use all temporary lighting is equipped with bulb covers.
Make sure all power supplies, circuit boxes and breaker boxes are properly marked to indicate their
purpose.

Remember: The best way to eliminate the hazard of the “quiet killer” is to act as if each exposure
to an electrical hazard may be your last. Never take electricity for granted, “it’s a killer.”

TOPIC: LIGHTINING STRIKES

Seek Shelter
1 – For every 5 seconds you count, lightning is one mile away

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2 – The safest location during lightning activity is in an enclosed building


3 – If outside, seek shelter in a ditch, cave, or canyon
4 – If you are in a wooded area seek shelter in an area of shorter trees and crouch down away
from the tree trunks
5 – Stay off and away from anything tall, i.e. rooftops, scaffolding, ladders, utility poles, etc.
6 – Never use metal objects outside, such as tools, golf clubs, etc.

Stay in Your Vehicle


1 – If you are traveling and no external shelters are present, do not exit your vehicle
2 – The second safest location to be during lightning activity is in a fully enclosed hard topped
car, truck, tractor, etc.
3 – Make sure all doors are closed and roll up all the windows
4 – Do not touch any metal parts of your vehicle
5 – Be sure to stop and park the vehicle (A lightning flash that hits your vehicle may startle you
and cause temporary blindness resulting in an accident.)
6 – Refrain from using the radio and cell phone during a lightning storm

Lightning Strikes
1 – If you feel your skin tingling or your hair stands on end, a lightning strike may be about to
happen, take cover immediately
2 – Get as low to the ground as possible, but DO NOT LAY DOWN
3 – Crouch down on the balls of your feet with your feet together, hands over your head, and
head down
4 – If someone is struck by lightning start cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) immediately
5 – There is no danger to anyone helping a person who has been struck, no electrical charge
remains

I have given Toolbox Talk No. to all the men under my control. A Total of-______
Person attended.

The talk was carried out on……………………………… (Date)

Signed……………………………………Company……………………………………….

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