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2 • August 2012

Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association Medical Plan may cover this examination. Contact your plan provider
Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association Medical Plan may
cover this examination. Contact your plan provider to verify.

Visit us on the web at

www.lafra.org

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COPYRIGHT © 2012

Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association. No material may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher.

Notice: Production of The Firemen’s Grapevine magazine is very expensive, and while your dues serve to underwrite a portion of the magazine’s costs, the bulk of funding comes from advertisers. Many businesses advertise in the Grapevine. This does not mean that LAFRA endorses these advertisers. Use of a Grapevine advertiser is at the risk of the member. If you are interested in any of the advertisements, we urge you to use any and all means at your disposal to investigate them.

use any and all means at your disposal to investigate them. Vol. lXXXIX AUGUST 2012 •

Vol. lXXXIX

AUGUST 2012

• Feature •

Life is One Big sandBOx

No. 01

For those of you who wonder what exactly the Tractor Company does, here’s a little of their history and the role they play within the LAFD today •

 

06

a firefighters MOst functiOnaL tOOL

 

There has long been one axe that stands out in LAFD folklore – the incomparable Seagrave axe •

 

08

retireMent dinners gaLOre

 

LAFD members are retiring at an astounding rate. Check out the dinner announcements and then read the stories about the celebrations •

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40

• contents •

President’s Message •

05

Station Fridge •

10

In Memoriam Stephenie Glas •

11

Battalion News •

13

Retired Guys •

21

Search & Rescue •

23

Service Pension Checklist •

25

Department In Action

26

LAFD Golf Club Championship Tournament •

32

LAFD Handball Two National Champions •

35

Mailbox •

36

Memorials •

38

Retirement Dinner Announcements •

39

Retirement Dinner Celebrations Rodolfo “Rudy” Martinez •

40

Bobby Raya •

41

Bill Gerke •

42

Randy Opperman •

43

Dollars & Sense •

47

LAFD-HS History The GATX fire •

49

Minutes of the Board of Trustees •

52

Classifieds •

57

Tailboard •

61

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Paid Advertisements: 4 • August 2012 FIREMEN’S GRAPEVINE owned and published by the Los Angeles Firemen’s
Paid Advertisements: 4 • August 2012 FIREMEN’S GRAPEVINE owned and published by the Los Angeles Firemen’s

4 • August 2012

FIREMEN’S GRAPEVINE

owned and published by the

Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association

815 Colorado Blvd, 4th Floor, los angeles Ca 90041

EdItoRIAL StAFF

dave Wagner • Editor editor@lafra.org Juan-Carlos Sánchez • Project Coordinator jcsanchez@lafra.org Eric Santiago • Creative Editor esantiago@lafra.org davidVienna•Web/SocialMediaEditor dvienna@lafra.org displayAdvertising (323)259-5200ext.231,232,260

PSo’s

Matt Spence, Brian HuMpHrey, erik Scott

CoNtRIbutING WRItERS

Mike MaStro, Frank Borden, Marc eckStein M.d., JoHn MittendorF, MicHael SteFano, Monte egHerMan, Jody HouSer

PHotoGRAPHERS

david Blaire, doc deMulle’, keitH culloM, roB curtiS, Harry garvin, Juan guerra, Brian HaiMer, gavin kauFMan, ryan ling, rick Mcclure, Mike MeadowS, lloyd payne, JeFF ZiMMerMan, yvonne griFFin, laura licHter.

LoS ANGELES FIREMEN’S RELIEF ASSoCIAtIoN

John JaCoBsen

preSident

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vice-preSident

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boARd oF tRuStEES

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tHE FIREMEN’S GRAPEVINE (USPS 191-060) is published monthly by the Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association, 815 Colorado blvd. 4th Floor, Los Angeles, California 90041. Annual $24 Subscription included with Association membership; Non-members: $36. Single issues $3 postpaid. Back issues $6 postpaid. Periodicals postage paid at Los Angeles, CA and at additional mailing office. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: tHE FIREMEN’S GRAPEVINE Magazine, P.O. BOX 41903, Los Angeles, CA 90041.

Printed by Collective Color, Los Angeles CA. For Classified and Display Advertising rates please call (323) 259-5200, ext. 231, 232 or 260. All editorial matter must be received by the Editor eight weeks prior to the month of publication. The opinions expressed herein are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the official views of the Los Angeles City Fire Department or the Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association.

By John Jacobsen I don’t think anyone in the country has escaped hearing about the
By John Jacobsen I don’t think anyone in the country has escaped hearing about the

By John Jacobsen

By John Jacobsen I don’t think anyone in the country has escaped hearing about the re-

I don’t think anyone in the country has escaped hearing about the re- cent developments dealing with Healthcare Reform. You would have had to been living in a cave or on a remote desert island to escape

the media blitz. It’s been on the radio, the television, the web, in the newspapers and even on the side of buildings in some areas. I’m sure each of us has tried to absorb and follow along with the key points of the legislation, or then again maybe you haven’t. (A desert island might not be that bad) Regardless, most of us have the same concerns and questions of how is this going to affect us. Is this going to raise our healthcare premiums? Is access to doctors for my family going to be reduced? How is this all going to work? The simple answer is that we can only take an educated guess on some of the provisions and the final outcome is going to be determined sometime in the future for a lot of the changes. LAFRA has implemented several of the changes already and we are planning in anticipation of the upcoming ones as they unfold. If you take a look at the timeline for the entire Affordable Care Act, each year has several different developments and/or requirements that need to be complied with. It is difficult to say with the utmost certainty the full impact of the legislation because it has been and continues to be somewhat of a moving target. Provisions are being defined or clarified continuously and it’s my opinion that this will continue to be the case. Rest assured, almost everything to do with healthcare has a cost associated with it, whether it is a savings or increase. As the changes or mandates unfold we will do our best to keep you informed of how each will impact you and your family. Our current pharmaceutical benefit manager Medco recently merged with Express Scripts and combined to form one company which will be known as Express Scripts. On September 1, 2012, the process of introduc- ing the Express Scripts name to Medco members will begin. This means the website, customer service representatives, and written communications will begin referencing the Express Scripts name. Even though the name is changing, the way our plan members order prescriptions, contact customer service and access the website will remain the same.

What will change on September 1? • The Express Scripts name and brand will appear on most member communications starting September 1. • All references to the Medco name/logo on the current website will change to Express Scripts, BUT the web address - www. medco.com - will remain the same. If you have a link to this website from your computer, you do not need to change it.

• Communication pieces such as Explanation of Benefits (EOBs), or those encouraging the use of preferred medications such as generics, will reference Express Scripts.

• Customer service representative greetings will include this transitional messaging: “Medco is now a part of the Express Scripts family of pharmacies.”

• Literature packets and communications associated with prescrip- tions ordered through the mail will include information about the name change. There may be times when members will still see references to Medco as well as Express Scripts until the full transition is complete.

What remains the same?

• How you order prescriptions or contact the Medco Pharmacy remains the same.

• Members can continue to refill their prescriptions by using their current ID card, refill order forms, the website, or the toll-free member services telephone number on their ID card.

I hope no one is going into information overload at this point, but we

need to get the word out sooner than later. The bottom line for our LAFRA

PPO Medical Plan members is this: the Medco name is being replaced with Express Scripts. Other than that notable change, everything else should re- main the same.

I want to say thank you to the 40+% of our Relief Association members

who are currently contributing to the Widows, Orphans & Disabled Fire- men’s Fund through payroll deduction. Many of you have been contributing since the day you signed up in the Drill Tower. This includes both our active and retired members alike and is something that should be commended. It would be quite an impressive feat if we could attain 100% participation and even if the amount contributed was as little as the cost of a cup of fancy coffee. It’s as easy as making a phone call to get started or to adjust your

deduction. (323) 259-5200 Ext. 223 Sales pitch is over, but all of you know how important this is.

Respectfully, Respectfully,
Respectfully, Respectfully,

John E. Jacobsen President@lafra.org 323 259-5200

By sergio Mayorga, FF/heo, Fs 109-c

LAFD

B y s ergio M ayorga , FF/heo, Fs 109-c LAFD Mountain Patrol - circa 1967
Mountain Patrol - circa 1967
Mountain Patrol - circa 1967

Through the years, the Mountain Pa- trol acquired many pieces of apparatus includ- ing trucks, tractors, and trailers. The amount of land covered also increased. In 1961, depart- ment dozers were used during the Bel Air fire and saved homes by widening firebreaks and placing lines behind homes. In the years that followed, the civil- ian crew was released and the Tractor Compa- ny was closed and reopened a couple of times. Finally in 1995, Chief Donald F. Anthony be- gan rebuilding the Tractor Company, and by the year 2000, six operators were assigned to Fire Station 88.

today

Today’s Tractor Company (aka Heavy Equipment Company) is part of the Wildland Fuel Management Unit and is located at FS109. It has two firefighters on special duty working 10 hour shifts as acting captains, and six heavy equipment operators (HEO’s) - two per shift.

F or those of you who wonder what exact- ly the tractor company does, this article will explain a little bit about the history

of the tractor company and what role we play in the fire department today.

HiStory The genesis of the tractor company began in 1924 with Mountain Patrol 1 - located in Coldwater Canyon, and Mountain Patrol 2 - located in Sepulveda Canyon. The patrols were housed in two water department buildings and staffed with a battalion chief, firefighters, and civilians. The 108 mile area was divided into districts, and patrolled by firefighters who would report and mount an initial attack on any fires in the district. Civilian workers cut and maintained the fire roads, trails, and firebreaks.

6 • August 2012

overhauling the universal Fire
overhauling the universal Fire

Today’s Tractor Company is respon- sible for maintaining 54 miles of fire roads, and 28 miles of fire breaks annually. Other opera- tions include towing apparatus of all types and overhauling major fires. The Tractor Company also responds to brushfires with bulldozers and/ or water tenders. In addition, active firefight- ing is done with our equipment. For example, HEO’s were on scene at the Universal Studios fire, the auto wrecking yard fires, as well as the metal fires. The company also handles the re- moval of mud flow debris, roadway slides, and sandbag deliveries. The tractor company deliv- ers all the drill cars for training to the Frank Hotchkin Memorial Training Center and fire stations, and assists the U.S.A.R, Hazmat, Air Ops, and Building Administration with their projects.

In addition to our duties during the day, at night, tractor operators rotate between Rescue 909 and Engine 109. Recently we were put in charge of the rehab tender for FS 83 and the light utility. According to the year-end report for 2011, the tractor company saved the depart-

ment a total of $352,435.00 when compared to the cost of hiring outside contractors to do this varied work. A summary of the savings is as follows:

• Fire Break Maintenance - $42,644

• Fire Road Maintenance - $113,883

• Roadway Slides Cleared - $3,332

• Washout Repairs with Drain Installa- tion - $3,570 • Overhauls - $94,381 • Tows
• Washout Repairs with Drain Installa-
tion - $3,570
• Overhauls - $94,381
• Tows - $57,960
• Sand and Sand Bag Deliveries -
$10,000
• Misc. Projects - $26,665
The duties of a HEO for the tractor
company are varied and require many hours of
training. Upcoming articles will provide more
information about specific Tractor Company
operations.
laFD MeMBers Michael valas, sergio Mayorga,
steve Dyer anD roBerto Martinez train with
ventura co. Fire.

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August 2012 • 7
FireMan’s axe - Pick heaD MoDel A ccording to the LAFD Drill Manu-
FireMan’s axe - Pick heaD MoDel
A ccording to
the LAFD
Drill Manu-
axe - Pick heaD MoDel A ccording to the LAFD Drill Manu- al, the pickhead axe

al, the pickhead axe is one of the most func- tional tools carried on fire apparatus. Its multiple uses have long- proven valuable, and the pride in which mem- bers care for this tool is unparalleled. Whether venting a Victorian or breaching a wall, the pickhead axe has time and again proven to be a firefighter’s best friend. So valued is this tool, that many have come to define “firemanship” by how well a member performs once forced to unscabbard their axe. LAFD axes come in different shapes and sizes, and are equipped with synthetic han- dles instead of the traditional wood. As irrever-

ent as this may sound, today’s firefighters actu- ally prefer an artificial handle over the prestige and elegance of hickory or ash. That said, there has long been one axe that stands out amongst all others in LAFD folklore; the incomparable Seagrave axe. While the allure of the Seagrave axe may be known to many, it’s the history be- hind the axe that may surprise even more. Aesthetically, the head of a Seagrave axe is unlike any pickhead axe ever made. There are four distinct traits differentiating this axe from all others: (1) the overall length is lon- ger, (2) the breadth of the blade is more slender, (3) the pick angle is cast slightly downward, and (4) the axe-lip (where the handle enters the head) is diamond-shaped. Note: the term “Sea- grave axe” is a moniker given this tool by fire- men long ago, and NOT by the manufacturer or the LAFD.

