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Bachelor of Computer Science

Academic Session 2012/2013

USM Vision
Transforming Higher Education for a Sustainable Tomorrow

USM Mission
USM is a pioneering, transdisciplinary research intensive university that empowers future talent and enables the bottom billions to transform their socio-economic well being

STUDENT'S PERSONAL INFORMATION Full Name

Identity Card (IC)/Passport No.

Current Address

Permanent Address

E-mail Address

Telephone No. (Residence)

Mobile Phone No. (if applicable)

School Programme of Study

Computer Sciences Bachelor of Computer Science (Hons.) [B.Comp.Sc. (Hons.)]

CONTENT I. II. III. IV. V. VI. 1.0

PAGE

VISION AND MISSION STUDENT'S PERSONAL INFORMATION CONTENT .................................................................................................... ACADEMIC CALENDAR .......................................................................... SCHOOL PRINCIPAL OFFICERS ........................................................... SCHOOL STAFF LIST ................................................................................ INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................ 1.1 School of Computer Sciences .............................................................. 1.2 Mission and Vision of the School of Computer Sciences .................... 1.3 Bachelor of Computer Science (Honours) Programme ........................ 1.4 General Educational Goals and Objectives .......................................... 1.5 Programme Outcomes .......................................................................... 1.6 Applications of Softskills ..................................................................... 1.7 Programme Profile ............................................................................... 1.8 Type of Programmes ............................................................................ 1.9 Programme Requirements .................................................................... 1.10 Type of Courses ................................................................................... 1.11 Graduation Requirements .................................................................... 1.12 Academic Year Status ......................................................................... 1.13 Course Coding ..................................................................................... ACADEMIC SYSTEM AND GENERAL INFORMATION .................... 2.1 Course Registration Activity ................................................................ 2.1.1 Course Registration Secretariat for the Bachelor Degree and University's Diploma Student .................................................. 2.1.2 Course Registration Platform .................................................. 2.1.3 The Frequency of Course Registration to One Academic Session ..................................................................................... 2.1.4 General Guideline Before Students Register for Courses ........ 2.1.5 Information/Document Given to All Students Through Campus Online Portal (www.campusonline.com.my).............. 2.1.6 Registration of Language and Co-Curriculum Courses ........... 2.1.7 Registration of 'Audit' Course (Y Code) .................................. 2.1.8 Registration of Prerequisite Course (Z Code) .......................... 2.1.9 Late Course Registration/Late Course Addition ...................... 2.1.10 Dropping Courses .................................................................... 2.1.11 Course Registration Confirmation Slip .................................... 2.1.12 Revising and Updating Data/Information/Students Personal and Academic Records ............................................................. 2.1.13 Academic Adivsor ................................................................... 2.2 Interpretation of Unit/Credit ................................................................ 2.3 Examination System ............................................................................. 2.4 Unit Exemption/Credit Transfer ........................................................... i

i 1 2 4 14 14 14 14 15 16 20 23 23 24 24 26 26 27 28 28 28 28 30 30 31 32 33 33 33 33 34 34 35 35 36 40

2.0

CONTENT 2.5 2.6 2.7 3.0

PAGE Academic Integrity ............................................................................... USM Mentor Programme .................................................................... Student Exchange Programme ............................................................. 44 49 49 50 50 52 52 54 55 56 60 60 63 63 64 65 69 72 74 75 75 77 81 81 81 83 83 84 85 85 86 87 87 87 88 88 89

UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS .............................................................. 3.1 Summary of University Requirements .................................................. 3.2 Bahasa Malaysia ................................................................................... 3.3 English Language ................................................................................. 3.4 Local Students - Islamic and Asian Civilisation/Ethnic Relations/ Core Entrepreneurship .......................................................................... 3.5 International Students - Malaysian Studies/Option .............................. 3.6 Third Language/Co-Curriculum/Skill Courses/Options ....................... SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS ...................................................................... 4.1 Summary of School Requirements ....................................................... 4.2 Specific Requirements for Skill Course/Options .................................. 4.3 Course Registration Guideline ............................................................. 4.4 Unit Exemption/Credit Transfer ........................................................... 4.5 Specialisation Areas ............................................................................. 4.6 Industrial Training/Undergraduate Research Training ......................... 4.7 Group Innovation Project ..................................................................... 4.8 Undergraduate Major Project/Undergraduate Research Project .......... 4.9 Student Learning Time (SLT) .............................................................. 4.10 GRoW Programme .............................................................................. MINOR PROGRAMMES ........................................................................... FACILITIES ................................................................................................. 6.1 Computer Labs Facilities for Undergraduate Teaching ........................ 6.2 Computer Labs Facilities for Research and Undergraduate Project ..... 6.3 Servers .................................................................................................. 6.4 Lab Usage Regulations ........................................................................ 6.5 Lecture Halls and Tutorial Rooms ...................................................... GENERAL INFORMATION ...................................................................... 7.1 Industry-Community Advisory Panel (ICAP) and Computer Industrial Forum (CIF) ........................................................ 7.2 Student Affairs Section ........................................................................ 7.2.1 Academic Staff - Students Committee ....................................... 7.2.2 Academic Advisors ................................................................... 7.2.3 Mentor System and Counselling Service ................................... 7.3 Sustainable Student Workshop (Bengkel Siswa Lestari) (Year I) ....... 7.4 Intel eLite Programme ......................................................................... 7.5 Microsoft Student Partner (MSP) Programme ..................................... ii

4.0

5.0 6.0

7.0

CONTENT 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

PAGE Computer Science Society ................................................................... Prizes and Awards ............................................................................... 7.7.1 School Level ............................................................................. 7.7.2 University Level ........................................................................ Research and Higher Degree Programmes ........................................... Schools Website and E-learning Portal .............................................. 91 91 91 91 92 93 94 94 100 147 148 150 151 158 159 160

LIST AND DESCRIPTION OF COURSES ............................................... 8.1 List of Courses ..................................................................................... 8.2 Course Descriptions .............................................................................

APPENDIX A .......................................................................................................... APPENDIX B .......................................................................................................... APPENDIX C .......................................................................................................... APPENDIX D .......................................................................................................... SCHEDULE PLAN FOR GRADUATION .......................................................... INDEX ..................................................................................................................... STUDENTS' FEEDBACK .....................................................................................

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IV. ACADEMIC CALENDAR


Monday, 10 September 2012 - Sunday, 8 September 2013
WEEK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 - 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 - 52 43 - 45 46 - 47 48 49 - 52 VACATION TEACHING EXAMINATION VACATION EXAMINATION EXAMINATION ACTIVITY DATE REMARKS FIRST SEMESTER Monday, 10/09/2012 - Friday, 14/09/2012 Hari Malaysia Sunday, 16/09/2013 Monday, 17/09/2012 - Friday, 21/09/2012 Monday, 24/09/2012 - Friday, 28/09/2012 Monday, 01/10/2012 - Friday, 05/10/2012 Monday, 08/10/2012 - Friday, 12/10/2012 Monday, 15/10/2012 - Friday, 19/10/2012 Monday, 22/10/2012 - Friday, 26/10/2012 Monday, 29/10/2012 - Friday, 02/11/2012 Hari Raya Qurban Friday, 26/10/2012 Monday, 05/11/2012 - Friday, 09/11/2012 MID-SEMESTER BREAK Saturday, 10/11/2012 - Sunday, 17/11/2012 Monday, 19/11/2012 - Friday, 23/11/2012 Monday, 26/11/2012 - Friday, 30/11/2012 Monday, 03/12/2012 - Friday, 07/12/2012 Monday, 10/12/2012 - Friday, 14/12/2012 Monday, 17/12/2012 - Friday, 21/12/2012 REVISION WEEK Saturday, 22/12/2012 - Tuesday, 01/01/2013 Wednesday, 02/01/2013 - Saturday, 05/01/2013 Monday, 07/01/2013 - Saturday, 12/01/2013 Monday, 14/01/2013 - Friday, 18/01/2013 INTER-SEMESTER BREAK Saturday, 19/01/2013 - Sunday, 17/02/2013 SECOND SEMESTER Monday, 18/02/2013 - Friday, 22/02/2013 Monday, 25/02/2013 - Friday, 01/03/2013 Monday, 04/03/2013 - Friday, 08/03/2013 Monday, 11/03/2013 - Friday, 15/03/2013 Monday, 18/03/2013 - Friday, 22/03/2013 Monday, 25/03/2013 - Friday, 29/03/2013 Monday, 01/04/2013 - Friday, 05/04/2013 MID-SEMESTER BREAK Saturday, 06/04/2013 - Sunday, 14/04/2013 Monday, 15/04/2013 - Friday, 19/04/2013 Monday, 22/04/2013 - Friday, 26/04/2013 Hari Pekerja Wednesday, 01/05/2013 Monday, 29/04/2012 - Friday, 03/05/2013 Monday, 06/05/2013 - Friday, 10/05/2013 Monday, 13/05/2013 - Friday, 17/05/2013 Hari Wesak 05/2013 Monday, 20/05/2013 - Friday, 24/05/2013 Monday, 27/05/2013 - Friday, 31/05/2013 REVISION WEEK Saturday, 01/06/2013 - Sunday, 09/06/2013 Monday, 10/06/2013 - Friday, 14/06/2013 Monday, 17/06/2013 - Friday, 21/06/2013 Monday, 24/06/2013 - Friday, 28/06/2013 LONG VACATION Saturday, 29/06/2013 - Sunday, 08/09/2013 COURSES DURING LONG VACATION Saturday, 29/06/2012 - Sunday, 21/07/2013 Monday, 22/07/2013 - Friday, 02/08/2013 Monday, 05/08/2013 - Friday, 09/08/2013 Saturday, 10/08/2013 - Sunday, 08/09/2013

TEACHING

TEACHING

TEACHING

TEACHING

V. SCHOOL PRINCIPAL OFFICERS DEAN

Prof. Rosni Abdullah

DEPUTY DEANS

Assoc. Prof. Nur'Aini Abdul Rashid (Academic & Student Development)

Prof. Ahamad Tajudin Khader (Graduate Studies & Research)

Prof. Abdullah Zawawi Haji Talib (Industry & Community Network)

PROGRAMME CHAIRPERSONS

Assoc. Prof. Wan Tat Chee (Computer Systems)

Puan Maziani Sabudin (Computing Science)

Dr. Nasriah Zakaria (Information Systems)

Assoc. Prof. Cheah Yu-N (Software Engineering)

SENIOR ASSISTANT REGISTRAR

ASSISTANT REGISTRAR

Encik Muhamad Tarmizi Rahim

Encik Mohd Redzuan Asmi

LIST OF PRINCIPAL OFFICERS


Principal Officers E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension rosni@cs.usm.my 704B / 724 3647 / 2169

DEAN Prof. Rosni Abdullah DEPUTY DEANS Academic & Student Development Assoc. Prof. Nur'Aini Abdul Rashid Graduate Studies & Research Prof. Ahamad Tajudin Khader Industry & Community Network Prof. Abdullah Zawawi Haji Talib PROGRAMME CHAIRPERSONS Computer Systems (Network Computing and Distributed System & Security) Assoc. Prof. Wan Tat Chee Computing Science (Year I and Computing Science Common Core Courses) Puan Maziani Sabudin Information Systems (Information Systems Engineering and Multimedia Computing) Dr. Nasriah Zakaria Software Engineering (Software Engineering and Intelligent Systems) Assoc. Prof. Cheah Yu-N SENIOR ASSISTANT REGISTRAR Encik Muhamad Tarmizi Rahim B.Commn. (Hons), MA, USM ASSISTANT REGISTRAR Encik Mohd Redzuan Asmi BBA (Hons.) Finance, UiTM

nuraini@cs.usm.my 704D / 728 4380 / 3640 tajudin@cs.usm.my 704C / 720 2158 / 3646 azht@cs.usm.my 506A / 735 4389 / 3614

tcwan@cs.usm.my 625 3617 maziani@cs.usm.my 632 4649 nasriah@cs.usm.my 726 4639 yncheah@cs.usm.my 608 / 401 4644 / 3830

mtarmizi@cs.usm.my 704F 4636

redzuan@cs.usm.my 704E 3263

VI. SCHOOL STAFF LIST


Research Cluster: Specialisation Data to Knowledge: Graphics and Visualisation Geometric Computing Computational Modelling Data to Knowledge: Evolutionary Algorithm Metaheuristics Genetic Algorithm Scheduling/Timetabling/ Planning Data to Knowledge: Computational Intelligence E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension azht@cs.usm.my 506A / 735 4389 / 3614

Professor Abdullah Zawawi Haji Talib BSc (Hons.), BRADFORD MSc, NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE PhD, WALES Ahamad Tajudin Khader BSc, MSc, OHIO PhD, STRATHCLYDE

tajudin@cs.usm.my 704C / 720 2158 / 3646

Lim Chee Peng BEng, UTM MSc (Eng), PhD, SHEFFIELD On Leave Mandava Rajeswari BE, MADRAS MTech, IIT KANPUR PhD, WALES

cplim@cs.usm.my 718 5050 mandava@cs.usm.my 730 2157

Data to Knowledge: Semantic Image Knowledge Extraction Medical Image Analysis and Visualisation Multimedia Knowledge Integration Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures: Parallel and Distributed Computing Parallel Algorithms for Bioinformatics Applications

Rosni Abdullah BSc, MSc, WESTERN MICHIGAN PhD, LOUGHBOROUGH

rosni@cs.usm.my 704B / 724 3647 / 2169

Associate Professor Azman Samsudin BSc, ROCHESTER MSc, PhD, DENVER

Research Cluster: Specialisation Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures: Cryptography Parallel and Distributed Computing Interconnection Switching Networks

E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension azman@cs.usm.my 719 3635

Associate Professor Bahari Belaton BAppSc (Comp. Studies), SOUTH AUSTRALIA I.T. BSc (Hons), FLINDERS PhD, LEEDS Research Dean of Information & Communications Technology Research Platform Chan Huah Yong BCompSc (Hons.), MSc, USM PhD, FRANCHE-COMTE

Research Cluster: Specialisation Data to Knowledge: Scientific Data Visualisation Computer Graphics Network Security

E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension bahari@cs.usm.my 618 4382 / 3083

Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures: Parallel and Distributed Processing Grid Computing Multi-Agent Systems Resource Allocation Cloud Computing Data to Knowledge: Knowledge Management Knowledge Engineering Intelligent Systems Health Informatics Data to Knowledge: Natural Language Processing Lexicography Terminology Translation Data to Knowledge: Computer Vision Data Mining and Machine Learning Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures: Parallel and Distributed Processing Grid Computing Modelling and Simulation Service Computing: E-Learning/CAI Multimedia Virtual Reality RFID

hychan@cs.usm.my 628 / 504 4647 / 4390

Cheah Yu-N BCompSc (Hons.), PhD, USM

yncheah@cs.usm.my 733 / 2128 4644 / 3830

Chuah Choy Kim BSc (Hons.), Cert. Prof. Trans. (I), MALAYA MSc, UMIST PhD, MONTREAL Dhanesh Ramachandram BTech (Hons), PhD, USM

kimc@cs.usm.my 528 4387

dhaneshr@cs.usm.my 731 4046 fazilah@cs.usm.my

Fazilah Haron BSc, WISCONSIN-Madison PhD, LEEDS Seconded to Taibah University, Medina, Saudi Arabia Muhammad Rafie Hj. Mohd. Arshad BA, MACALESTER COLLEGE MBA-MIS, DALLAS

rafie@cs.usm.my 725 3616

Associate Professor Nur'Aini Abdul Rashid BSc, MISSISSIPPI STATE MSc, PhD, USM

Research Cluster: Specialisation Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures: Parallel and Distributed Processing Parallel Algorithms for Genomic Information Retrieval String Matching Algorithms Service Computing: Distributed Multimedia and Communication Content Distribution Network (CDN) Data Scheduling and Broadcasting Image Retrieval, Processing and Analysis Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures: Wireless Networks Satellite Communications Real Time Systems

E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension nuraini@cs.usm.my 704D / 728 4380 / 3640

Putra Sumari BCompSc (Hons.), USM MSc, PhD, LIVERPOOL

putras@cs.usm.my 721 3615

Wan Tat Chee BSEE (CE), MSECE, MIAMI PhD, USM

tcwan@cs.usm.my 625 3617 / 4633

Lecturer Ahmad Suhaimi Baharudin ACIS, UK Dip.Comp.Sc., ITM BSc, INDIANA STATE MBA, PhD, USM

Research Cluster: Specialisation Service Computing: Service Science and Innovation Management of Information Systems (MIS) Human Computer Interaction (HCI) IT Operations and Management Technopreneurship Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures: Security Software Engineering Programming Language System

E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension suhaimi@cs.usm.my 527 2659

Aman Jantan BCompSc (Hons.), MSc, PhD, USM

aman@cs.usm.my 729 4642

Lecturer Azizul Rahman Mohd. Shariff B.Eng (Hons.), PLYMOUTH MSc, PhD, BRADFORD

Research Cluster: Specialisation Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures: Mobile Communications and Broadband Networks Wireless Sensor Networks Autonomous Computing WiMAX and LTE/LTE Advanced Vehicular Networks Defense and Public Safety Service Computing: Natural Language Processing Programming Social Computing Management Information System Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures: Parallel and Distributed Processing Grid Computing Natural Language Processing Data to Knowledge: Artificial Intelligence Databases Information Visualisation Data Mining Data to Knowledge: Computational Intelligence Biometrics Computer Vision Service Computing: Logic and Object Oriented Programming e-Learning and Multimedia Service Computing: Collaborative Computing Distributed Computing Information Security Service Computing

E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension azizul@cs.usm.my 723 2486

Faten Damanhoori BSc, INDIANA STATE MSc, N. ILLINOIS

faten@cs.usm.my 709 4637

G. C. Sodhy BCompSc (Hons.), MSc, USM

sodhy@cs.usm.my 635 3002

Hasimah Hj. Mohamed BCompSc (Hons.), UTM MSc, USM

hasimah@cs.usm.my 727 4640

Ibrahim Venkat BSc, MKU, INDIA MSc, UMT PhD, HERIOT-WATT, UK Maziani Sabudin BSc, WISCONSIN MSc, BRADLEY Mohd. Adib Haji Omar BSc, MSc, AMERICAN UNIVERSITY PhD, USM

ibrahim@cs.usm.my 634 4753 maziani@cs.usm.my 632 4649 adib@cs.usm.my 620 4648

Lecturer Mohd. Azam Osman BCompSc (Hons.), MSc, USM

Research Cluster: Specialisation Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures: Distributed Shared Memory Systems Multicore Programming Mobile Applications Image Processing Data to Knowledge: Mobile Robotics Computer Vision Time Synchronisation Service Computing: Biomedical Engineering Information Privacy Health Informatics Service Computing: Technopreneurship Information Systems Development Service Computing: Database Management System Information System Business Process Reengineering Data to knowledge: Chemoinformatics Bioinformatics Data mining Service Computing: ERP and Capacity Planning Technopreneurship Education Computer Ethics Digital Library Service Computing: Software Reliability Software Testing Iterative and Incremental Software Development Open Source Software

E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension azam@cs.usm.my 712 2127

Munir Zaman BSc (Hons.), MANCHESTER MSc, CRANFIELD PhD, SURREY Nasriah Zakaria BSc., MSc. RPI PhD, SYRACUSE Nasuha Lee Abdullah BsEE/CE, UPM MSc, USM On Study Leave Norlia Mustaffa BSc, MSc, INDIANA STATE

mzaman@cs.usm.my 714 2062 nasriah@cs.usm.my 726 4639 nasuha@cs.usm.my 633 4754 norlia@cs.usm.my 711 4750

Nurul Hashimah Ahamed Hassain Malim BCompSc (Hons.), MSc, USM PhD, SHEFFIELD Rosnah Haji Idrus BSc, MBA, E. ILLINOIS

nurulhashimah@cs.usm.my

630 4645 rosnah@cs.usm.my 636 4384

Sharifah Mashita Syed Mohamad BIT (Hons), UUM MSc, USM PhD, TECHNOLOGY SYDNEY

mashita@cs.usm.my 607 4756

Lecturer Siti Khaotijah Mohamad BA (Hons.), UKM MSc, PhD, USM Tan Tien Ping BCompSc (Hons.), MSc, USM PhD, JOSEPH FOURIER Umi Kalsom Yusof BSc, WESTERN ILLINOIS MSc, USM Vincent Khoo Kay Teong BSc (Hons.), MALAYA MSc, USM PhD, UMIST

Research Cluster: Specialisation Data to Knowledge: Linguistics Computational Linguistics Natural Language Processing Data to Knowledge: Automatic Speech Recognition Natural Language Processing Data to Knowledge: Database Design Artificial Intelligence Web Engineering Service Computing: Service Systems Engineering Decision Support Technologies Business Intelligence Marketing and Predictive Analytics Service Computing: Knowledge-based Systems Data Integration Data to Knowledge: Information Visualisation Bioinformatics Application and Visualisation Information Retrieval Data to Knowledge: Scheduling Optimization Meta-Heuristics Soft Computing Data to Knowledge: Computer Networks Intelligent Systems Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures: XML Database Management Database Theory and Formal Specification Artificial Intelligence

E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension sitijah@cs.usm.my 525 2320 tienping@cs.usm.my 522 4386 umiyusof@cs.usm.my 631 3036 vkhoo@cs.usm.my 623 / 408 2156 / 4394

Wahidah Husain BSc, CALIF. STATE MSc, NORTHROP Wan Mohd. Nazmee Wan Zainon BCompSc (Hons.), MSc, PhD, USM

wahidah@cs.usm.my 708 3645 nazmee@cs.usm.my 713 4638

Wong Li Pei BCompSc (Hons.), MSc, USM PhD, NTU, S'PORE

lpwong@cs.usm.my 523 4751

Yap Fa Toh BSEE (Hons.), MSEE, NUS PhD, MISSOURI Zurinahni Zainol BSc (Hons.), ITM-UKM MSc, USM PhD, HULL

ftyap@cs.usm.my 619 4383 zuri@cs.usm.my 710 3618

Attachment Staff Manmeet Kaur Mahinderjit Singh BCompSc (Hons.), MSc, USM

Research Cluster: Specialisation Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures: Data Security Security and Privacy Trust Management Sensors Network

E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension manmeet@cs.usm.my 514 5346

Visiting Professor K. G. Subramanian BSc, MSc, PhD, MADRAS

Research Cluster: Specialisation Data to Knowledge: Theory of Computation Applications of Automata and Formal Languages

E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension kgs@cs.usm.my 629 4641

Invited Lecturer Sureswaran Ramadass (Prof.) BSEE/CE, MSEE/CE, MIAMI PhD, USM Director of National Advanced IPv6 Centre (NAV6)

Centre: Specialisation National Advanced IPv6 Centre (NAV6): Next Generation Networks and IPv6 Video and Multimedia Conferencing Cyber Terrorism and Network Security National Advanced IPv6 Centre (NAV6): Office Automation Networking Multimedia/Animation

E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension sures@cs.usm.my 601D 3004

Azlan Osman BSc, WISCONSIN MSc, BRADLEY Deputy Director (Industry and Community Network) of National Advanced IPv6 (NAV6)

azlan@nav6.usm.my 602C 4395

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Invited Lecturer Selvakumar Manickam BCompSc (Hons.), MSc, USM Deputy Director (Research & Innovation) of National Advanced IPv6 Centre (NAV6) Tan Chen Wei BCompSc (Hons.), MSc, USM

Centre: Specialisation National Advanced IPv6 Centre (NAV6): IPv6 Mobile Technologies Data Mining and Visualisation Web Applications National Advanced IPv6 Centre (NAV6): VOIP and Multimedia Conferencing Satellite Network Network Security Navigation and Location Based Services

E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension selva@nav6.usm.my 601B 4630

cwtan@nav6.usm.my 602D 04-6532488 Ext. 2160

Information Technology Officer Encik Ahmad Anas Ismail B.IT (Hons.), UKM Cik Farahiyah Abu Bakar B.IT (Hons.), MMU Encik Mahadi Yusoff BCompSc (Hons.), MSc, USM Encik Muhammad Rizal Mohd. Amin BCompSc (Hons.), MSc, USM Encik Nor Azman Shahiran BCompSc (Hons.), USM

E-mail Room Number Telephone Extension anas@cs.usm.my 307 5047 farah@cs.usm.my 521 2116 mahadi@cs.usm.my 311 3003 rizal@cs.usm.my 309 2342 norazman@cs.usm.my 310 3003

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Administrative Staff Senior Administrative Assistant (Clerical) Puan Azizah Saad Puan Rohana Omar Puan Siti Fatimah Martavi Office Secretary Puan Siti Suhaila Shahbudin Puan Zarina Mohamed Ibrahim Administrative Assistant (Clerical) Puan Chan Joon Kew Puan Mohaini Ismail Puan Mureza Shamin Muhammad Puan Noor Aida Lob Abu Bakar Puan Noor Azlina Yusof Senior Office General Assistant Encik Zainol Mansor Office General Assistant Encik Shahrum Mokhtar General Office

E-mail

azizah@cs.usm.my rohana@cs.usm.my fatimah@cs.usm.my

ila@cs.usm.my zarina@cs.usm.my

chan@cs.usm.my mohaini@cs.usm.my shamin@cs.usm.my aida@cs.usm.my ina@cs.usm.my

zainol@cs.usm.my

shahrum@cs.usm.my Room Number: 704 Telephone Extension: 3610 / 3484 / 4381 / 3647 / 2158 / 2155 Room Number: 506C Telephone Extension: 3925

Industry & Community Network (Jaringan Industri & Masyarakat (JIM)) Office

12

Technical Staff Senior Technician Encik Shik Abdulla Mohamed Ali Puan Badriyah Che May Encik Ramlee Yahaya Puan Sharifa Abdul Rahman Technician Encik Abdul Rohim Mansur Encik Jasmi Chek Isa Encik Mohamad Tarmizi Hat Encik Mohd. Hidzir Shamshul Bahrin Puan Noor Salwanie Abdul Ghani Encik Ruslan Ahmad Encik Syed Mohamad Syed Sahil General Office

E-mail

sheik@cs.usm.my badriyah@cs.usm.my yramli@cs.usm.my sha@cs.usm.my

rohim@cs.usm.my jasmi@cs.usm.my tarmizi@cs.usm.my hidzir@cs.usm.my salwanie@cs.usm.my ruslan@cs.usm.my syed@cs.usm.my Room Number: 305B / 305 Telephone Extension: 2343 / 2310

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1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 School of Computer Sciences The School of Computer Sciences was established officially on the 1st of March 1995 after functioning for a period of 10 years as the Division of Computer Science, an independent and autonomous unit within the then School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences. The period had witnessed various advances, developments and achievements of Computer Science pertaining to academic programmes, research and development, consultancy, community services and others. The School of Computer Sciences will continue its efforts to strengthen its curricula and at the same time explore research areas that contribute significantly to the development of the nation. 1.2 Mission and Vision of the School of Computer Sciences Vision: Towards holistic and sustainability-inspired computing for a better tomorrow Mission: Providing holistic and sustainability-inspired computing in the quest for knowledge and excellence in education and research that nurtures individuals who can contribute effectively towards the transformation of the nation. 1.3 Bachelor of Computer Science (Honours) Programme Computer Science at USM began with a course in programming in 1974. It has since developed into a specialisation in Computer Science under the Bachelor of Science (Mathematics) honours degree, and eventually the Bachelor of Science (Computer Science) (B.Sc. (Comp.Sc.)) degree with honours was offered. Beginning in the 1983/84 session, after a complete revamp of the curriculum, the Bachelor of Computer Science (B.Comp.Sc) degree with honours was offered to replace the B.Sc. (Comp.Sc.) degree. USM B.Comp.Sc. (Hons) has achieved significantly in producing highly qualified graduates that have been widely accepted by both the public and the private sectors. An important contributing factor to this success is its strong curriculum, which always strives to achieve a balance between the teaching of the theory of computing and exposure to practical aspects. The curriculum has been continually updated in accordance with current technology. For instance, in the 1992/93 session a new curriculum which was more up-to-date was implemented, and in the 1994/95 session, it was further modified to conform to the University Academic System (SPU). Beginning with the 1996/97 session, the curriculum had been adjusted to reduce the minimum period for graduation from 4 years to 3 years under the Three Year Academic System (SPTT). In 2000/01 session a new curriculum was introduced and adapted to conform with the recommendation made by the National Higher Education Council on SPTT (SPTT(M)). In 2006/07 session, a new revised curriculum was introduced. The degree programme has been adjusted in 2009/2010 to revert the minimum period for graduation to 4 years (Four Year Academic Systems) (Sistem Pengajian Empat Tahun) (SPET). 14

The School of Computer Sciences was the first school in USM to offer a collaborative programme with private colleges at the diploma level since 1995 and also the first to offer the USM external degree programme beginning 1997. The aims of the Bachelor of Computer Science (Honours) degree programme are to produce high-quality graduates with the necessary professional skills to practise as successful computing professionals and compete effectively in a world of rapid technological change. 1.4 General Educational Goals and Objectives The general educational goal of the Bachelor of Computer Science degree programme is to produce high-quality graduates with the necessary professional skills to practice as successful computing professionals and compete effectively in a world of rapid technological change. Therefore the objectives of the programme are to produce quality graduates in computer science who are: 1. Knowledgeable and competent in the fundamental areas of computer science (programming, theoretical foundations, algorithms, software and hardware) as well as one specialisation area of computer science. Analytical, logical and critical thinkers who are adept in continuing intellectual and professional development through the integration of theory and practical knowledge. Capable to develop (analyse, design, and implement) and support computing solutions using scientific, engineering and sustainable approaches. Effective and good in communication and leadership skills, and gainfully employed in the diverse and challenging world of computing, serving the needs of the local and global community. Able to successfully engage in self-directed professional technopreneurship, postgraduate studies and life-long learning. development,

2. 3. 4.