By Jerry BeDoya, caPtain, Fs 10-c

In 1826, blacksmith’s Samuel and David Collins and their wealthy cousin found- ed an axe manufacturing business on the banks of the Farmington River in South Canton, CT. Despite the Industrial Revolution having com- menced seventy-five years earlier, it still took blacksmiths of that era an entire day to produce a single unsharpened axe. The three men con- cluded if they could mass-produce high quality, sharpened axes at a low price point then sales would flourish. They went on to name their new venture, Collins & Co. Simply stated, the three men were in- novators with backgrounds in fabrication and finance. They began their manufacturing enter- prise by bringing in several blacksmith’s from

caPt selwyn lloyD receiveD an authentic seagrave axe FroM the MeMBers at 10’s uPon his
caPt selwyn lloyD receiveD an authentic
seagrave axe FroM the MeMBers at 10’s
uPon his ProMotion. here he’s with his
crew at 73’s.
Photo By gavin kauFMan, FF/PM, Fs 93-a

8 • August 2012

neighboring areas and making each a special- ist in a single aspect of the fabrication process. This commitment to specialization enabled Collins & Co. to mass-produce high quality axes which were sharpened, less costly and ready for use immediately upon purchase. Manufacturing outputs steadily in- creased over the years as newer machines and innovative ideas were introduced. The Collins Co. expanded into making various other edge tools in an effort to supply the ever-demanding contracting needs of that era. They eventu- ally entered the international market to service the harvesting demands of Central and South America as well as the West Indies and Cuba. The Collins Company evolved into a legiti- mate global competitor and in time became the world’s leading axe manufacturer. This global prominence, however, resulted in serious complications as competi- tors began counterfeiting their axes and mar- keting labels. Although several US patents were obtained in an effort to curtail such prac- tices, none of them proved as constructive as the stamping of the company emblem on their axes. The stamped insignia of a Crown, Arm & Hammer above the word “Legitimus” along with the names of “Collins & Co” and “Hart- ford,” was thereafter etched into the axes. Coinciding with the company’s growth and area development, the Collinsville

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More than anything, however, Root re-concep- tualized the making of axes which catapulted The Collins Co into the world’s leading axe manufacturer. Elisha K. Root’s inventiveness

Volunteer Fire Department established itself in 1846. Shortly thereafter the company fabri- cated a unique looking axe (Seagrave axe) for the Collinsville fire engine which they aptly

named the “Fireman Axe.” Years later Fredric soon became widely acclaimed, and within

Seagrave, founder of the Seagrave Corpora- tion, commissioned The Collins Co. to provide a similar axe as standard compliment on all new Seagrave fire engines. In addition to the standard insignia, those made exclusively for Seagrave also included the wording “Expressly Made for the Seagrave Corporation.” Although no definitive proof has been found as to when the production of the Seagrave axe was discon- tinued, it is believed to be circa 1921 as low production numbers ceased to justify cost. Aside from the Collins brothers, a machinist by the name of Elisha K. Root be- came the company’s most notable employee. In 1830, Root invented “die casting” which was critical in the production of their high quality axes. Unlike “mold casting,” die casting in- volved injecting metal into a mold under high pressure thus creating a more uniform product with dimensional accuracy. The costly post- machining of axes had now been eliminated thanks to Root’s ingenuity. Elisha K. Root went on to create several more patents, including an automated machine that shaved the blade of axes in an ef- fort to reduce the cost of grindstone finishing.

time captured the attention of another famous

industrialist. In 1849, gun maker Samuel Colt (Colt 45) recognized the industrialist nature of Elisha K. Root and hired him away from The Collins Company. Root went on to carry out his duties with great success, developing sev- eral more techniques and machinery related to the gun industry. Root’s contributions to the Colt industry were so noteworthy that after Samuel Colt’s death in 1862, Elisha K. Root was named president of Colt Firearms. After 140 years of success and com- munity pride, The Collins Company closed its doors for the final time in 1966. Today, twenty- six of the original factory buildings remain in large part due to the efforts of the Canton His- torical Museum. As you’ve just read, the origin of the incomparable Seagrave axe has tentacles far beyond that of simple fabrication. Therefore, let us be mindful of the perspective one gets when piercing into the light of darkness, as it can inspire an appreciation for what may often-

times appear

insignificant.

the light of darkness, as it can inspire an appreciation for what may often- times appear

10 • August 2012

S tephenie was born in Re- dondo Beach on a warm day in August of
S tephenie was born in Re- dondo Beach on a warm day in August of
S tephenie was born in Re- dondo Beach on a warm day in August of
S tephenie was born in Re- dondo Beach on a warm day in August of
S tephenie was born in Re- dondo Beach on a warm day in August of
S tephenie was born in Re- dondo Beach on a warm day in August of
S tephenie was born in Re- dondo Beach on a warm day in August of
S tephenie was born in Re- dondo Beach on a warm day in August of

S tephenie was born in Re-

dondo Beach on a warm

day in August of 1974.

She was always a happy child except when it was time to go to bed. I used to think that may- be she thought her dad and I were going to have a party after she fell asleep and she didn’t want to miss out. Stephenie loved the outdoors immensely. She en- joyed the camping trips we took and the chance to stay up late with her mom and dad. She was a delightful child and took an interest in skateboarding, reading and playing sports with the boys in the neighborhood. Her inter- est in competitive sports started in the seventh grade. She really enjoyed track and field as well, and that interest continued in high school. I used to go weak in the knees when I watched her jump hurdles. Stephenie set the bar extremely high for herself. She was never happy with anything but an A. Her grades were excellent in high

school and she was accepted to seven universities. She chose UCLA and graduated with honors with a degree in psychology. After graduation Stephenie started her own business, “Glas Fitness.” As a personal trainer Stephenie did what she loved, helping people get healthy and strong. This preparation proved to be the catalyst for a career as a firefighter. After six years of disappointments, she was finally accepted to the Los Angeles Fire Department. Although Stephenie was proud to be a firefighter, and pleased that firefighting fulfilled her need to work hard, give support to her team and serve the community, she still needed to do more. She spent the last two years of her life giving service and support to her own community, Malibu. By working closely with her boyfriend, Stephenie spent long hours conceiving ideas, formulating plans and interviewing members of the community that wanted to restore the Malibu Lagoon. She created a web site that educated the community and gave historical reference to the Chumash that inhabited Malibu. And she lovingly found time to mountain bike, kite surf, snowboard, train clients and workout to keep herself fit. Stephenie created an impact on many people’s lives. She was remarkable. Her father and I will miss her every day for the rest of our lives. Thank you to everyone that shared in the celebration of her life.

Patricia Glas

A portion of fire-related jewelry profits donated to the Widows, Orphans and Disabled Firemen’s Fund.
A portion of fire-related
jewelry profits donated to
the Widows, Orphans and
Disabled Firemen’s Fund.
Paid Advertisement:

12 • August 2012

the views expressed by the battalion News writers do Not necessarily reflect those of the

the views expressed by the battalion News writers do Not necessarily reflect those of the Firemen’s Relief Association

One of the bigwigs at AEG, the group that controls Staples Center, had his “day
One of the bigwigs at AEG, the
group that controls Staples Center, had his
“day with the cup” in June and wanted to
share with the public servants who help to
protect the folks at Staples. On June 28, 2012,
the Stanley Cup made its rounds around the
LA Live area and was at Fire Station 10 from
noon until 1400 hours. The Cup also visited
the Fire Prevention Bureau, the LAPD divi-
sion and then was on to Children’s Hospital to
shareshare withwith thethe kids.kids.
Photos by Rob CuRtis, A/o, Fs 89
Greetings once again from the sin- ners and the saints of the Second Battalion Lots

Greetings once again from the sin- ners and the saints of the Second Battalion Lots of comings and goings this month. A/O Jessie Wong jumps out of the pool at One’s for a permanent home at 50’s on the ‘A.’ Eng/PM Ricolas Riddall mutuals out of Highland Park for 11’s and FF Ara Hagopian leaves the Double Nickle for Accounting. To ease the pain of our loss Captain I Phil Domin- guez will lead the brave at 12’s on the ‘A.’ CI Duc Nguyen returns to his old stomping grounds in El Sereno, CI/PM Kristina Kepner will call 12’s home, Engineer Gregory Stone- braker mutuals out of 11’s and into 12’s, and last, but certainly not least, FF Daniel Carillo will hang his PPE’s up in Highland Park. Remember we start off liking you, you’ll have to do something to change that. Let me start with the sad news from our beloved battalion this month. As you have probably heard, Engine 44 and Rescue One’s best efforts were unsuccessful in reviving Inspector Jerald Coates who resides in 44’s first in and would park his inspectormobile in their parking lot. Light Forces One and Three

in their parking lot. Light Forces One and Three F roM what i saw anD hearD

FroM what i saw anD hearD not knowing the Man was My loss.

were present with crossed aerials at the post memorial service at Frank’s Place. While I

didn’t know him, judging from the turnout and and the ‘A’ and

the stories told it was my loss. This brings me to the good news. The depart- ment sponsored show of respect and support for the family is reminiscent of an earlier time where there was little noticeable separation between the leadership and the rank and file.

coming back from a four day

‘B’ were able to show their pride and do the

heavy lifting

anyway, all hands at 50’s are

working hard to make the house and appara- tus sparkle in between calls to save lives and property. Come 7 pm it is noticed by those in charge that the intensity of the work is begin- ning to wane as the crew grows weak from hunger, so a pizza solution is considered. As

For a while political and luck would have it a long ring comes in before

promotional aspirations were set aside and the Fire Department fam-

ily was whole again. It gives me hope for the future. To quote Luke Skywalker as he battled

Darth Vader

is still good in you. I can to any form of sustenance is lost. The Rescue

feel it.”

I would also be remiss

in my duties if I didn’t

give proper credit to Battalion 2 Chief Rudy

Hill who made the

rounds on Father’s Day

to deliver pies for des-

sert. MARIE CALEN- DER pies! Thank you

Chief, unexpected gifts come from the heart. Again it gives me hope for the future.

A story has made its

way to me this month about the big Five-O. The day before June’s ‘C’ shift Battalion Inspection, yes, the one where the ‘C’ shift was

the weakest link

the pizza plan can be implemented. After aid is rendered to a critical minor constituent, two members from the Light Force accompany Rescue 55 to Children’s Hospital. Once their task has been accomplished, the helpful pair wait patiently for their compatri- ots to come and pick them up. Forty five min- utes pass and hope for timely transportation

completes all of their paperwork, so pity is taken upon the deserted duo and a ride back to

quarters is offered. As their destination looms on the horizon the truck and pump are noticed safely parked within view of a nearby Denny’s. Having just enough reserve strength

to make their way into the restaurant and to

the table of their comrades, they discover that

if they carefully brush the table cloth with

a butter knife and are willing to suck on the

leftover ice cubes they will be strong enough

to make it back to quarters and continue pre-

paring for inspection

‘til midnight.

This is why I maintain that there should be at

least some math on ALL promotional exams.

Send your version of the truth to:

battalion7news@yahoo.com

“There

version of the truth to: battalion7news@yahoo.com “There “l ight F orce o ne anD l ight

“light Force one anD light Force three were ProuD to Be Part oF the DePartMents show oF suPPort For the FaMily oF insPector JeralD coates.

to Be Part oF the D ePartMent ’ s show oF suPPort For the FaMily oF

14 • August 2012

Out with the old and in with the old?!? Recently retired bull engineer Wayne Nakamura
Out with the old and in with the
Out with the old
and in with the

old?!? Recently retired bull engineer Wayne Nakamura made his way down to FS 85 to present Matt Powell with the department bull (looks like someone fixed the broken horn). The newest bull engineer promoted to rank in July of 1981 – that’s over thirty years ago!! Matt was also presented with the new “bull engineer plaque” made by Dustin Bulmer of FS 89-A.

“bull engineer plaque” made by Dustin Bulmer of FS 89-A. Let me start this story by
“bull engineer plaque” made by Dustin Bulmer of FS 89-A. Let me start this story by

Let me start this story by letting you know this was a out-of-battalion Chief. No Battalion 9 chief was harmed in this story at any time. So let the buffoonery begin. LAPD bomb squad comes across some unexploded ordinance than needs to be safely disposed of (blown up) on the beach in 23’s first in. En- gine 23 lets the B/C know about the upcoming fireworks show. Battalion 9 responds emergen- cy to the beach, head clouded with thoughts of rocket’s red glare and bombs bursting in air. A young PD officer stops the chief at the gate and says, “Sir you can’t come in THIS WAY.” The chief responds, “Hey KID, see this red suburban with a Nine on it? Yeah, I do what I want.” Well, when Officer Friendly said “THIS WAY” it was to keep the chief from running over the EXIT only, one way spikes! Yikes! Four flat tires later, Heavy Rescue is cruising to the beach at midnight with four fresh tires and a slice of warm humble pie. Moral of the story - no matter how cool you think you are, spike strips always win.

Captain Jaramillo is slowly easing into the 37’s routine. He went from suppos- edly “Do It” at 9’s to slaying the automatic dragon at 37’s. He still likes to remind the guys at 37’s how tough he is though. What better way to show them how tough than by tearing your bicep off on the handball court. Be careful Cap, too many injury’s will get you banned from the court, according to manage- ment.

Jim Prabhu and Jorge Ostrovsky recently finished interviews for the Ride for 911 documentary which should be airing in the next few months - keep an eye out. Some goodbyes now. Dave Allen retired out of 23’s - “Never get out of the cab. If you break rule one, never cross the curb and never take your hands out of your pockets.” Ron Lingo and Chris Dale retired out of 69’s. Captains George Roque (37) and Tom Haus (19) both transferred somewhere. They were replaced with a large bags of saw- dust.

It’s not personal, It’s just business ninewriter@yahoo.com

not personal, It’s just business ninewriter@yahoo.com l ast Month the guys at 39-c were treateD to

last Month the guys at 39-c were treateD to a taco cartDinner By e.i.t. anD all-arounD gooD guy Joe Porras. Joe also haD the whole FaMily in, incluDing the granDkiDs, to celeBrate 35 years oF service with the laFD.

Pilot scott BowMan was recently in- tervieweD For the PrograM “caught on taPe” which airs
Pilot scott BowMan was recently in-
tervieweD For the PrograM “caught on
taPe” which airs on MsnBc.
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16 • August 2012

P ilot -i n -c o M M a n D guarDing shiP’s cockPit Recently
P ilot -i n -c o M M a n D guarDing shiP’s cockPit
P ilot -i n -c o M M a n D
guarDing shiP’s cockPit

Recently the department was requested to participate in the American Hero’s Air Show. An Air Ambulance was sent to be part of the display. As usual it was a full day with lots of visitors. So as the story goes the Pilot-In-Command decided that he would take first lunch, and his last words to the

crew were, “Don’t let ANYBODY ANY visitors in the cockpit. So after stating

that HIS kids would be OK, the chiefs’ chil- dren enjoyed their time in the cockpit as the other visitors looked on.

into the cockpit,” concerned that any one of the hundreds of buttons, switches, dials, levers, or knobs could be moved, compromising the

aircrafts readiness to respond or operate with the highest level of safety. Well that’s not really the story,

here’s the story

Sometime while the Pilot-

In-Command was away, foraging for lunch, an Off-Duty B/C arrived to show HIS children the LAFD helicopter. As the chief reached for the cockpit door, the crew dutifully informed HIM that the Pilot-In-Command did not want

informed HIM that the Pilot-In-Command did not want In the late afternoon of July 6th, a

In the late afternoon of July 6th, a Cadillac Escalade with two people inside lost control and struck the rear of a parked tractor-trailer rig in the 8400 block of Foothill Blvd in Sunland. Arriving on scene, Light Force 74 determined that the SUV needed to be removed from under the trailer and used their engine to pull it out. The driver had been pinned under the steering wheel and the passenger wedged under the trailer bed. 77’s, 24’s, 98’s and a few battalion 14 companies helped with the extrication and treatment of the patients.