5.

15

1.5 Programme Outcomes Graduates should be able to apply the core knowledge of computer science together with a specialised area of computer science by: 1. Mastering theory and abstraction through analytical, logical and critical thinking as well as scientific and engineering approach in developing and implementing robust and useful computing solutions (Knowledge). Using scientific and engineering decisions and considerations in developing (analysis, design, implementation, evaluation, project management) high quality computer-based systems (Technical Skill, Practical Skill, Psychomotor). Mastering skills in managing, planning and administering computer-based systems (such as security, maintenance, installation) as well as applying and choosing appropriate technologies (Thinking Skill and Scientific Approach). Mastering communication skill such as in analysing, presenting and negotiating in computing practices (Communication Skill). Carrying out tasks in team in computing practices including decision making and planning (Social and Responsibility Skill). Possessing ethical attributes and professionalism in professional activities in computing (Profesionalism, Value, Attitude and Ethics). Possessing abilities to search and manage information, adapt to current changes, realise life-long learning and proceed to higher level studies (Life-long Education and Information Management). Participating in technopreneurship and practising sound management such as in decision making and planning (Management and Entreprenuership Skill). Possessing leadership attributes such as participating in, playing a role in, and leading computing and community projects (Leadership Skill).

2.

3.

4. 5. 6. 7.

8. 9.

16

The table below provides the matrix for programme outcomes.


Common Courses Technical Skill/Practical Skill/Psychomotor Programme Outcomes Lifelong Education and Information Management Social and Responsibility Skill Professionalism, Value, Attitude and Ethics Management and Entrepreneurship Skill Communication Skill Thinking Skill and Scientific Approach

No.

Course Code/Unit

Course Title

COMMON CORE COURSES 1. 2. 3. CPT111/3 CPT112/4 CPT113/3 Principles of Programming Discrete Structures Programming Methodology & Data Structures Logic & Applications Mathematical Methods for Computer Science Computer Organisations Integrated Software Development Workshop Database Organisations & Design Systems Analysis & Design Programming Language Concepts & Paradigms Design & Analysis of Algorithms Data Communications & Networks Operating Systems Group Innovation Project Research Methods & Special Topic Study Industrial Training/ Undergraduate Research Training

4. 5.

CPT114/4 CPT115/4

6. 7.

CST131/4 CAT200/3

8.

CMT221/4

9. 10.

CMT222/4 CPT211/3

11. 12.

CPT212/4 CST231/3

13. 14. 15. 16.

CST232/3 CAT300/2 CAT301/2 CAT302/12/ CAT303/12

17

Leadership Skill

Knowledge

Common Courses Technical Skill/Practical Skill/Psychomotor

Programme Outcomes Lifelong Education and Information Management Social and Responsibility Skill Professionalism, Value, Attitude and Ethics Management and Entrepreneurship Skill Communication Skill Thinking Skill and Scientific Approach

No.

Course Code/Unit

Course Title

17.

CAT400/8/ CAT401/8

Undergraduate Major Project/ Undergraduate Research Project Professional & Technopreneurship Development

18.

CAT402/2

SPECIALISATION CORE / OPTION / ELECTIVE COURSES 1. CMT223/3 Information Systems Theory & Management Multimedia Systems Software Requirements Analysis & Modelling Artificial Intelligence Information Security & Assurance Network Programming Management & Engineering of Databases Web Engineering & Technologies Computer Graphics & Visual Computing Software Design & Architecture Knowledge Management & Engineering Software Project Management, Process & Evolution Computer Vision & Image Processing

2. 3.

CMT224/3 CPT243/3

4. 5. 6. 7.

CPT244/3 CST233/3 CST234/3 CMT321/3

8. 9. 10. 11.

CMT322/3 CMT324/3 CPT341/3 CPT342/3

12.

CPT343/3

13.

CPT344/3

18

Leadership Skill

Knowledge

Common Courses Technical Skill/Practical Skill/Psychomotor

Programme Outcomes Lifelong Education and Information Management Social and Responsibility Skill Professionalism, Value, Attitude and Ethics Management and Entrepreneurship Skill Communication Skill Thinking Skill and Scientific Approach

No.

Course Code/Unit

Course Title

14. 15.

CPT346/3 CST331/3

Natural Language Processing Principles of Parallel & Distributed Programming Internet Protocols, Architecture & Routing Distributed & Grid Computing Network Monitoring & Security E-Business Strategy, Architecture & Design Multimedia Information Systems & Management Decision Support Systems & Business Intelligence Animation & Virtual Reality Software Quality Assurance & Testing Automata Theory & Formal Languages Intelligent Health Informatics Systems Security & Protection Microprocessors & Embedded Systems Advanced Computer Architecture Wireless Network & Mobile Computing

16.

CST332/3

17. 18. 19.

CST333/3 CST334/3 CMT421/3

20.

CMT422/3

21.

CMT423/3

22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29.

CMT424/3 CPT441/3 CPT443/3 CPT444/3 CST431/3 CST432/3 CST433/3 CST434/3

19

Leadership Skill

Knowledge

1.6 Applications of Softskills The table below provides the matrix for the applications of softskills.
CTPS - Critical Thinking and Problem Solving EM - Moral and Professional Ethics ES - Entrepreneurship Skill LL - Lifelong Learning and Information Management CS - Communication Skill

No.

Course Code/Unit

Course Title

COMMON CORE COURSES 1. 2. 3. CPT111/3 CPT112/4 CPT113/3 Principles of Programming Discrete Structures Programming Methodology & Data Structures Logic & Applications Mathematical Methods for Computer Science Computer Organisations Integrated Software Development Workshop Database Organisations & Design Systems Analysis & Design Programming Language Concepts & Paradigms Design & Analysis of Algorithms Data Communications & Networks Operating Systems Group Innovation Project Research Methods & Special Topic Study

4. 5.

CPT114/4 CPT115/4

6. 7.

CST131/4 CAT200/3

8.

CMT221/4

9. 10.

CMT222/4 CPT211/3

11. 12.

CPT212/4 CST231/3

13. 14. 15.

CST232/3 CAT300/2 CAT301/2

20

LS - Leadership Skill

TS - Teamwork

CTPS - Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

EM - Moral and Professional Ethics

ES - Entrepreneurship Skill

LL - Lifelong Learning and Information Management

CS - Communication Skill

No.

Course Code/Unit

Course Title

16.

CAT302/12/ CAT303/12 CAT400/8/ CAT401/8

Industrial Training/ Undergraduate Research Training Undergraduate Major Project/ Undergraduate Research Project Professional & Technopreneurship Development

17.

18.

CAT402/2

SPECIALISATION CORE / OPTION / ELECTIVE COURSES 1. CMT223/3 Information Systems Theory & Management Multimedia Systems Software Requirements Analysis & Modelling Artificial Intelligence Information Security & Assurance Network Programming Management & Engineering of Databases Web Engineering & Technologies Computer Graphics & Visual Computing Software Design & Architecture Knowledge Management & Engineering Software Project Management, Process & Evolution

2. 3.

CMT224/3 CPT243/3

4. 5. 6. 7.

CPT244/3 CST233/3 CST234/3 CMT321/3

8. 9. 10. 11.

CMT322/3 CMT324/3 CPT341/3 CPT342/3

12.

CPT343/3

21

LS - Leadership Skill

TS - Teamwork

CTPS - Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

EM - Moral and Professional Ethics

ES - Entrepreneurship Skill

LL - Lifelong Learning and Information Management

CS - Communication Skill

No.

Course Code/Unit

Course Title

13. 14. 15.

CPT344/3 CPT346/3 CST331/3

Computer Vision & Image Processing Natural Language Processing Principles of Parallel & Distributed Programming Internet Protocols, Architecture & Routing Distributed & Grid Computing Network Monitoring & Security E-Business Strategy, Architecture & Design Multimedia Information Systems & Management Decision Support Systems & Business Intelligence Animation & Virtual Reality Software Quality Assurance & Testing Automata Theory & Formal Languages Intelligent Health Informatics Systems Security & Protection Microprocessors & Embedded Systems Advanced Computer Architecture Wireless Network & Mobile Computing

16.

CST332/3

17. 18. 19.

CST333/3 CST334/3 CMT421/3

20.

CMT422/3

21.

CMT423/3

22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29.

CMT424/3 CPT441/3 CPT443/3 CPT444/3 CST431/3 CST432/3 CST433/3 CST434/3

22

LS - Leadership Skill

TS - Teamwork

1.7 Programme Profile The Bachelor of Computer Science encompasses all aspects of computing as a discipline. The programme covers theoretical and scientific foundations as well as various extensive applications in industry and commerce. The curriculum of the programme emphasizes problem-based learning concepts in particular through practical/project/training-based courses that are integrated throughout the years, and emphasises as well as inculcates a research orientation to the students. In the first year, students are taught the basics of Computer Science such as algorithms and problem solving, programming techniques using a high level language, data structures, computer organisation and a strong foundation in mathematics and logic. Year II and Year III offer an integrated and a wide range of courses that focus on a variety of areas in computing that allow students to specialise in a specific area. The fields of specialisation are Intelligent Systems, Software Engineering, Information Systems Engineering, Multimedia Computing, Network Computing, and Distributed Systems & Security. Second year topics also include common core courses namely operating systems, data communication, programming language concepts and paradigms, algorithms, database organisation, and system analysis and design. Practical and projectbased courses namely integrated software development, group project and research methods and special topics on their specialisation area are also offered. During the second semester and the long vacation of the third year students will be assigned to various organisations for a full time industrial training for a period of six months. In the final year, students will be taking other advanced courses to enhance their field of specialisation that focuses on the main research activities of the school. Students are also required to complete a major project during the fourth year under the supervision of at least one academic staff and to undertake a course on professional and technoprenuership development. 1.8 Type of Programmes The degree is offered through two programmes namely: (i) Computer Science with Minor (Computer Science (Minor)) Under this programme students choose and complete one minor area offered by other schools. Computer Science with Elective (Computer Science (Elective)) Under this programme students choose several elective courses to widen their specialisation area and their knowledge in Computer Science.

(ii)

All students must choose either Computer Science with Minor programme or Computer Science with Elective programme at the beginning of the second semester of Year I. Students in Computer Science with Minor programme will have to choose and begin their Minor specialisation in the second semester of Year I. 23

1.9 Programme Requirements Programme requirements together with course code classification for the Bachelor of Computer Science (Honours) are given below. Programme Requirements and Course Code Classification
Number of Units Programme Requirements Course Code Classification Types of Programme Computer Science with Electives Computer Science with Minor

School Requirements (a) Core Courses

90 (Common = 72, Specialisation: Compulsory = 15, Option = 3) 20 0 15 - 22 125 - 132 0 20

(b) (c)

Elective Courses Minor Courses

E M U

University Requirements Minimum Total Unit Requirements

1.10 Type of Courses Courses offered in the Bachelor of Computer Science degree programme as shown in the above table (in Section 1.9) are categorised as follows: (a) Core Courses (Course Code Classification - T) Core courses consist of Computer Science courses and are divided into two categories, namely: Common Core courses that must be taken and passed by all Bachelor of Computer Science students (Please refer to Section 4.1). Common Core courses also include: (i) (ii) (iii) Industrial Training/Undergraduate Research Training (Please refer to Section 4.5) Group Innovation Project (Please refer to Section 4.6) Undergraduate Major Project/Undergraduate Research Project (Please refer to Section 4.7)

Specialisation Core which is a set of compulsory courses for a particular area of specialisation including a set of choices (specialisation option) that must be taken and passed by all students (Please refer to Section 4.1 and 4.4). 24

(b)

Minor Courses (Course Code Classification - M) Students in the Computer Science with Minor programme have to choose a minor specialisation offered by another school (Please refer to Section 5)

(c)

Elective Courses (Course Code Classification - E) Elective courses consist of courses that students can choose from to strengthen their specialisation courses. Elective courses must be taken by students in Computer Science with Elective programme (to replace the minor specialisation requirement). These courses are divided into intra-disciplinary (Computer Science/specialisation) elective courses (12 units) and inter-disciplinary elective courses (outside Computer Science (Appendix A)) (8 units) (Please refer to Section 4.1).

(d)

University Courses/Option (Course Code Classification - U) All Computer Science students must take a number of courses to fulfill the University requirements. Further information on the University Courses/Options is given in Section 3 and specific requirements for students of the School of Computer Sciences are given in Section 4.2.

(e)

Special Courses (Course Code Type - Z) Special Courses are pre-requisite courses that must be taken and passed with at least 'C' grade before a less qualified student is allowed to take a higher level course. LMT100/2 - Preparatory English is one of such courses in this category.

(f)

Audit Courses (Course Code Type - Y) In principle, the university allows students to register for any courses on an audit basis for the purpose of enhancing the students' knowledge in specific fields during the duration of their study. However, the units of any such audit courses will not be taken into consideration for graduation purposes. The registration procedures for courses on an audit basis are as follows: (i) Students can register for courses on an audit basis for the purpose of augmenting his/her knowledge in specific fields. Registration for the said course must be done within the course registration period. Only students of active status are allowed to register for courses on an audit basis. Courses registered for on an audit basis are designated as code 'Y' courses. This designation will be indicated on the relevant academic transcript. A space at the bottom of the academic transcript will be reserved for listing the courses registered for on an audit basis. 25

(ii) (iii)

(iv) (v)

Courses registered for on an audit basis will not be taken into consideration in determining the minimum and maximum units of courses registered for. Students must fulfil all course requirements. Students, who register for courses on an audit basis, are not obligated to sit for any examinations pertaining to that course. A grade 'R' will be awarded irrespective as to whether the student had or had not sat for the examination.

1.11 Graduation Requirements Students must fulfill the following requirements to graduate: (a) Fulfill the minimum required (8 semesters) of the residential requirement for the programme of study and has not exceeded the maximum period of study (14 semesters). Fulfill all credit requirements of the courses for the programme of study required units such as the requirements for each component (Core, Elective/Minor and University courses/Option). Obtained a CGPA of 2.00 and above for Core components. Obtained a CGPA of 2.00 and above for the programme. Achieved a minimum of 'C' grade or a grade point of 2.00 for Bahasa Malaysia, English Language (4 units), TITAS, Ethnic Relations, Core Entrepreneurship and SEA205E - Malaysian Studies (for all international students only).

(b)

(c) (d) (e)

1.12 Academic Year Status Based on the unit system, the student's academic status is not defined by the number of years the student has spent in the university. Instead students are classified as First Year student, Second Year and so on based on the total unit accumulated. The academic year status for Bachelor of Computer Science programme is as follows: Year Status First Second Third Fourth Total Units Accumulated 0 - 30 31 - 62 63 - 91 92 - Graduation Units

26

1.13 Course Coding Each course has a course code, which is made up of 3 letters and 3 numbers. The explanation for each of the code used by the School of Computer Sciences is as follows:
CXY nnn Serial No. Area of Studies/Specialisation/Course Format: 0 = Training/Project/Practical 1 = Computing Science 2 = Information Systems Engineering/Multimedia Computing 3 = Computer Systems/Network Computing 4 = Software Engineering/Intelligent Systems Level: 1 = Level 100 courses 2 = Level 200 courses 3 = Level 300 courses 4 = Level 400 courses Type of Course: T = Core (some of these courses can be taken as elective) M = Minor/Service (not offered to students of the School of Computer Sciences) Area of Studies/Course Format: A = Training/Project/Practical M = Information Engineering P = Computing Science/Software Engineering S = Computer Systems C = School of Computer Sciences

27

2.0 ACADEMIC SYSTEM AND GENERAL INFORMATION 2.1 Course Registration Activity Registration is an important activity during the period of study at the University. It is the first step for the students to sit for the examination at the end of each semester. Sign up for the right courses each semester will help to facilitate the graduation of each student from the first semester till the final semester. 2.1.1 Course Registration Secretariat for the Bachelor Degree and University's Diploma Student Student Data & Records Section (SDRP) Academic Management Division Registry (Level 1, Chancellory Building) Tel. No. Fax No. Website : : : 04-6532925/3169/4195 04-6574641 registry.usm.my/updr/

SDRP office is the secretariat/manager/coordinator of course registration for the Bachelor Degree and Diploma of the University. Further enquiries about course registration activities for the first degree and diploma can be made at any time at the office of the Student Data & Records Section. 2.1.2 Course Registration Platform (i) E-Daftar (E-Registration) E-Daftar is a platform for course registration through website. The registration is done directly through Campus Online portal (campusonline.usm.my). Only students with active account are allowed to register for courses in the E-Daftar. Registration under E-Daftar for Semester 1 usually starts 1-2 days after the release of 'Official' examination result of the Semester 2 from the previous academic year. The system closes a day before Semester 1 begins (usually in September). E-Daftar registration for Semester 2 usually starts 1-2 days after Semester 1 'Provisional' examination result is released until a day before Semester 2 begins (normally in February). The actual timing of registration under E-Daftar will be announced by the Student Data & Records Section usually during the Revision Week of every semester and will be displayed on the schools/centres/hostels' bulletin board and in the USM's official website.

28

Under E-Daftar, students can register any courses offered by USM, except co-curriculum courses. Registration of Co-curriculum courses is still placed under the administration of the Director of the Centre for Co-Curriculum Programme at the Main Campus or the Coordinator of the Co-Curriculum Programme at the Engineering Campus and the Coordinator of the Co-Curriculum Programme at the Health Campus. Co-Curriculum courses will be included in the students' course registration account prior to the E-Daftar activity, if their pre-registration application is successful. (ii) Access to E-Daftar System (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (iii) E-Daftar System can be accessed through Campus Online Portal (campusonline.usm.my). Students need to register in this portal to be a member. Each member will be given an ID and Password. Students need to use the ID and Password to access to their profile page, which includes the E-Daftar menu. Students need to click at the E-Daftar menu to access and register for the relevant courses. Students are advised to print the course registration confirmation slip upon completion of the registration process or after updating the course registration list (add/drop) within the E-Daftar period. E-Daftar system can only be accessed for a certain period of time. Guidelines to register/access to E-Daftar portal are available at the Campus Online portals main page.

Online Course Registration (OCR) OCR activities are conducted in the Schools/Centres and are applicable to all students regardless of their academic status (Active or Probation (P1/P2)). Students, who face difficulties in registering their courses in the E-Daftar can register their courses during the official period of OCR alternatively. Each school is responsible for scheduling this activity. Students must refer to the schedule at the notice board of their respective schools. Students can register OCR at the school starting from the first day of the semester until the week six. However, after the first day of the semester, the registration is considered late and students need to pay the penalty of RM50.00 if no justification is given. During the first six week of the semester, OCR will be conducted at each school. After week six, all registration, including adding and dropping courses will be administered by the Examination & Graduation Section Office (Academic Management Division, Registry).

29

2.1.3 The Frequency of Course Registration to One Academic Session (i) (ii) Normal Study Semester - 2 times per year (beginning of Semester 1 & Semester 2) Long Semester Break (about one month/two weeks after the provisional results of second semester) - Once per year - Applicable for relevant students only.

2.1.4 General Guideline Before Students Register for Courses (i) Matters/Information/Documents required being noted/considered/referred by students before course registration: - Refer to the respective school's website to get updated information for courses offered or course registration. - Decide courses to be registered according to the semester as stipulated in the Study Program Guide Book. - List courses to be registered and number of units (unit value) for each course. - Provide Cumulative Statement of Grades (Cangred). - Construct Teaching and Learning Timetable for the registered courses (to avoid overlapping in timetable). - Read and comprehend the reminders regarding policies/general requirements for the course registration. The number of maximum and minimum units that can be registered in every semester are stated as below: Academic Status Active P1 P2 Minimum Unit 9 9 9 Maximum Unit 21 12 10

(ii)

- Determination for an academic status in a semester is based on the academic performance of the students in the previous semester (Grade Point Average, GPA): GPA 2.00 & above = Active Academic Status GPA 1.99 & below = Probation Academic Status (P1/P2) - Students who meet the minimum period of residency (6 semesters for 3 years programme, 7 semesters for 3.5 years programme or 8 semesters for 4 years programme) are allowed to register courses with total units below 9. The semester in which the student is on leave is not considered for the residency period.

30

(iii)

Type of course codes during registration: T E M U = = = = Core courses Elective courses Minor courses University courses Grade and number of units obtain from these courses are considered for graduation

Two (2) other course codes are: Y Z (iv) = = Audit courses Pre-requisite courses Grade and number of units obtain from these courses are not considered for graduation

Advice and approval of the Academic Advisor. - Approval from the Academic Advisor is required for the students under Probation status before being allowed to register during the OCR period. Probation students cannot assess E-Daftar for registration. - Approval from the Academic Advisor is not required for the students under Active Status to register courses through E-Daftar. Students are not allowed to register and to repeat any course that has achieved a grade 'C' and above.

(v)

2.1.5 Information/Document Given to All Students Through Campus Online Portal (www.campusonline.com.my) (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) The information of Academic Advisor. Academic information such as academic status, GPA value, CGPA value and year of study. Cangred and Course Registration Form. List of courses offered from all schools/centres. Teaching and Learning Timetable for all schools/centres/units from the three campuses. List of pre-registered courses which have been added into the students course registration record (if any).

(vii) Reminders about the University course registration policies/general requisites.

31

2.1.6 Registration of Language and Co-Curriculum Courses (i) Registration for Language courses through E-Daftar is allowed However, if any problem occurs, registration for language courses can still be carried out/updated during the official period of OCR at the office of the School of Language, Literacies & Translation. All approval/registration/dropping/adding of the language courses are under the responsibility and administration of the School of Language, Literacies & Translation. Any problems related to the registration of language courses can be made to the School of Language, Literacies & Translation. The contact details are as follow: General Office Malay Language Programme Chairperson English Language Programme Chairperson Foreign Language Programme Chairperson : : : : 04-6534542 04-6533974 04-6533406 04-6533396 for Main Campus students

Engineering Campus Programme Chairperson : 04-5995407 Health Campus Programme Chairperson : 09-7671252 (ii) Registration for Co-Curriculum courses through E-Daftar is not allowed Registration for Co-Curriculum courses is either done through pre-registration before the semester begins or during the first/second week of the semester. Co-Curriculum courses will be included in the students course registration account prior to the E-Daftar activity, if their pre-registration application successful. All approval/registration/dropping/adding of the Co-Curriculum courses are under the responsibility and administration of the Director of the Centre for Co-Curriculum Programme for Main Campus (04-6535243/45/48), Coordinator of the Co-Curriculum Programme for Engineering Campus (04-5995091), Coordinator of the Co-Curriculum Programme for Health Campus (09-7677547). (iii) Dropping of Language and Co-Curriculum courses, if necessary, must be made within the first week. After the first week, a fine of RM50.00 will be charged.

32

2.1.7 Registration of 'Audit' Course (Y Code) Registration for the 'Audit' course (Y code) is not allowed in the E-Daftar. It can only be made during the official period of OCR in the School or Centre involved. Students who are interested must complete the course registration form which can be printed from the Campus Online Portal or obtained it directly from the School. Approval from the lecturers of the course to be audited and the Dean/Deputy Dean (Academic) of the School where the courses are offered [signed and stamped] in the course registration form are required. Registration on 'Audit' courses (Y code) is not included in the calculation of the total registered workload units. Grades obtained from 'Audit' course are not considered in the calculation of CGPA and total units for graduation. 2.1.8 Registration of Prerequisite Course (Z Code) Registration of the Prerequisite courses (Z code) is included in the total registered workload (unit). Grades obtained from the Prerequisite courses are not considered in the calculation of CGPA and units for graduation. 2.1.9 Late Course Registration/Late Course Addition Late course registration or addition is not allowed after the day of the OCR ends. General information on this matter is as follows: (i) Late course registration and addition are only allowed in the first to the six week with the approval of the Dean. Students will be fined RM50.00 if the reasons given are not reasonable. Application to add a course after the six week will not be considered, except for the special cases approved by the University.

(ii)

2.1.10 Dropping Courses Dropping the course is allowed until the end of the sixth week. For this purpose, students must meet the requirements set by the University as follows: (i) Dropping Course Form must be completed by the student and signed by the lecturer of the course involved and the Dean/Deputy Dean of their respective schools and submit it to the general office of the School/Centre which is responsible of offering the courses involved.

33

(ii)

Students who wish to drop a language course must obtain the signature and stamp of the Dean of the School of Language, Literacies and Translation, as well as the signature and stamp of the Dean of their respective schools. Students who wish to drop the Co-Curriculum courses must obtain the approval of the Centre for Co-Curriculum Programme and the signature and stamp of the Dean of their respective schools. The option for dropping courses cannot be misused. Lecturers have the right not to certify the course that the student wish to drop if the student is not serious, such as the record of attendance at lectures, tutorials and practical is unsatisfactory, as well as poor performance in course work. The student will be denied to sit for the examination and will be given grade 'X' and is not allowed to repeat the course during the period of Courses during the Long Vacation (KSCP).