Photos by David “Doc” DeMulle’

helped with the extrication and treatment of the patients. Photos by David “Doc” DeMulle’ August 2012
helped with the extrication and treatment of the patients. Photos by David “Doc” DeMulle’ August 2012
Greetings from the Battalion that never sleeps! First of all, I’d like to say “Thank

Greetings from the Battalion that never sleeps! First of all, I’d like to say “Thank You” to one of the Stalwarts of Battalion 13 that finally/begrudgingly moved to greener pastures out at FS 87. Many current engineers owe Steve Canchola a huge thank you for the knowledge and work ethic he instilled and expected from everybody that was around him. Good luck out there Steve and I hope they ordered double the amount of metal polish,

because their rigs are in for a real treat. Also, recently the Hope For Firefight- er’s event was held downtown. Couldn’t have picked a better day to enjoy a full cornucopia of delectable delights. Perfect weather, good times, and plenty of food served for a really great cause! Thank you to all who participated and congrats to FS 60 on the win. Another month and another Bi-

Monthly Inspection

Bi-Monthly Inspection on May 5th, and here it

is again on June 11th I guess since we just

had it, it shouldn’t be that hard to “maintain” all the previous month’s work along with a little

tidying up. Although I know that everybody in the battalion didn’t rest on their past laurels and made sure that they still gave the chief a good inspection. Diamond-plate was re-polished, station floors were re-stripped and waxed, and PPE’s were once again swapped out to the lesser used set. Apparently everything went well, and thanks to everybody for all the hard work. See you July 17th for the next one?!? Speaking of inspection and inspec-

tion prep

any suspense and talk about 65’s right from the start. From what I hear, if you’re looking for a SOD day, sign-up right before inspection. Apparently, out of the eight normally assigned members, only four were working the shift before. So when it comes time to do the 5054’s and the captain calls for a little help, it’s usually

Yes I know, we just had

I think this month I will bypass

the normally assigned personnel, not the out

of house guys

not sure if that means that

as if there were three non-shifters and one

regular shifter until the regular shifter up-and- walked away from the table and then there was just three non-shifters. Talk about shift pride! Later in the day, while two out-of-house guys are washing, waxing and detailing the reserve RA 65, the previously mentioned, normally assigned member looked at the work they were putting in and then looked at his front-line RA

865 and

theme?). I guess the saying, “a little work goes

a long way” was the motto of the day

was it, “a little work and up-and walk away?” Anyway Inspection went fine and all is well. I’m still waiting on info for next month’s issue, so keep your fingers crossed! Last month we had a full Lunar Eclipse which is fairly rare, but even more out of the ordinary is an officer riding on an 800 series ambulance. This could be a question from the next chief’s test, so all you studiers pay attention. Recently I was told about the strange sight, when RA 866 was dispatched into 57’s district. You can imagine the surprised looks when the 800 pulls up and expecting two FF’s to get out, they saw a Capt II get out instead. When asked why he was on the 800, he simply said,” just making it work.” Turns out that Engine 66 was shut down for EMT and there was an extra guy. The Captain I is on the II’s list, so in order to allow the Captain I to get some experience on the truck and the cook to stay un-interrupted, the C-2 jumped on the 800

attendant spot and did what’s right for his crew. whole car and only had minimal damage. Nice

This also allowed two meals to be prepared and put on the table on time. Seems like no big deal, but we’ve all seen some that would need

to go do “office work” or whatever, not to make Stay safe, and keep taking care of one another!

it work. No wonder he’s been passed over for

B/C a few times

can’t believe that an officer would go to those measures, well congratulations, you’ve prob- ably already promoted past that. Just sayin’ Finally, I received a comment from one of the previous articles regarding the cook

Kudos to the guys riding RA846 when this next incident happened. RA846 was dispatched to a traffic accident and when they got there, it turned out to be an auto fire in the parking lot of a grocery store. They were able to put two dry chems on it before it took the

who didn’t want to cook. The statement was

. well the shortened statement was, “you get out

what you put in”

if you put in effort you get effort back, or if you

don’t make any effort then you won’t get any effort back. Maybe he was trying to quote Jules Winnfield, and he’s not sure if he’s The Righ- teous Man or maybe The Shepherd? Anyway, from what I hear, his frozen bag of chicken

wings isn’t the worst thing being served up to a hungry hard working crew. Apparently there’s

a guy in the next battalion over that wants a run

for the Championship! At FS 14 on the “A” days, if you’re lucky enough to work the day before inspection or any other day the captain may cook, you are really in for a gourmet treat! And by gourmet, be prepared to be wowed by such delights as: boiled hot dogs on generic

wheat bread

cans of Ragu sauce with hot

dogs in it (common theme? Is the crew made

up of 5 year olds?)

wait there’s more?!?

. and to really add some zest to it, chop up last

night’s salmon and put it in the sauce and serve over a bed of overcooked pasta. And finally comes the ever favorite lunch consisting of

chopped up iceberg lettuce with two cans of

partly drained tuna in oil (I always wondered who bought that and I guess now I know) and

the outcome is

tuna salad.

or am I screwed up? Seems

up-and-walked away (on-going

or

work and quick thinking! I know we all get paid to “do your job”, but nice head’s up! Well that’s all I’ve got for this month.

. and remember, 2+2 makes sense, play nice,

stay marginal, know your audience, get a cool nickname, figure out which formula you use before the media gets a hold of it, and “you get out what you put in.” Keep sending your stories to:

wattsfire@gmail.com

and for those of you who

stories to: wattsfire@gmail.com and for those of you who c oMManD P ost at n orth

coMManD Post at north hollywooD MiDDle school (60’s First-in) aFter a sMall aciD release in the science

laB on June 11, 2012.

Photo By Mike MeaDows, ePn

18 • August 2012

a sMall aciD release in the s cience l aB on J une 11, 2012. P
Battalion 15 MeMBers workeD a sMall Brush Fire along the 118 Fwy at BalBoa on
Battalion 15 MeMBers workeD a
sMall Brush Fire along the 118 Fwy
at BalBoa on July 11, 2012.
Photos By ryan BaBroFF, ePn

lF 96 showeD uP For a little Pr to show their suPPort at the granD oPening oF the orange line extension in chatsworth.

Pr to show their suPPort at the granD oPening oF the o range l ine e
t ask F orce anD r escue 94 resPonDeD to an auto that knockeD Down
t ask F orce anD r escue 94 resPonDeD to an auto that knockeD Down
t ask F orce anD r escue 94 resPonDeD to an auto that knockeD Down

task Force anD rescue 94 resPonDeD to an auto that knockeD Down a Power Pole anD knockeD oFF a Fire hyDrant on June 29, 2012. the inciDent occureD on la cienega near BlackwelDer anD culver city Fire assisteD.

Photos By Brian haiMer

ulver c ity F ire assisteD . P hotos By B rian h aiMer 20 •
ulver c ity F ire assisteD . P hotos By B rian h aiMer 20 •

20 • August 2012

congratulations to Mike (MFc-a) anD Jessica horst on the Birth oF their First chilD a BaBy girl naMeD colette renee. Born on aPril 9th anD weighing 7 lBs. 12 oz, her Favorite lulla- Bies are “Mary haD a little laMBanD “MFc, we have a looM uP!!” shes a welcoMe aDDition to the horst FireFighting FaMily!! the First Photo is the one MoM wanteD in Print. the sec- onD is one For DaD to Be ProuD oF.

FireFighting FaMily !! t he First Photo is the one MoM wanteD in Print . t
I’ve always had a hard time with change. Whether it was changin’ from them F-173

I’ve always had a hard time with change. Whether it was changin’ from them F-173 cards to computerized Fire Prevention files or the permanent removal of all buck- ets from fire station roofs, changin’ stuff that seemed to work pretty dang well didn’t always make sense to me. I recently read that the Ko- dak Theatre in Hollywood has been changed to “Hollywood & Highland Center.” This imaginative name change came about because the 131 year old Eastman Kodak Company is broke and has filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Hence, Kodak no longer can afford to pay for their name to be on the theatre. Hey, I know two retired Captain II’s that could easily put Kodak back in the black! Anyway, according to the experts, 35 millimeter film is comin’ to the end of its life. And because theaters now receive their films by satellite or via hard drives delivered by courier, film is practically a thing of the past. We’re in the digital age! Lots of other stuff is changin’ as well. I had lunch the other day with one of them “rich” retired Captain II’s, and afterwards we went to one of them fancy “coffee” hangouts. You know, where people sit in silence with their smart phones and lap tops. No kiddin’, I thought we were goin’ to get kicked out for disturbin’ the peace, because we were the only two people makin’ audible conversation! Everyone there was either on their phone or computer. In fact, one female was usin’ both devices at the same time! I mention all this because one day verbal conversation will go the way of 35 millimeter film. Textin’ will replace talkin’ and the desire to exchange verbal ideas will probably become obsolete. You know there’s another serious implica- tion that also must be considered with the loss of verbal conversation; the mentality insane. Those who claim they hear voices may have to re-think their defense strategy!

hear voices may have to re-think their defense strategy! So, does this also mean that my

So, does this also mean that my wife and I are goin’ to have to text one another while we’re in bed instead of whisperin’ sweet nothin’s in each other’s ear? I can see it now. I’ll text her, “XOXO,” and she’ll text back, “LOL.”

text her, “XOXO,” and she’ll text back, “LOL.” COWBOY HUMOR mind us, we’re joined at the

COWBOY HUMOR

mind us, we’re joined at the hip. I’m John and here on my right is Jim. Two beers please.” The bartender, feeling kind of awk- ward, tries to make polite conversation while pouring the beers and asks, “Been on holiday yet, lads?”

“Off to England next month,” says John. “We go to England every year, rent a car and drive for miles, don’t we Jim?” Jim nods his head in agreement. “Ah, England,” says the bartender. “Wonderful country, the history, the beer, the culture.”

“Nah, we don’t like all that British baloney,” says John. “We can’t stand the Eng- lish. They’re so arrogant and rude and it’s too crowded, lousy food and terrible warm beer.” “So why keep going to England?”

Siamese twins walk into a bar in New York. One of them says

to the bartender, “Don’t asks the bartender.

“It’s the only chance Jim gets to

drive.”

KEEP SMILIN’!

aC

choppedup@att.net

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• The size and type of structure will dictate its floor plan, which able location
• The size and type of structure will dictate its floor plan, which able location

• The size and type of structure will dictate its floor plan, which able location is to follow the attack line to the nozzle. To affect a timely

rescue, a search team should initially follow and search along the path of the attack line to the nozzle, including the general area around the nozzle. Therefore, it is imperative that personnel practice and become familiar with the concept of following a hose line with only their hands as a reference point. It is also essential that personnel are able to feel a coupling with their gloved hands and be able to quickly determine their direc- tion of travel to the nozzle (interior) or the pump (exterior) along the hoseline. This is easily accomplished as follows; assume a nozzle is connected to a male coupling. Therefore, the hoseline behind male couplings lead towards the pump (outside the structure) and the hose- line behind female couplings will lead towards the nozzle (into the structure). With practice, it is easy to distinguish between a male and female coupling by feel only. A female coupling is twice as long as a male coupling, and the lugs on a male coupling are twice as long as the lugs on a female coupling (Figure 1). Additionally, before entering a structure for a search operation along a hoseline, determine from the proper pump engineer the appropriate hose line to follow into the struc- ture, how many feet of line is into the structure, and what is the type of hose lay (forward or reverse). Remember that a 2-1/2-inch line can be forward or reverse and 1-3/4, 1-1/2 and 1-inch lines are forward only. Every firefighter whether involved in a search or not should be familiar with this concept. 3. Area. It is often necessary to search an unknown area for known or potential victims. Entering the initial entrance opening and turning left or right, following a hoseline or search line will determine the path of travel while searching through the area-structure.

• When entering a centrally located room (i.e., bedroom)

in turn will determine the type of search to be used.

• Search operations for children and adults are not the same.

Children can hide anywhere and adults will try to escape (avenues of

egress). Additionally, when searching for a firefighter, although they can be anywhere, their last approximate location is often known.

• When searching commercial buildings, forget the residential mindset for the following reasons:

1. Large floor plans require more time to be searched.

2. A two person search team is probably insufficient.

3. The apprehension level of personnel is likely increased.

4. Commercials can require considerably more air than resi- dential structures. Big buildings mean big air!

5. Fire load will likely be greater than residential structures.

6. Specific search patterns may be necessary.

• If a search cannot be completed or a specific area cannot be

searched, the incident commander must be notified in a timely manner. This will allow another search team to complete the search when ap- propriate. As an example, attics can be a difficult area to search as they are normally above a fire and are not easy to enter or exit. However, due to the difficulty of being able to easily access an attic, it may be advantageous to search an attic area after the fire has been controlled or

mitigated. As a side note, there is a big difference between an attic with

a substantial stairway and a fold-down stairway or a small ladder for access/egress.

through a window, remember that the door to the room is normally located across from the window (to provide natural ventilation for the room) and the doors in corner bedrooms are normally located in the corner of two walls (remember to look at the common floor plans of homes in your district on EMS calls, etc). Before entering a window, always clear all glass (as the window opening will also be your exit point) and after entering the room, evaluate the benefits of

closing the door to the room.

• When entering a struc-

ture, three factors usually deter-

mine the path of search as follows:

1. Information gathered

from occupants or firefighting personnel prior to entry. As an ex- ample, occupants who have exited

a structure should know who is

still in the structure and their ap- proximate location.

2. Attack Line. Assume

an attack line is inside a structure and it is suddenly determined the attack team needs to be rescued (flashover, building collapse, etc). The most direct path to their prob-

team needs to be rescued (flashover, building collapse, etc). The most direct path to their prob-
Arson Shoot-Out Golf Tournament at the Braemar Country Club 4001 Reseda Boulevard, Tarzana Monday, October
Arson Shoot-Out Golf Tournament at the Braemar Country Club 4001 Reseda Boulevard, Tarzana Monday, October
Arson Shoot-Out Golf Tournament at the Braemar Country Club 4001 Reseda Boulevard, Tarzana Monday, October

Arson Shoot-Out Golf Tournament at the Braemar Country Club

4001 Reseda Boulevard, Tarzana

Monday, October 22, 2012, 6:30 AM Check-in & 7:30 AM Shotgun Start

Partner’s (Two-Person) Scramble Format ($100 per Player)

Includes: Continental Breakfast, Range Balls, Raffle Prizes, Tri-Tip or Chicken Lunch, Cash Prizes & Trophy Plaques for Flight Winners

Entry is due no later than October 10, 2012. Your payment confirms your spot! Tournament is limited to first 144 players. Contact Mike Camello or Tim Crass for additional information and/or donations and special contributions. Proceeds will be donated to the Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association Widows, Orphans and Disabled Firefighters Fund.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Make check(s) payable and mail to: LAFD Arson Investigators Golf 1700 Stadium Way, Room 109 Los Angeles, CA 90012

Name:

Index:

SCGA No

Name:

Index:

SCGA No

Provide the SCGA number and current index for both players if applicable. An estimated handicap may be used only

when player does not have an official index. Indicate meal preference for both players. Chicken:

Tri-Tip:

24 • August 2012

aDaPteD FroM service Pension guiDelines By toM Franck, laFD retireD
aDaPteD FroM service Pension guiDelines
By toM Franck, laFD retireD

A ccording to the “Roster of DROP En- rollment” an astonishing number of our members will be required to retire

in the next few years: 85 in 2012, 104 in 2013, 72 in 2014, 125 in 2015, and because of uncer- tainties in the retirees’ medical subsidy, more than 100 members will exit in the first half of 2016 alone. That’s nearly 20% of the depart- ment’s sworn membership in just five years! Because the road from work to retire- ment isn’t always the smoothest, we’re hoping the following information will help to smooth over any chuckholes or speed humps. Pnel requests you have your vehicle

Service Pension timeline Checklist

Beginning of the year you retire – de-

pending on your retirement date – you might want to adjust the amount of money going into Deferred Compensation if you want to receive the maximum in the year you retire. Deferred Compensation deposits can only come from payroll deduction.

60-90 days – Begin the Department of Pen- sions process by going to www.lafpp.com to download the appropriate forms or call (213) 978-4545 to have the forms mailed or faxed to you. Once you completed the forms, you can fax to Pensions at (213) 978-4450 to get the process started.

60 days – Contact Personnel Services Sec- tion to make an appointment. They will prepare seven identical “Letters of Intent” for you to sign. You will bring one to the Pension Depart- ment for their records. During your visit to Per- sonnel Services they will take your retirement identification photo. This whole process should only take about 15 minutes. They open at 0800. Call Ramona at (213) 978-3774 to make your appointment.

60 days – Contact Department of Pensions for an appointment. Scheduling it on the same day after your visit to Personnel will make the process much more efficient, as you will need the Letter of Intent when you meet with Pen- sions. If you have decided what you will do with your DROP money you can fill out the form they give you or the one partially filled out by Great West, and sign it right there and then to avoid having the document notarized if you do it by mail. • 30-60 days – Contact Credit Union (or your financial institution) for Automatic Deposit of your pension check. The Credit Union no lon- ger accepts new payroll deductions so if you have a loan or want to continue to contribute you will need direct deposit or get your loan put on a payment coupon system, which can be arranged when you initially call the Credit Union at (800) 231-1626. For more informa- tion, go to https://www.lafirecu.org. • 30-60 days – Contact the Relief Associa- tion. They will send payroll deduction cards for Relief Association Monthly Deduction, Relief Association Annual Deduction and the Relief Medical Plan. Contact Member Services at memberservices@lafra.org, or call (323) 259- 5200 Ext. 223 or 259. • 30-60 days - Contact UFLAC for pension mailing. They should provide payroll deduc- tion cards for dental and life insurance. Call (213) 895-4006 or (213) 485-2091 for more information, or go to www.uflac.org. • 30-60 days – Determine how you will re- ceive your DROP account balance. If you are going to rollover all or a portion of the monies into a qualified account, set this up with your financial institution of choice. If you choose to roll it into Deferred Comp, contact Great- West and they will provide a partially filled out form for rollover of DROP money into

Deferred Compensation and various disbursal documents for your Deferred Compensation monies. Deferred Comp is located within the Employee Benefits department at City Hall:

200 N. Spring St. Room 867, Los Angeles, CA 90012. For more information, call (213) 978- 1602. They open at 0830. You may wish to consult with your tax and/or financial advisor so that you are aware of any financial consequences that could affect your DROP distribution decision. • 30 days – Contact the Chief Officer’s asso- ciation at (310) 398-2148. • 20 days – Call Department of Pensions to make sure they have received any documents you sent them and to ensure everything is pro- gressing smoothly. You can request an exit medical through the Personnel Services Sec- tion. If you have an existing medical problem that could require lifetime care, there is noth- ing you need to do at this time. If your Work Comp Doctor placed you on Permanent and/or Stationary status, he/she should have addressed the issue of future medical care in his/her report to your Work Comp carrier. If not, you might want to contact the Medical Liaison Unit and discuss your status. If you don’t have the LAFRA Fire Medical plan or UFLAC Dental insurance, you will have to contact your respective carrier to provide a new payroll deduction card. If you are an active firefighter who, as of your retire- ment date, has been covered under the LAFRA Fire Medical Plan for a total of 84 months (seven years), you may elect to continue cov- erage under the LAFRA Fire Medical Plan for yourself and your dependents covered under the plan at the time of your retirement, at the applicable group rates. Here’s to your happy and healthy retirement!

structure FIre beveRly PaRk Photos by: Mike Meadows, EPN & Juan Guerra, EPN Info by:
structure FIre beveRly PaRk
structure FIre
beveRly PaRk
Photos by: Mike Meadows, EPN & Juan Guerra, EPN Info by: Erik Scott, PSO
Photos by:
Mike Meadows, EPN & Juan Guerra, EPN
Info by:
Erik Scott, PSO

a firefighter was injured battling a large mansion fire in a gated Beverly Park community on Friday June 29, 2012. due to firefighters’ aggressive and coordi- nated attack, the vast majority of the multimillion dollar residence was saved. a 9-1-1 call summoned Los angeles and Beverly Hills firefighters to 50 Beverly Park Way at 6:30 p.m. First arriving firefighters forced entry through the ground’s gates to find moderate smoke pouring from the roof of the two-story French chateau-style mansion. Entry was forced into the 15,480 square-foot resi- dence as flames were rapidly spreading throughout the attic above.

26 • August 2012

into the 15,480 square-foot resi- dence as flames were rapidly spreading throughout the attic above. 26

Fire attack teams quickly deployed hand-lines in an effort to stop the spread throughout the interior, and were as- sisted by residential fire sprinklers. Simultaneously, roof teams cut holes on top of the structure to release super heated gases from below, as flames began burning through the roof allowing it to self ventilate. Shortly thereafter, portions of the roof and the ceiling inside collapsed. the fire was fully extinguished in just over one hour and the majority of the home was saved. a Beverly Hills Firefighter was injured after a beam struck him in the head. He was treated and transported by LaFd paramedics to a local hospital in serious but stable condition. Preliminary information of what may have sparked the blaze is an exterior waterproofing operation that utilized a torch by workers. However, a thorough investigation by LaFd arson investigators will determine the exact cause. the dollar loss is estimated at $1.25 million ($1 million structure and $250,000 contents).

cause. the dollar loss is estimated at $1.25 million ($1 million structure and $250,000 contents). August
LaFD aIr oPeratIons Photos by: Mike Meadows, EPN & Juan Guerra, EPN LaFd helicopters were
LaFD aIr oPeratIons
LaFD aIr oPeratIons

Photos by:

Mike Meadows, EPN & Juan Guerra, EPN

Photos by: Mike Meadows, EPN & Juan Guerra, EPN LaFd helicopters were busy in June, fighting
LaFd helicopters were busy in June, fighting brush fires, rescuing hikers and taking part in
LaFd helicopters were busy in June, fighting brush fires, rescuing hikers
and taking part in an air show. Fire 4 assisted La County and Ventura
County Fire on a 500 acre brush fire just off interstate 5 in Hungry Valley.
Fire 3 hoisted two hikers off a trail in Sylmar and took them to an LZ for
evaluation. Kids clamored into the pilot seat of Fire 2 at the american He-
roes air Show at Hansen dam while Pilot dave Nordquist and Medics Joe
St George and Carl Kohler look on.

28 • August 2012

August 2012 • 29
Greater aLarM structure FIre canoga PaRk Photos by: Rick McClure - EPN, Juan Guerra –
Greater aLarM structure FIre canoga PaRk
Greater aLarM structure FIre
canoga PaRk
Photos by: Rick McClure - EPN, Juan Guerra – EPN, Gavin Kaufman - FF/PM FS
Photos by:
Rick McClure - EPN,
Juan Guerra – EPN,
Gavin Kaufman - FF/PM FS 93,
& David DeMulle’ - The Foothills Paper
Info by:
Erik Scott, PSO

30 • August 2012

Gavin Kaufman - FF/PM FS 93, & David DeMulle’ - The Foothills Paper Info by: Erik
Gavin Kaufman - FF/PM FS 93, & David DeMulle’ - The Foothills Paper Info by: Erik
intense flames gutted an under-construction, three-story apart- ment complex in Canoga Park in the early

intense flames gutted an under-construction, three-story apart- ment complex in Canoga Park in the early morning of July 7, 2012. Nearby buildings were spared destruction, however three firefighters were injured. LaFd companies were summoned to 7050 N Vassar avenue, just after midnight to find a 50’ x 100’ apartment complex that was well involved in fire. the building was under various stages of construction with scaffold- ing reaching the third floor. Flames on top of the structure stretched over 20’ into the sky, exposing nearby buildings. the flames were extinguished in just over one hour by nearly 100 firefighters.

nearby buildings. the flames were extinguished in just over one hour by nearly 100 firefighters. August
By r anDy s ouza A good time was had by all at this year’s
By r anDy s ouza A good time was had by all at this year’s

By ranDy souza

A good time was had by all at this year’s club championship, 67 golfers in all. The event took place on May 22nd –

24th and we played three fantastic courses: the Arnold Palmer course in Rancho Mirage, the Dunes Course in La Quinta and the Nicklaus Course at PGA West. This year’s champion is Graham Ev- erett, which happens to be his 4th title. Graham

shot 79, 76 and 78 to beat next closest Andy Zar by seven strokes. 1st place net in the “A” flight is another past champion, Gary Klasse. In the “B” flight the gross winner was Joe Zabalza with a 226 total. 1st place net in the “B” flight went to Bruce Bickly. Robert Vege was the gross winner in the “C” flight with a 271 total, and 1st net was Buzz Clark. In the “D” flight, Ken Moody took 1st gross and right behind

him to take 1st net was Raul Cabrera. This year we had seven in the Guest Flight, and James Grogan took the honors of 1st place gross. A new comer Don Barkley took 1st place net. It was good to see Jesse Lea there with his bag of tricks to celebrate his 87th birthday. Good job guys and looking forward to seeing more in the desert next year.

and looking forward to seeing more in the desert next year. a F light n et
and looking forward to seeing more in the desert next year. a F light n et

a Flight

net & gross chaMPions

gary klasse & grahaM everett

B Flight

net & gross chaMPions

Bruce Bickly & Joe zaBalza

g rahaM e verett B F light n et & g ross c haMPions B ruce
g rahaM e verett B F light n et & g ross c haMPions B ruce

32 • August 2012

Paid Advertisement:

Paid Advertisement: c F light n et & g ross c haMPions B oB v ege
Paid Advertisement: c F light n et & g ross c haMPions B oB v ege

c Flight

net & gross chaMPions

BoB vege & Buzz clark

D Flight

net & gross chaMPions

raul caBrera & ken MooDy

g ross c haMPions r aul c aBrera & k en M ooDy visit: www.LaFra.org mail:
g ross c haMPions r aul c aBrera & k en M ooDy visit: www.LaFra.org mail:
visit: www.LaFra.org mail: P.o. Box 41903 Los angeles Ca 90041 phone: (800) 244-3439
visit: www.LaFra.org mail: P.o. Box 41903 Los angeles Ca 90041 phone: (800) 244-3439
visit: www.LaFra.org mail: P.o. Box 41903 Los angeles Ca 90041 phone: (800) 244-3439
visit: www.LaFra.org mail: P.o. Box 41903 Los angeles Ca 90041 phone: (800) 244-3439

visit:

www.LaFra.org

mail:

P.o. Box 41903 Los angeles Ca

90041

phone:

(800) 244-3439

Paid Advertisement: 34 • August 2012 We’re noW on tWItter! Go to twitter.com username: firemnsgrpvn

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34 • August 2012

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FIRE FAMILY ESTATE SALES

Rebecca Martin

Principal

firefamilyestatesales@gmail.com

• settle family estates

• downsizing

• moving or liquidating

818.216.3637

firefamilyestatesales@gmail.com • settle family estates • downsizing • moving or liquidating 818.216.3637
The United States Handball Association held the 62nd Annual 4-Wall Nationals at Los Caballeros Sports

The United States Handball Association held the 62nd Annual 4-Wall Nationals at Los Caballeros Sports Village in Fountain Valley, California from June 26th through July 1st. LAFD Handball made an outstanding showing, which resulted in two members becoming Na- tional Champions and two members placing second. LAFD Handball was also honored as the “Handball Organization of the Year” during the USHA Banquet. Nearly 400 players from the United States, Canada, Mexico and Ireland competed in this event. The LAFD group was lead by John Libby (FS-3-B) who won his 4th National Title in the Men’s 45 and over Di- vision. John dominated his division, winning all of his matches in two games. Salvador Castillon (FS-26-B) won his first National Title in the “C” Division, exhibiting excellent physical condition and mental toughness as he advanced through the tournament. His drive and enthusiasm for the sport made this victory exciting for Sal and all of his fans. Richard Ramirez (FS-27-C) advanced to the semi-finals in this division, before losing; nearly making it an all LAFD final. Eddie Marez (FS-2-C) battled through a tough field in the “A” Di- vision before falling to an outstanding player from Ireland in the final. Eddie received strong support from the crowd, including his one-month old daughter, wife and sons. Paul Cajiao (FS-62-B) made a strong showing in the “Golden Mas- ter’s B-Division” in singles. He was defeated in the final by the same player who eliminated Roy Harvey (FS-92-B) in the semi-final, prevent- ing an all LAFD final. Cajiao also advanced to the semi-finals in “B” Doubles before being eliminated. LAFD Handball Commissioner Roy Harvey accepted the Handball Organization of the Year Award on behalf of the Department. We were recognized due to the great sportsmanship and volunteer activities of LAFD Handball players. Handball Tournament Fundraisers, cooking at tournaments, supporting youth handball, competing on the highest levels and interacting with civilian players were the activities that led to this honor.