(ii)

(iv)

2.1.11 Course Registration Confirmation Slip Course registration confirmation slip that has been printed/obtained after registering the course should be checked carefully to ensure no errors, especially the code type of the registered course codes. Any data errors for course registration must be corrected immediately whether during the period of E-Daftar (for student with active status only) or during the period of OCR at the Schools. 2.1.12 Revising and Updating Data/Information/Students Personal and Academic Records Personal and academic information for each student can be checked through the Campus Online portal (campusonline.usm.my). Students are advised to always check all the information displayed on this website. - Any application/notification for correction/updating of personal data such as the spelling of names (names must be spelled as shown on the Identification Card), Identification Card number and address (permanent address and correspondence address) must be notified to the office of the Student Data & Records Section. - Any application/notification for correction of academic data such as information on Major, Minor, MUET result and the course code should be reported to the office of the Student Data & Records Section. - Application/notification for correction of the examination/results data should be reported to the office of the Examination and Graduation Section.

34

2.1.13 Academic Adivsor Each School will appoint an Academic Advisor for each student. Academic Advisors are comprised of academic staff (lecturers). Normally, confirmation from Academic Advisors will be made known to every student during the first semester in the first year of their studies. Academic Advisors will advice the students under their responsibility on the academicrelated matters. Among the important advice for the student is the registration planning for certain courses in each semester during the study period. Before registering the course, students are advised to consult and discuss with their Academic Advisor to determine the courses to be registered in a semester. Final year students are advised to consult their respective academic advisors before registering via E-Daftar to ensure they fulfil the graduation requirements. Students under the Probation status (P1/P2) should obtain the approval from the Academic Advisor before they register for courses in a semester through OCR at the School and they are not allowed to register through E-Daftar. 2.2 Interpretation of Unit/Credit (a) Unit Each course is given a value, which is called a UNIT. The unit is determined by the scope of its syllabus and the workload for the students. In general, a unit is defined as follows: Type of Course Theory Practical/Laboratory Language Proficiency Industrial Training/Teaching Practice (b) Contact Contact is defined as formal face-to-face meeting between an academic staff and his/her students and it may take the form of lectures, tutorials, seminar, laboratory and field work. Definition of Unit 1 unit is equivalent to 1 contact hour per week for 13 - 14 weeks in one semester. 1 unit is equivalent to 1.5 contact hours per week for 13 - 14 hours in one semester 1 unit is equivalent to 1.5 contact hours per week for 13 - 14 weeks in one semester. 1 unit is equivalent to 2 weeks of training.

35

(c)

Accumulated Credit Unit Units registered and passed are known as credits. To graduate, students must accumulate the total number of credits stipulated for the program concerned.

2.3 Examination System Examination would be held at the end of every semester. Students have to sit for the examination of the courses they have registered. Students are required to settle all due fees and fulfil the standing requirements for lectures/tutorials/practical and other requirements before being allowed to sit for the examination of courses they registered. Course evaluation will be based on the two components of coursework and final examinations. Coursework evaluation includes tests, essays, projects, assignments and participation in tutorials. Duration of Examination Evaluated Courses 2 units 2 units 3 units or more 3 units or more Barring from Examination Students will be barred from sitting the final examination if they do not satisfy the course requirements, such as absence from lectures and tutorials for at least 70%, and have not completed/fulfilled the required components of coursework. Students will also be barred from sitting the final examination if they have not settled the academic fees. A grade 'X' would be awarded for a course in which a student is barred. Students will not be allowed repeating the course during Course during the Long Vacation (KSCP). Grade Point Average System Student academic achievement for registered courses will be graded as follows:
Alphabetic Grade Grade Points A 4.00 A3.67 B+ 3.33 B 3.00 B2.67 C+ 2.33 C 2.00 C1.67 D+ 1.33 D 1.00 D0.67 F 0

Examination Duration 1 hour for coursework of more than 40% 2 hours for coursework of 40% and below 2 hours for coursework of more than 40% 3 hours for coursework of 40% and below

Students awarded with grade 'C-' and below for a particular course would be given a chance to improve their grades by repeating the course during the KSCP (See below) or normal semester. Students awarded with grade 'C' and above for a particular course will not be allowed to repeat the course whether during KSCP or normal semester.

36

The achievements of students in any semester are based on Grade Point Average (GPA) achieved from all the registered courses in a particular semester. GPA is the indicator to determine the academic performance of students in any semester. CGPA is the Cumulative Grade Point Average accumulated by a student from one semester to another during the years of study. The formula to compute GPA and CGPA is as follows:

Grade Point Average =

i=1 n

Ui Mi Ui i=1

where n = Number of courses taken Ui = Course units for course i Mi = Grade point for course i Example of calculation for GPA and CGPA: Course Semester I ABCXX1 ABCXX2 BCDXX3 CDEXX4 EFGXX5 EFGXX6 Unit 4 4 3 4 3 2 20 GPA = 43.66 20 = 2.18 Grade Point (GP) 3.00 2.33 1.67 2.00 1.33 2.67 Grade (G) B C+ CC D+ BTotal GP 12.00 9.32 5.01 8.00 3.99 5.34 43.66

37

Course Semester II ABCXX7 ABBXX8 BBCXX9 BCBX10 XYZXX1

Unit 3 4 4 4 3 18

Grade Point (GP) 1.00 2.33 2.00 2.67 3.33

Grade (G) D C+ C BB+

Total GP 3.00 9.32 8.00 10.68 9.99 40.99

GPA =

40.99 18 = 2.28

Total Accumulated GP 43.66 + 40.99 84.65 CGPA = Total Accumulated Unit = = 38 = 2.23 20 + 18 From the above examples, the CGPA is calculated as the total grade point accumulated for all the registered courses and divided by the total number of the registered units. Courses During the Long Vacation (Kursus Semasa Cuti Panjang) (KSCP) KSCP is offered to students who have taken a course earlier and obtained a grade of 'C-', 'D+', 'D', 'D-', 'F' and 'DK' only. Students who have obtained 'X' or 'F*' grade are not allowed to take the course during KSCP. The purpose of KSCP is to: (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) Give an opportunity to students who are facing time constraints for graduation. Assist students who need to accumulate a few more credits for graduation. Assist "probationary" students to enhance their academic status. Assist students who need to repeat a prerequisite course, which is not offered in the following semester.

However, this opportunity is only given to students who are taking courses that they have attempted before and achieved a grade as stipulated above, provided that the course is being offered. Priority is given to the final year students. Usually, formal lectures are not held, and teaching is via tutorials. The duration of KSCP is 3 weeks, i.e. 2 weeks of tutorial and 1 week of examination, all held during the long vacation. The KSCP schedule is available in the University's Academic Calendar.

38

The Implementation KSCP (a) (b) Students are allowed to register a maximum of 3 courses and the total number of units registered must not exceed 10. Marks/grades for coursework are taken from the highest marks/the best grades obtained in a particular course in the normal semester before KSCP. The final overall grade is determined as follows: Final Grade = The best coursework marks or grade + Marks or grade for KSCP examination (c) GPA calculation involves the LATEST grades (obtained in KSCP) and also involves courses taken in the second semester and those repeated in KSCP. If the GPA during KSCP as calculated above is 2.00 or better, the academic status will be active, even though the academic status for the second semester was on probation status. However, if the GPA for KSCP (as calculated above) is 1.99 or below, the academic status will remain as probation status for the second semester. Graduating students (those who have fulfilled the graduation requirements) in the second semester are not allowed to register for KSCP.

(d)

Academic Status Active Status: Any student who achieves a GPA of 2.00 and above for any examination in a semester will be recognised as ACTIVE and be allowed to pursue his/her studies for the following semester. Probation Status: A probation status is given to any student who achieves a GPA of 1.99 and below. A student who is under probation status for three consecutive semesters (P1, P2, FO) will not be allowed to pursue his/her studies at the university. On the other hand, if the CGPA is 2.00 and above, the student concerned will be allowed to pursue his/her studies and will be maintained at P2 status. Without any prejudice to the above regulations, the University Examination Council has the absolute right to terminate any student's studies if his/her academic achievement do not satisfy and fulfil the accumulated minimum credit in line with the number of semesters completed by the student as given in the table below. Total Accumulated Minimum Credit Units Number of Semesters End of 2 semester End of 4 semester End of 6 semester End of 8 semester
th th th nd

Pure 15 35 55 75 39

Applied 15 35 55 75

Professional 16 38 60 80

The University Examination Council has the right to terminate any student's studies due to certain reasons (a student who has not registered for the courses, has not attended examination without valid reasons), as well as medical reasons can be disqualified from pursuing his/her studies. Examination Result A provisional result (pass/fail) through the Tele-academic line: (600-83-7899), Campus Online Portal and short message service (SMS) will usually be released and announced after the School Examination Council meeting and presumably one month after final examination. Full result (grade) can be enquired through the Tele-academic line: (600-83-7899), Campus Online Portal and short message service (SMS) will be released and announced after the University Examination Council meeting and is usually two weeks after the provisional results are released. The official semester results (SEMGRED) will be issued to students during the second week of the following semester. 2.4 Unit Exemption/Credit Transfer Definition of Unit Exemption Unit exemption is defined as the total number of units given to students who are pursuing their studies in USM that are exempted from the graduation requirements. Students only need to accumulate the remaining units for graduating purpose. Only passes or course grades accumulated or acquired in USM will be included in the calculation of the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) for graduation purpose. Regulations and Implementation of Unit Exemption (a) Diploma holders from recognised Public and Private Institutions of Higher Learning (i) (ii) Unit exemption can only be given to courses taken at diploma level. Courses for unit exemption may be combined (in two or more combinations) in order to obtain exemption of one course at degree level. However if the School would like to approve only one course at the diploma level for unit exemption of one course at degree level, the course at diploma level must be equivalent to the degree course and has the same or more units. Courses taken during employment (in service) for diploma holders cannot be considered for unit exemption. 40

(iii)

(iv) (v) (vi)

The minimum achievement at diploma level that can be considered for unit exemption is at least 'C' grade or 2.0 or equivalent. The total number of semesters exempted should not exceed two semesters. In order to obtain unit exemption for industrial training, a student must have work experience continuously for at least two years in the area. If the student has undergone industrial training during the diploma level study, a student must have work experience for at least one year. The students are also required to produce the report on the level and type of work performed. Industrial Training unit exemption cannot be considered for semester exemption as the industrial training is carried out during the long vacation in USM.

(vii) Unit exemption for university and option courses can only be given for courses such as Bahasa Malaysia (LKM400), English Language, Islamic and Asian Civilisations and as well as co-curriculum. (b) IPTS (Private Institution of Higher Learning) USM Supervised/External Diploma Graduates (i) Students who are IPTS USM supervised/external diploma graduates are given unit exemption as stipulated by the specific programme of study. Normally, unit exemption in this category is given as a block according to the agreement between USM (through School that offers the programme) with the IPTS.

(c)

Students from recognised local or foreign IPTA (Public Institution of Higher Learning)/IPTS who are studying at the Bachelor Degree level may apply to study in this university and if successful, can be considered for unit exemptions subject to the following conditions: (i) (ii) Courses taken in the previous IPT are equivalent (at least 50% of the course must be the same) with courses offered in USM. Students taking courses at advanced diploma level in IPT that is recognised to be equivalent to the Bachelor Degree course at USM may be considered for unit exemption as in c) i). The total maximum unit exemption allowed should not exceed one third of the total unit requirement for graduation.

(iii)

41

Total Number of Exempted Semesters Semester exemption is based on the total unit exempted as below:Total Unit Exempted <9 9-32 >32 Application Procedure for Unit Exemption Any student who would like to apply for exemption unit is required to complete the Unit Exemption Form which can be obtained at the counter of Admission and Enrolments Unit or the respective schools. The form must to be approved by the Dean/Deputy Dean of the School prior to the submission to the Admission and Enrolments Unit for consideration. Definition of Credit Transfer Credit transfer is defined as the recognition of a total number of credits obtained by USM students taking courses in other IPTA (Public Institution of Higher Learning) within the period of study at USM, and is combined with credits obtained at USM to fulfil units requirement for his/her programme of study. The transferred examination result or grades obtained in courses taken at other IPTA will be combined in the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) calculation. Category of Students Who Can Be Considered for Credit Transfer USM full-time Bachelor Degree level students who would like to attend specific Bachelor Degree level courses at other IPTA. USM full-time diploma level students who would like to attend specific diploma level courses at other IPTA. Conditions (a) Basic and Core Courses (i) Credit transfer can only be considered for credits obtained from other courses in other IPTA that are equivalent (at least 50% of the content are the same) with the courses offered by the programme. Total Semester Exempted 1 2

42

(ii)

Courses that can be transferred are only courses that have the same number of units or more. For equivalent courses but with less number of units, credit transfers can be approved by combining a few courses. Credits transferred are the same as the course units as offered in USM. Average grade of the combined course will be taken into account in CGPA calculation.

(b)

Elective or Option Courses (i) (ii) Students may attend any appropriate courses in other IPTA subject to permission from the School as well as the approval of other IPTA. The transferred credits are credits obtained from courses at other IPTA. No course equivalence condition is required.

(c)

Minor Courses (i) For credit transfer of minor courses, the School should adhere to either conditions (a) or (b), and take into account of the programme requirement.

(d) (e) (f)

The total maximum units transferred should not exceed one third of the total number of units for the programme. Credit transfer from other IPTA can be considered only once for each IPTA. The examination results obtained by a student taken at other IPTA will be taken into account for graduation purpose. Grade obtained for each course will be combined with the grades obtained at USM for CGPA calculation. Students who have applied and approved for credit transfer are not allowed to cancel the approval after the examination result is obtained. Students are required to register courses at other IPTA with not less than the total minimum units as well as not exceeding the maximum units as stipulated in their programme of study. However, for specific cases (e.g. students on extended semester and only require a few units for graduation), the Dean may approve such students to register less than the minimum and the semester will not be counted in the residential requirement. In this case, the CGPA calculation will be carried out as in KSCP. USM students attending courses at other IPTA and failed in any of the courses are allowed to resit the examination if there is such provision in that IPTA. If the method of calculation of examination marks in the other IPTA is not the same as in USM, a grade conversion method will be carried out according to the existing scales. USM students who have registered courses at other IPTA and decide to return to study in USM must adhere to the existing course registration conditions in USM. 43

(g) (h)

(i) (j)

(k)

Application Procedure for Attending Courses/Credit Transfer USM students who would like to attend courses/credit transfer at other IPTAs should apply using Unit Exemption Form. The application form should be submitted for the Dean's approval for the programme of study within three months before the application is submitted to other IPTA for consideration. 2.5 Academic Integrity "Integrity without knowledge is weak and useless. Knowledge without integrity is dangerous and weak" Samuel Johnson Being a student of the University Sains Malaysia requires a firm adherence to the basic values, integrity, purpose and meaning of a university education. The most essential values in academia are rooted on the principles of truth seeking in knowledge and honesty with regards to the intellectual property of oneself and of others. Thus, students must bear the responsibility of maintaining these principles in all work done in their academic endeavour. Academic dishonesty violates the fundamental purpose of preserving and maintaining the integrity of university education and will not be tolerated. The following, although not exhaustive, are examples of practices or actions that are considered dishonest acts in academic pursuit. (a) Cheating Cheating is the unauthorised use of information or other aids in any academic exercise. There are numerous "infamous" ways and methods of cheating including: Copying from others during a test or an exam. Using unauthorised materials or devices (calculator, PDA, mobile phone, pager, etc.) during a test or an exam. Asking or allowing another student to take a test or an exam for you and viceversa. Sharing answers or programmes for an assignment or project. Tampering with marked/graded work after it has been returned, then resubmitting it for remarking/regrading. Allowing others to do the research, writing, programming, or other types of assignment. Submitting identical or similar work in more than one course without consulting or prior permission from the lecturers involved.

44

Below is an excerpt from the University and University College Act 1971, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Discipline of Students, Rule 1999 regarding conduct during examination (Part II, Provision 8):
Conduct during examination 8. No student can(a) take any form of books, worksheets, documents, pictures or any other materials, other than those authorised by the examiner, into or out of any examination room, or receive any form of books, worksheets, documents, pictures or any other materials from outsiders when in examination room. Students can receive any form of books, worksheets, documents, pictures or any other materials recommended by the examiner or the Board of Examiners, and authorized by the Vice-Chancellor. write, or have somebody else to write, any information or to draw diagrams which can be related to the examination taken by the student, on any parts of the body, or on the clothings worn by the student. contact with other students during an examination through any form of communication, or cheat or try to cheat or act in any way that can be interpreted as cheating.

(b) (c) (d)

(b)

Plagiarism Plagiarism is "academic theft". It violates the intellectual property rights of the author. Simply put, it is the use, in part or whole, of other's words or ideas and claiming it as yours without proper attribution to the original author. It includes: Copying and pasting information, graphics or media from the Internet into your work without citing the source. Paraphrasing or summarising other's written or spoken words that are not common knowledge, without referencing the source. Not putting quote marks around parts of the source that you copy exactly. Using someone else's work or acquiring papers, assignment, project or research you did not do and turning it in as if you had done the work yourself. Giving incorrect information about the source of reference. Not acknowledging collaborators in an assignment, paper, project or research. Plagiarism is, however, often misunderstood. There are numerous sources in the Internet that describe plagiarism and explain acceptable ways for using borrowed words. Students should explore the relevant materials. Below is an excerpt from the University and University College Act 1971, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Discipline of Students, Rule 1999 regarding prohibition against plagiarism (Part II, Provision 6):

45

Prohibitions against plagiarism 6. (1) A student shall not plagiarise any idea, writing, data or invention belonging to another person. (2) For the purpose of this rule, plagiarism includes: (a) the act of taking an idea, writing, data or invention of another person and claiming that the idea, writing, data or invention is the result of one's own findings or creation; or (b) an attempt to make out or the act of making out, in such a way, that one is the original source or the creator of an idea, writing, data or invention which has actually been taken from some other source. (3) Without prejudice to the generality of sub rule (2), a student plagiarises when he/she: (a) publishes, with himself/herself as the author, an abstract, article, scientific or academic paper, or book which is wholly or partly written by some other person; (b) incorporates himself/herself or allows himself/herself to be incorporated as a co-author of an abstract, article, scientific or academic paper, or book, when he/she has not at all made any written contribution to the abstract, article, scientific or academic paper, or book; (c) forces another person to include his/her name in the list of coresearchers for a particular research project or in the list of co-authors for a publication when he/she has not made any contribution which may qualify him/her as a co-researcher or co-author; (d) extract academic data which are the result of research undertaken by some other person, such as laboratory findings or field work findings or data obtained through library research, whether published or unpublished, and incorporate those data as part of his/her academic research without giving due acknowledgement to the actual source; (e) uses research data obtained through collaborative work with some other person, whether or not that other person is a staff member or a student of the University, as part of another distinct personal academic research of his/her, or for a publication In his/her own name as sole author, without obtaining the consent of his/her co-researchers prior to embarking on his/her personal research or prior to publishing the data; (f) transcribes the ideas or creations of others kept in whatever form, whether written, printed or available in electronic form, or in slide form, or in whatever form of teaching or research apparatus, or in any other form, and claims whether directly or indirectly that he/she is the creator of that idea or creation; (g) translates the writing or creation of another person from one language to another whether or not wholly or partly, and subsequently presents the translation in whatever form or manner as his/her own writing or creation; or (h) extracts ideas from another person's writing or creation and makes certain modifications without due reference to the original source and rearranges them in such a way that it appears as if he/she is the creator of those ideas.

46

(c)

Fabrication Unauthorised invention, alteration, falsification or misleading use of data, information or citation in any academic work constitutes fabrication. Fabricated information neither represent the student's own effort nor the truth concerning a particular investigation or study thus violates the principle of truth seeking in knowledge. Some examples are: Making up or changing of data or result, or using someone else's result, in an experiment, assignment or research. Citing sources that are not actually used or referred to. Intentional listing of incorrect or fictitious references. Falsifying of academic records or documents to gain academic advantage. Forging signatures of authorisation in any academic record or other university document.

(d)

Collusion The School does not differentiate between those who commit an act of academic dishonesty with those who knowingly allow or help others in performing those acts. Some examples of collusion include: Paying, bribing or allowing someone to do an assignment, test/exam, project or research for you. Doing or assisting others in an assignment, test/exam, project or research for something in return. Permitting your work to be submitted as the work of others. Providing material, information, or sources to others knowing that such aids could be used in any dishonest act.

(e)

Unfair Advantage A student may obtain an unfair advantage over another, which is also a breach of academic integrity, in several ways including: Gaining access to, stealing, reproducing or circulating of test or exam material prior to its authorised time. Depriving others of the use of library material by stealing, defacing, destroying or hiding it. Intentionally interfering with other's effort to do their academic work. Altering or destroying work or computer files/programmes that belong to others or those that are meant for the whole class.

47

(f)

Consequences of Violating Academic Integrity Both students and academic staff must assume the responsibility of protecting and upholding the academic integrity of the university. In the event that a student encounters any incident that denotes academic dishonesty, the student is expected to report it to the relevant lecturer. The lecturer is then responsible to substantiate the violation and is encouraged to confront the perpetrator(s) to discuss the facts surrounding the allegation, and report the matter to the Deputy Deans or the Dean of the School. If the lecturer found that the student is guilty, an appropriate punitive grading may be applied, depending on the extent of the violation. Examples of punitive grading are giving lower grade or "F" on the assignment, test, project, or lower grade or "F" for the whole course. If the violation is deemed serious by the lecturer, the matter will be brought to the attention of the University Disciplinary Authority where appropriate action will be taken. If a student is caught in an examination, the University Examination Board will pursue the matter according to the university's procedure. The consequence then may range from a warning, fine not exceeding RM200, exclusion from any specific part or parts of the University for a specified period, suspension from being a student of the University for a specified period, or expulsion from the University (University and University College Act 1971, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Discipline of Students, Rule 1999). Below is an excerpt from the University and University College Act 1971, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Discipline of Students, Rule 1999 regarding Disciplinary Punishment (Part II, Provision 48):
Disciplinary punishment 48. A student who commits a disciplinary offense under these Rules and found guilty of the offense can be punished according to any one or any two or more of the following appropriate actions; (a) warning; (b) fine not more than two hundred ringgit; (c) banned from entering any or certain premises of the University for a specified period; (d) suspended from being a student of the University for a specified period; (e) dismissed from the University

48

2.6 USM Mentor Programme Mentor Programme acts as a support-aid that involves the staff undergoing special training as a consultant and guide to USM community who would like to share their feelings and any psychosocial aspects that could harm their social functions. This programme manages psychosocial issues in a more effective manner and finally could improve the well-being of individuals in order to achieve life of better quality. Objectives (a) As a co-operation and mutual assistance mechanism for dealing with stress, psychosocial problems and many more in order to reinforce the well-being of the USM community. To inculcate the spirit of unity and the concept of helping one another by appointing a well-trained mentor as a social agent who promotes caring society for USM. To produce more volunteers to assist those who need help. To prevent damages in any psychosocial aspects before they reach a critical stage.

(b)

(c) (d)

For more information, please visit www.usm.my/mentor. 2.7 Student Exchange Programme (a) Study Abroad Scheme The student exchange programme is an opportunity for USM students to study one or two semesters abroad at any USM partners institutions. Ideally, students are encouraged to participate in the exchange programme within their third to fifth semester (3 years degree programme) and within third to seventh semester (4 years degree programme). Studies abroad are planned beforehand with the Dean or Deputy Dean of the respective School, and with the International Office. Credits earned at an associate university are transferable as a part of credit accumulation for graduation. (b) Student Exchange Programme between Local Higher Education Institutions (RPPIPT) This is a programme that allows students of public higher learning institutions to do an exchange programme for a semester between the public higher institutions itself. Students can choose any relevant courses and apply for credit transfers. For more information, please visit http://www.usm.my/io or contact the Academic Collaboration Unit, International Office at +604 653 2775/2778. 49

3.0 UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS 3.1 Summary of University Requirements Students are required to take 15 - 22 units of the following University/Option courses for University requirements:
1. 2. 3.

4.

University Requirements Bahasa Malaysia English Language Local Students Islamic and Asian Civilisations (TITAS) (2 Units) Ethnic Relations (2 Units) Core Entrepreneurship* (2 Units) International Students Malaysian Studies (4 Units) Option/Bahasa Malaysia/English Language (2 Units) Third Language/Co-Curriculum /Skill Course/Options Students have to choose one of the followings: Third Language Package Co-Curriculum** (1 - 6 Units) Skill Course/Options Total

Units 2 4 6

3 - 10

15 - 22

* Students from Schools which have a similar course as this are exempted from following this course. The units should be replaced by an option course. ** Students from the School of Education are required to choose a uniformed body co-curriculum package. Students from the School of Medical Sciences and School of Dentistry are required to register two (2) units of Co-Curiculum course in year Two. Students from the School of Health Sciences are required to register one (1) unit of Co-Curiculum course.

Details of the University requirements are given in the following sections. 3.2 Bahasa Malaysia (a) Local Students The requirements are as follows: LKM400/2 - Bahasa Malaysia IV All Malaysian students must take LKM400 and pass with the minimum of grade 'C' in order to graduate.

50

Entry requirements for Bahasa Malaysia are as follows:


No 1. Qualification (a) SPM/MCE/SC (or equivalent qualification) (b) STPM/HSC (or equivalent qualification) Grade 1-6 P/S Level of Entry LKM400 Type U Units 2 Status Graduation requirement

Note: To obtain credit units for Bahasa Malaysia courses, a minimum grade of C is required. Students may obtain advice from the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation if they have different Bahasa Malaysia qualification from the above.

(b)

International Students International students pursuing Bachelor's degrees in Science, Accounting, Arts (ELLS), Education (TESL) and Housing, Building and Planning. All international students in this category are required to take the following courses: Code LKM100 Type U Units 2

International students (non-Indonesian) pursuing Bachelors degrees in Arts. International students in this category are required to take and pass three Intensive Malay Language courses before they commence their Bachelors degree programmes. Code LKM101 LKM102 LKM201 Course Bahasa Malaysia Persediaan I Bahasa Malaysia Persediaan II Bahasa Malaysia Pertengahan Duration 4 months 4 months 4 months

The Bahasa Malaysia graduation requirement for this category of students is as follows: Code LKM300 Type U Units 2

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International students (Indonesian) pursuing Bachelors degrees in Arts. The Bahasa Malaysia graduation requirement for this category of students is as follows: Code LKM200 LKM300 Type U U Units 2 2

Note: Students must pass with a minimum grade of 'C' for type U courses. 3.3 English Language All Bachelors degree students must take 4 units of English Language courses in fulfillment of the University requirement for graduation. (a) Entry Requirements for English Language Courses
No 1. English Language Qualification *MUET LSP401/402/403/404 Discretion of Dean *MUET LSP300 Discretion of Dean *MUET LMT100 Discretion of Dean *MUET Discretion of Dean Grade Band 6 A-C Level of Entry LHP 451/452/453/ 454/455/456/ 457/458/459 LSP 401/402/403/ 404 LSP300 Status Compulsory/ Option/Type U (2 Units) Compulsory/ Type U (2 Units) Compulsory/ Type U (2 Units) Pre-requisite/ Type Z (2 Units)

2.

Band 5 A-C Band 4 A-C Band 3/2/1 (Score 0 - 179)

3.

4.

LMT100/ Re-sit MUET

* MUET: Malaysia University English Test. Students may obtain advice from the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation if they have different English Language qualification from the above. Note: Students are required to accumulate four (4) units of English for graduation. In order to obtain units in English Language courses, students have to pass with a minimum grade of C. Students with a Score 260 - 300 (Band 6) in MUET must accumulate the 4 units of English from the courses in the post-advanced level (LHP451/452/453/454/455/456/457/ 458/459*). They can also take foreign language courses to replace their English language units but they must first obtain a written consent from the Dean of the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation. (Please use the form that can be obtained from the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation.) [*The number of units for LHP457 is 4 and for LHP451, 452, 453, 454, 455, 456, 458 and 459 is 2.] Students with a score of 179 and below in MUET are required to resit MUET to improve their score to Band 4 or take LMT100 and pass with a minimum grade of C.

52

(b)

English Language Courses (Compulsory English Language Units) The English Language courses offered as University courses are as follows: No 1. 2. 3. Code/Unit LMT100/2 LSP300/2 LSP401/2 Course Title Preparatory English Academic English General English School (If Applicable) Students from all Schools Students from all Schools Students from: School of Education Studies (Arts) School of Fine Arts School of Humanities School of Social Sciences Students from: School of Biological Sciences School of Physics School of Chemical Sciences School of Mathematical Sciences School of Industrial Technology School of Education Studies (Science) School of Medical Sciences School of Health & Dental Sciences School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Students from: School of Management School of Communication Students from: School of Computer Sciences School of Housing, Building and Planning Schools of Engineering School from School of Health Sciences School from School of Health Sciences

4.

LSP402/2

Scientific and Medical English

5.

LSP403/2

Business and Communication English Technical and Engineering English

6.

LSP404/2

7. 8.

LDN101/2 LDN201/2

English For Nursing I English For Nursing II

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3.4 Local Students - Islamic and Asian Civilisations/Ethnic Relations/ Core Entrepreneurship (a) Islamic and Asian Civilisations (The course is conducted in Bahasa Malaysia) The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C): HTU223 - Islamic and Asian Civilisation (TITAS) (2 units) This course aims to increase students knowledge on history, principles, values, main aspect of Malay civilization, Islamic civilization and its culture. With the academic exposure to cultural issues and civilization in Malaysia, it is hoped that students will be more aware of issues that can contribute to the cultivation of the culture of respect and harmony among the plural society of Malaysia. Among the topics in this course are Interaction among Various Civilization, Islamic Civilization, Malay Civilization, Contemporary Challenges faced by the Islamic and Asian Civilization and Islamic Hadhari Principles. (b) Ethnic Relations (The course is conducted in Bahasa Malaysia) The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C): SHE101 - Ethnic Relations (2 units) This course is an introduction to ethnic relations in Malaysia. This course is designed with 3 main objectives: (1) to introduce students to the basic concept and the practices of social accord in Malaysia, (2) to reinforce basic understanding of challenges and problems in a multi-ethnic society, and (3) to provide an understanding and awareness in managing the complexity of ethnic relations in Malaysia. At the end of this course, it is hoped that students will be able to identify and apply the skills to issues associated with ethnic relations in Malaysia. (c) Core Entrepreneurship (The course is conducted in Bahasa Malaysia) The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C): WUS101 - Core Entrepreneurship (2 units) This course aims to provide basic exposure to students in the field of entrepreneurship and business, with emphasis on the implementation of the learning aspects while experiencing the process of executing business projects in campus. The mode of teaching is through interactive lectures, practical, business plan proposal, execution of entrepreneurial projects and report presentations. Practical experiences through hands-on participation of students in business projects management will generate interest and provide a clearer picture of entrepreneurship world. The main learning outcome is the assimilation of culture 54

and entrepreneurship work ethics in their everyday life. This initiative is made to open the minds and arouse the spirit of entrepreneurship among target groups that possess the potentials to become successful entrepreneurs. By exposing entrepreneurial knowledge to all students, it is hoped that it will accelerate the effort to increase the number of middle class entrepreneurs in the country. For more information, please refer to the Co-curriculum Program Reference Book. 3.5 International Students - Malaysian Studies/Option (a) Malaysian Studies The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C) for all international students: SEA205E - Malaysian Studies (4 Units) This course investigates the structure of the Malaysian system of government and the major trends in contemporary Malaysia. Emphasis will be given both to current issues in Malaysian politics and the historical and economic developments and trends of the country. The discussion begins with a review of the independence process. An analysis of the formation and workings of the major institutions of government parliament, judiciary, bureaucracy, and the electoral and party systems will follow this. The scope and extent of Malaysian democracy will be considered, especially in light of current changes and developments in Malaysian politics. The second part of the course focuses on specific issues: ethnic relations, national unity and the national ideology; development and political change; federal-state relations; the role of religion in Malaysian politics; politics and business; Malaysia in the modern world system; civil society; law, justice and order; and directions for the future. (b) Option/Bahasa Malaysia/English Language (2 Units) International students need to fulfill a further 2 units of option course or additional Bahasa Malaysia/English Language course.

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3.6 Third Language/Co-Curriculum/Skill Courses/Options Students have to choose one of the followings (A/B/C): (A) Third Language Package (6 Units) Third Language Courses are offered as University courses. They are offered as a package of three (3) levels, 2 units per level. The total number of units per package is 6. Students are requested to complete all levels (3 semesters). The packages offered are as follows: Commn. Arabic LTA100/2 LTA200/2 LTA300/2 Commn. Chinese LTC100/2 LTC200/2 LTC300/2 Commn. Japanese LTJ100/2 LTJ200/2 LTJ300/2 Commn. German LTG100/2 LTG200/2 LTG300/2 Commn. Korean LTK100/2 LTK200/2 LTK300/2

Commn. French LTP100/2 LTP200/2 LTP300/2

Commn. Spanish LTE100/2 LTE200/2 LTE300/2

Commn. Tamil LTT100/2 LTT200/2 LTT300/2

Commn. Thai LTS100/2 LTS200/2 LTS300/2

(B)

Uniformed/Seni Silat Cekak Co-Curriculum Package (4 - 6 Units) Students who choose to take packaged co-curriculum courses are required to complete all levels of the package. It is compulsory for students from the School of Education to choose a uniformed body co-curriculum package from the list below (excluding Seni Silat Cekak). The co-curriculum packages offered are as follows: Armed Uniformed/Seni Silat Cekak Co-Curriculum Package (6 Units) (3 years)
PALAPES Tentera Darat (Army) WTD102/2 WTD202/2 WTD302/2 PALAPES Tentera Laut (Navy) WTL102/2 WTL202/2 WTL302/2 PALAPES Tentera Udara (Air Force) WTU102/2 WTU202/2 WTU302/2 SUKSIS (Student Police Volunteer) WPD101/2 WPD201/2 WPD301/2 Seni Silat Cekak

WCC123/2 WCC223/2 WCC323/2

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Unarmed Uniformed Co-Curriculum Package (4 Units) (2 Years) Kelana Siswa (Rover Training) WLK101/2 WLK201/2 Bulan Sabit Merah (Red Crescent) WBM101/2 WBM201/2 Ambulans St. John (St. John Ambulance) WJA101/2 WJA201/2

Unarmed Uniformed Co-Curriculum Package (2 Units) (1 Year) SISPA (Siswa Siswi Pertahanan Awam) (Public Defense) (offered in Health Campus only) WLK101/2 WLK201/2 (C) Co-Curriculum/Skill Course/Options (1 6 Units) All students are encouraged to follow the co-curriculum courses and are given a maximum total of 6 units for Community Service, Culture, Sports, Innovation & Initiatives and Leadership (Students from the School of Medical Sciences and School of Dentistry are required to register for two (2) units of Co-Curriculum course in Year Two). (Students from the School of Health Sciences must take at least one of the co-curriculum courses while those from the School of Education must take the uniformed co-curriculum package [excluding Seni Silat Cekak]). Students who do not enroll for any co-curriculum courses or who enroll for only a portion of the 3 units need to replace these units with skill/option courses. The cocurriculum, skill and option courses offered are as follows: (i) Community Service, Culture, Sports, Innovation & Initiatives and Leadership Co-Curriculum Courses
Packaged (Students are required to complete all levels) Khidmat Masyarakat (Community Service) (2 Years) WKM101/1 WKM201/1 Jazz Band (3 Years) WCC108/1 WCC208/1 WCC308/1 Karate (3 Semesters) WSC108/1 WSC208/1 WSC308/1 Taekwondo (3 Semesters) WSC115/1 WSC215/1 WSC315/1

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Non-Packaged (1 Semester) Culture WCC103/1 - Catan (Painting) WCC105/1 - Gamelan WCC107/1 - Guitar WCC109/1 - Koir (Choir) WCC110/1 - Kraftangan (Handcrafting) WCC115/1 - Tarian Moden (Modern Dance) WCC116/1 - Tarian Tradisional (Traditional Dance) WCC117/1 - Teater Moden (Modern Theatre) WCC118/1 - Wayang Kulit Melayu (Malay Shadow Play) WCC119/1 - Senaman Qigong Asas (Basic Qigong Exercise) WCC219/1 - Senaman Qigong Pertengahan (Intermediate Qigong Exercise) WCC124/1 - Kompang Berlagu WCC122/1 - Seni Memasak (Culinary Art) WCC127/1 - Kesenian Muzik Nasyid (Nasyid Musical Art) Innovation & Initiative WCC120/1 - Canting Batik (Batik Painting) WCC121/1 - Seni Khat (Calligraphic Art) WCC125/1 - Seni Wau Tradisional (Traditional Kite Art) WCC128/1 - Seni Sulaman & Manik Labuci (Embroidery & Beads Sequins Art) WCC130/1 - Seni Fotografi SLR Digital (Digital SLR Photography Art) Sports WSC105/1 - Bola Tampar (Volley Ball) WSC106/1 - Golf WSC110/1 - Memanah (Archery) WSC111/1 - Ping Pong (Table Tennis) WSC112/1 - Renang (Swimming) WSC113/1 - Aerobik (Aerobic) WSC114/1 - Skuasy (Squash) WSC116/1 - Tenis (Tennis) WSC119/1 - Badminton WSC122/1 - Selaman SCUBA (SCUBA Diving) WSC123/1 - Kriket (Cricket)

WCC124/1 - Sepak Takraw WSC125/1 - Futsal WSC126/1 - Bola Jaring (Netball) Leadership (Kepimpinan) WSC127/1 - Pengurusan Acara 1 (Event Management 1) WSC227/1 - Pengurusan Acara 2 (Event Management 2)

(ii) (iii)

HTV201/2 - Teknik Berfikir (Thinking Techniques) Other option/skill courses as recommended or required by the respective school (if any) 58

(iv)

English Language Courses The following courses may be taken as university courses to fulfill the compulsory English Language requirements (for Band 5 and Band 6 in MUET) or as skill/option courses: No 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Code/Unit LHP451/2 LHP452/2 LHP453/2 LHP454/2 LHP455/2 LHP456/2 LHP457/4 LHP458/2 LHP459/2 Course Title Effective Reading Business Writing Creative Writing Academic Writing English Pronunciation Skills Spoken English Speech Writing and Public Speaking English for Translation (Offered only in Semester II) English for Interpretation (Offered only in Semester I)

(v)

Foreign Language Courses The foreign language courses offered by the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation can be taken by students as option or compulsory courses to fulfill the number of units required for graduation. Students are not allowed to register for more than one foreign language course per semester. They must complete at least two levels of a foreign language course before they are allowed to register for another foreign language course. However, students are not required to complete all four levels of one particular foreign language course. The foreign language courses offered are as follows:
Arabic LAA100/2 LAA200/2 LAA300/2 LAA400/2 French LAP100/2 LAP200/2 LAP300/2 LAP400/2 Chinese LAC100/2 LAC200/2 LAC300/2 LAC400/2 Thai LAS100/2 LAS200/2 LAS300/2 LAS400/2 Japanese LAJ100/2 LAJ200/2 LAJ300/2 LAJ400/2 German LAG100/2 LAG200/2 LAG300/2 LAG400/2 Tamil LAT100/2 LAT200/2 LAT300/2 Spanish LAE100/2 LAE200/2 LAE300/2 LAE400/2 Korean LAK100/2 LAK200/2 LAK300/2

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4.0 SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS 4.1 Summary of School Requirements Details and summary of units and courses for the degree programme and the specialisation areas are given in the tables below.
CORE COURSES: 90 UNITS Common Core (72 Units) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. CPT111/3 - Principles of Programming CPT112/4 - Discrete Structures CPT113/3 - Programming Methodology & Data Structures CPT114/4 - Logic & Applications CPT115/4 - Mathematical Methods for Computer Science CST131/4 - Computer Organisations CMT221/4 - Database Organisations & Design CMT222/4 - Systems Analysis & Design CPT211/3 - Programming Language Concepts & Paradigms CPT212/4 - Design & Analysis of Algorithms CST231/3 - Data Communications & Networks CST232/3 - Operating Systems CAT200/3 - Integrated Software Development Workshop CAT300/2 - Group Innovation Project CAT301/2 - Research Methods & Special Topic Study CAT302/12 - Industrial Training or CAT303/12 - Undergraduate Research Training CAT400/8 - Undergraduate Major Project or CAT401/8 - Undergraduate Research Project CAT402/2 - Professional & Technopreneurship Development Compulsory (15 Units): Students are required to take the top 5 courses (numbers 1 to 5) according to the specialisation area.

17.

18. (i)

Specialisation Core (18 Units) (Refer specialisation table below)

(ii) Specialisation Option (3 Units): Students are required to choose 1 course from courses numbers 6, 7 or 8 according to the specialisation area. Note: See also Appendix B that shows the corresponding semesters to take the courses.

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ELECTIVE/MINOR COURSES: 20 UNITS


Elective (20 Units): For Computer Science with Electives Programme Minor/Elective (20 Units): For Computer Science with Minor Programme

Inter-Disciplinary Courses (8 units) Choose course(s) from an approved list as given in Appendix A. Intra-Disciplinary Courses (12 units) (See specialisation table below) Outside the Specialisation: Choose 1 course (number 1 only) of other specialisation areas. Within the Specialisation: Choose 3 courses from number 6 to 11 from the respective specialisation list or with approval from the Dean.

20 units of Minor courses from a Minor package (For list of Minor programmes and courses, see Section 5 and Minor Programme Handbook)

SPECIALISATIONS
Specialisation Core: Compulsory - Courses numbers 1 to 5 and Specialisation Option - Choose 1 course from courses numbers 6 to 8. Computer Science with Electives Programme: Choose 1 course (number 1 only) of other specialisation areas and 3 courses from numbers 6 to 11 from the respective specialisation list or with approval from the Dean. Note: The list below shows the code and the name of each specialisation (a) to (f) and the corresponding courses: numbers 1 to 11. (a) 008H: Information Systems Engineering (b) 008J: Multimedia Computing 1. CMT223/3 - Information Systems Theory 1. CMT224/3 - Multimedia Systems & Management 2. CMT321/3 - Management & Engineering 2. CMT322/3 - Web Engineering & of Databases Technologies 3. CMT322/3 - Web Engineering & 3. CMT324/3 - Computer Graphics & Visual Technologies Computing 4. CPT343/3 - Software Project Management, 4. CPT344/3 - Computer Vision & Image Process & Evolution Processing 5. CMT421/3 - E-Business Strategy, 5. CMT422/3 - Multimedia Information Architecture & Design Systems & Management 6. CMT423/3 - Decision Support Systems & 6. CMT424/3 - Animation & Virtual Business Intelligence* Reality* 7. CMT422/3 - Multimedia Information 7. CMT421/3 - E-Business Strategy, Systems & Management Architecture & Design 8. CPT444/3 - Intelligent Health Informatics* 8. CMT423/3 - Decision Support Systems & Business Intelligence* 9. CMT324/3 - Computer Graphics & Visual 9. CPT343/3 - Software Project Computing Management, Process, & Evolution 10. CPT341/3 - Software Design & 10. CPT346/3 - Natural Language Processing Architecture 11. CPT342/3 - Knowledge Management & 11. CST332/3 - Internet Protocols, Engineering Architecture & Routing

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SPECIALISATIONS (contd.)
(c) 008N: Distributed Systems & Security 1. CST233/3 - Information Security & Assurance 2. CST331/3 - Principles of Parallel & Distributed Programming 3. CST334/3 - Network Monitoring & Security 4. CST333/3 - Distributed & Grid Computing 5. CST431/3 - Systems Security & Protection 6. CST433/3 - Advanced Computer Architecture* 7. CST432/3 - Microprocessors & Embedded Systems 8. CST434/3 - Wireless Network & Mobile Computing* 9. CMT321/3 - Management & Engineering of Databases 10. CMT322/3 - Web Engineering & Technologies 11. CST332/3 - Internet Protocols, Architecture & Routing (e) 008K: Software Engineering 1. CPT243/3 - Software Requirements Analysis & Modelling 2. CPT341/3 - Software Design & Architecture 3. CMT322/3 - Web Engineering & Technologies 4. CPT343/3 - Software Project Management, Process & Evolution 5. CPT441/3 - Software Quality Assurance & Testing 6. CPT443/3 - Automata Theory & Formal Languages* 7. CPT444/3 - Intelligent Health Informatics* 8. CMT421/3 - E-Business Strategy, Architecture & Design 9. CMT321/3 - Management & Engineering of Databases 10. CMT324/3 - Computer Graphics & Visual Computing 11. CPT342/3 - Knowledge Management & Engineering
*These courses may not be offered in certain academic sessions.

(d) 008M: Network Computing 1. CST234/3 - Network Programming 2. CST332/3 - Internet Protocols, Architecture & Routing 3. CST334/3 - Network Monitoring & Security 4. CST333/3 - Distributed & Grid Computing 5. CST432/3 - Microprocessors & Embedded Systems 6. CST434/3 - Wireless Network & Mobile Computing * 7. CST431/3 - Systems Security & Protection 8. CST433/3 - Advanced Computer Architecture* 9. CMT321/3 - Management & Engineering of Databases 10. CMT322/3 - Web Engineering & Technologies 11. CST331/3 - Principles of Parallel & Distributed Programming (f) 008L: Intelligent Systems 1. CPT244/3 - Artificial Intelligence 2. CPT342/3 - Knowledge Management & Engineering 3. CPT344/3 - Computer Vision & Image Processing 4. CPT346/3 - Natural Language Processing 5. CMT422/3 - Multimedia Information Systems & Management 6. CMT423/3 - Decision Support Systems & Business Intelligence* 7. CPT444/3 - Intelligent Health Informatics* 8. CPT443/3 - Automata Theory & Formal Languages* 9. CMT321/3 - Management & Engineering of Databases 10. CMT322/3 - Web Engineering & Technologies 11. CMT324/3 - Computer Graphics & Visual Computing

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4.2 Specific Requirements for Skill Course/Options Computer Science students who do not enrol for co-curriculum courses or who enrol for only a portion of the 3 units (excluding students who choose to take uniformed/Seni Silat Cekak or Third Language package) need to replace these units with LHP456 - Spoken English (2 units) and/or skill course/options based on MUET qualification as given in the table below. MUET Bands 4 / 3 / 2 / 1 Co-Curriculum 1 Unit 2 Units 3 - 6 Units Bands 5 / 6 1 Unit 2 Units 3 - 6 Units Option/HTV201 2 Units 3 Units 2 Units 2 Units LHP456 2 Units 2 Units 2 Units Taken as English Language requirements (See Section 3.3)

4.3 Course Registration Guideline A guideline summary of course registration for each specialisation area for each semester is given in Appendix B (See also Appendix C for sequential/concurrent pre-requisite requirements). Students are advised to understand and follow the given guideline. All Computer Science students are not allowed to enroll for any co-curriculum courses (except for 3-year co-curriculum packages) during the second semester of the third year because of the compulsory industrial training during that period. Please note that the offering semesters for University courses for students of the School of Computer Sciences are as follows: Courses SHE101 WUS101 HTU223 HTV201 LKM400 English Language Semester I (Year I) II (Year II) I I I (Year I) I & II

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Setting for CAT400/CAT401: 4 units setting will be given in Semester I and 4 units setting will be given in Semester II even though the course needs to be registered as 8 units for both semesters. Only students in their final semester may apply for more than the maximum 20 units. Approval from Deputy Dean (Academic & Student Development) should be sought. All Probation students are required to see the Deputy Dean (Academic & Student Development) to obtain approval of registration and signature after consulting and getting the signature of their respective Academic Advisor during on-line registration activities. 4.4 Unit Exemption/Credit Transfer All students applying for Unit Exemption/Credit Transfer must sit for a placement test that will be held on the day of the Semester I. This is a three hour test that assess the three basic knowledge in Computer Science. They are basic object oriented programming, basic database knowledge and basic systems knowledge. Only students who pass the test will be considered for Unit Exemption/Credit Transfer. The courses that are considered for credit transfer are limited to the following courses: Course Code CPT111 CPT112 CPT113 CST131 CAT200 CMT221 CMT222 CMT223 CMT224 CST231 CST232 Course Title Principles of Programming Discrete Structures Programming Methodology & Data Structures Computer Organisation Bengkel Pembangunan Perisian Bersepadu Database Organisation & Design System Analysis & Design Information Systems Theory & Management Multimedia Systems Komunikasi Data & Rangkaian Operating Systems Unit 3 4 3 4 3 4 4 3 3 3 3

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4.5 Specialisation Areas The Bachelor of Computer Science (Honours) degree programme has been designed to allow students to tailor the programme to suit their particular interests, needs and circumstances. There are 6 specialisation areas (See specialisation table in Section 4.1 for list of courses) and students must choose one specialisation area at the beginning of the second year. The specialisation areas and their respective learning outcomes are as follows: (a) Information Systems Engineering [Code: 008H] Graduates specialising in Information Systems Engineering is expected to: (i) (ii) (iii) Apply basic concepts on abstraction, generalization, specialization, and visualization towards solving and resolving complex business problems. Keep abreast of current and emerging technologies, architectures, methodologies, techniques, tools and open standards in ICT. Apply theories and current best practices towards the analysis, design, implementation, deployment and maintenance of application systems in modern organizations. Adopt a disciplined software development process leveraging various software engineering principles together with a basic understanding of artificial intelligence, knowledge engineering, multimedia computing and computer networking issues so that the resulting architecture-centric end-toend systems are more trustworthy, secure, usable and maintainable. Incorporate main concepts and techniques in current business practices, such as business process engineering, re-engineering, redesign and reverseengineering so that appropriate business values can be added to the resulting business solutions for the interested parties.

(iv)

(v)

Courses offered under this specialisation include Information Systems Theory & Management, Management & Engineering of Databases, Web Engineering & Technology, E-Business Strategy, Architecture & Design, Software Project Management, Process & Evolution, and Decision Support Systems & Business Intelligence.

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(b)

Multimedia Computing [Code: 008J] Graduates specialising in Multimedia Computing is expected to: (i) Offer a meaningful critic of multimedia and graphical information, presentations and exploration that incorporates an understanding of the principles of multimedia and graphics design. Apply the principles that underpin the design of multimedia, hypermedia, multimedia information, graphics and information retrieval systems including web-enabled systems. Describe the range of media, tools and supporting devices that can be used to support the use and development of multimedia information, hypermedia, and graphical systems. Address the issue of compact representation of multimedia information for the purposes of storage, transmission and processing. Use existing multimedia and graphics packages to develop an appropriate application including web-enabled systems.

(ii)

(iii)

(iv) (v)

Courses offered under this specialisation include Multimedia Systems, Web Engineering & Technology, Computer Graphics & Visual Computing, Computer Vision & Image Processing, Multimedia Information Systems & Management, and Animation & Virtual Reality. (c) Distributed Systems & Security [Code: 008N] Graduates specialising in Distributed Systems & Security is expected to: (i) Understand the current and emerging technologies, architectures and standards in computer hardware and software architectures, and apply this knowledge towards the design and implementation of new computer languages and modern operating systems. Create, develop, and implement algorithms and/or components for managing, scheduling and optimizing computer services for distributed and grid-based computing environments. Manage and secure computer systems and networks using current tools and techniques, to protect the security and confidentiality of user data, as well as implement preventive measures to deal with known and unknown cyber threats. Apply distributed and grid computing algorithms towards solution of "high performance computing" problem domains. 66

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

Courses offered under this specialisation include Information Security & Assurance, Principles of Parallel & Distributed Programming, Network Monitoring & Security, Distributed Systems & Grid Computing, Computer Systems Security & Protection, and Advanced Computer Architecture. (d) Network Computing [Code: 008M] Graduates specialising in Network Computing is expected to: (i) (ii) Create, develop, and implement network-centric services such as clientserver and peer-to-peer applications. Use current and emerging technologies, architectures and standards in computer networking and apply this knowledge towards the design and implementation of computer networks in modern organizations and network service providers. Manage and Secure computer systems and networks using current tools and techniques, to protect the security and confidentiality of user data, as well as implement preventive measures to deal with known and unknown cyber threats. Manage the requirements for embedded computing systems, and acquire low level programming and device interfacing skills for development of such systems.

(iii)

(iv)

Courses offered under this specialisation include Network/Socket Programming, Internet Protocols, Architecture & Routing, Network Monitoring & Security, Distributed & Grid Computing, Microprocessors & Embedded Systems, and Wireless & Ad Hoc Networks. (e) Software Engineering [Code: 008K] Graduates specialising in Software Engineering is expected to: (i) (ii) (iii) Show mastery of the software engineering knowledge and skills, and professional issues necessary to begin practice as a software engineer. Work as an individual and as part of a team to develop and deliver quality software artifacts Reconcile conflicting project objectives, finding acceptable compromises within limitations of cost, time, knowledge, existing systems and organizations.

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(iv)

Design appropriate solutions in one or more applications domains using software engineering approaches that integrate ethical, social, legal and economic concerns. Demonstrate an understanding of and apply current theories, models, and techniques that provide a basis for problem identification and analysis, software design, development, implementation, verification and documentation. Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation for the importance of negotiation, effective work habits, leadership and good communications with stakeholders in a typical software development environment.

(v)

(vi)

(vii) Learn new models, techniques and technologies as they emerge and appreciate the necessity of such continuing professional development. Courses offered under this specialisation include Software Requirements Analysis & Modelling, Software Design & Architecture, Web Engineering & Technology, Software Project Management, Process, & Evolution, Software Quality Assurance & Testing, and Automata Theory & Formal Language. (f) Intelligent Systems [Code: 008L] Graduates specialising in Intelligent Systems is expected to: (i) (ii) (iii) Demonstrate the mastery of various issues and techniques of acquiring, representing, using and managing knowledge for problem solving. Design and develop knowledge-based systems such as expert systems, casebased systems and knowledge management systems. Use the latest technological developments that support the development of intelligent systems and their applications in various domains such as computer vision and natural language processing. Awareness of various ethical and social implications of using knowledgebased computer systems for problem solving.