On Friday, June 29th, LAFD Handball cooked lunch for the tourna- ment. The volunteers were lead by retiree Bobby Raya who used his ex- pertise as a former permanent cook on the grills. The menu consisted of hamburgers, hot dogs, fish, carne asada, chicken, salad, salsa and chips. Players and volunteers had a great day serving and socializing. LAFD players are encouraged to continue to participate in tourna- ments sponsored by USHA and Southern California Handball. Tourna- ment directors look forward to our participation and the handball family invites the competition. The Royal Flush Singles in Las Vegas is August 18-19th, and the LAFD 3-Wall Invitational is at Venice Beach on Sep- tember 8th. Keep training!

August 18-19th, and the LAFD 3-Wall Invitational is at Venice Beach on Sep- tember 8th. Keep
dear LaFra, Please accept this donation to the Widows, Orphans and Disabled Firemen’s Fund in
dear LaFra, Please accept this donation to the Widows, Orphans and Disabled Firemen’s Fund in

dear LaFra,

Please accept this donation to the Widows, Orphans and Disabled Firemen’s Fund in memory of John E. Squire. John inspired me

to become a firefighter at the age of five. It was

this time when Fireman Squire visited his son

Matthew’s kindergarten class at San Pascual

Elementary School (12’s first-in). I also was in Matthew’s class and was quite impressed with John. A couple of years later John became my Cub Scout Troop Master. It was at this time where I began to see the caring side of John. Our Cub Scout Den was truly blessed to have John and an active LAPD policeman. They truly made scouting fun and enjoyable for the troop. One year and a half ago I was able to call John and personally thank him for inspiring me

to join the fire service. He had commented to

me that he would have never believed he was making an impression on any of the kids in the troop. When he heard how he did, he was very happy to hear that. I will always be thankful for John’s dedication to the Boy Scouts of America. He was truly a great man and will be missed. Thank you.

Robert Rodriquez, Fire Captain Los Angeles County Fire Department

dear Wayne Sherman,

We would like to reimburse the Medical Plan for my wife’s medical bill. We would also like to make a donation of the remainder of the funds enclosed as a thank you for the loan of medical equipment we used.

Send your letters & comments to the editor at: editor@lafra.org

Thank you so very much. Needless to say, we thank our good fortune that Carl has the Relief Association to help us in our declining years.

Sincerely, Alta and Carl Carlson Laguna Niguel, CA

La Firemen’s relief:

Please accept this donation to the Widows, Orphans and Disabled Firemen’s Fund in memory of Reno Zulianai – fireboat pilot, handball player and great guy.

Thank you, Bob and Joanne Thompson

dear LaFra,

Please accept this donation in memory of

dear LaFra, Please accept this donation in memory of Los angeles Firemen’s relief association The enclosed

Los angeles Firemen’s relief association

The enclosed donation is given in memory of our dear friend and cherished neighbor Irene Thermos, widow of the late John Thermos, a proud retired member of the Los Angeles Fire Department.

Edward Rozeski

Torrance, CA

LaFra

This donation is made in memory of Fred Daniel Croghan who died on May 22, 2012. Fred retired from the Los Angeles City Fire Department after 30 years of dedicated service. He is survived by a large family and his wife Loretta.

Thank you, Don and Patricia DeJesse Yorba Linda, CA

Los angeles Firemen’s relief association

Donation for the passing of my brother Alan R. Fulkerson, retired captain, Los Angeles Fire Dept. Alan and I worked together at old Engine 84’s on Canoga Ave, Woodland Hills. Alan always was a clown in the 1950’s, working for old Captain Yager who had forty plus

James Costello for the Widows, Orphans and years seniority. Our company had sorts of

personalities, i.e. Eng Norbert Hiegert, Bill McMurry, Bill Penix, Don Sivacoe, Tom Crockatt, Bill Woody and John Fulkerson. Old Capt Yager was constantly saying ‘what have I done on this job to get stuck with ‘two’ Fulkerson’s on my company. Most of us made promotions over the years, and Alan even continued to make his famous apple pies after he made captain and wound up at Engine 72’s in Canoga Park. He retired from

Sincerely, Barbara Brown Grass Valley, CA

Disabled Firemen’s Fund. Jim will be remembered as a great fireman and part of our Grass Valley group. Thank you for all your good work.

Thank you, Gary and Debra Shelford

Thousand Oaks, CA

Los angeles Firemen’s relief association

My husband Carl A Carlson had need of a wheelchair in January and we requested the use of one from the Relief Association. It was quickly provided by PS Medical Supplies. It has been very useful and was of high quality. He had a broken femur as it turned out and had to have surgery in March to place

a metal piece in. It sure was a needed piece

of equipment and we are so grateful for your prompt help. Today I called PS Medical Supplies and they will pick it up today as Carl is doing pretty well at this time and needs only a cane to walk around.

36 • August 2012

will pick it up today as Carl is doing pretty well at this time and needs

Mailbox continued

there and he and his lovely wife Francis moved

to Godfrie, IL.

When I built our new home in Woodland Hills, my wife Mae committed to go back to work for one year to support our yard landscape. Alan and Francis lived close to the grammar school, where Lynn and Lynda, our children attended. Francis took them after school and Mae picked them up every evening. Mae gave notice of her resignation when we achieved our goal. Over the years we stayed close, by phone and cards on holidays. I shall miss his joking and humor. God bless his family.

Thomas G. Crockatt Bullhead City, AZ

dear LaFra,

Please accept this contribution to the Widows, Orphans and Disabled Firemen’s

Fund in memory of Herbert Tourtillot who was

a special person to many of us. He worked at

old 28’s and other downtown assignments. He loved to pull a joke on someone. He was on more than a few “I’ll get even with you” lists. One special occasion at old 28’s was the train coming through the dormitory at 0300 hours. It was quiet and way back downtown you could hear the noise a train makes. Choochoo choo. The only thing was the train noise got louder

and louder waking most of us up. Then all of

a sudden the train came crashing through the

dormitory with abright flood light and train whistle. Now all of us were wide awake and

there was Herb holding the light and laughing

at our rude awakening.

There were many more Tourtillot escapades. He was always busy with organizations and volunteering at a moment’s notice. From Grass Valley to Relief Association meetings, he will be missed dearly. God bless his family and friends.

Jack A. Bennett Bluffton, SC

dear John:

Recently and still continuing the Relief Association has been partially paying for breathing equipment for myself, and now my wife’s needs. Hopefully soon we can be released from their uses. We both wish to thank the Relief Association, as it further shows how much [they are] there for the firefighters and their families. It is my hope as well as yours that the younger members of the LAFD will pay heed for the future and support this great group. Enclosed is a check to help make payment and we wish to thank the Relief for all they do.

Sincerely,

John and Joan Adams Camarillo, CA

MEMBErS

StEPHENiE a. GLaS, Firefighter III. Appointed August 22, 2005. Actively on duty at FS 93-B.
StEPHENiE a. GLaS, Firefighter III. Appointed August 22, 2005.
Actively on duty at FS 93-B. Passed away June 09, 2012.
GWyNNE W. BriStoL, Firefighter. Appointed January 05, 1948.
Retired on a service pension June 01, 1978 from FS 49. Passed away June 10, 2012.
HENry E. NiSKa, Engineer. Appointed May 28, 1951.
Retired on a service pension June 01, 1976 from FS 48-A. Passed away June 14, 2012.
rENo a. ZULiaNi, Fireboat Pilot. Appointed July 11, 1949.
Retired on a service pension June 30, 1979 from FS 49-A. Passed away June 17, 2012.
StaNCiL G. JoNES, Captain I. Appointed November 01, 1948.
Retired on a service pension May 15, 2004 from FS 112-C. Passed away June 17, 2012.
toNy GriMES, Firefighter. Appointed April 01, 1957.
Retired on a service pension July 15, 1979 from FS 98-B. Passed away June 26, 2012.
LorEN L. WHitE, Captain. Appointed November 19, 1946.
Retired on a disability pension July 01, 1977 from FS 18-C. Passed away June 30, 2012.
GEraLd G. SiMoN, Firefighter II. Appointed October 28, 1947.
Retired on a service pension June 01, 1978 from FS 39-C. Passed away July 01, 2012.
FaMiLy
EVELyN a. KNiLL, surviving spouse of Jack R. Knill. passed away May 27, 2012.
GLadyS r. WoodrUFF, spouse of Bydie S. Woodruff passed away June 03, 2012.
SHaryL SiMoNS, surviving spouse of Albert L. Simons passed away June 09, 2012.
JaNEt F. NiELSoN, surviving spouse of Lyle S. Nielson passed away June 19, 2012.
EMMa J. raMSEy, surviving spouse of Robert H. Ramsey passed away July 02, 2012.

JaMES V. PattEN, Helicopter Pilot. Appointed February 01, 1955. Retired on a disability pension December 25, 1978 from Helicopter Co-C. Passed away July 04, 2012.

roSaLiNd N. MartiN, surviving spouse of Richard A. Martin passed away June 06, 2012.

Paid Advertisements:

N. MartiN, surviving spouse of Richard A. Martin passed away June 06, 2012. Paid Advertisements: 38

38 • August 2012

N. MartiN, surviving spouse of Richard A. Martin passed away June 06, 2012. Paid Advertisements: 38
AlAN BUSH, Firefighter/Paramedic, FS 23-A S ATUR dAy, A UGUST 11, 2012 Scarlett Belle, luxurious
AlAN BUSH, Firefighter/Paramedic, FS 23-A S ATUR dAy, A UGUST 11, 2012 Scarlett Belle, luxurious

AlAN BUSH, Firefighter/Paramedic, FS 23-A S ATUR dAy, A UGUST 11, 2012

Scarlett Belle, luxurious paddlewheel Riverboat 3600 Cabezone Circle - Oxnard CA 93035 Riverboat Boating & Social Hour: 4:45 - 5:45 PM

Departure from Dock - 5:45 PM

Dinner & Cruise: 5:45 - 9:00 PM

Menu: Sirloin Tri Tip, Chicken Marsala, Jambalaya Buffet $50, includes tax, tip & gift Call FS 23 - (310) 454-2003 or Ron Dorn Home - (805) 652-0616 Casual Attire. Alan Bush email: abcbmbkb@yahoo.com

dAVE SoTo, Captain II, FS 1-B FRIdAy, AUGUST 24, 2012

ports o’Call

1199 Nagoya Way, Berth 76 - San Pedro CA 90731

Social Hour: 5:00 PM Dinner: 6:00 PM

Menu: Chicken A Fornaio or Grilled Prime Top Sirloin $50, includes tax, tip & gift

Call FS1 (213) 485-6201 or John Theodore (310) 559-8740. RSVp by July 24

ToM lAMBERT, Captain I, FS 112-A S ATUR dAy, S Ep TEMBER 08, 2012

ports o’Call

1199 Nagoya Way, Berth 76 - San Pedro CA 90731

Social Hour: 6:00 PM Dinner: 7:00 PM

Menu: Mexican Buffet - $50, includes tax, tip & gift

Call FS 112 - (310) 548-9929 or (310) 548-9919

MICHAEl “WHITEy” WHITEHoUSE, Engineer, FS 114-B TUESdAy, oCToBER 2, 2012

odySSEy RESTAURANT 15600 Odyssey Drive - Granada Hills CA 91344

Social Hour - 6:00 PM

Dinner: 7:00 PM

Menu: Buffet Dinner $50, includes tax, tip & gift Call FS 114 - (818) 756-8635 or Bill Hertz - (805) 358-4299 Spouses are cordially invited

includes tax, tip & gift Call FS 114 - (818) 756-8635 or Bill Hertz - (805)

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F amily, friends and co-workers gathered at the Friendship Auditorium to honor Inspector Rudy Martinez
F amily, friends and co-workers gathered at the Friendship Auditorium to honor Inspector Rudy Martinez
F amily, friends and co-workers gathered at the Friendship Auditorium to honor Inspector Rudy Martinez

F amily, friends and co-workers gathered at the Friendship Auditorium to honor Inspector Rudy Martinez for his 36 years

of service to the LAFD and the citizens of Los

Angeles. Everyone enjoyed a delicious Mexi- can buffet (hosted by the Martinez family) and then danced the rest of the evening away until midnight.

A gracious Rudy wanted to thank all who attended his retirement celebration. As he said that evening, “There is nothing more im- portant than your faith, your family and your friends. God bless you and your families.”

40 • August 2012

more im- portant than your faith, your family and your friends. God bless you and your
O n a cold dark winter’s night, a cast of characters assembled at Taix’s in
O n a cold dark winter’s night, a cast of characters assembled at Taix’s in
O n a cold dark winter’s night, a cast of characters assembled at Taix’s in
O n a cold dark winter’s night, a cast of characters assembled at Taix’s in

O n a cold dark winter’s night, a cast of characters assembled at Taix’s in Echo Park to bid happy retirement to

true a LAFD firefighter and paramedic - Bobby Raya. Bobby officially retired on 10/16/2010, after 36 years and one month on the LAFD.

He worked for years at Fire Station 2 with his brother David, and they were otherwise known

as the battlin’ Raya brothers

your own conclusions on that one

the Battlin’ Ortiz brothers Joe and Jesse may

have something to say about that. Then a little later on, Bobby ended up at Fire Station 44, and

on the opposite

shift this time. However, this night the Raya Broth- ers, including the youngest, Andy, were in at- tendance to celebrate Bobby’s entrance into re- tirement The festivities were headed up by the Mayor of Glassell Park (Bedrock) himself, Ed- die Elguea. Presentation after presentation was

so did his brother David

you can draw I am sure

made, including Frank Lima from UFLAC, Keith Douglass from CSFA, and Gene Bed- narchik from the Los Angeles Fireman’s Relief Association And then story after story com- menced of Bobby and the “Days of Thunder” on the East Side. But the stories that seemed to be common ground were the ones concern- ing not only Bobby’s compassion and skills as a firefighter, but as a paramedic - the care and

quality of care he gave to all he came in contact with. This coming from firsthand experience, and of years working around this outstanding individual. The evening was closed out by Bob- by coming to the podium, answering back to

all allegations

Or should I say answering

up to the presenters that provided a historical background to a true legend of our department.