(iv)

Courses offered under this specialisation include Artificial Intelligence, Knowledge Management & Engineering, Computer Vision & Image Processing, Natural Language Processing, Intelligent Health Informatics, Multimedia Information Systems & Management, and Decision Support Systems & Business Intelligence.

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The specialisation areas together with the common core courses have been carefully designed to ensure that graduates will have the widest choice in their later careers in business, industry, public sector, research and education, occupying a variety of positions such as System Analyst, Analyst/Programmer, System Engineer, System Programmer, System Administrator, Software Engineer, Information Systems/Information Technology Officer, Software Project Manager, Software Quality Officer, Knowledge Engineer, Information Systems Project Manager, Multimedia Project Manager, Information Research Manager, Information Systems Manager, Database Administrator, Network Manager, Network Engineer and Research Officer. Details on course requirements for each specialisation area can be obtained from Section 4.1. 4.6 Industrial Training/Undergraduate Research Training Industrial Training Objectives Among the objectives of this training programme are: 1. To provide students with an opportunity to familiarise themselves with the operations, administration and organisational development of a computer department or organisation. To allow students to observe computing applications in daily practice. To expose students to "real" working situations and the problems normally encountered by an organisation. To enable organisations to identify appropriate good students as their potential employees upon graduation.

2. 3. 4.

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course, student should be able to: 1. 2. 3. 4. Propose solutions to operational and administrative problems that are normally encountered in an organization. Participate in real team-work environment in an organization. Follow ethical work values in an organization. Demonstrate skills in organizational management as well as business opportunities. 69

Synopsis The Industrial Training programme is one of the equiping Computer Science graduates with useful Trainees are expected to enhance their ability documentations, prepare and deliver a presentation, systems. Length and Period of Training 26 weeks (6 months): Year 3 Semester II and Long Vacation Note: During the Industrial Training period students are not allowed to enrol in any course during Long Vacation (KSCP) or any other courses. Prerequisites To qualify for the industrial training programme students must have: 1. 2. 3. 4. Attained CGPA of 2.0. Accumulated 60 credits. An active academic status. Taken and passed all of the following core courses with a GPA of 2.0: CPT111/3 - Principles of Programming CPT113/3 - Programming Methodology & Data Structures CST131/4 - Computer Organisation CMT221/4 - Database Organisation & Design CMT222/4 - System Analysis & Design CAT200/3 - Integrated Software Development Workshop and have taken the following course at the time of application CAT300/2 - Group Innovation Project 5. 6. Attained Band 4 in MUET or passed at least with a C grade in LMT100 Preparatory English. Have a possibility of graduating within three semesters after the completion of the Industrial Training. most important components of skills in professional contexts. to manage projects, prepare design, implement, or maintain

Implementation of Training Students are expected to obtain a full-time placement at an organisation which can provide appropriate Industrial Training experience to a future graduate of the Bachelor of Computer Science. Learning is achieved through the supervision process, practical work (including projects) and independent learning. 70

Evaluation Method This course is evaluated as pass or fail. In order to pass, a candidate has to fulfil the following conditions: 1. 2. 3. Received a positive evaluation from the USM lecturer assigned to do the evaluation. Received a positive evaluation from the supervisor in the organisation where the trainee is trained. Written a comprehensive report with a quality appropriate for a student who is a candidate for Bachelor of Computer Science.

Incomplete grade (TL) will normally be given on serious medical reason. Applications, Allowances, Medical Services and Insurance Students have to apply on their own to government or private agencies for training placement. Applications must be submitted through the Deputy Dean of Industry & Community Network. Most organisations pay a nominal wage training allowance. Failing this, a limited financial aid may be provided by the University to suitably qualified students. Medical services (as for normal semesters at panel clinics and government hospitals only) are provided by the university. Insurance (PA) will be covered by USM Alumni upon request. Types of Training Candidates undergo Industrial Training for a period of 26 weeks (6 months). The experience gained from the training varies from one organisation to another, but the experience usually has the following attributes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Exposure to daily work environment; including organisational structure, functions, regulation and work material/resource. Participation in group work involving systems analysis, design, implementation maintenance and evaluation. Enhancement of oral and written communication skill through documentation preparation and oral/multimedia presentation activities. Development of manpower skills such as leadership, cooperation, and independence. Opportunity to practice elements of courses taken during their study. Opportunity to perform research and development activities. 71

An organisation would normally be allowed to recruit trainees only if they have the capability to provide an appropriate work environment suitable for a trainee who is a candidate for the Bachelor of Computer Science. Currently, there are around 180 organisations in Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, Sarawak and Singapore that are capable and ready to recruit USM Computer Science trainees. The organisations cover all sosio-economic spectrums and include: Multinational corporations. Academic and research institution. Government and semi-government bodies. Hardware suppliers, software and integrated solution companies. Factories. Banks, insurance firms and financial institution. Consultancy and high value services organisation.

Undergraduate Research Training This training provides an alternative to Industrial Training. Students with good academic performance (CGPA 2.50 or GPA for core courses 2.50) and with an inclination towards academic and research work are encourage to undertake this type of training. The description for this training is as for the industrial training as given above. However, Undergraduate Research Training emphasises research aspects and the trainee will be assigned to research organisations or laboratories or higher educational institutional either within USM, in or outside the country in particular in those institutions and organisations which have established research links or collaborations with the School of Computer Sciences or Universiti Sains Malaysia. Trainees will be given the opportunity to be trained in research methodologies and act as a research assistant. Trainees will also be given the opportunity to continue their research work through Undergraduate Research Project as an alternative to Undergraduate Project after completing the training (See Section 4.7). 4.7 Group Innovation Project Objectives To test skills, competence, analytical skills and individual maturity in planning and solving problems in information systems or other areas related to the area of specialisation. Emphasis will be given to group work and students will carry out the project in a small group. It also serves as a preparatory course for the industrial training or undergraduate research training.

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Length and Period of the Project This project is implemented during the first semester of the third year. Types of Project, Software and Hardware Students are encouraged to carry out database projects. The types of software needed are not restricted to particular programming languages or software packages. Students are given the freedom to build their systems using programming languages such as C, C++, Java, Visual Basic, and .NET or to use related software packages such as MySQL, Dreamweaver, Flash, and Oracle. Students may use the hardware facility provided by the School of Computer Sciences or their own personal computers. The choice of hardware must be suitable with the type of project and software. Choosing Project Title Students are encouraged to suggest their own project titles or to continue with projects which they have carried out in the courses on Databases and Systems Analysis & Design. Students are required to discuss with their respective supervisor on the scope and specification of their projects so as to ensure that the projects fulfill the requirement of the project. The acceptance or rejection of the project suggested by the students depends on each supervisor. Report Format Each group is required to submit only a single report.
Implementation Period/ Submission Deadlines A. 1. Submission of Reports Preliminary report (abstract, foreword, system analysis and design) Final report (abstracts in Malay and English) To be announced 10 (including Appendices) 30 (including Appendices) Maximum Number of Pages

2.

To be announced

Evaluation Evaluation of the project will be carried out based on the report from the respective supervisor, preliminary report, final report, system developed and an open presentation of the project.

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4.8 Undergraduate Major Project/Undergraduate Research Project Undergraduate Project Objectives - To give an opportunity to students to carry out an in-depth study of their respective specialisation area. - To enhance student's competence in systems design, analysis of algorithms and using theories that they have learnt from Year I to Year III. - To build systems using programming languages and tools. - To give students an intellectual challenge to their abilities to learn new topics without formal classes and to further develop their abilities in literature searching, report writing, verbal presentation, project planning and time management. Length and Period of the Project This project is implemented in the final year (two semesters). Choosing Project Title Titles of projects will be issued during the first week of the first semester. Students are advised to see lecturers to get more information on the project they have chosen. Each student will be monitored by an academic staff. Another lecturer will be appointed to monitor the progress of the student together with the supervisor and will act as the second examiner. Project Report Development projects are usually carried out in teams, using a role-playing approach where students are considered as "employees" of PPSK Software House (PSH). The deliverables for a development project, including any required reports are listed in the "PSH Standard Operating Procedures" document. Evaluation Please refer to PSH Standard Operating Procedures' document which will be provided by the Coordinator.

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Undergraduate Research Project Students who has undertaken Undergraduate Research Training (as an alternative to Industrial Training - See Section 4.5), can choose to proceed to Undergraduate Research Project as an alternative to Undergraduate Project. This project course aims to inculcate a better intellectual collaboration between undergraduate students and the academic staff and also the graduate students. Thus, undergraduate students may participate actively in the school research activities and gain research experience in Computer Science/IT research. The description of this project course is similar to the undergraduate project as given above. However, the nature of project, reports and presentation as well breakdown of evaluation marks are different with reports, seminar and viva emphasise research aspects and approach. 4.9 Student Learning Time (SLT) Student Learning Time (SLT) for the core or elective courses is given in Appendix D. Students should refer to the suggested SLT (See Appendix D) as the guide in managing their study time. SLT can be described as follows: Effective learning time or student effort in learning or the learning volume (a quantitative measurement of all learning activities) in order to achieve the specified learning outcomes; Inclusive of all learning time components (learning activities), that is formal and informal. Total time required by student to learn a particular component of curriculum; Official Contact Time + Guided Learning Time + Self Study Time (Independent learning) + Assessment Time. Synonymous to students academic load.

(Source: MOHE/MQA) 4.10 GRoW Programme In tandem with the governments myBrain15 programme that aims to produce 100,000 PhD graduates in the next 15 years starting 2007, GRoW (Grooming Researchers of the World) programme was initiated in 2010 to extensively expose and facilitate research activities at the undergraduate level. This programme also aims to support USMs key areas to make research and innovation as a culture and strengthen students in academic and its environment. Students with CGPA 2.50 are encouraged to join GRoW programme as a member. Special activities will be conducted to groom research and innovation skill set much earlier among the members. GRoW members are expected to maintain the minimum CGPA of 2.50 through out their study. 75

GRoW programme exposes to the students with research opportunities in specific areas once they start to specialise in the second year of their study. GRoW members will start to work on research topic for their group project (CAT300) and digest the same topic in research methods & special topic study (CAT301) during the first semester of the third year. Then they are expected to continue working on the same research topic during their undergraduate research training (CAT303) under the same supervisor assigned for CAT300 and CAT301. The students may perform their research training outside USM under the collaboration of their supervisors with external researchers either in industries, research institutes or other higher learning institutions. GRoW members should continue with undergraduate research project (CAT401) during their final year in the same research area and as much as possible under the same supervisor; and start thinking on innovation. In the second semester of their final year, GRoW members may start applying to pursue their postgraduates study at the school in the same specialisation or research topic that they have worked on under the programme. In the nutshell, GRoW members will be equipped with research and innovation skills as early as possible.

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5.0 MINOR PROGRAMMES All students that choose to do Computer Science with Minor programme must choose one minor programme and commence their minor study in the second semester of the first year of their studies. These students must complete 20 units of the courses in the minor package. Among the minor programmes offered are:
School School of Biological Sciences School of Physics School of Chemical Sciences School of Mathematical Sciences School of Humanities Minor Package Biology Physics Chemistry Mathematics English Language Malay Linguistics Geography Literature Islamic Studies History Japanese Studies Philosophy & Civilisations Translation and Interpretation Japanese Language Studies Chinese Language Studies Communicational Arabic Fine Art Performing Art Musics Drama and Theatre Communicational Graphics Acting and Directing Music Technology Communication Studies Science and Environment Journalism Management Archeology Anthropology and Sociology Economics Social Development and Administration Political Science Development Planning and Management Industrial Relation Public Policy and Administration International Relation South-East Asian Studies Psychology Tropical Environmental Studies Code 0B01 0Z01 0K01 0M01 0H01 0H02 0H03 0H04 0H05 0H06 0H11 0H14 0L01 0L02 0L06 0H07 0H08 0H09 0H10 0H12 0H13 0V01 0Y05 0Y06 0A03 0U01 0S01 0S02 0S04 0S05 0S07 0S08 0S09 0S10 0S11 0S12 0B02

School of Languages, Literacy & Translation School of Arts

School of Communication School of Management Centre for Archaeological Research School of Social Sciences

Schools of Biological Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Physics, and Mathematical Sciences School of Industrial Technology

Food Technology Bio-Resource, Paper & Coating Technology

0I06 0I08

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Computer Science students are strongly encouraged to minor in the following minor programmes: (a) Management Studies No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Code AKW103 AKW104 AKP201 AKP202 AKP302 Units 4 4 4 4 4 Course Title Introduction to Management Accounting and Finance Marketing Organisational Behaviour Operation Management Semester I II I II I

Courses 1 and 2 are compulsory and pre-requisites to other courses. (b) Economics No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. (c) Code SKW104 SEW211 SEW213 SEU225 SEU226 SEU228 SEU229 Units 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Course Title Pengantar Isu-Isu Ekonomi (Compulsory) Mikroekonomi I (Compulsory) Makroekonomi I (Compulsory) Ekonomi Pembangunan Ekonomi Buruh Ekonomi Malaysia Ekonomi Islam

Psychology No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Code STU231 STU241 STU242 STU243 STU244 STU342 Units 4 4 4 4 4 4 Course Title Asas-Asas Psikologi (Compulsory) Psikologi Kesihatan Psikologi Sosial Psikologi Perkembangan Psikologi Taknormal Terapi Penyembuhan

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(d)

Translation and Interpretation No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Code HBT100 HBT105 HBT112 HBT206 HBT302 HBT305 Units 4 4 3 3 3 4 Course Title Pengenalan Teori dan Praktik Terjemahan Kaedah Penterjemahan Tatabahasa Bahasa Malaysia dan Bahasa Inggeris dan Strategi Penyuntingan Menghasilkan dan Menyunting Terjemahan Sosiolinguistik dan Penterjemahan Projek Penterjemahan

(e)

Communication Studies No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Code YKT101 YKT102 YKT103 YKT111 YFP324 YFP321 YBP223 YBP224 YWP215 YFP222 YBP326 YBP327 Units 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Course Title Pengantar Komunikasi Manusia Pengantar Komunikasi Massa Komunikasi dan Masyarakat Teori dan Penyelidikan Komunikasi 1 Kajian Sinema Kajian Televisyen Periklanan Perhubungan Awam Pengenalan kepada Kewartawanan Penulisan Skrip & Lakon Layar Komunikasi Korporat Pengurusan Media (Compulsory) (Choose 1)

(f)

Science and Environment Journalism No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Code YKT102 YKT103 YWP221 YWP325 YKT112 YKT214 YWP223 YWP324 Units 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 Course Title Pengantar Komunikasi Massa Komunikasi dan Masyarakat Kewartawanan 1 (Compulsory) Penulisan dan Pelaporan Sains (Compulsory) Komunikasi untuk Pembangunan Sosial Teknologi Komunikasi Penulisan Rencana Media, Sains & Alam Sekitar 79 (Compulsory) (Choose 1)

(g)

Communicational Graphics No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Code VHA101 VRS104 VRS105E VRL221E VRA111E VRH221E VHG112 Units 4 2 2 4 4 4 4 Course Title Pengantar Seni Halus (Compulsory) Asas Studio 2 Dimensi (Compulsory) Fundamentals of 3 Dimensional Studio (Compulsory) Drawing Fundamentals of Computer Graphics Typography Rekabentuk Grafik I Semester I & II I & II I & II II I II II

(h)

Mathematics No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Code MAA101 MAA111 MAA161 MAT122 MAT263 MAT203 MSG162 MSG262 MSS211 Units 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Course Title Calculus for Science Students (Compulsory) Algebra for Science Students (Compulsory) Statistics for Science Students Differential Equations I Probability Theory Vector Calculus Applied Statistical Methods Quality Control Modern Algebra Semester I I & II I & II II I & II I II II II

(i)

Archeology No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Code UAW101 UAW201 UAW302 UAW303 UAW304 Units 4 4 4 4 4 Course Title Pengantar Arkeologi Perkembangan Manusia dan Tamadun Sains dalam Arkeologi Arkeologi Asia Tenggara Ekskavasi Arkeologi

For students wishing to minor in other areas other than Management Studies, please make sure that time-tabling and course scheduling allows you to graduate in the stipulated period. See Minor Programmes Handbook for further information on Minor Specialisations. 80

6.0 FACILITIES 6.1 Computer Labs Facilities for Undergraduate Teaching Labs Computer Lab 1 Computer Lab 2 Computer Lab 3 Computer Lab 4 Computer Lab 5 Location 301 302 303 312 313 Description Mac OS, Windows, Adobe Application Windows, Oracle, Database Windows, Multimedia, Internet Windows, Programming Windows, Programming

Each lab consists of an average 45 personal computers. There are eleven technicians who are responsible to operate the labs. The labs are open during office hours, semester breaks, and are open until 11:00 pm during the semester. The General Office for the lab is located on Level 3 (Room 305). 6.2 Computer Labs Facilities for Research and Undergraduate Project There are three main research clusters shown in the table below.
Research Cluster (Head) Service Computing (Prof. Rosni Abdullah) Data to Knowledge (Prof. Mandava Rajeswari) Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures (Assoc. Prof. Azman Samsudin) Research Group (Coordinator) Enterprise Computing (Dr. Ahmad Suhaimi Baharudin) Software Engineering (Dr. Vincent Khoo Kay Teong) Social and Sustainable Computing (Dr. Nasriah Zakaria) Multimedia Systems (Assoc. Prof. Muhammad Rafie Hj. Mohd. Arshad) Computational Intelligence (Prof. Ahamad Tajudin Khader) Computer Vision and Image Processing (Prof. Mandava Rajeswari) Visual Informatics (Prof. Abdullah Zawawi Haji Talib) Language Engineering (Dr. Tan Tien Ping) Knowledge Engineering (Assoc. Prof. Cheah Yu-N) High Performance Computing (Prof. Rosni Abdullah) Computer Networks (Assoc. Prof. Wan Tat Chee) Information Security (Assoc. Prof. Azman Samsudin) High Performance Computational Biology (Assoc. Prof. Nur'Aini Abdul Rashid)

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Students who do research training at the school will be located at their supervisors respective labs. During the final year undergraduate or research projects, students are also located at the respective research labs. This is subject to availability of spaces. Students without labs for undergraduate projects will be located at a dedicated lab. The research labs and the locations are listed in the following table.
Research Cluster (Head) Service Computing (Prof. Rosni Abdullah) Data to Knowledge (Prof. Mandava Rajeswari) Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures (Assoc. Prof. Azman Samsudin) Research Labs (Lab Head) Enterprise Computing (Dr. Ahmad Suhaimi Baharudin) Software Engineering (Dr. Vincent Khoo Kay Teong) Social and Sustainable Computing (Dr. Nasriah Zakaria) Multimedia Systems (Assoc. Prof. Muhammad Rafie Hj. Mohd. Arshad) Knowledge Engineering (Assoc. Prof. Cheah Yu-N) Computational Intelligence (Prof. Ahamad Tajudin Khader) Visual Informatics (Prof. Abdullah Zawawi Haji Talib) Computer Vision and Image Processing (Prof. Mandava Rajeswari) Language Engineering (Dr. Tan Tien Ping) High Performance Computing (Prof. Rosni Abdullah) High Performance Computational Biology (Assoc. Prof. Nur'Aini Abdul Rashid) Information Security (Assoc. Prof. Azman Samsudin) Location (Room No.) 404 404 408 603 401 409 410 501, 524 511 411, 412, 504 411, 412 502, 503

The research labs are open 24 hours a day to students who have been given permission to use the labs and the list of the students will be posted on each lab. Each lab is supervised by a lab head and is assisted by security personnel who are supposed to patrol the designated area. All applications based on Intel processor with Windows operating systems can be loaded into the computers in the labs for research purposes and project work. Respective supervisors should be informed on installations and related activities involving facilities at the research labs.

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6.3 Servers All computers (over 500 units) within the School of Computer Sciences are linked via the LAN (Local Area Network). Each computer laboratory is interconnected with high-speed optic cable and all the computers are networked over gigabit Ethernet link. The campus network is connected to the Internet through a 155MB leased line. At locations where wireless connectivity is essential, Wi-Fi hotspots have been setup to allow users to connect to the campus network over wireless links. There are more than 20 servers assigned for network, services, teaching/learning and research. Some of these servers are Windows 2008, Unix (Linux), VMWare ESXi, Blade, SANs, Microsoft Exchange and Oracle Database. The servers are also available for student use to allow students to get practical experience with most high-end platforms and technologies. All University students are automatically enrolled in Microsoft Live@Edu service that provides them with an e-mail account, Internet storage and various communication and collaboration tools. The combination of excellent educational technology and professional management enriched the learning environment. 6.4 Lab Usage Regulations Users must scan their student/staf card to enter the labs using the door access system. Users must display their lab card in the appropriate slot while using the computer (lab cards can be obtained from the lab office). Without the card users are not allowed to enter the lab. Users are not allowed to eat, drink and bring in any food or drinks into the lab. Users can enter the lab according to the times and periods as allocated through course scheduling in each lab. Users must use the equipments properly and ensure that all documents, software and hardware are protected from virus attacks or infected by virus. Users are not allowed to bring in or take out any lab equipments (computers, printers, etc) except with permission from lab staff. Users of the lab must switch off the equipment used before leaving the lab. Users must dress properly conforming to the universitys dress code when entering the lab. Users are not allowed to unplug any type of cables attached to the computer. Users must always keep the lab clean. Users are not allowed to install any kind of software without permission of lecturers or technicians of the lab.

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6.5 Lecture Halls and Tutorial Rooms Most lectures are conducted at DKG31 that is located at the ground floor of the School of Computer Sciences building. The School of Computer Sciences shares the lecture hall mainly with the School of Mathematical Sciences. Other lectures are conducted at dedicated lecture halls and tutorial rooms around the campus. Some tutorials and lectures consisting of small group of students are conducted at the following rooms in the school building: ELL (Room 045) AV (Room 402) Tutorial Room (Room 507) Students are not allowed to eat and drink in the lecture halls and the tutorial rooms. In addition, students must dress properly conforming to the universitys dress code when entering any lecture halls and tutorial rooms when attending their lectures or tutorials. The lecturers have the right to prohibit students who do wear proper attire from attending their lectures. Students should not use the facility provided in the rooms without the permission of the respective lecturers.

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7.0 GENERAL INFORMATION 7.1 Industry-Community Advisory Panel (ICAP) and Computer Industrial Forum (CIF) Dynamic changes in the computer industries today compels the School of Computer Sciences to follow closely the trends and development in order to ensure that the school remains as the leading institution in the country that produces highest quality graduates in Computer Science. As a result of this, ICAP and CIF were established to allow the School of Computer Sciences to collaborate and enhance its relation with the industrial sector, business, government bodies and other organisations in Computer or IT fields. The panel members of the ICAP for the School of Computer Sciences are as follows:
No. 1. Name Encik Muhammad Imran Kunalan Abdullah Position General Manager Organisation K-Workers Development Department Multimedia Development Corporation Sdn. Bhd. (MDeC) MSCHead Quarters 2360 Persiaran APEC 63000 Cyberjaya Selangor Information Communication Technology MIMOS Berhad, Technology Park Malaysia 57000 Kuala Lumpur Intel Technology Sdn. Bhd. 121, Bayan Lepas Free Industrial Zone 11900 Bayan Lepas Pulau Pinang Emanate Technology Sdn. Bhd. 1-2-1, Kompleks Mayang Mall Jalan Mayang Pasir 1 Bayan Baru 11900 Bayan Lepas Pulau Pinang

2.

Dr. Ettikan Kandasamy Karuppiah

Principal Engineer

3.

Encik Chew Yen Hsiang

Staff Engineer

4.

Encik Jeffrey Lim Tau Hoong

CEO

The Computer Industrial Forum aims: 1. 2. To provide a mechanism to spread computing practices and development that can be benefited. To provide a channel for evaluating the local computing needs.

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3.

To encourage technology transfer by assisting the academic staff with entrepreneurial inclination in developing new promising computing products for marketing through collaboration research, consultancy and other means. To acquire research grants and consultation to enhance R&D efforts and scholarships from the industrial sector to excellent students. To ensure output of graduates with high quality and well-sought after by the market/computer industries.

4. 5.

Among the various activities organised by the CIF are: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h) (i) Annual meeting to discuss relevant issues. Organising technical seminars, courses and workshops. Strengthening cooperation in research and development work. Exchange of technical information. Consultancy works with the industry. Increasing scholarship and employment opportunities. Carrying surveys to get appropriate feed back of the effectiveness of the programmes of study. Industrial training placement. Staff attachment or sabbatical leave in industry.

7.2 Student Affairs Section The Computer Science Student Affairs Section was set up to provide assistance, advice and additional services other than those directly related to academic matters to all computer science major students at the School of Computer Sciences, USM. All academically related matters should instead be referred to the Computer Science Academic Section under the respective programme chairperson. Among the types of assistance, advice and services rendered by the Student Affairs Section are: to coordinate the activities of the Computer Science Society, USM. to coordinate social and sports activities of the students. to function as an official communication channel between the students and the staff members of the School of Computer Sciences. to coordinate the mentor system, student leave application, student application to extend scholarship/loans, etc. to assist and to provide services such as for the preparation of supporting letters for various applications. to provide advisory services related to personal problems. etc.

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7.2.1 Academic Staff - Students Committee This committee acts as an official channel of communication between the students and the staff of the School of Computer Sciences. Among the objectives of the committee are the following: (a) (b) (c) (d) to inculcate closer relationship between academic staff and students. to plan and carry out activities that support the above objective in (a). to plan and to carry out activities that will help new students to familiarise themselves with the new learning environment. to function as a forum to discuss problems faced by students.

Members of the committee consist of academic staff of the School of Computer Sciences and student representatives. 7.2.2 Academic Advisors Each student will be assigned to an academic advisor who is an academic staff of the school. Students are required to see their respective academic advisor during course registration activities before the start of the semester and if needed at other times for consultation and advise on academic and other matters. 7.2.3 Mentor System and Counselling Service The Mentor System was initiated to counsel and assist probationary students in facing and overcoming their academic problems. The functions of the Mentor System are: (a) (b) (c) to assist students placed on probationary status to overcome their academic problems as well as other related academic matters. to help such students face the academic challenges and subsequently overcome them. to provide guidance to students on effective learning strategies.

The school has established an open mentor panel system. Probation students are free to see any of the mentors. At the school level, the mentors are appointed among academic staff who can contribute as a mentor to assist students mainly in their academic matters.

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The mentors appointed are as listed below: 1. 2. 3. 4. 4. 5. 6. 7. Assoc. Prof. Nur'Aini Abdul Rashid (Deputy Dean, Academic & Students Development as the coordinator) Assoc. Prof. Azman Samsudin Dr. Mohd. Adib Haji Omar Dr. Nurul Hashimah Ahamed Hassain Malim Puan Maziani Sabudin Encik Mohd. Azam Osman Puan Umi Kalsom Yusof Puan Wahidah Husain

Probation students will be given a mentor-mentee card that must be brought to each discussion session to be signed by the mentor. Although the Mentor System is primarily intended for probation students, students with an active status but require guidance or are having difficulties in their studies are encouraged to consult the mentors. For mentees that are deemed to require additional advice or counselling, the mentor shall refer such cases to the Deputy Dean or Counselling Unit or any other relevant authority. The school is also served by a trainee councillor who is a graduate student of the School of Educational Studies, USM. Mentees and also other students are encouraged to meet the appointed trainee councillor. 7.3 Sustainable Student Workshop (Bengkel Siswa Lestari) (Year I) In Year I a number of workshop sessions will be held for first year students. All first year students must attend these sessions. Among the objectives of the workshop is to introduce the students to the School of Computer Sciences, the discipline of Computer Science including specialisation areas offered in the programme, research activities and provide sessions that would assist first year students to familiarise and adapt themselves to university level education and in building up their personal development and softskills. 7.4 Intel eLite Programme Intel eLite programme is a programme initiated by Intel Corporation (Penang) in collaboration with the School of Computer Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia. The programme is a structured Intel-University programme to build up graduates' readiness for industries and to develop a predetermined hiring resource pipeline of USM's Computer Science undergraduates. The program's vision is to create a structured and efficient programme to develop USM Computer Science undergraduates' readiness for industry. It would benefit both students and the industries in terms of career placement once the students graduated. 88

To achieve this vision, the programme will try to address the technical competency gaps between industries and students and also increase the soft-skill capabilities of the students. By achieving this vision, a more structured development of undergraduate hiring resource pool can be ensured. Among the rationales of this programme are to: avoid ad-hoc hiring be certain of availability of human resources increase the awareness of job opportunities in Intel match the skills of graduates to job positions control the diversity (gender and race) of hiring win outstanding graduates from competitors ensure a good supply of graduate expertise reduce the training time of new recruits which in turn will speed up their productive contribution

The requirements for joining this program are as follows: Students must be recommended by the School of Computer Sciences, USM Students must currently enrolled as students in the School of Computer Sciences, USM First year students must have achieved at least CGPA > 2.8 in Matriculation/STPM and 2nd Year and above must have achieved CGPA > 3.0 Non-sponsored/Sponsored but non-bonded (PTPTN is allowed) Intend to work in Multi-National Companies Possess strong behavioral skills As an Intel eLite student must: Maintain CGPA > 3.0 Attend all programme activities Remain in the School of Computer Sciences, USM Remain non-bonded Maintain teamwork culture & positive attitudes

The following are some of the benefits of joining the programme: Students will be exposed to Intel work experiences Students will have better chances of being hired by the industry Students are not bonded to Intel, nor does Intel have the obligation to hire 7.5 Microsoft Student Partners (MSP) Programme Microsoft Student Partners programme started in 2006/2007. Microsoft Student Partner (MSP) is a programme designed to groom and recognise bright, passionate, technology students for their contribution to the academic community on a one-year renewable term. It is an opportunity for top young minds to build vital technical and soft skills, sharing with students and peers about technology and bringing out the best in them! 89

What MSP do? Plan and play Technology-education events on Campus Imagine Cup Lead Learning Workshops Web development with ASP.NET Cloud development on Windows Azure Windows Phone 7 Personal Experience Great opportunity for self improvement - Develop soft skills - Be a technology leader Up to 11 terabyte of software from MSDN Meeting exciting people form the industry MSP Mission and Goals Groom Young Talents Program for Students Build Technology Community Exposure to Industry Role Description Organise technology related activities on campus. Represent Microsoft in campus. Disseminate campus initiatives information. Engage campus student clubs. Participate in premier Microsoft technology events. Engage campus student clubs. Benefit Experience & Connections Recognition & Reference Letter MSDN Ultimate Subscription Participation in Microsoft Corporate Events Workshops/Trainings by Industry Professionals Microsoft Giveaways What is in it? Opportunity to be mentored Self Discovery Community Engagement Industry Exposure Personal Branding

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7.6 Computer Science Society Computer Science Society was specially established for the students of the School of Computer Sciences. This society provides a formal channel between the School of Computer Sciences and Universiti Sains Malaysia with computer science students. Besides, the society provides a platform for students to carry out a number of acitivites such as social activities, sport carnival, community services, peer counseling, convocation expo, and log-off nite. All Computer Science students are automatically registered as the members of this society. 7.7 Prizes and Awards Computer Science prizes and awards are divided into two categories, at the School level and at the University level. 7.7.1 School Level Model Student Award The Model Student Award is awarded to first and second year students who excel or have performed exceptionally well in their studies as well as have involved themselves actively in academic and society activities and have shown to render help to their peers in academic matters. The recipients of this award will be requested to assist lecturers in guiding their peers in the following semester. Dean's Certificate Dean's Certificate is awarded to students who excel (obtained GPA 3.5) and acquired at least 12 credits of courses with grade points for a particular semester. 7.7.2 University Level The Gold Medal Award is awarded to the best final year student in the Bachelor of Computer Science degree programme. Other awards include the best final year students in all areas i.e. Chancellor's Gold Medal, Royal Education Award, and USM Gold Medal by USM Woman Society. Prizes are also given to the best student in academic field to Computer Science student for Year I, II and III.

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7.8 Research and Higher Degree Programmes The research areas of the School of Computer Sciences can be divided into three clusters that reflect the available expertise within the school. The three clusters and their respective research groups include (see also Section 6.2): Service Computing: Enterprise Computing, Software Engineering, Social and Sustainable Computing, and Multimedia Systems. Data to Knowledge: Computational Intelligence, Computer Vision and Image Processing, Visual Informatics, Language Engineering, and Knowledge Engineering. Enabling Technologies and Infrastructures: High Performance Computing, Computer Networks, Information Security, and High Performance Computational Biology. The research clusters overlap with the specialisation core courses offered in the Bachelor of Computer Science programme (see Section 4.1). Research Programmes Postgraduate programmes leading to MSc and PhD in Computer Science are open to candidates who have obtained a good honours degree. The degree can be pursued through research in the research clusters stated above under the supervision of at least one academic staff of the school. A candidate is required to complete a thesis in a stipulated time period. Usually, candidates for an MSc complete their thesis in 12 - 18 months and for a PhD in 30 - 40 months. Undergraduate students who are interested to pursue postgraduate studies may refer to the Postgraduate Study Handbook that is available at the school for more detail information. Students who are GRoW members are encouraged to apply this research programme in the second semester of their final year. Mixed Mode Programmes Two postgraduate programmes by mixed mode (coursework and research) are offered namely Master of Science (Computer Science) and Master of Science (IT Technopreneurship). Both programmes require at least one year full time and two years for part time of study for M.Sc. (IT Technopreneurship) only. Master of Science (Computer Science) is offered to graduates in Computer Science or related areas. Areas of concentration offered under this programme include Information & Knowledge Engineering, and Distributed Computing and Networks. Master of Science (IT Technopreneurship) is offered to graduates in any field. This programme allows such graduates to study Information Technology Technopreneurship and become technopreneurs. Details on postgraduate studies can be obtained from the Institute of Postgraduate Studies and its website: http://www.ips.usm.my 92

7.9 School's Website and E-learning Portal Information pertaining to the School of Computer Sciences can be obtained in the homepage of the school at this address: http://www.cs.usm.my The school uses Moodle (Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment) which is an open source e-learning platform to help lecturers to create an effective online learning environment. Moodle has many features expected from an e-learning platform including forums, content management, quizzes, surveys, chat and peer assessment. The system can be accessed at this address: http://elearning.usm.my using campus online user ID. Students are responsible to check both the schools website and the e-learning portal for latest announcements and updates in related matters. Some urgent announcements are pasted on the notice boards at the school. Students must be alert of all related announcements besides those posted online. Students can also post their concerns via the school platform online called Computer Science e-Community (CSeC) platform.

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8.0 LIST AND DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 8.1 List of Courses All courses in the table below are conducted in English.
C'work Breakdown Evaluation 30% Assignments 20% Tests

Code

Course Title

Units

Sem

Year

C'work

Exam

CPT111/ CPM111

Principles of Programming (Prinsip Pengaturcaraan) Discrete Structures (Struktur Diskret) Programming Methodology & Data Structures (Metodologi Pengaturcaraan & Struktur Data) Logic & Applications (Logik & Aplikasi) Mathematical Methods for Computer Science (Kaedah Matematik untuk Sains Komputer) Computer Organisation (Organisasi Komputer) Integrated Software Development Workshop (Bengkel Pembangunan Perisian Bersepadu) Database Organisations & Design (Organisasi & Reka Bentuk Pangkalan Data)

I & II

50

50

CPT112@

II

40

60

20% Assignments 20% Tests 30% Assignments 20% Tests

CPT113/ CPM213

II

50

50

CPT114@

40

60

20% Assignments 20% Tests 30% Assignments 20% Tests

CPT115

II

50

50

CST131

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CAT200

II

100

70% Projects 30% Tests

CMT221/ CMM222@

II

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

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Code

Course Title

Units

Sem

Year

C'work

Exam

C'work Breakdown Evaluation 30% Assignments 20% Tests

CMT222/ CMM321

Systems Analysis & Design (Analisis & Reka Bentuk Sistem) Information Systems Theory & Management (Teori & Pengurusan Sistem Maklumat) Multimedia Systems (Sistem Multimedia) Programming Language Concepts & Paradigms (Konsep & Paradigma Bahasa Pengaturcaraan) Design & Analysis of Algorithms (Reka Bentuk & Analisis Algoritma) Software Requirements Analysis & Modelling (Analisis Keperluan & Pemodelan Perisian) Artificial Intelligence (Kecerdasan Buatan) Data Communications & Networks (Komunikasi Data & Rangkaian) Operating Systems (Sistem Pengendalian) Information Security & Assurance (Keselamatan & Jaminan Maklumat)

II

II

50

50

CMT223/ CMM322

II

II (ISE)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CMT224/ CMM221 CPT211/ CPM313

II

II (MC) II

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests 30% Assignments 20% Tests

II

50

50

CPT212

II

II

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CPT243

II

II (SE)

50

50

30% Projects 20% Tests

CPT244

II

II (IS) II

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests 30% Assignments 20% Tests

CST231/ CSM331

50

50

CST232

II

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CST233

II

II (DSS)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

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Code

Course Title

Units

Sem

Year

C'work

Exam

C'work Breakdown Evaluation 40% Projects 20% Assignments 10% Practical

CST234

Network Programming (Pengaturcaraan Rangkaian) Group Innovation Project (Projek Inovasi Berkumpulan) Research Methods & Special Topic Study (Kaedah Penyelidikan & Kajian Tajuk Khas) Industrial Training (Latihan Industri) Undergraduate Research Training (Latihan Penyelidikan Prasiswazah) Management & Engineering of Databases (Pengurusan & Kejuruteraan Pangkalan Data) Web Engineering & Technologies (Kejuruteraan & Teknologi Web) Computer Graphics & Visual Computing (Grafik Komputer & Perkomputeran Visual) Software Design & Architecture (Reka Bentuk & Seni Bina Perisian)

II

II (NC)

70

30

CAT300

III

100

100% Projects

CAT301

III

100

20% Tests/Quizes 20% Presentations 60% Technical Papers

CAT302/ CAT303

12

II

III

100

100% Training

CMT321

III (ISE)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CMT322/ CMM323

III (ISE, SE, MC)

50

50

30% Projects 20% Tests/Quizes

CMT324

III (MC)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CPT341

III (SE)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

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Code

Course Title

Units

Sem

Year

C'work

Exam

C'work Breakdown Evaluation 30% Assignments 20% Tests

CPT342

Knowledge Management & Engineering (Pengurusan & Kejuruteraan Pengetahuan) Software Project Management, Process & Evolution (Pengurusan Projek, Proses & Evolusi Perisian) Computer Vision & Image Processing (Penglihatan Komputer & Pemprosesan Imej) Natural Language Processing (Pemprosesan Bahasa Tabii) Principles of Parallel & Distributed Programming (Prinsip Pengaturcaraan Selari & Teragih) Internet Protocols, Architecture & Routing (Protokol, Seni Bina & Penghalaan Internet) Distributed & Grid Computing (Perkomputeran Teragih & Grid) Network Monitoring & Security (Pengawasan & Keselamatan Rangkaian)

III (IS)

50

50

CPT343/* CPM314

IV (ISE, SE)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CPT344

III (IS) IV (MC)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CPT346

IV (IS)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CST331

III (DSS)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CST332

III (NC)

70

30

20% Practical 20% Assignments 20% Tests 10% Practical Tests

CST333*

IV (DSS, NC)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CST334

III (DSS, NC)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

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Code

Course Title

Units

Sem

Year

C'work

Exam

C'work Breakdown Evaluation 100% Projects

CAT400/

CAT401

Undergraduate Major Project (Projek Major Prasiswazah) Undergraduate Research Project (Projek Penyelidikan Prasiswazah) Professional and Technopreneurship Development (Pembangunan Profesional & Teknokeusahawanan) E-Business Strategy, Architecture & Design (Strategi, Seni Bina & Reka Bentuk EPerniagaan) Multimedia Information Systems & Management (Sistem & Pengurusan Maklumat Multimedia) Decision Support Systems & Business Intelligence (Sistem Sokongan Keputusan & Kecerdasan Perniagaan) Animation & Virtual Reality (Animasi & Realiti Maya) Software Quality Assurance & Testing (Jaminan Mutu & Pengujian Perisian)

I & II (2 Sem)

IV

100

CAT402

IV

100

70% Assignments 30% Tests

CMT421/ CMM324

II

IV (ISE, MC, SE)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CMT422

II

IV (ISE, MC, IS)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CMT423*

II

IV (ISE, MC, IS)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CMT424*

II

IV (MC)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CPT441

II

IV (SE)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

98

Code

Course Title

Units

Sem

Year

C'work

Exam

C'work Breakdown Evaluation 20% Assignments 20% Tests

CPT443*

Automata Theory & Formal Languages (Teori Automata & Bahasa Formal) Informatik Kesihatan Cerdas (Intelligent Health Informatics) Systems Security & Protection (Keselamatan & Perlindungan Sistem) Microprocessors & Embedded Systems (Mikropemproses & Sistem Terbenam) Advanced Computer Architecture (Seni Bina Komputer Termaju) Wireless Network & Mobile Computing (Perkomputeran Rangkaian Tanpa Wayar dan Bergerak)

II

IV (SE, IS)

40

60

CPT444*

II

IV (ISE, SE, IS)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CST431

II

IV (DSS, NC)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CST432

II

IV (DSS, NC)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CST433*

II

IV (DSS, NC)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

CST434*

II

IV (DSS, NC)

50

50

30% Assignments 20% Tests

*These courses may not be offered in certain academic sessions. @ Service courses open to students from other schools CPM/CMM/CSM - Courses for Minor programmes ISE - Information Systems Engineering MC - Multimedia Computing DSS - Distributed Systems & Security NC - Network Computing SE - Software Engineering IS - Intelligent System

99

8.2 Course Descriptions Level 100 Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus : CPT111 Principles of Programming 3 Basic Concepts of Computer System: Features and components of computer system, computer software, programming languages. Problem Solving Techniques: Problem solving, program development method. Basics of C++ Language: Environment, basic components and structure, input/output operators. Arithmetic Operations: Arithmetic, relational and logical operators, arithmetic errors. Choice Control Structure: if-else, switch. Repetition Control Structure: while, for, do-while. Modular Program - Function: Modular program components and structure, value returning function, function and parameters. Reference Variables and Pointers. Arrays: Arrays, arrays and pointers, arrays and functions. At the end of this course the students will be able to: define and identify the basic concepts of programming. follow the rules of programming development. implement programmes using C++. develop effective problem solving techniques. 1. 2. 3. D. S. Malik, C++ Programming: From Problem Analysis to Program Design, 5th Edition, Course Technology, Thomson Learning, 2009. Abdullah Zawawi Talib, Ahamad Tajudin Khader, Maziani Sabudin, Wahidah Husain, Prinsip-Prinsip Pengaturcaraan Menggunakan C++, Prentice Hall, 2003. Bjarne Stroustrup, Programming Principles and Practice Using C++, Addison-Wesley, December 2008.

Learning Outcomes

References

100

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT112 Discrete Structures 4 Basic concepts: Numbering system, Integers and division, Boolean system, K-map, Boolean matrices, set, subset, Venn diagrams, set handlers, relations, set multiplication, sequence, recursive definition, counting techniques, permutation, combination, pigeonhole principle, probability theory, and complexity of algorithms. Core concepts: Logic, data type and handlers, computer representation, algorithms and pseudocode, and mathematical Induction. Relations and graphs: Definition, multiplication and mapping, relations and graphs, properties of relations, equivalence relations, relations manipulations, and transitive closure, POSET, and Hasse diagrams. Functions: Function (injection, surjection, bijection), inverse functions and compositions of functions. Trees and languages: Trees, labelled trees, languages, grammar representation and specific languages. At the end of this course the students will be able to: choose the right mathematical structures to be used in problem representation by using the concepts and characteristics of mathematical structures. apply an appropriate algorithmic approach in problem solving. practise basic computing concepts and theories in other computer science courses. review the appropriate tools and techniques for computer system design. 1. 2. 3. K. H. Rosen, Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications, 6th Edition, McGraw Hill International, 2007. B. Kolman, R. C. Busby, Discrete Mathematical Structures for Computer Science, 5th Edition, Prentice-Hall, 2004. B. Kolman, R. C. Busby (Penyunting Terjemahan: Zaharin Yusoff, Siti Aishah Hamdan), Struktur Matematik Diskret bagi Sains Komputer, Edisi kedua, Penerbit USM, 1999.

Learning Outcomes

References

101

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT113 Programming Methodology & Data Structures 3 Software Engineering Principles and C++ Classes: Software development Phase, Basic Class and Object, Class and Abstraction Constructor and Destructor, Abstract Data Type and UML, Inheritance and Composition, Friend Class and Friend Function, Operator Overloading Templates. Pointers and Array-Based Lists: The Pointer Data Type and Pointer Variables Dynamic variable and Dynamic Array, Classes and Pointers. Standard Template Library (STL): Component of the STL, Iterator. Linked Lists: Introduction to Linked Lists, Linked list as ADT, Ordered and Unordered Linked Lists, Double linked Lists, Array as Linked Lists. Stacks: Implementation of Stacks as Arrays, Linked Implementation of Stacks. Queues: Implementation of Queues as Arrays, Linked Implementation of Queues, STL Class queues. Binary Trees: Introduction Binary Tree Traversal. Recursion: Recursion Definitions, Problem Solving Using Recursion, Recursion or Iteraration. At the end of this course the students will be able to: manipulate data structure design of programming languages. create object-oriented programmes in C++. write programmes using abstract data types and data structures in C++. choose appropriate data structures to be used in object-oriented programme development. 1. 2. 3. D. S. Malik, C++ Programming: Program Design Including Data Structures, 4th Edition, Course Technology, Thomson Learning, 2009. Carrano, Helman & Veroff, Data Abstraction & Problem Solving with C++, 5th Edition, Addison Wesley, 2007. Deitel & Deitel, C++: How To Program, 7th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2010.

Learning Outcomes

References

102

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT114 Logic & Applications 4 Basic Concepts and Language: Arguments, premises and conclusions. Recognizing arguments. Deduction and induction. Validity, truth, soundness, strength, cogency. Argument forms: proving invalidity. Extended arguments. Language: Meaning and Definition. Propositional Logic: Symbols and translation. Truth functions. Truth tables for propositions. Truth tables for arguments. Indirect truth tables. Natural Deduction in Propositional Logic: Rules of implication I and II. Rules of replacement I and II. Conditional proof. Indirect proof. Proving logical truths. Predicate Logic: Symbols and translation. Using the rules of inference. Change of quantifier rule. Conditional and indirect proof. Proving invalidity. Relational predicates and overlapping quantifiers. Applications of Logic: Formal specification. Introduction to Prolog. Syntax and meaning of Prolog programs. Lists, operators and arithmetic. Using structures: example programs Prolog in Artificial Intelligence. Introduction to artificial intelligence. Basic problem-solving strategies. Knowledge representation and expert systems. At the end of this course the students will be able to: define the basic concepts of propositional logic that include arguments, premises and conclusions and also how to determine the validity of arguments. describe the basic concepts of predicate logic and the use of quantifiers and also how to prove the validity of predicate logic. apply logics in programming language mainly for artificial intelligence. 1. 2. 3. Hurley, P. J., A Concise Introduction to Logic, Thomson Learning, 10th Edition, 2008. Chakraborti, C., Logic: Informal, Symbolic & Inductive, Prentice Hall, 2006. Bratko, I., PROLOG Programming for Artificial Intelligence, Addison-Wesley Educational Publishers Inc, 4th Edition, 2011.

Learning Outcomes

References

103

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT115 Mathematical Methods for Computer Science 4 Matrix Algebra. Functions. Calculus (Integral & Differential). Differential Equations. Spatial Vectors. Complex Numbers. Fourier Transform. Applications to Computer Science. Transformation. Shading. Fractals. Edge detection. Image Blurring. Histogram equalisation. At the end of this course the students will be able to: show mastery in mathematical concepts in computer science. practice the application of mathematical concepts using software tools in computer science. apply the knowledge gained on mathematical concepts to solve problems in Computer Science domain. develop further general mathematical competencies. 1. 2. 3. Stanley, Technical Analysis and Applications with MATLAB, Delmar Learning, 2005. Stroud and Booth, Engineering Mathematics, 6th Edition, MacMillan, 2007. Chapman, Essentials of Matlab Programming, 2nd Edition, Cengage Learning, 2009.

Learning Outcomes

References

104

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CST131 Computer Organisation 4 Introduction: Organisation & architecture. Structure and function. History of Computers. Number Systems: Decimal systems. Binary systems. Converting between binary and decimal. Hexadecimal notation. Computer Arithmetic: The arithmetic and logic unit. Integer representation. Integer arithmetic. Floating-point representation. Floating-point arithmetic. Digital Logic: Boolean Algebra. Gates. Combinational Circuits. Sequential Circuits. Memory Locations and Addressing: Memory location. Addresses. Information coding. Instruction sequencing. Types of instruction. 3address, 2-address, 1-address, and 0 address. Type of operations. Addressing Modes and Formats: Addressing modes. Instruction formats. Central Processing Unit (CPU): Basic concepts. Instruction execution using single bus. Instruction pipelining. Control Unit: Control unit. Hardwired vs micro-programmed. Input-Output Organization: Accessing input/output devices. Programmed I/O. Interrupts. Direct Memory Access. Memory: Types of memory. Memory hierarchy. Organization of the main memory. Semiconductor main memory. Associative memory. Cache Memory: Basic concepts. Mapping methods. Direct mapping. Associative mapping. Set associative mapping. Virtual Memory: Basic concepts. Address translation. Implementation of paging. Segmentation. At the end of this course the students will be able to: to explain the basic functional units of the computer such as CPU, input/output and memory, and also number systems. to create digital logic circuit. to explain the memory organisation in computers. 1. 2. 3. Stalling, W., Computer Organization and Architecture Designing for Performance, 8th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2010. Murdocca, M. and Heuring, V., Computer Architecture and Organization an Integrated Approach, Wiley, 2007. Tanenbaum, A. S., Structured Computer Organisation, 5th Edition, Prentice-Hall, 2006.

Learning Outcomes

References

105

Level 200 Course Code : Course Code : Units : Syllabus : CAT200 Integrated Software Development Workshop 3 Introduction to software engineering: What is software engineering? Software quality, software engineering projects, Activities common to software projects. Review of object orientation (in Java): Introduction to Java, classes, objects, polymorphism, inheritance. Sofware reuse and client-server framework: Reuse, reusability, clientserver architeture and technology, The Object Client-Server Framework (OCSF). Requirements: Domain analysis, type of requirements, use cases, gathering, reviewing and managing changing requirements. Modelling with classes: UML, objects diagrams, class diagrams (in Java). User Interface Design and Usability: User-centred design, the characteristics of users, the basics of user interface design, usability principles, evaluating user interfaces. GUI/multimedia in Java: menu, dialogue, windows, texts, graphics, animation, sound, event-driven programming. Modelling interactions and behaviour: Interaction diagrams, state diagrams, activity diagrams, implementing classes based on interaction and state diagrams. Architecting and designing software: the proces of design, good design decisions, software architecture, and architectural patterns. Testing and software quality: Effective and efficient testing, defects in ordinary algorithms, testing of large systems, inspections, quality assurance. Project (in Java): A mini group project based on and that will apply the above topics. At the end of this course the students will be able to: identify the basis of object-oriented design and basic principles of software engineering using Java. build software with user-friendly graphical interface after evaluating users' needs. practise the implementation of programming projects in Integrated Development Environment.

Learning Outcomes

106

References

1. 2. 3.

L. Lethbridge, Object-Oriented Software Engineering-Practical Software Development using UML and Java, McGraw-Hill, 2nd Edition, 2005. Y. D. Liang, Introduction to Java Programming: Comprehensive Version, 8th Edition, Prentice-Hall, 2010. B. Schneidermann, C. Plasaint, Designing the User Interface, 5th Edition, Addison-Wesley, 2010.

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CMT221 Database Organisation & Design 4 Introduction: Data vs. Information. Role and Advantages of DBMS. The database System Environment. Introducing Access DBMS. SQL: Data Definition Commands. Data Manipulation Commands. SELECT Queries. Virtual Tables. Joining Database Tables. Data Models: Business Rules. The evolution of Data Models. Degrees of Data Abstraction. The Relational Database Model: A logical View of Data. Keys. Integrity Rules. Relationships within the relational database. Entity Relationship (ER) Modeling: Entities, Attributes, relationships. Connectivity and Cardinality. Developing an ER Diagram. Database Design Challenges - Conflicting goals. Advanced Data Modeling: The Extended Entity Relationship Model. Entity Clustering. Maintaining History of Time Variant Data. Fan Traps. Redundant Relationship. Data Normalisation: Data redundancy. Functional, partial and transitive dependencies. First Normal Form (1NF), Second Normal Form (2NF), Third Normal Form (3NF) and Boyce-Codd Normal Form (BCNF). Multi-valued and join dependencies, and non-loss decomposition. Fourth Normal Form (4NF), Domain Key Normal Form (DKNF). Mapping of class diagram (E-R model) to normalised relational model. Advanced Queries and Subqueries: Subqueries. SQL SELECT. SQL Data Definition Commands. SQL Data Manipulation Commands. Database Administration: The evolution of the database administration function. Security. Database administration tools. Developing a data administration strategy. Distributed Databases and the Internet: The evolution of distributed database management systems. Distributed processing and distributed database. Characteristics of distributed database management systems. Distributed database design. Overview of Oracle Introduction to Java NetBeans Making connection between Java NetBeans and Oracle User Interface design using Java NetBeans 107

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course the students will be able to: explain the fundamental concepts, theories, designs and management of database. build database system using query language (SQL, QBE) and DBMS (Oracle 11g). report and carry out project work on database in groups. 1. 2. Rob, P. and Coronel, C., Database Systems: Design, Implementation and Management, Thomson Course Technology, 8th Edition, 2009. Connolly, T. and Begg, C., Database Systems: A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation and Management, 5th Edition, Addison Wesley, 2009.

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CMT222 Systems Analysis & Design 4 Basic concepts in systems development: Environment - types of information systems, involvement and role of systems analysts. Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC). Approaches in objectoriented systems development. Analysing systems: Studying systems functional and technical requirements. Class diagrams modelling, use case diagrams, interacting and object executions. Systems design: Package Diagram Development, Class Design Diagrams, methods and pseudocode design. Systems architecture design. Object-oriented database design, systems input, output and interface design. Implementation: Program development, systems implementation, documentation, training and supports. At the end of this course the students will be able to: define basic concept of system development and unified process. identify disciplines in requirement analysis and design phases including modelling using Unified Modeling Language (UML) notation. practise dicipline in implementation, experimentation and system implementation including teamwork skills. propose and report the software system development through three phases that are planning, analysis and design including the database and its interface.