Happy retirement to you Bobby!!!

background to a true legend of our department. Happy retirement to you Bobby!!! Paid Advertisement: August

Paid Advertisement:

background to a true legend of our department. Happy retirement to you Bobby!!! Paid Advertisement: August
A fter you’ve been to a few retirement dinners they all seem to look the
A fter you’ve been to a few retirement dinners they all seem to look the

A fter you’ve been to a few retirement

dinners they all seem to look the same.

ers showed how easy it was to kick a field goal or at least tried. On Saturday, April 28, 2012, it was time for the actual retirement celebration. Held in a local Micro Brew, with an open bar, tons of spectacular food, the atmosphere was “Party On!” This too was PAID FOR AND ORGANIZED BY BILL GERKE. All atten- dants had to wear a button with a picture of a much younger Bill Gerke on it. The M.C. for the night was Ben Simpson (Bill’s trade part-

ner). Ben went on to tell a few stories about Bill, including the one that Bill wanted to make a bunch of trades with Ben after Ben got sick. “If you don’t die I guess I’ll have to pay you back,” said Bill. Just goes to show the person-

able to make others laugh and

everything would be ok. Bill was a FIREMAN for over 30 years. He had the knowledge skills and abilities to have held any rank on this job. He stayed as a FIREMAN, mentoring and teaching younger members the right way to do this job. Come to work, do your best and don’t complain about stuff you can’t control. Michael Caro made a plaque presen- tation on behalf of UFLAC. Bill and Michael worked together at 107’s during Bill’s last five

years on the job. Gary Zieger presented Bill with a plaque custom designed and built by Gary. A small paddle tennis court and racquet were mounted and read “FS 107 Paddle Tennis Champ.”

The party was attended by Bill’s im- mediate family and friends, as well as Firemen from other departments. They were Jeff Simon, Ben Simpson, Keith Johnson, Rick Denning, Michael Caro, Jim Stiglich, Jim Boyle, Gary Zeiger, Scott Christie LA Co. FD, Scott Hall Ventura Co. FD, Scott Schuster Ventura Co.

FD, Brian Rowley Burbank FD, Bill Barrie Portland FD, John Peugh Boise FD, Boise FD Truck 5, Eng. 1, BC 1 and BC 3. By the attendance of so many people traveling to such a great event, it goes to show that Bill is truly a man of great character and values. A long healthy and happy retirement Bill! The best to you and your family! May- be you can ask about a “bounce” after your

“DROP”

pass your ways on to others.

you notice

how many times you read “ PAID FOR AND

ORGANIZED BY BILL GERKE”. Bill now knows just how much it costs to ship a paddle tennis plaque from L.A. to Boise. If you want

to know

and ask for $50.00!!!!!

the guys put on their

best Levis jeans, Hawaiian print shirts and ten- nis shoes. The only thing different is the guy

that’s retiring!! Well this retirement celebration

was completely different

as far as logistics were concerned. It started in downtown Boise, Idaho. Why there? The fireman retiring was Bill Ger- ke, a commuter from Boise to L.A. for the last

12 years of his career. It began as a meet and greet at The Grove Hotel. Bill had family and friends coming into town from all over! Tons of food to be eaten and plenty of adult beverages were on scene. This party was just getting start-

ed

FOR BY BILL GERKE. After a few hours of socializing it was time to eat dinner at a local

restaurant. The group of 40+ walked to the res- taurant ready to continue the celebration. Once again, that fine meal was ORGANIZED AND PAID FOR BY BILL GERKE. The next after- noon, a bus tour of Boise and the surrounding areas, as well as a tour of Boise State Univ. and a chance to take pics on the famous Blue Field, was ORGANIZED AND PAID FOR BY BILL GERKE. A few highly athletic party go-

way over the top

You know

ALL OF IT ORGANIZED AND PAID ality of Bill

so you can come back here and

did

Before I forget

PAID ality of Bill so you can come back here and did Before I forget ask

ask

Gary Zeiger

he’ll

tell ya

PAID ality of Bill so you can come back here and did Before I forget ask
PAID ality of Bill so you can come back here and did Before I forget ask
PAID ality of Bill so you can come back here and did Before I forget ask

42 • August 2012

i nFo ProviDeD By c ris o PPerMan A huge group of family, friends and
i nFo ProviDeD By c ris o PPerMan A huge group of family, friends and

inFo ProviDeD By cris oPPerMan

A huge group of family, friends and fire-

fighters gathered at the Odyssey Res-

taurant on June 24, 2012 to honor A/O

Randy Opperman Sr. for his 32 years of service to the LAFD. And Randy was quite busy for those 32 years, being a member of the Swift Water Rescue team, FEMA USAR team, and Critical Incident Stress Management team. He was also a Haz Mat Technician and Manager, and went on three hurricane deployments and numerous FDNY-related trips. Wife Cris, son Randy Jr. (FS 27- C) with wife Carmen and daughters Sara and Catherine, son Patrick with girlfriend Erica, daughter Edith with husband Jason (LACoFD), step-daughter Brooke with boyfriend Chris, brother Byron with wife Charlene, nieces Erin and Courtney (with husband Ray), sister Mar- garet and last, but not least, mother Alma, 83 years young, all were present to welcome Ran- dy into retirement.

of how Randy came into her life at the age of eight (she’s now 25) and how his examples of acceptance and unconditional love have influ- enced her and shaped who she is today. Brother, Byron got up next and said, “Here’s mud in your eye,” before giving Randy a gag-gift between them, a broken down tool- box that Byron had repaired for Randy and

painted an ugly reddish-fuchsia color. Retired B/C Jack Gamrat very briefly took the podium and harangued Randy about being his “DT-89 mistake!” Joe Kovacic followed with a few words about Randy being one-of-a-kind, how deeply he’ll be missed, and closed with his well-known harmonica “HYMN,” choosing to

LOVE HIM!” - noting it

end the song with

was a family affair. The Guest of Honor followed with a

few remarks of his own. He started with, “Like

to say it won’t take long

and

Also, everything I say will be the truth

but it’s my dinner.

Chris Hare handled the duties as the final word.”

Master of Ceremonies and managed to not piss

anyone off all evening – right! Hareball intro- duced a host of fellow firemen to bestow the usual gifts and honors upon the retiree: Craig White presented the service pin, Chris Oelrich handled the Personal Record Book, the Certifi- cate of Appreciation was given by Jerry Hor- wedel, Freddy Escobar represented UFLAC and bestowed the Axe Plaque, the CSFA Plaque, Retirement Certificate and FEMA Task Force Coin were juggled by Don Reyes and the crew from 87’s presented the retirement gift of

a Home Depot gift card. Randy Jr. read an amazing and emo- tional speech when he got up to give his dad his retirement badge. He touched on, how as

a kid, he was proud to see his father wear the

badge of an LAFD firefighter. Later, he was once again proud and inspired to see his dad’s badge change after promoting to A/O. One of his proudest moments though, came when his dad pinned on HIS LAFD badge, 11 years ago. And now, he had the honor of presenting him with his final badge, that of retirement. Tears filled the room. Randy’s four kids stood together as daughter Edith read a touching speech about what an awesome career he had, doing some- thing he absolutely loved. And, how as a kid, she had no idea of the dangers he faced at work. And then when her brother and husband

became firemen, it made her appreciate him even more. Step-daughter Brooke briefly spoke

He thanked his wife for making him

a better man every day and putting up with the long hours at work, which allowed him to give the fire department his best. He also thanked her for the time and effort in preparing his biog- raphy, stating, “Let me clear up the “honey-do” list thing (from the biography). Here’s a typical day at the Opperman house:

• 0630 - Wife serves breakfast in bed

• 0730 - Line up, wife receives list of jobs to do for the day

• 1200 - Wife serves lunch on the veranda

• 1700 - Wife serves dinner in main dining hall

• 2100 - Wife gives full body massage to husband, no foo foo cream, and tucks him in for the night.”

Randy then thanked his mother, who he referred to as a SAINT, for instilling in him the traits to do his job and become the man he is today. He thanked his children, saying how proud he is and for fulfilling his expectations without worry as he went to work. He thanked son Randy, for taking the lead in preparing for his retirement dinner and everyone else at 87’s who helped. He thanked Jeff Bader and Bob- by Garcia for a great movie slideshow, which began with five Chippendale dancers dancing hip-hop, all with Randy’s face throughout the years! As “The End” came up on the slideshow, it scanned down Randy’s back, where he’s

Photos By Don Frazeur

wearing an “LA City Fire Dept. Bad Boyz” t- shirt and his shorts are pulled down, showing half of his hairy butt. He thanked all who pre- sented and Hare for M/Cing. He spoke about the various stations throughout his career, ac- knowledging the guys from 17’s who are no longer with us: Ed Rivas, Lane Kemper & Bob Egizi. And lastly, he talked about why he loved his job. How it provided monetarily to raise and support a family, helping people and mak- ing a positive impact on lives during crises or disasters, and allowing him time to participate in sporting activities on-duty, like handball and off-duty with the kids, or handball tourneys and Bats n’ Beer. And finally, for the camaraderie and lifelong friendships of his second family, he thanked the LAFD and said, “Farewell.”

friendships of his second family, he thanked the LAFD and said, “Farewell.” August 2012 • 43
August 2012 • 43 August 2012 • 43
August 2012 • 43
August 2012 • 43

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44 • August 2012

I t’s been a little over 10 years now since the tragic morning of September

I t’s been a little over 10 years now since the tragic morning of

September 11, 2001. The terrorist attack on the WTC Twin Towers

in lower Manhattan, New York City is still too fresh in many of our

minds. That horrific and cowardly act, coupled with the loss of 343 of our FDNY brothers, reminds us to continue the chant - “NEVER FOR- GET.”

To that end, on Tuesday, May 15, a small group of LAFD members from the department’s USAR & CISM teams, who were deployed to “Ground Zero,” gathered at “Rock-N-Fish” restaurant at L.A. Live to remember, reflect and enjoy a great lunch. Longtime friend and benefactor to the LAFD, Jeff Neu, one of the owners of “Rock-N-Fish,” hosted the event. A tip-o-the helmet once again to Jeff for his caring and generosity. Jeff is responsible for the donation of the massive 23 ton steel beam from the South Tower, which stands in silent memory at the FHMTC - memorializing those who gave EVERYTHING on 9/11 at “Ground Zero.”

The deployment gang enjoyed a wonderful lunch, compli- ments of Jeff. But, most importantly, it was the camaraderie and the bonding shared ONLY by those of us who were at “Ground-Zero” after 9/11, that can truly understand and appreciate these emotions.

There is a great quote, author unknown, that sums it up best ;

I showed up, I stood up, I stepped forward.

I raised my right hand, I stood the gap, I walked the fire.

I did not run, I did not hide, I did not dodge, I did not evade. Consequently

I have nothing to prove, no one to convince. Those who matter, already know. Those who don’t, never will.

MAY WE “NEVER FORGET”

By Don Forrest, laFD retireD August 2012 • 45 August 2012 • 45
By Don Forrest,
laFD retireD
August 2012 • 45
August 2012 • 45

46 • August 2012

by Mike Mastro, President/CEo Los Angeles Firemen’s Credit Union O ne of the most popular
by Mike Mastro, President/CEo Los Angeles Firemen’s Credit Union O ne of the most popular

by Mike Mastro, President/CEo Los Angeles Firemen’s Credit Union

Mastro, President/CEo Los Angeles Firemen’s Credit Union O ne of the most popular questions I have

O ne of the most popular questions I have been asked by firefighters is, “How safe is my money?” With the ups and downs our econ-

omy has experienced, and especially with the num- ber of failed financial institutions making headlines over the past few years, it has caused many folks to think twice about their savings. Concerned deposi- tors found themselves pulling funds out, and stuffing them under their mattress, so to speak. No matter where your savings may be, at a big bank, a local community bank, LAFCU, or another credit union, your deposits are safe and sound, up to insured deposit limits. Even if your financial institu- tion was taken over, you can expect for your funds to be insured.

For this month’s article, I’d like to discuss deposit insurance. After reading this article, you’ll need to reevaluate how you’re saving and what steps you’ll need to take to ensure all of your deposits are insured.

What exactly is deposit insurance? When you open a savings account at a

bank or credit union, your deposits are automatically insured. The amount of deposit insurance will vary by financial institution. Typically, banks and credit unions will insure customer deposits up to $250,000. Other credit unions, like LAFCU, opt to insure mem- ber deposits up to $500,000. As a depositor to a bank or credit union, you do not pay for your insurance coverage directly. Financial institutions pay a premium to insure the funds of its depositors. Premiums will vary based on the size of the institution. Deposit insurance covers all types of de-

posits received at

an insured financial institution,

including deposits in a savings account, checking ac- count, money market account, IRA, or share certifi- cate.

Funds invested in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, life insurance, securities, annuities, and other investments are not insured. Deposits can be insured by the United States government or by a private insurance company. Of the two government-backed agencies, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation provides coverage for banks, while the National Credit Union Administra- tion administers insurance for credit unions.

Federal deposit insurance Corporation (FdiC) Created by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1933 through the Banking Act, the role of the FDIC is to oversee banking institutions in the United States, to prevent misuse of depositors’ money, and to guarantee deposits in the event of a bank failure. In 2008, the insurance limit was temporar- ily expanded from $100,000 to $250,000. The limit was scheduled to expire on December 31, 2013, but the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act made the $250,000 insurance limit per- manent.

The biggest misconception about FDIC coverage is that the insurance applies at the account level. Deposits are not insured at the account level, but are insured at the depositor level. For example, if a person has two certifi- cates of deposit, the accounts would be aggregated for up to $250,000 of coverage. Funds deposited in sepa- rate branches of the same insured bank are not sepa- rately insured. The FDIC provides separate coverage for funds should a depositor have accounts with different categories of legal ownership, such as a trust account. For example, if a bank customer has multiple accounts in an insured bank, they may qualify for more than $250,000 in insurance coverage if specific require- ments are met.

as long as deposit balances are under $250,000. These deposits are insured by ASI’s primary insur- ance. Should balances exceed $250,000, but be under $500,000, these funds are insured by ASI’s excess in- surance. Credit unions have a limited amount of cov- erage for excess insurance. For example, if a credit union has excess coverage for only $25 million, but has deposits of $30 million, $5 million will not be covered. To en- sure deposits are protected, it’s wise to spread large balances over multiple accounts with balances of less than $250,000. In ASI’s existence, no credit union mem- ber has ever lost money in any ASI-insured credit union account.

National Credit Union administration (NCUa) NCUA, the other U.S.-backed govern- ment agency, provides deposit insurance to U.S. credit unions through the National Credit Union Share In- surance Fund (NCUSIF). Established in 1970, the NCUSIF insures credit union deposits in much of the same way as the FDIC protects bank deposits. The NCUSIF is also backed by the full faith of the U.S. government. An alternative to U.S government-backed coverage is private insurance. Not all banks and credit unions are federally insured. Regulations allow for several states, such as California, to opt for private de- posit insurance.

LaFCU’s deposit insurance At LAFCU, member deposits are insured by ASI for up to $500,000 per account ($250,000 pri- mary insurance and $250,000 excess insurance). We look out for your best interest by insuring deposits with the most comprehensive coverage available. It’s important to understand that all of your funds can be safely insured as long as they are maintained in mul- tiple accounts. As stated earlier, ASI-insured credit unions can have an unlimited number of accounts covered by ASI’s primary insurance. Yet, funds insured by ASI’s excess insurance are limited and some funds could po- tentially be uninsured. In the past, LAFCU had a cushion to insure

Whether your deposits are at LAFCU or

The more business we do

american Share insurance (aSi) Founded in 1974, ASI is one of a few pro- viders of private deposit insurance. ASI’s only busi- ness is to provide deposit insurance to credit unions. It is owned by its insured credit unions which represents 1.2 million credit union members. ASI is selective as to who it insures. Not all credit unions who apply for coverage are accepted due to ASI’s strict underwriting standards.

excess deposits. In recent years, though, LAFCU has become a safe haven for deposits, driving up individu- al account balances. As a result, we have reached our excess insurance limit. Now more than ever, I cannot stress the importance of reevaluating your accounts and spreading funds over multiple LAFCU accounts with balances less than $200,000 per account. If you’re concerned about not getting our best dividend yield available, think again. Splitting a $400,000 certificate into two certificates will still earn

Member deposits in an ASI-insured credit union are insured to $250,000 per individual account, no matter how many accounts are held with the credit union. This is different from FDIC and NCUA-in- sured institutions, where the focus is on the depositor. To illustrate ASI’s coverage, consider the

following:

dividends at the same yield. LAFCU is built on a solid foundation ex- clusively for firefighters. We look out for your best interest.

a big bank, re-evaluate your deposit accounts. Your deposits may not be covered. To ensure your LAFCU

If a credit union member has 3 deposit ac- counts – a share account with $150,000, a money mar- ket account with $250,000, and a certificate with a bal- ance of $250,000 – all three accounts would be fully insured despite an aggregate balance of $650,000. For those ASI-insured credit unions that have depositors with even higher balances, ASI pro- vides for excess deposit insurance. This coverage al- lows for an additional $250,000 on top of the primary

deposits are properly insured, we encourage you to contact a Credit Union Representative at (800) 231- 1626. We can assist you by splitting up your accounts to the appropriate amounts to ensure their safety.

together as a Fire Family, the greater the financial reward will be for all members!

coverage of $250,000. Total coverage would be up to $500,000 per account.

Have a great month!

It’s important to note that credit unions have coverage for an unlimited number of accounts

Mike

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LAFD Historical Society

LAFD Historical Society Submitted by Frank Borden • Director of Operations, LAFDHS T he GATX F

Submitted by Frank Borden • Director of Operations, LAFDHS

The GATX Fire – AuGusT 8, 1972

T his month, 40 years ago a major fire oc- operating our ladder pipe (the nozzle atop the

curred at the Port of Los Angeles that 100-foot ladder), we had one man up there,

firemen had themselves in spots where they could have been wiped out in an instant. But there wasn’t one who backed out, they all stood

er forget. On August 8th at 5:57 PM, a huge ex- said. “He was receiving more heat than he re- in there and fought. They really proved them-

selves,” he added. Firemen said they learned that us-

large tank farm located along the water’s edge after he came down, heat exhaustion began to ing the heavy streams of water to cool down

near Warehouse 1. The following newspaper article

gives a more human interest side of the story man who wasn’t affected by the intense heat the water used to keep the tanks from explod-

ing. Despite the extensive use of streams, the firemen weren’t able to keep one tank from ex- ploding and it rocketed some 300 feet in the air, crashing just behind a line of firemen. “The men from Engines 48 and 53 were on the east side when the tank crashed,” said Young. “They were completely under the smoke blanket and they didn’t know the tank had blown.”That might have saved their lives,” he went on to say.” “Because if they had seen the tank blow, they might have run to escape it and gotten se- riously hurt.”

from our firefighters who were there.

plosion and fire occurred at the General Ameri- alized and when the tanks started popping their can Transportation Company (GATX). It was a tops, I brought him down. Less than 10 minutes

many of our retired firefighters will nev- Bruce Norman, for 20 or 30 minutes,” Young

hit him and he got weak.” However, Young said that one fire-

was auto fireman Clarence Ware, who drives the big hook and ladder truck. “Old Clarence

stood up there and fought that fire tooth and nail -- he wouldn’t give up,” said Young. “We were about 35 feet from the fire and the only way we could keep Clarence there was to keep

a spray of water on him all the time.He was at

the base of the ladder on the controls sweeping

the fire with the ladder pipe. You couldn’t stand on the side of the truck toward the fire any more than five seconds or it would burn you. That’s why we had to keep a stream on Clarence,” he added, pointing out that they

had to soak Ware to keep him from catching on fire. Young also said he put a fireman between the

the tanks affected the effectiveness of the foam units. Young said the foam was weakened by

oFFicials take look Back at san PeDro ho- locaust FireMens lives were in JeoParDy

By Xavier Hermossillo, News Pilot, August 15, 1972

How do you fight a $3 million oil fire? Los Angeles City firemen found that it took more than $8 million worth of equipment and some gutsy individuals to finally contain the GATX blaze in San Pedro one week ago. Even though the flaming fumes of acetone and nitromethane have been extinguished, firemen from Harbor Area companies are surveying their own damage. Truck Company 48 had its 100-foot aerial ladder unit burned. Capt. Bud Young, the Task Force commander, said the heat and flames charred the right side of the $90,000 truck, peeling paint and melting the red lights. The ladders mounted on the side also fell victim to the blaze. Young says the fire- men are still looking in every nook and cranny of the truck for chunks of mud and anything else they picked up in the mire around the tank farm that was partially destroyed. In the one week that passed since the more than 300 firefighters and 90 pieces of equipment fought the fire, Capt. Young and other fire officials have had a chance to play “Monday morning quarterback.” “The big- gest problem we had was trying to cover both sides of the fire,” says the veteran captain.”We were the only ones there for a long time until the uptown companies came down.” But Young also has some individual praise for the firemen who braved the 100 foot walls of flames and the intense heat. Clarence Ware and Bruce Norman, both assigned to the Truck Company, drew spe- cial lauds from Young. “When we first started

Blast oFF--several FireMen escaPeD Death when this tank, con- taining More than 30,000 gallons oF
Blast oFF--several FireMen escaPeD Death when this tank, con-
taining More than 30,000 gallons oF highly volatile acetates, ex-
PloDeD anD was launcheD 300 Feet into the air.

blaze and the truck as often as possible to keep the truck cool. The melted

lights have all been replaced and officials say

it

the truck is repaired. But San Pedro and Wilmington fire-

will just be a matter of time before the side of

men say they did learn a lesson from the fire at the General American Transportation Corp.,

lesson that holds signs of future problems in case of another major fire. “We learned that

if

“we’re going to have to count on ourselves until we can get help from the downtown L.A. companies. “The time lapse in getting help to us was the thing that hurt the most. Once we committed our companies here in San Pedro and Wilmington, we had to wait for the other companies to roll. And it took them a while to get here.” Young pointed out that if more help had arrived sooner, the blaze could have been extinguished faster. However, he said, “We can have all the equipment in the world, but it’s the manpower that puts these fires out. All of these

we ever have a big fire again,” said Young,

a

Capt Mike Riley, who commanded the operations for Engine Company 48 also drew a commendation from Young. Riley’s men were first in along with Engine 53 and Capt. Fred Croghan, and the two companies battled the flames for the entire three hours, success- fully keeping the flames away from a supply house and a furniture warehouse. The man who handled the over- all firefighting operations, Battalion 6 Chief Frank Brown, is the man who many officials say should draw most of the credit. Brown de- ployed the manpower for the entire fire and is credited with confining the blaze to the tank farm. Although some of the oil did spill into the waters of Los Angeles Harbor, crews were able to boom it off and stop the spread. However, firemen are now breathing a sigh of relief as they considered what “might” have happened. “If all those tanks had ruptured and overflowed the dike area and gone into the harbor,” Young said, “the harbor waters could have been burn- ing. This in turn would have ignited the docks and then we would have been in real trouble.” But the “ifs” and the “might haves” didn’t come about and firemen say they will be better able to handle a major fire next time. Captains Young, Riley, Croghan and Chief Brown know the manpower shortage will still exist -- but they’re confident they can still count on firemen like Bruce Norman and Clar- ence Ware to fight tooth and nail and never give in to the fire.

in MeMory oF caPtain stancil Jones 55 years oF laFD service

Stancil Jones passed away on June 17, 2012, at the age of 85, after a long and productive life, leaving a large family of seven sons and five daughters and 40 grandchildren. Stan was the LAFD’s longest serving member with nearly 56 years of service, retiring from Fire Station 112 C in 2004. His LAFD legacy lives on through his sons Dory and William, both retired LAFD Captains, his son-in-law Mike Corcoran, retired Fireboat Pilot and his grandson Kelly Corcoran, Fire Station 1-B. Stan was a very historic person, serv- ing our country during WW II in the US Navy and then the citizens of Los Angeles for over 55 years. In fact, he had not only exceeded the se- niority record for the LAFD but also surpassed all fire department members in the USA for continuous service. Captain Stancil Jones was appointed to the LAFD on November 1, 1948 and retired on May 15, 2004. I believe that he was the last World War II veteran to retire from the job. Stan was a captain for 43 years, and that is another record for the LAFD. Stan worked for many of his last years on the job in San Pedro at old 53’s, and when Engine 53 moved to FS 112, he was the captain of Engine 112-B. Stan’s career spanned over five decades. What was the LAFD like in 1948? Chief Alderson was the Chief Engineer and General Manager and the department was just

engine 57 in the ForegrounD anD engine 46, Both FroM south la, with wagon Batteries going. truck 48 is BehinD engine 57 with a laDDer PiPe. the heat was extreMe For the FireFighters who For the Most Part useD their aPParatus as a shielD.

starting to grow after the end of World War II. I did some research in our Museum library us- ing the Grapevines some of you donated from the year 1948. I found articles written by now retired Deputy Chief Bill Goss called “It’s a Fact.” From the Nov. ’48 issue: There were officially 42 television sets installed in LAFD stations and by December there would be 47. The bonds approved in 1947 were being used to purchase new apparatus such as new high pres- sure companies at 16’s, 23’s, 28’s and 11’s, and new triples, aerial trucks, salvage apparatus, a large wrecker, and another manifold wagon to go with the fourth duplex pump the department has. Engine 22 and 83 were in their new quar- ters (Stan worked at then new 22’s). The total alarms for the month of September 1948 was 1,708, broken down as follows: Actual fires – 1,205, false alarms – 118, rescue service – 102, misc. service – 208, outside of city – 10, smoke scares – 64, wrong location – 1. From the December issue: Ten new MSA demand type breathing apparatus had been purchased and were in service at Trucks 4, 17, 27, 28, and 37. Ten additional units would be purchased and put in service at Trucks 48, 49, and Fireboats 1, 2, 1 and 3. The 2-hour self-contained Gibbs now carried by those units would be retained. The department has come a long way since those days and Stan had the opportunity and experience of living the through this evolu- tion that made the LAFD such a great depart- ment. Stan said at his retirement dinner that he had lost an older brother, but on November 1, 1948, the day he joined the LAFD, he was given 3,000 brothers to replace the one he had lost. Firefighters take care of one another and they all share in the joys and sorrows of this elite family. Now we share the great memory of a great man in the passing of Stancil Jones.

great memory of a great man in the passing of Stancil Jones. s tan anD his
great memory of a great man in the passing of Stancil Jones. s tan anD his
great memory of a great man in the passing of Stancil Jones. s tan anD his

stan anD his wiFe Mary in Front oF the sign DisPlay Designating the stancil g. Jones Plaza in his honor For his long service to the city anD the Port oF la. the Plaza is locateD across FroM the Front entrance to Fire station 112 in san PeDro.

an aerial view showing the Fire attack oP- eration to Protect the exPoseD tanks. soMe oF the FireFighters are using Protective lines to keeP the rigs cool FroM raDiateD heat. FireBoat 2 “the ralPh J. scottwas at the Dock suPPlying MultiPle lines to the lanD coMPanies.

50 • August 2012

s tan loveD vintage cars anD trucks . h ere he is stanDing ProuDly next

stan loveD vintage cars anD trucks. here he is stanDing ProuDly next to his truck at last years harBor Fire MuseuM Pancake BreakFast anD car show.

arBor F ire M useuM P ancake B reakFast anD c ar show . laFD F

laFD FireBoat 2 leaDs the iowa Down the channel to Berth 87 with a traDitional water DisPlay FroM its aFt

Monitors. Photo By walt Jaeger, laFDhs.

the iowa is easily seen FroM harBor BlvD. with the “ralPh J. scott” FireBoat in the ForegrounD unDer restoration the iowa is 887 Ft. 3in. long anD the “scottis 99 Ft. 6 in. long as a PersPective.

“s cott ” is 99 Ft . 6 i n . long as a PersPective .

the uss iowa is hoMe in the Port oF l.a.