Learning Outcomes

108

References

1. 2. 3.

Satzinger, J. W., Jackson, R. B. and Burd, S. D., Systems Analysis and Design in a Changing World, 5th Edition, Course Technology CENGAGE Learning, 2009. Satzinger, J. W., Jackson, R. B. and Burd, S. D., Object-Oriented Analysis and Design with the Unified Process, Thomson, 2005. Whitten, J. L. and Bentley, L. D., Systems Analysis and Design Methods, 7th Edition, McGraw Hill, 2007.

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CMT223 Information Systems Theory & Management 3 Foundation of IS: Basic Information System (IS) Concept. Importance of Information in organisations. Key Resources in Organisation. Effects of IT on people and organisation. Using IS/IT in Organisations: Business Process & IS. Types of IS Functional IS; Cross-functional/Enterprise Applications (over view) IS Departments, IT Culture. IS in Organisations & Competitive Advantage: Fundamentals of Strategic Advantage. Strategy for the Internet Age. Five forces model. Three generic strategies. Value Chain model. Ethics, Threats & Safeguards: Cyber Crime and Computer Forensics. IS and Legal, Ethical & Social implications - Morality & Ethics, Privacy, Information & Property Rights. Threats & Securities Vulnerability & abuse, Framework for Security Control, Technology & Tools for Protection. Enterprise IT Infrastructure & Emerging Technologies: Business goals & strategies. Information Infrastructure & Business Logic. Storage & Supporting infrastructure. Telecommunications & Networks - Types, Trends, Wirelessness. Business Intelligence: Databases & Data Warehouses. Overview of database models & tools. Data warehousing & mining. Other database trends. Enterprise Applications: Enterprise Resource Planning - Supply Chain Management, Customer Relationship Management. Knowledge Management & Collaboration - Knowledge-work system, Content Management, Collaboration Tools, Learning Management. Intelligent Techniques - Expert Systems, Neural Networks, Intelligent Agents. Digital Firms: Growth of E-Commerce. Types of e-business: Brick & Mortar, Click & Bricks, Pure-play. E-Commerce Business Models: B2B, B2C, C2B, C2C, B2G, C2G, G2B, G2C, G2G. M-Commerce. E-payment system. E-Business Trends. Decision Support: IS & Decision Making - Decisions - process & types. Decision Suppot Systems - DSS, GDSS. Executive Support System - Balanced Scorecard. Geographic Information Systems.

109

Organisational Redesign: Business Process Reengineering -TQM, Six Sigma. System Development Methodologies - Component-based Development. RAD, Extreme Programming, Agile Methodology, SOA - Selfsourcing vs. outsourcing vs Insourcing. IS Projects: Project Management. Selecting projects. Why Systems Fail? - Critical Success factor, Portfolio Analysis, Scoring Model. Change and Risk Management. Global IS: Global strategies. Managing global systems. Issues and opportunities. Malaysian initiative: Multimedia Super Corridor. Learning Outcomes : At the end of this course the students will be able to: describe the foundation and theory of information systems (IS), types of IS and the importance of information and knowledge in business and public organizations. demonstrate the uses of different types of IS (including ERP, CRM, SCM and e-collaboration) to support operational and strategic activities and also to achieve competitive advantage. choose different IS/IT aspects (database, artificial intelligence, system development, networking etc) in solving real business case studies in an ethical manner. choose enterprise infrastructure to meet organizations' demands and to use suitable metrics. 1. 2. 3. Laudon & Laudon, Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm, 11th Edition, Pearson Education, 2010. Haag, S. & Cummings, M., Management Information Systems for the Information Age, 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2010. OBrien, James, Management Information Systems: Managing Information Technology in the Business Enterprise, 7th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2006.

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CMT224 Multimedia Systems 3 Introduction to Multimedia: Background. Components & system types. Multimedia system applications. Requirements. Latest Multimedia technology. Multimedia Development Processes: Development teams. Methodology. Planning & preparing proposal. Analysis: Audience analysis. Content acquisition. Script preparation. Design: Script. Story boarding. Design consideration. Interface design (HCI). Metaphor. Navigation. Interactivity. Implementation & Production: Hardware. Software. Implementation & Testing. 110

Evaluation Delivery Project Management. Multimedia Building Block Texts: Texts in multimedia. Fonts & Typefaces. Hypertexts & hypermedia. Integrations of text in system. Multimedia Building Block Graphics: Bitmaps vs vector. 2D. 3D. Colour. Graphic Format. Integrations of graphics in system. Multimedia Building Block Audio: Audio multimedia system. Digital Audio. MIDI Audio. Audio Format. Integrations of audio in system. Multimedia Building Block Animation: Animation principle. Types of animations. Integrations of animation in system. Multimedia Building Block Video: Analog Video. Digital Video. Format & compression. Integrations of video in system. Multimedia System: Multimedia in education. System Technology: Storage I/O devices & interface. RAID Technology. Others storage technology - CD, etc. Multimedia System Architecture: Multimedia system components. Multimedia system architecture. Multimedia system Taxonomy. Scheduling. Synchronization. Learning Outcomes : At the end of this course the students will be able to: describe the fundamental knowledge about multimedia systems, applications, components, softwares and hardwares. manipulate the multimedia authoring tools and other media development software packages. mould a suitable team of developers for multimedia systems development. work on and report the processes involved in the implementations, developments and management of a multimedia project. 1. 2. 3. Tay Vaughan, Multimedia Making It Work, 6th Edition, McGrawHill, 2009. Robin Linda, Graphic Design Solution, 4th Edition; Cengage learning, 2011. Ze-Nian Li, Marks S. Drew, Fundamentals of Multimedia, Pearson, 2004.

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT211 Programming Language Concepts & Paradigms 3 Introduction to Programming Language Concepts: Background and History. Reason for studying Programming Languages. Role of Programming Languages. Programming Environments. Programming Language Paradigms. Evolution of Machine Architectures and Programming Languages: The Operation of a Computer. Evolution of Major Programming Languages. Languages Categories. 111

Language Translation Issues: Programming Language Syntax. Stages in Translation. Formal Translation Models (BNF,EBNF, Parse Trees, Syntax Charts). Names, Bindings, Type Checking and Scopes: Names, variables, the concept of binding, type checking, type compatibility and scope. Data Types - Primitive data types, string, user-defined types, array, etc. Perl Script: Introduction. Variable Types. Array and Hash. Perl Operators. Control Structure. Expression & Assignment Statements: Implicit and Explicit Sequence Control. Sequencing With Arithmetic Expressions. Overloaded operator. Type conversion. Relational & Boolean expressions. Assignment statements. Statements-Level Control Structures & Parameter Transmissions: Compound statements, selection statements. Iterative and unconditional branching. Parameter Transmission. Web Programming: HTML 4.X - Basic HTML tags and Linking, Graphics and File Format, Table and Frame, HTML form. XML Introduction to XML, Structuring Data, Documents Types Definition and Schemes, XML vocabularies, Documents Objects Models and Methods. Internet Programming: Java Script - Introduction to Java Script, Control Structures (if, if..else, while, for,switch, break and continue), Java Script Function. Event Driven Programming: Introduction to ASP.net. How ASP.Net work. Control Structures (if, if..else, while, for, switch, break and continue) ASP.Net Function. Session Tracking Introduction to Parallel Computing: Overview. Concepts & Terminology. Parallel Computer Memory Architectures. Introduction to Parallel Computing: Parallel Programming Models. Shared Memory Model & Message Passing Model. Parallel Examples. Learning Outcomes : At the end of this course the students will be able to: explain the various programming concepts and paradigms. exhibit an understanding of scripting languages i.e Perl and Java scripting language, web and internet programming languages and event-driven programming. explain the fundamentals of parallel and distributed programming. differentiate various programming concepts and paradigms in order to select the best programming language in problem-solving process. 1. 2. 3. Robert W. Sebesta, Concepts of Programming Languages, 9th Edition, Addison Wesley, 2009. Terrence W. Pratt & Marvin V. Zelkowitz, Programming Languages: Design & Implementation, 4th Edition Prentice Hall, 2001. Deital, Internet & World Wide Web: How to Program, 4th Edition, 2008. 112

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT212 Design & Analysis of Algorithms 4 Basic Algorithmic Analysis: Mathematical functions. Asymptotic Analysis & Big-O Notation. Analysis performance of simple data structures - Stacks, Queue, Array lists, Sequences with linked list. Sorting Algorithms: Elementary Sorting Algorithm - Insertion, Selection, Bubble. Efficient Sorting Algorithms - Mergesort, Quicksort, Radix. Searching and Sorting Algorithms on Binary Trees: Binary Search Tree. AVL Trees. B, 2-4 Tree. Priority queues. Heaps. Graph Algorithms: Data Structures. Traversals. Directed Graphs. Shortest Paths. Spanning Trees. Hashing & Ordered Maps: Maps tables. Hash Functions. Ordered maps. Memory: Memory management. External memory and caching. External searching and B-trees. External memory sorting. Text Processing: String Operations. Pattern Matching (Brute Force, Boyer-Moore). Text Compression (Huffman Codes, Standard Tries). At the end of this course the students will be able to: compare the various algorithm designs based on category. apply the relevant basic techniques of algorithm and data structures in programming. explain the characteristics and perform elementary analysis of algorithm. choose the most appropriate computer algorithm for practical use. 1. 2. 3. Goodrich, Tamassia. Data Structures & Algorithms in JAVA, 5th Edition, John Wiley, 2011. Drozdek, Data Structures and Algorithms in Java, 3rd Edition, Thomson, 2008. Corrano, Prichard, Data Abstraction & Problem Solving with Java - Walls & Mirrors, 3rd Edition, Addison Wesley, 2010.

Learning Outcomes

References

113

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT243 Software Requirements Analysis & Modelling 3 Introduction: Course overview. Software product & types. Software development process. Software Engineering. The role of software requirement: Software requirement. Content of software specification. Problem observed in practice. Requirement in product lifecycle. Elicitation stage: Risk Analysis. Focus Group. Stakeholder Analysis. Cost/Benefits Analysis. Feasibility study. Other Techniques. Modeling the software: Modeling and concept. Data model. Class based data model. Context diagram. Use Case Diagram. Virtual Windows. Task Description. Data Dictionary & Expression. Scenario. Data Flow Diagram. Class Diagram. Sequence Diagram. Collaboration diagrams. State Transition Diagram. Textual Process Description. Quality of requirement: IEEE 830. Quality factors. The quality grid. At the end of this course the students will be able to: explain and appreciate the concept of software engineering, software process and product, and the engineering requirement in software development. carry out a software elicitation task using various techniques and styles of elicitation. write a software specification report that transforms/model the data collected during elicitation stage into a standard report. validate the changes made in the specification report to fulfill the customers requirements. 1. 2. Axel Van Lamsweerde, Requirement Engineering, Wiley Publication, 2010. Roger S. Pressman, Software Engineering: A Practitioners Approach, 7th Edition, McGraw-Hill International Edition, 2010.

Learning Outcomes

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT244 Artificial Intelligence 3 Artificial Intelligence, its roots and scope: AI, an attempted definition. Historical foundations. Overview of application areas. An introduction to representation and search - The Predicate Calculus: Representation languages. The propositional calculus and its semantics. The predicate calculus: syntax & semantics. Inference: soundness, completeness. The unification algorithm. 114

Structures and strategies for state space search: Quick review of graphs. State space search. Data-driven and goal-driven search. Breadth-first, depth-first, and depth-first iterative deepening search. Heuristic search: Priority queues. A*. Iterative deepening A*. Beam search. Two-person games. Mini-Max and alpha-beta. Architectures for AI problem solving: Recursive specification for queues, stacks, and priority queues. The production system. The blackboard. PROLOG: The PROLOG environment. Relational specifications and rule based constraints. Abstract data types in PROLOG. Graph search with the production system. A PROLOG planner. Introduction to AI representational schemes: Issues in knowledge representation. Semantic networks. Conceptual dependencies. Frames, scripts, and object systems. The hybrid design: objects with rule sets. Rule-based, case-based, and model-based systems: Production system based search. Rule stacks and the why query, proof trees and the how query. Models of inductive reasoning. The Stanford Certainty Factor algebra. Knowledge engineering. Building expert systems in PROLOG: Meta-predicates in PROLOG. The role of a meta-interpreter - PROLOG in PROLOG. Rule-stacks, proof-trees, and certainty factor algebras in PROLOG. Exshell, a backchaining rule interpreter in PROLOG. Reasoning in situations of uncertainty: Examples of Abductive Inference. Non-monotonic logic, belief revision. Certainty factor algebras and fuzzy reasoning. Stochastic models and Bayesian belief networks. Advanced AI Applications: Machine Learning - connectionist. Machine Learning - genetic and emergent. Seminar. Learning Outcomes : At the end of this course the students will be able to: explain the concepts of search strategy and how to apply them, different artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithm. describe the required characteristics of an expert system. apply different techniques to represent and to retrieve data and knowledge. identify artificial intelligence algorithms that are suitable for expert systems applications. 1. 2. 3. G. F. Lugger, Artificial Intelligence: Structure and Strategies for Complex Problem Solving, 6th Edition, Addison-Wesley, 2009. S. Russel, P. Norvig, Artificial Intelligenc: A Modern Approach, 3rd Edition, Prentice-Hall, 2010. Michael Negnevitsky, Artificial Intelligence: A Guide to Intelligent Systems, 2nd Edition, Addison Wesley, 2004. 115

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CST231 Data Communications & Networks 3 Introduction: Network terminology. Basics of network configuration. Network Architectures model (OSI& TCP/IP). Network mathematics. Fundamentals of Data and Signals: Data and Signal. Converting data into signals. Bandwidth. Network Media: Copper Media. Optical Media. Wireless Media. Errors, Error detection and Error Control: Noise and Errors. Error Prevention and Detection. Error control. Ethernet Fundamentals: Basic Local Area Network Topologies. Introduction to Ethernet. Ethernet Operation. Ethernet Technologies. Local Area Network devices: Internetworking: Hub. Bridge. Switch. Router. Ethernet Switching: Layer 2 Bridging & Switching. Switch Operation. Collision Domains and Broadcast Domains. TCP/IP Protocols Suite and IP Addressing: Introduction to TCP/IP. Internet Address. Obtaining an IP Address. Routing Fundamentals and Subnets: Routed Protocol. IP Routing Protocol. Classes of IP addresses. Establishing the subnet Mask Address. Applying the Subnet mask. TCP/IP Transport and Application Layers: TCP/IP Transport Layer. The Application Layers. Network Security: Standard System Attack. Physical Protection. Controlling Access, Secure Data. Security Communication. At the end of this course the students will be able to: explain the various network types and technologies as well as data communication and network devices. manipulate the theoretical and practical skills to reconfigure networks. practise ethical values in network security development based on policy. demonstrate the necessary steps to enhance network security at various layers such as data linkages, networks and application layers. 1. 2. 3. Behrouz A. Forouzan, Data Communications and Networking, 4th Edition, McGraw Hill, 2007. Curt M. White, Data Communications & Computer Networks, 4th Edition, Thomson Learning, 2006. Willam Stalings, Data and Computer Communications, 8th Edition, Prentice-Hall, 2007.

Learning Outcomes

References

116

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CST232 Operating Systems 3 Introduction to Computer System: Basic elements of computer. Processor registers. Instruction execution. Interrupts. Memory and cache memory. I/O communication techniques. Operating System Overviews: Objectives and Functions. Evolution of Operating Systems. Achievements in process, memory managements, information protection, scheduling and resource management. Processes Management: Process definition. Process states. Process description and control. Execution of the Operating system. Security Issues. Process and Threads. Symmetric Multiprocessor. Concurrency: Principle of Concurrency. Mutual exclusion, Semaphores, Monitors. Message passing. Principles of deadlock. Deadlock prevention, avoidance, detection. Memory Management: Reason for Memory Management. Memory management schemes - Partitioning, Paging and Segmentation. Security Issues. Virtual Memory: Virtual memory management schemes - Paging and Segmentation. Protection and sharing. Fetch, Placement and Replacement Policies. Scheduling Uniprocessor. Scheduling Multiprocessor: Multi processor scheduling, Real-Time. Protection & Security: Computer Security Concepts. Treats, Attacks, assets Intruders, Malicious Software, virus, worms and Bots. Security Techniques: Authentication, Access Control. Intrusion Detection and Malware Defense. Dealing with Buffer Overflow Attacks Input/Output and Files: I/O devices. Organization of the I/O function. Operating System design issues. I/O Buffering. Disk Scheduling. RAID. Disk cache. Embbedded Systems: What is Embedded System. Characteristic of Embedded Operating Systems. eCOS 607 and TinyOS 62. File Management: File Organization and Access. File Directories & File Sharing. Record Blocking. File System and security. At the end of this course the students will be able to: explain major components of an operating system such as memory, process, file and device managers, and how each of them operates. show the ability to use operating systems (for example Unixbased) with ease. differentiate the implementation methods of each component.

Learning Outcomes

117

References

1. 2. 3.

William Stallings, Operating Systems-Internals and Design Principles, 6th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2009. Andres S. Tanenbaum, Modern Operating Systems, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2009. Mark Russinovich and David Solomon, Windows Internals, 5th Edition, Microsoft Press, 2009.

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CST233 Information Security & Assurance 3 Introduction to Information Security. The need for security. Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in Information Security. Risk Management. Planning for Security. Firewalls and VPNs. Intrusion Detection, Access Control, and Other Security Tools. Cryptography. Implementing Information Security. Information Security Maintenance. Developing The Security Program. Security Management Models and Practices. Risk Management: Identifying and Assessing Risk. Risk Management: Controlling Risk. Information Security Project Management. At the end of this course the students will be able to: describe the current principles and practices of modern information security. assert the risk effects in information security. cultivate the modern practice of information security in career by reckoning the ethics and professionalism aspects. 1. 2. 3. Michael E. Whitman, Herbert J. Mattord, Principles of Information Security, Thomson Course Technology, 2009. Michael E. Whitman, Herbert J. Mattord, Management of Information Security, Thomson Course Technology, 2009. Volonino L., Robinson S., Principles and Practice of Information Security, Pearson.

Learning Outcomes

References

118

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CST234 Network Programming 3 Introduction to Network/Socket Programming: What is TCP/IP? OSI Network Layer and Internet. Unix Network Programming. Transport Layer: TCP, UDP and SCTP. Basics of Socket (TCP): Socket Network Programming Interfacing. Socket Address Structure. Basic Conversion Function. TCP Socket. Example of TCP Client-Server. Multiplexing and Socket Options. Basic of Socket (UDP and SCTP): UDP Socket. SCTP socket. Example of SCTP Client-Server. Name and Address Conversion. Server Architecture: daemon and inetd Process. Thread Server. Alternative Design. Advanced Socket: IPv6 Socket Programming. Advanced I/O Functions. ioctl Functions. Broadcast and Multicast. Raw Socket. At the end of this course the students will be able to: develop the latest network programmes and services. build network computing applications by using their programming skills. choose the appropriate programming techniques for developing network programmes. improve their ability to write network programmes. 1. 2. 3. W. R. Stevens, B. Fenner, A. Rudoff, Unix Network Programming, Vol. 1: The Sockets Networking API, 3rd Edition, Addison Wesley/Pearson Education International, 2004. W. R. Stevens, Unix Network Programming, Vol. 2: Interprocess Communications, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 1999. D. Comer, D. Stevens, Internetworking with TCP/IP, Vol. III: Client-Server Programming and Application: Linux/POSIX Sockets Version, Prentice Hall, 2000.

Learning Outcomes

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119

Level 300 Course Code : Course Title : Units : Learning Outcomes : CAT300 Group Innovation Project 2 At the end of this course the students will be able to: develop analytical skills and maturity in planning and solving problems in information systems development or in fields related to the area of specialisation as a group. plan and coordinate development activities and produce deliverables (software and reports) on time. share, demonstrate and be involved in group projects. organize work, present and communicate the work done effectively (Please refer to Section 4.6: Group Innovation Project) Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus : CAT301 Research Methods & Special Topic Study 2 Ethics and Types of Publications: Overview of intellectual property, copyrights and ethics. Types of publications. Search engine and indexes. Citations, references, quotations. Research Process: Scientific methods and proving. Writing research proposal. Evaluating research proposal. Project planning. Choosing results and places to publish. Outlining and structuring research papers. Peer review process. Poster and paper presentation at conferences. Publication in academic journals and engineering. Literature Review: Reading and summarising relevant articles. Purpose and structure of literature review. Samples of literature reviews. Empirical Techniques: Revision of discrete probability in computerised application. Basic statistics, distributions, correlation and regression. Statistical analysis for computer science: t-test, ANOVA and chi square. Design of experiments and tests for hypothesis. Statistical applications in computer science and usability. Seminar: Writing full papers. Present full papers and peer review.

120

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course the students will be able to: demonstrate the process of creating engineering and scientific knowledge. report and present the results of a survey on recent research publications in a special topic. review the results of the design and management based on good understanding and ethics in statistics and probablity. critically select potential and recent publications to review to generate new ideas. 1. 2. 3. Zobel, J., Writing for Computer Science, 2nd Edition, Springer, 2004. Sekaran, U., Research Methods for Business: A Skill Building Approach, 4th Edition, Wiley, 2007. Leedy, P. D., Ormord, J. E., Practical Research: Planning and Design, 8th Edition, Pearson-Prentice Hall, 2005.

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Learning Outcomes :

CAT302/CAT303 Industrial Training/Undergraduate Research Training 12 At the end of this course the students will be able to: propose solutions to problems pertaining to operation and administration normally encountered by an organisation. participate in group work involving real working environment in an organisation. develop the values of work ethics in an organisation. develop skills in organizational management as well as business opportunities. (Refer to Section 4.5: Industrial Training/Undergraduate Research Training)

121

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CMT321 Management & Engineering of Databases 3 Introduction to DBMS: Definition of Transaction. Properties of Transactions. Database Architecture. Concurrency Control: Problems of Concurrency Control. Serializability. Recoverability. Locking Methods. Timestamping Methods. Optimistic Techniques. Granularity of Data Items. Database Recovery: Concepts. Transactions and Recovery. Recovery Facilities. Backup Mechanis. Log File. Checkpointing. Recovery Techniques. Shadow Paging. ARIES Recovery Algorithm. Database Security: Threats. Authorization. Discretionary Access. Mandatory Access Control. Multilevel Relations and Polyinstantiation. Views. Backup and Recovery. Encryption. RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks). DBMSs and Web Security. Distributed DBMS: Concepts. Advantages and Disadvantages of DDBMSs. Homogeneous and Heterogeneous DDBMSs. Functions and Architectures of a DDBMS. Data Fragmentation, Replication, and Allocation. Distributed Relational Database Design. Data Allocation. Data Fragmentation.Transparencies in a DDBMS. Dates Twelve Rules for a DDBMS. Object Oriented Database: Introduction to OODBMSs. Issues in OODBMS. Advantages and Disadvantages of OODBMS. ObjectOriented Database Design. Object-Relational Database System. Data Warehousing: Introduction to Data Warehousing. Data Warehouse Architecture. Data Modelling for Data Warehouses. Data Warehousing Tools and Technologies. Data Mart. Designing a Data Warehouse Database. OLAP: Introduction to OLAP. OLAP Applications. Multidimensional Data Model. OLAP Tools. Data Mining: Introduction to Data Mining. Data Mining Techniques. Data Mining Process. Data Mining Tools. Data Mining and Data Warehousing. Emerging Database Technologies and Applications: Mobile Databases. Multimedia Databases. Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Genome Data Management. At the end of this course the students will be able to: to differentiate characteristics, components and types of database. to explain concepts, methods and protocol of transaction, concurrency control, recovery and security for database. to report issues and latest development in database.

Learning Outcomes

122

References

1. 2. 3.

Connolly, T.M. and Begg, C., Database Systems: A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation, and Management, 5th Edition, Pearson Education - Addison Wesley, 2010. Elmasri, R. and Navathe, S. B., Database Systems, 6th Edition, Pearson, 2011. Silberschatz, A., Korth, H. F., Sudarshan, S., Database System Concepts, 6th Edition, Mc Graw Hill, 2011.

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CMT322 Web Engineering & Technologies 3 Introduction: Introduction to Web Engineering. Motivation. Categories and characteristics of Web Applications. Requirements Engineering for Web Applications: Introduction and Fundamentals. Principles for Requirement Engineering of Web Applications. Adapting Requirement Engineering Methods to Web Application Development. Components of Web Engineering. Agility in Web Engineering. Modeling Web Applications: Modeling Specifics in Web Engineering and Requirement. Modeling Framework and languages. Analysis Modeling: Content, Interaction, Functional and Configuration Models. Web Application Design: History of Web Authoring & Web Programming. Presentation, Interaction and Functional Design. Design of Conceptual Architecture. Design of Technical Architecture. Web Application Architectures: Specifics of Web Application Architectures. Components of a Web Application Architecture. Layered Architectures. Technologies for Web Applications: Client/Server Communication on the Web. Client-side Technologies. Document-specific Technologies. Server-side Technologies. Testing Web Applications: "Dimension" of Quality. Testing Strategy And Process. Test Methods and Techniques. Operation and Maintenance of Web Applications: Challenges Following the Launch of a Web Application. Change and Content Management. The Web Application Development Process: Motivation and Fundamentals. Requirements for a Web Application Development Process. Incremental Process Flow. Security for Web Applications: Aspects of Security. Secure Client/Server-Interaction. Client Security Issues. Service Provider Security Issues.

123

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course the students will be able to: exhibit the concept and technologies related to the development of Web-based application which include basic requirements, models, designs and architectures. develop the Web-based application using knowledge in concept and technologies of Web engineering. study the state-of-the-art Web technologies and techniques to manipulate information in Web. mould a team with different expertise which is in demand in the development of Web-based application. 1. 2. 3. Gerti Kappel, Web Engineering: The Discipline of Systematic Development of Web Applications, Wiley, July 2006. Roger S. Pressman, David Lowe, Web Engineering: A Practitioners Approach, McGraw-Hill, 2009. Marc Wandschneider, Web Application Development with PHP and MySQL, Prentice Hall, 2006.

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CMT324 Computer Graphics & Visual Computing 3 Graphics Systems and Models: Graphics Applications and Systems; Image Formation; Models and Architectures. Graphics Programming: Intro to OpenGL with Simple Examples; Primitives and Attributes; Viewing and Control Functions; 3D Applications. Input and Interaction: Interaction and Input Devices; Programming Event-Driven Input; Interactive Program Design and Display Lists. Geometric Objects and Transformations: Geometry; Representation and Coordinate Systems; Object Modeling and Representation; Transformations; OpenGL Transformations. Viewing: Classical Viewing; Computer Viewing; Projection Matrices. Shading: Illumination Models; Shading in OpenGL. Discrete Techniques: Buffers; Texture Mapping; Texture Mapping OpenGL; Compositing and Blending. Implementation: Basic Implementation Strategies; Line Clipping and Clipping in 3D; Polygon Clipping and Clipping of Other Primitives; Hidden Surface Removals; Scan Converting Lines; Scan Converting Polygons; Antialiasing. Modeling and Advanced Techniques: Hierarchical Models; TreeStructured Models; Curves and Surfaces; Bezier and Spline Curves and Surfaces; Plotting of Implicit Functions; Programmable Pipelining.