It was a big day for a big ship on Saturday June 9, 2012, when the Battleship USS Iowa BB61, came down the channel in San Pedro Harbor to its final berth next to Fire Station 112. The Iowa was launched in 1942 and was involved in WWII in the Atlantic and Pacific and in the Korean War. She was decommissioned after Korea and reactivated in 1984 to operate as a global deterrent force. The Iowa was decommis- sioned for the last time in 1990. It was only a couple of years ago the Pa- cific Battleship Center was able to raise several million dollars to bring the ship out of mothballs to Los Angeles where it will be a museum and major tourist attraction opening on July 7th. The ship is located at Berth 87 right next to where we are working to restore the LAFD’s “Ralph J. Scott” Fireboat.

CaLENdar for august & September 2012

august 2012

“Ralph J. Scott” Fireboat. CaLENdar for august & September 2012 august 2012 September 2012 August 2012

September 2012

“Ralph J. Scott” Fireboat. CaLENdar for august & September 2012 august 2012 September 2012 August 2012

LOS ANGELES FIREMEN’S RELIEF ASSOCIATION MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES June 6, 2012

CaLL to ordEr

President John Jacobsen called the Meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association to order at 11:25a.m.

roLL CaLL

MEMBErS PrESENt:

John Jacobsen, President Juan Albarran, Vice President Andrew Kuljis, Secretary Trustee James Coburn Trustee Jeff Cawdrey Trustee Gene Bednarchik Trustee Chris Stine Trustee Doak Smith Trustee Robert Steinbacher Trustee Steve Tufts Trustee Craig White Trustee Francisco Hernandez Trustee Steven Domanski Trustee Rick Godinez Trustee Gary Matsubara Trustee Kurt Stabel Trustee Mark Akahoshi Trustee David Peters Trustee David Ortiz Trustee Barry Hedberg Trustee David Lowe Trustee Tim Larson David Ned Smith - Exec. Director Todd Layfer - Controller

MEMBErS aBSENt:

Trustee Chris Hart (Excused) Trustee Michael Overholser (Excused)

iNVoCatioN & Flag Salute

Rick Godinez led the invocation. David Lowe led the flag salute.

ratiFiCatioN oF MiNUtES

John Jacobsen entertained a motion to ratify and dispense with the reading of the minutes of the Board of Trustees meeting held May 2, 2012. Gary Matsubara so moved. David Peters seconded

52 • August 2012

the motion. There was no further discussion or objections.

Motion carried to ratify and dispense with the reading of the minutes of the Board of Trustees meeting held May 2, 2012.

PrESidENt’S rEPort

reports on the unrealized loss for 2011 due to the poorly performing stock market. He

stated that Beacon Pointe reported netted $8K. He referred to the

that the loss, after investment management fees, compared to the audit report had a difference in $3.6 million. He reported that the majority difference ($2.6 million) in reporting was that interest and dividends received in the investment account was shown on a different line in the audit report and was really not a difference between the two reports. He reviewed the remaining $1 million difference in figures which was that not all of the management fees, willed

the year and mentioned that the Hook & Ladder event netted $15K and the Buzzard Baits

operating expenses and stated that they are within budget; however, he stated that the Trustee expenses were up due to the Wharton Investment conference. He reported on the market value of the portfolio and indicated that they were holding steady. Todd summarized that the Association was on budget and that revenues were exceeding expenditures.

iNVEStMENt CoMMittEE rEPort

Jacobsen informed that the investment transfer of funds to the three new investment managers has been completed. He also briefly reported on several Trustee’s participation in the Wharton Investment Conference.

1) Jacobsen informed the Board that they will hold a Policy Committee meeting on June 20th to review the policy book and add items that have been approved. He also mentioned that they will have a By-laws committee meeting that same day. He asked the Trustees if they had any issues

concerning the By-laws to submit estates and capital calls for

them in writing for discussion and investments had been included in

for debate.

the Beacon Pointe reports. David Smith indicated that everything is now reconciled and that Garth has restated the last four years of investment returns. The revised

presumptive claims with the City. numbers were only slightly

2) Jacobsen stated that they have been working on a workers comp flow process chart for

He indicated that Wayne Sherman is the key point person at HSB for presumptive claims for members if they are active or within the ten-year time frame for filing after retirement.

different than the previously reported numbers. All future reporting will be done with this in consideration to maintain accuracy.

adMiNiStratiVE CoMMittEE rEPort

Robert Steinbacher presented the following motions.

3) Jacobsen referred to the Eternal Flame Society for those members who wish to leave behind a contribution as a legacy to the WODFF. He stated that so far they have fifteen members signed up with various amounts committed; he indicated that some wish to remain anonymous.

ViCE PrESidENt rEPort

Juan Albarran reported on the Grass Valley event and indicated that the event was well received with about 130 attendees.

aUdit CoMMittEE rEPort

Doak Smith reported on the auditors findings compared to previously received investment

Doak Smith made the following motion. The committee recommends and I so move to accept the audit report presented for 2011. There was no further discussion or objections.

Motion carried to accept the audit report presented for 2011.

EXECUtiVE dirECtor’S rEPort

Todd Layfer presented the First Quarter Expenditure report for 2012. He reported on the main revenue sources and stated that everything was on target for the budget. He stated that benefits paid to members were tracking below what was anticipated for the budget except for the DME benefit. He indicated that the contributions were on target for

The committee recommends and I so move to pay the usual and customary bills in the amount of $998,933.67. There was no discussion or objections.

Motion carried to pay the usual and customary bills in the amount of $998,933.67.

The committee recommends and I so move to pay the professional fees in the amount of $100,099.52. There was no discussion or objections.

Motion carried to pay the professional fees in the amount of $100,099.52.

The committee recommends and I so move to purchase another 100 flag boxes from Daniel Marino at $140 each. There was no

discussion or objections.

EMErGENCy

4) LAFD Invitational Golf

11th – 14th

Motion carried to purchase another 100 flag boxes from Daniel Marino at $140 each.

The Estate Planning benefit in the amount of $4,800

The Life & Accident Withdrawals in the amount of $3,111

adVaNCEMENtS

James Coburn presented the following motion.

Tournament – September 24th 5) IFEBP Annual Employee Benefits Conf. – November

6) LAFRA Open House –

The committee recommends and I so move to enter into

The Relief Death Benefits in the amount of $31,500

The committee recommends and I so move to approve

December 1st

contract with the Hentzenwerke

the emergency advancement

rEtirEMENt diNNErS

Corporation web consultants for

There was no discussion or

 

$37K to develop the specification objections.

applications for active and retired members. There was no

Motion carried to approve

1) tom Burroughs, Barry Sears,

Odyssey Restaurant (Lowe)

leading to the upgrade the FRITS database system. Jacobsen reported that this company will

Motion carried to pay the above Relief benefits.

discussion or objections.

rick Semsch, Jim Walters – June 9th FS 114 (Peters) 2) Frank Cosola – June 9th Frank

go through the entire FRITS system and will document how to recreate the program when converting from the Fox Pro data base which has not been

James Coburn read the names of members who recently passed and asked for a moment of silence from the Board.

the emergency advancement applications for active and retired members.

& Susan’s Home Leona Valley (Domanski) 3) Gerald Horwedel – June 10th

James Coburn informed the Board 4) Gail Martin, Jr. – June

maintained by Microsoft for

that they have decided to change

11th Sutter’s Mill Restaurant

several years. He also indicated that this will be Phase II of the project. David Smith stated that this contract will include delivery of a 300-page detailed specification so they can then send out to bid to upgrade the FRITS system.

MEMoriaLS

PHILIP K. BOUKATHER EDWARD J. DREHER PAUL L. MITTENDORF WALTER L. BALL WINFRED D. PARKER EARL G. JOHNSON EDWARD E. WEGNER

member’s payroll deduction plan.

a

SCHoLarSHiP CoMMittEE rEPort

Doak Smith reported that the grading has been done for all the essays and stated that the winners

(Bednarchik) 5) david Castaneda – June 16th Brookside County Club (Larson) 6) *randall opperman – June

24th Odyssey Restaurant *Dinner at 3:00pm (White) 7) Steve owens – June 26th Avalon (Larson) 8) James Lawrence Gaffney

June 28th Sagebrush Cantina

Knollwood Country Club (Peters)

Motion carried to enter into contract with the Hentzenwerke Corporation web consultants at

aSSiStaNCE CoMMittEE

will be notified within the week. He also indicated that they will ask the winners to come to the

(Lowe) 9) Scott ames – July 12th

$37K to develop the specification leading to the upgrade the

James Coburn presented the following motions.

July Board meeting for their checks.

10) don Cascio and John rojas

FRITS database system.

July 19th Los Robles Greens

MEdiCaL CoMMittEE rEPort

David Peters presented the following motions.

The committee recommends and I so move to accept the donations in the amount of $16,906.02 to the Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemen’s Fund. There was no discussion or objections.

NEW BUSiNESS

James Coburn mentioned that the amount of money taken in from

the payroll deductions has been declining and asked if there was

Golf Course (Albarran) 11) Wes Shundo – July 28th Elk’s Lodge #966 San Pedro (Larson) 12) alan Bush – August 11th Scarlett Belle, Oxnard (Doak/

 

a

way that they could reach out

Lowe)

The committee recommends and I Motion carried to accept the

to those not already contributing.

a

correspondence to members not

so move to accept the applications donations in the amount of to the Medical Plan. There was no $16,906.02 to the Widows,

David Smith mentioned that there are about 40% of the membership

adJoUrNMENt

discussion and no objections.

Orphans & Disabled Firemen’s Fund.

that do not contribute through the payroll deduction system. He

John Jacobsen entertained a motion to adjourn. Gary

Peters seconded. There was no

Motion carried to accept all applications to the Medical Plan.

The committee recommends

stated that Marlene is working on

Matsubara so moved. David

rELiEF CoMMittEE rEPort

and I so move to approve the financial assistance applications for surviving spouses, active and

contributing to WODFF through payroll deductions.

discussion and no objections.

retired members. There was no

SEttiNG oF datES

Motion carried to adjourn. The Board of Trustees meeting

James Coburn presented the following motion.

discussion or objections.

1) Hope for Firefighters –

adjourned at 12:34pm.

The committee recommends and I so move to pay:

Motion carried to approve the financial assistance applications for surviving spouses, active and retired members.

June 7th 2) Fallen Firefighter Memorial Run June 30th 3) Over the Line Tournament –

John Jacobsen, President

The Sick & Injury benefits in the amount of $27,104.38

September 12th

donations to Widows, orphans & disabled Firemen’s Fund

May 2012

ROGER & PAT SCHMITZ IN MEMORY OF DON COCHRANE, DON WICHNER, AND DON HOFFMAN

JOHN A. WILMES

PI KAPPA ALPHA/GAMMA PIKE PHILANTHROPY

DANIEL LEON IN MEMORY OF DAKOTA DEMOTT, GATENA

M. BONANNI, CAROL MATTHEWS, ROBERT VAN BLARCOM, TYLER LYNCH, & WI

CROSSROADS COPPEROPOLIS CHURCH IN MEMORY OF WALTER BALL

GAMMA PHI BETA PIKE PHILANTHROPY

ALPHA DELTA PI SORORITY PIKE PHILANTHROPY

BETA PI CHAPTER ALPHA PHI PIKE PHILANTHROPY

PI BETA PHI/CALIFORNIA GAMMA PIKE PHILANTHROPY

DELTA DELTA DELTA/THETA XI CHAPTER PIKE PHILANTHROPY

THOMAS MURO JR IN MEMORY OF EARL G. JOHNSON

JAMES R. HAW IN MEMORY OF BILL WILLARD A GOOD FRIEND FOR MANY YEARS

TERRY D. MORGAN IN MEMORY OF WALTER BALL

TERRY D. MORGAN IN MEMORY OF JERRY FOUST

MERRILL E. REED IN MEMORY OF ED BURNHAM

DEBRA PRINDLE IN MEMORY OF DANA RICKMAN L.A. COUNTY FIRE DEPT NO. 130

PEGGY BETTENHAUSEN IN MEMORY OF EDWIN C. BURNHAM

JAMES E. GILLUM FROM THE “BREAKFAST CLUB”

DONALD L. CATE IN MEMORY OF MY WIFE LOIS CATE

EDWIN HARTMAN

HELEN L. MEGORDEN

KAPPA ALPHA THETA PIKE PHILANTHROPY

ARCHER R. MORGAN IN MEMORY OF MY OLD 29’S BUDDY ED DREHER

ALPHA NU CHAPTER/DELTA GAMMA FRATERNITY FOR PIKES PHILANTHROPY

ARCHER R. MORGAN IN MEMORY OF ONE “GREAT GUY” AL LOEWE

ROBERT V. CLAYTOR IN GRATITUDE FOR THE DURABLE MEDICAL EQUIPMENT

PAMELA P. ELLIOTT IN MEMORY OF ED BURNHAM

WILLIAM D. SIMS IN MEMORY OF ED WEGNER

EDWARD ROZESKI IN MEMORY OF IRENE ECONOMIDES THERMOS

FIRE STATION NO. 90 FROM THE FIRE EXTINGUISHER FUND

BRIDGET STRICKLAND PIKE PHILANTHROPY

CRAIG A. HURST IN MEMORY OF BOB & NOREEN HENDERSON

SHAWN T. AGNEW (1) WALKER

HELEN L. SCHULZ

MARY C. BEVINS

VIRGINIA L. BALL IN MEMORY OF MY HUSBAND WALTER “WALLY” BALL

DAVID CROGHAN

FRANCIS CROGHAN

GEORGE MC CONNELL IN MEMORY OF AL LOEWE

 

LOUIS CROGHAN

JAMES F. PERSON IN MEMORY OF PAUL MITTENDORF

 

STEVE DAVILA

HOWARD R. DUNFORD IN MEMORY OF WINFRED “WINNIE” PARKER

DI MEGLIO VINCE

DOUGLAS J. KIRBY IN MEMORY OF LAFD PILOT DONALD L. CARTER

VINCE DI MEGLIO

MAURINE FREEMAN

HEATHER D. BENES IN MEMORY OF DANA RICKMAN

BOB & KAY GREEN

FIRE STATION NO 95 FROM THE FIRE EXTINGUISHER FUND

JIM & MARIE HAWORTH

FIRE STATION NO. 11 FROM THE FIRE EXTINGUISHER FUND

WENDY KLENHA

CAROL BOUKATHER IN MEMORY OF HUSBAND AND FATHER PHILIP K. BOUKATHER

54 • August 2012