124

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course the students will be able to: elaborate the development and application of computer graphics and visual computing. state the basic principles of design, usage, and fundamental concepts of graphics systems which include the interaction techniques. write graphics program. design and implement graphics packages and algorithmic techniques particularly the application packages. 1. 2. 3. Angel & Shreiner, Interactive Computer Graphics: A Top-Down Approach Using Shader-Based OpenGL, 6th Edition, AddisonWesley, 2012. Hearn, Baker, Carithers, Computer Graphics with OpenGL, 4th Edition, Prentice-Hall, 2011. Angel, OpenGL - A Primer, Addison Wesley, 3rd Edition, 2008.

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT341 Software Design & Architecture 3 Software Architecture: What is software architecture? Views of architectures. Architecture methodology. Overview of architectural styles. Software Structure and Architecture: Architectural structures and viewpoints. Architectural styles. Design patterns. Families of programs and frameworks. Software Design Issues: Software design fundamentals. Other issues in software design. Data persistence. Software Design Quality Analysis and Evaluation: Quality attributes. Quality analysis and evaluation techniques. Software Design Measures. Complexity metrics. Software Design Notations: Structural descriptions (static views). Behavioral descriptions (dynamic views). State transition and statechart diagrams. Software Design Strategies and Methods: General Strategies. Design Methods.

125

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course the students will be able to: identify issues in software design and explain the concepts of software architecture, its structure, viewpoints and styles. choose suitable patterns, design components and middleware technology to construct various types of software based on the most suitable design strategies and methods. demonstrate design components and select quality metrics to measure and evaluate the proposed design focusing on usability. 1. 2. 3. Sulaiman, S., Software Architecture and Design, Open University Malaysia, Second Printing, April 2010. Taylor, R. N., Medvidovic, N., Dashofy, E., Software Architecture: Foundations, Theory, and Practice, Wiley, 2009. Shaw, M., Garlan, D., Software Architecture: Perspectives on an Emerging Discipline, PHI Learning, 2009.

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT342 Knowledge Management & Engineering 3 Understanding Knowledge & Knowledge Engineering: What is knowledge? Types of knowledge. Knowledge engineering definition. Knowledge engineering vs. Knowledgemanagement. Knowledge Modelling: Model components. Template models. Model construction. Knowledge Acquisition & Validation: Interview. Repertory grids. Twenty questions, etc. Knowledge Representation & Knowledge Bases: Frames. Scripts. Scenarios. Knowledge warehouse. Inferencing and Reasoning: Expert systems. Rule-based systems. Case-based reasoning. Fuzzy logic and qualitative reasoning. Machine Learning: Neural networks. Data Mining. Knowledge Management: Knowledge management definitions. Knowledge management framework and processes. Converting and connecting. Tacit and explicit knowledge. Organisational Knowledge Creation: Knowledge conversion. Enabling conditions for organisational knowledge creation. 5-phase model of organisational knowledge creation process Knowledge Collection: Tacit knowledge in detail. Mental model. Tacit knowledge explication. Scenario-based approach. Knowledge Organisation and Sharing: Ontologies. Knowledge sharing. Knowledge management and the internet. Organisational memory. Organisational memory tools. Measuring Knowledge Knowledge Management Tools 126

Other Areas of Interest in Knowledge Management: Knowledge Ecology. Knowledge Evolution. Knowledge Economy & Intellectual Capital. Enterprise Modelling. Organisational Learning. Knowledge Management Issues: Problems. Promises. Challenges. Trends. Ethical and legal issues. Learning Outcomes : At the end of this course the students will be able to: to describe and infer using basic concepts of knowledge management and engineering. to follow the activities of knowledge modeling, acquisition, representation, and reasoning. to propose new ideas with the concepts of knowledge creation, collection, organization, sharing, and application. 1. 2. 3. Becerra-Fernandez, I. and Sabherwal, R., Knowledge Management: Systems and Processes, M. E. Sharpe, 2010. Turban, E., Aronson, J.E., Liang, T.-P., and Sharda, R., Decision Support and Business Intelligence Systems, 8th Edition, PrenticeHall, 2007. Awad, E. M. and Ghaziri, H. M., Knowledge Management, Prentice Hall, 2004.

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT343 Software Project Management, Process & Evolution 3 Introduction to project management: What is a project? What is project management. The role of the project manager. The project management profession. The project management and information context: A system view of project management. Understanding organization. Stakeholder management. Project phases and the project life cycle. The context of information technology projects. The project management process group - A case study: Project management process groups. Mapping the process groups to the knowledge areas. Developing an information technology project management methodology. Case study. Project integration management: Strategic planning and project selection. Project management plan. Project execution. Monitoring and controlling project work. Integrated change control. Closing projects. Project scope management: Scope planning and the scope management plan. Scope definition and the project scope statement. Creating the work breakdown structure. Scope verification. Scope control.

127

Project time management: Activity definition and sequencing. Activity resource and duration estimating. Schedule development. Schedule control. Project cost management: Cost estimating. Cost budgeting. Cost control Project quality management: Quality planning. Quality assurance. Quality control. Tools and techniques for quality control. Modern quality management. Improving information technology project quality. Project human resource management: Keys to managing people. Human resource planning. Acquiring the project team. Developing the project team. Managing the project team. Project communications management: Communication planning. Information distribution. Distributing information in an effective and timely manner. Selecting the appropriate communications medium. Understanding group and individual communication needs. Project risk management: Risk management planning. Common sources of risk on information technology project. Risk identification. Qualitative risk analysis. Quantitative risk analysis. Risk response planning. Risk monitoring and control. Project procurement management: Planning purchases and acquisitions. Planning contracting. Requesting seller response. Selecting sellers. Administering the contract. Closing the contract. Software evolution: Program evolution dynamics. Software maintenance. Evolution processes. Legacy system evolution. Learning Outcomes : At the end of this course the students will be able to: apply all the nine knowledge areas in project management which are scope, time, cost, quality, human resource, communication, risk, procurement and integration in a real project. organize a project into five phases: initiating, planning, executing, monitor and control, closing. work on real projects in groups using Microsoft Project 2007 software and other tools. 1. 2. 3. Kathy Schwalbe, Managing Information Technology Projects, 6th Edition, Thomson Course Technology, 2010. Ian Sommerville, Software Engineering, 8th Edition, AddisonWesley, 2007. Jack T. Marchewka, Information Technology Project Management, 3rd Edition, John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2010.

References

128

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT344 Computer Vision & Image Processing 3 Introduction to Computer Vision: Human vision and computer vision. Basic components of a computer vision system. Applications. Digital Image Fundamentals: Fundamentals of digital image. Spatial and Intensity Resolution. Image Representation. Image Distances. Image Preprocessing: Introduction to image preprocessing. Pixel brightness transformation. Pixel Group Processing. Lowpass filtering. Highpass filtering Edge detection. Edge detection concepts. Laplacian edge detector. Line masks. Sobel operator. Image Segmentation: Introduction to segmentation. Thresholding. Edge based segmentation. Region based segmentation. Morphology: Introduction. Dilation. Erosion. Opening. Closing. Color and Texture: Color fundamentals. Color models. Color features. Texture fundamentals. Texture features. Statistical Methods: Bayesian. MLE. MAP. Shape Features: Introduction to shape based features. Boundary based shape features. Region based shape features. Decision Making: Introduction to decision making. Rule based systems. Supervised classification. Unsupervised classification. At the end of this course the students will be able to: explain methods for decomposing an image into basic elements: edges, regions, various higher order image features. state the issues and techniques for extracting information from digital imagery. work on image analysis, combining image features and decision making techniques. 1. 2. Milan Sonka, Vaclac Hlavac & Roger Boyle. Image Processing, Analysis & Machine Vision, 3rd Edition, Thomson Publishing, 2007. Gonzalez and Woods. Digital Image Processing, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2008.

Learning Outcomes

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129

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT346 Natural Language Processing 3 Introduction: Related areas. Applications. Natural language. Component of linguistics. NLP approaches Speech processing: Speech sounds. Properties of sounds. Speech transcription. Visualisation of speech signal. Speech recognition. Speech synthesis. Pronunciation lexicons. Text normalisation. Computational morphology: Morphology. Computational morphology. POS Tagging: Tagsets. Rule based tagging. Stochastic tagging. Transformation based tagging. Evaluation of taggers. Computational syntax: Syntax. Syntactic categories. Constituency grammars. Dependency grammars. Context-free grammars. Parsing techniques. Machine translation (MT): Rule based MT. Example based MT. Statistical MT. Computational semantics: Semantics. Lexical semantics. Phrase and sentence meaning. Computational semantics. Word Sense Disambiguation (WSD): Knowledge based WSD. Corpus based WSD. Hybrid WSD. Corpus processing: Types of corpora. Text segmentation, Tokenisation. Wordlist & Frequency. Concordance. Collocation. Text encoding. At the end of this course the students will be able to: define and contrast computational morphology, grammars, passing algorithms, syntax and semantics. defend the need for an established corpus. distinguish between techniques for machine translation and speech processing. propose suitable machine translation and speech processing techniques for a specific usage. 1. 2. 3. Jurafsky D., Martin J. H., Speech and Language Processing: An Introduction to Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics, and Speech Recognition, Prentice Hall. 2009. Indurkhya, Nitin and Damerau, J. Fred., Handbook of Natural Language Processing, 2nd Edition, CRC Press. 2010. Bird, S., Klein, E. and Loper, E., Natural Language Processing with Python, OReilly Media, 2009.

Learning Outcomes

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130

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CST331 Principles of Parallel & Distributed Programming 3 Introduction to Parallel and Distributed Computing: Parallel and Distributed Computing. Motivation for Parallel and Distributed Computing. Key Characteristics. Models and Paradigms. Architectures: SIMD Computers. Symmetric Multiprocessors. Disributed Memory Parallel Computers. Clusters. Loosely Coupled Distributed Systems and Grids. Data Parallelism: SIMD Parallelism. Data Parallelism on Arrays. Nested Data Parallelism. Collective Operations and Libraries. Shared-Memory Programming: Thread Models. Structured SharedMemory Programming. Distributed Shared Memory. One-Sided Communication Models. Message Passing: Interprocess Communication. Task Management. Interoperability. Very Low-level Models. Designing Parallel Algorithms: Methodical Design. Partitioning. Communication. Agglomeration. Mapping. Case Study - Atmosphere Model. A Quantitative Basis for Design: Approaches to Performance Modeling. Developing Models. Scalability Analysis. Experimental Studies. Evaluating Implementations. A Refined Communication Cost Model. Client/Server Computing: The Client/Server Paradigm. Sockets. Remote Procedure Calls. Code Mobility: Enhanced Client/Server Computing. Mobile Agents. Parallel Mobile Code. Transparent Migration. Object-Oriented Models: Distributed Objects. Active Objects. At the end of this course the students will be able to: explain the parallel algorithm design, modelling and implementation. develop a program in parallel and distributed computing. select suitable technique for solving major computing problems. 1. 2. 3. Calvin Lin and Lawrence Snyder, Principle of Parallel Programming, Pearson International Edition, 2009. Gregory R. Andrew, Foundations of Multithreaded, Parallel, and Distributed Programming, Addison Wesley, 2000. Distributed Systems-An Algoritmic Approach, Chapman & Hall/ CRC, 2007.

Learning Outcomes

References

131

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CST332 Internet Protocols, Architecture & Routing 3 Introduction to Routing and Packet Forwarding: Describe the purpose, nature and operations of a router. Introduction to Routing and Packet Forwarding: Explain the critical role that routers play in enabling communication across multiple networks. Introduction to Routing and Packet Forwarding: Describe the purpose of nature of routing tables. Explain how a router determines a path and switches packets. Static Routing: Configure and verify router interfaces. Static Routing: Describe the purpose and procedure for configuring static routes. Dynamic Routing Protocols: Describe the role of dynamic routing protocols and place these protocols in the context of modern network design, Distance Vector Routing Protocols: Describe how metrics are used by routing protocols and Identify the metric types used by dynamic routing protocols. Identify the characteristics of distance vector routing protocols RIP Version 1: Describe the functions, characteristics, and operation of RIPv1. Classless Routing: VLSM and CIDR: Compare and contrast classful and classless IP addressing. Describe classful and classless routing behavior in routed networks. Classless Routing: VLSM and CIDR: Design and implement a classless IP addressing scheme for a given network. Classless Routing Using RIPv2: Demonstrate comprehensive RIPv1 configuration skills. Apply basic RIPv2 configuration commands and evaluate classless routing updates. Routing Table: A closer look at routing table. Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP): Describe the main features and operation of the Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP). Use advanced configuration commands with routers implementing EIGRP. Link-State Routing Protocols: Describe the basis features and concepts of link-state routing protocols. OSPF: Describe the purpose, nature, and operation of OSPF.

132

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course the students will be able to: identify the principles of architecture and design as well as the usage of Internet protocols. employ hands-on approach by considering their technical knowledge as well as practical understanding of router configuration, routing and network security issues. apply their knowledge and experience in the principles of architecture and design as well as the usage of Internet protocols. employ their understanding of router configuration, routing and network security issues in computer networking management. 1. 2. 3. Jeffrey. S. Beasley, Networking, Prentice Hall. 2008. W. Stallings, Computer Networking with Internet Protocols and Technology, Prentice Hall, 2004. D. Comer, Internetworking with TCP/IP, Volume I: Principles, Protocols and Architectures, 5th Edtion, Prentice Hall, 2006.

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CST333 Distributed & Grid Computing 3 Introduction - Distributed Systems Concepts: Goals. Transparency. Services. Models of distributed systems. Design Issues. Communication in Distributed Systems: Message passing and client/server communication. TCP/IP sockets. Remote Procedure Call. Group Communication. MPI. Distributed Object (RMI, Corba. Stream). Interprocess Communication: Multithreads. Client-server. Mobile Agent. Coordination and Agreement: Distributed Mutual Exclusion. Election algorithms. Consensus and related problems. Name Services: Domain Name Services (DNS). Directory and Discovery Services. Case Study - X.500. Distributed Shared Memory: Consistency models. Grid Computing: Evolution, applications and issues. Cluster Computing: Rock cluster, Centos. Introduction to Globus ToolKit. Introduction to Grid Portal Technology: Gridsphere portal framework.

133

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course the students will be able to: describe the fundamental concepts of distributed systems, distributed algorithms, middleware, infrastructure and shared data. apply advanced distributed system design. develop a prototype of distributed systems. carry out work that uses basic grid computing facilities. 1. 2. 3. Tanenbaum, Andrew S., and Steen, van M., Distributed Systems, Principles and Paradigms, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2007. Coulouris, Dollimore and Kindberg, Distributed Systems Concepts and Design, 4th Edition, Addison Wesley, 2005. Foster, I., and Kesselman, C., The Grid: Blueprint for a New Computing Infrastructure, Morgan Kaufmann, 1999.

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CST334 Network Monitoring & Security 3 Packet Capture: The microscope on network wire. How does it work? How to capture at wire speed Packet Analysis: How to analyse packets using Inet-Portable. Moving up using Inet portable to higher levels and understanding the flow of packets Monitoring an Enterprise Network. Understanding the concept of InetEnterprise and how to use it Security Policies are Introduced. What is a security Policy? How do you create one? What are the standards governing such policies? Network Security Devices: Firewall, IDS/IPS, Nets and Proxies. Network Security Devices: ADSL and Enterprise Routers, Internet Security. Redirection, Interception and Spoofing, Email security Security Audits I Web Security Malware (Computer viruses, Spyware, and key-loggers) Nav6 Security Audit Botnet Discussion on Security Audits and Assignments Presentation and Discussion Assignment 2 Wireless LAN Security GSM and UMTS Security

134

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course the students will be able to: explain basic concepts and important aspects of network security. follow standard network monitoring and management. distinguish between viruses, network worms and other network attacks and vulnerabilities. develop network security devices configuration such as: Firewall, NAT, Proxy, anti-virus software, and network monitoring devices and software. 1. 2. 3. W. Stallings, Network Security Essentials, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2007. M. E. Withman, H. J. Mattord, Readings and Cases in the Management of Information Security, Thomson Course Technology, 2006. J. R. Burke, Network Management, Concepts and Practice: A Hands-on Approach, 1st Edition, Prentice Hall, 2004.

References

135

Level 400 Course Code : Course Title : Units : Learning Outcomes : CAT400/CAT401 Undergraduate Major Project/Undergraduate Research Project 8 At the end of this course the students will be able to: develop their competence in systems design, analysis of algorithms and theories application. choose programming/research methods for solving problems in group. develop their own abilities such as writing reports, searching for literature, giving seminars, presentations, planning projects and managing time. propose projects which can provide business opportunities. (Refer to Section 4.7: Undergraduate Major Project/Undergraduate Research Project) Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus : CAT402 Professional & Technopreneurship Development 2 Understanding E-Business. Defining Your e-Business Idea. Creating an E-Business Plan. Getting Your E-Business Off the Ground. Operating Your E-Business. Marketing Your E-Business. Taking Advantage of Affiliate Marketing. Securing Your E-Business. ICT related Issues. Computer & Professional Ethics. Privacy. Intellectual Property (IP). Cybercrime and Cyberlaw. At the end of this course the students will be able to: identify the scope of professionalism in computer scientists/ software engineers and how it compares to other professionals. construct a sustainable and profitable IT-based business plan. develop their own skills, interest and motivation in the context of career decision making.

Learning Outcomes

136

References

1. 2. 3.

Napier, A. A., Rivers, O., Wagner, S., & Napier, J. B., Creating a Winning E-Business, 2nd Edition, Thomson Course Technology, 2006. Quinn, M. J., Ethics for the Information Age, 4th Edition, Pearson-Addison Wesley, 2011. Bessant, J., & Tidd, J., Innovation and Entrepreneurship, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2009.

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CMT421 E-Business Strategy, Architecture & Design 3 Foundations of e-Business: The 2nd Wave of Global e-Business: Business Model, Revenue Model and Business Process - Advantages & Disadvantages of e-Business, Identifying e-Business Opportunities, International Nature of e-Business. E-Business Strategies: E-Business Revenue Models Revenue Strategy Issues. Marketing Strategy: Selling to Consumers Online - Web marketing Strategies, Market Segmentation, Adverting on the Web and e-Mail Marketing, Technology-Enabled CRM, Creating Brands on the Web, Search Engine Positioning and Domain Names. Marketing Strategies: Selling to Businesses Online - Purchasing, Logistics, & Support Activities, Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), Supply Change Management (SCM), Electronic Marketplaces and Portals. Virtual Communities - Social Networks, Mobile Commerce, Online Auctions. E- Business Technologies & Architecture: E-Business Technology Basic - The Internet and the WWW, Packet Switched Networks, Internet Protocol, Markup Languages, Internet & Intranet. Web Server & E-mail Technologies - Software for Web Servers, E-Mail, Web Site Utility Program, Web Server Hardware. Web Hosting & E-Business Software - Basic and Advanced Functions of E-Business Software, EBusiness Software for Small, midsize and Large Business. Online Security - Security for Client and Servers Computers, Communication Channel Security. Online Payment System - Payment Methods, Internet Technologies and the banking Industry. E-Business Law - The Legal Environment of E-Business, Online Crime and Ethical Issue, In Class Workshop Presentation (1-3). Web Design and Tool: Designing Web Site - Web Site Planning Process, Web Site Organization, Useful and Attractive Web Pages. Creating an Effective Web Presence - Web Site Usability. In Class Workshop Presentation (4-5). E-Business Integration: Implementing E-Business Initiativess Identifying Benefits and Estimating Costs, Strategies for Developing eBusiness Web Site, Managing e-Business Implementation. E-Business Group Project: Presentation and System Prototype

137

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course the students will be able to: revise various strategies for Internet-based technology and other emerging technology to maximize values and outcomes to connect retailers and purchasers through intelligent software agents. attained knowledge of the rapid changes taking place in e-business as well as any contemporary issues. identify the technical architecture and the detailed technology solutions that are required to implement reliable and efficient e-Business solutions. propose e-business systems design for small enterprise and smallto-medium sized enterprise. 1. 2. 3. Gary P. Schneider, E-Business, 9th Edition, Course Technology, 2011. Kenneth C. Laudon and Carol Guercio Traver, E-Commerce 2010: Business, Technology, Society, 6th Edition, Pearson, 2010. Ward A. Hanson and Kirthi Kalyanm, Internet Marketing and ECommerce, Thomson South-Western, 2007.

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CMT422 Multimedia Information Systems & Management 3 Multimedia/Hypermedia Development: Hypermedia Definition & Application. Hypermedia Application Characteristics. Hypermedia Engineering. Web based Hypermedia Architectures & Technologies. Understanding the project, product and process model. An Overview of UWE. Use Case Model. Conceptual Model I. Conceptual Model II. Navigation Structure Model. Navigation space model. Storyboarding model. Case study. Multimedia information retrieval: Multimedia Information Retrieval (MIR). Indexing & Retrieval Multimedia data. Recall and Precision. Single value summaries. Reference collection. Image Fundamental. Color based retrieval. Color Histogram. Texture based Retrieval. Co-occurrence matrix. Wavelet transform. Edge based retrieval. Mask convolution. Web search engine, browsing, query issues, research issues. Digital library: Definition and architecture OPAC, prototypes, project and interfaces. Standard and protocol.

138

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course the students will be able to: identify the product and process model for multimedia information system development. design web based multimedia information system using UML methodology. demonstrate multimedia information retrieval system. discuss the performance of multimedia retrieval system. 1. 2. 3. Nora Koch, Alexander Knapp, Gefei Zhang and Hubert Baumeister, UML-Based Web Engineering: An Approach Based on Standards, Springer, 2008. Michael S. Lew. Principles of Visual Information Retrieval, Springer-Verlag, London, 2010. Gerti Kapel, Birgit Proll, Web Engineering: The Discipline of Systematic Development of Web Applications, John Wiley & Son, 2008.

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CMT423 Decision Support Systems & Business Intelligence 3 Decision Support Systems and Business Intelligence. Decision Making, Systems, Modeling, and Support. Decision Support Systems Concepts, Methodologies, and Technologies: An Overview. Modeling and Analysis. Data Mining for Business Intelligence. Artificial Neural Networks for Data Mining. Text and Web Mining. Data Warehousing. Business Performance Management. Collaborative Computer-Supported Technologies and Group Support Systems. Knowledge Management. Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems. Advanced Intelligent Systems Management Support Systems: Emerging Trends and Impacts. At the end of this course the students will be able to: explain DSS concept and data mining. apply DSS concept and data mining in system development. suggest how computers can assist in decision making and exploring business intelligence.

Learning Outcomes

139

References

1. 2. 3.

Turban, E., Aronson, J. E., Liang, T. P., and Sharda, R., Decision Support and Business Intelligence Systems, 9th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2011. Turban Efraim, Sharda Ramesh, Aronson Jay E., King David, Business Intelligence, A Managerial Approach, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2011. Olson, D. L., Introduction to Business Data Mining, McGraw Hill, 2006.

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CMT424 Animation & Virtual Reality 3 Animation techniques and technologies: Key-frame animation, camera animation, scripting system, animation of articulated structures inverse kinematics. Motion capture. Procedural animation. Deformation. VR techniques: Stereoscopic display, haptic devices, viewer tracking, collision detection, visibility computation, time-critical rendering. VR systems: Image-base VR system, distributed VR, collaboration over computer network, Interactive modelling, User interface issues, Applications in medicine, simulation, and training. At the end of this course the students will be able to: compare several technologies for motion capture. manipulate several animation techniques to generate simple animation. describe the various technologies, algorithm and techniques in virtual reality systems. 1. 2. 3. R. M. Backer, Picture Driven Animation, Montvale Inc., 1998. J. Vince, Virtual Reality Systems, ACM Press, 1995. H. Kalawsky, The Science of Virtual Reality and Virtual Environments, Addison-Wesley, 1993.

Learning Outcomes

References

140

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT441 Software Quality Assurance & Testing 3 Introduction: Basic concepts and preliminaries. Theory of program testing. Unit Testing Techniques: Unit Testing. Control Flow Testing. Data Flow Testing. Domain Testing. Integration Testing: System Integration Testing. System Level Testing: System Test Categories. Functional Testing. Test Generation from FSM Models. System Test Design. System Test Planning and Automation. System Test Execution. Acceptance Testing. Software Reliability And Its Application To Software Testing: Software Reliability. Test Group Structure And Organization: Test Team Organization. Software Quality And Maturity Models: Software Quality. Maturity Models. At the end of this course the students will be able to: test software systems thoroughly in order to ensure that the software produced is of high quality. use testing and evaluation techniques that are suitable with systems requirements. implement problem analysis and reporting. practise quality assurance in software development and maintenance so that it meets the required standard. 1. 2. 3. Naik, K and Tripathy, P., Software Testing and Quality Assurance, John Wiley & Sons Publication, 2008. Ammann, P and Offutt, J., Introduction to Software Testing, Cambridge University Press, 2008. Fournier, G., Essential Software Testing A Use Case Approach, Aurbech Publication, 2009.

Learning Outcomes

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT443 Automata Theory & Formal Languages 3 Introduction to automata theory. Deterministic and non-deterministic finite state machine. Finite state transducer & stochastic finite state automata. Regular expressions. Regular and non-regular languages. Context free grammars and regular grammars. 141

Context free parsing. Pushdown automata. Context free and non-context free languages. Turing machine. Decidable and semi-decidable languages. Learning Outcomes : At the end of this course the students will be able to: to describe the concept of regular language, context-free language, and decidable language. to explore the tools for constructing finite state machine, regular expression and context free grammars. to design a finite state machine, pushdown automata or Turing machine for a given problem. 1. 2. 3. Elaine Rich, Automata, Computability and Complexity: Theory and Applications, Person Prentice Hall, 2009. Michael Sipser, Introduction to the Theory of Computation, 2nd Edition, Thomson, 2006. Peter Linz, An Introduction to Formal Languages and Automata, 3rd Edition, Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2001.

References

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CPT444 Intelligent Health Informatics 3 Data and health: Database management, coding and classification, structuring computer patient record, biosignal analysis, medical imaging and image analysis. Information systems and health: Primary care information systems, clinical information systems, nursing information systems, hospital information systems, health information resources. Issues and case studies: Human-computer interaction and health care, security in medical information systems, health information standards and telematics in Europe, international development in health informatics. At the end of this course the students will be able to: explain the basic concepts and scope of health informatics. develop and suggest how computers especially information systems and intelligent systems can play an important role in healthcare. propose systems based on health informatics for healthcare management.

Learning Outcomes

142

References

1. 2.

J. V. Bemmel, M. A. Musen (eds.), Handbook of Medical Informatics, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 2002. E. H. Shortliffe, L. E. Perreault (eds.), Medical Informatics: Computer Applications in Health Care and Biomedicine, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 2003.

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CST431 Systems Security & Protection 3 Introduction to Computer Security. Database Security. Malicious Software. Buffer Overflow. Software Security. Cryptography. Symmetric Encryption and Message Confidentiality. Public-Key Cryptography and Message Authentication. Internet Security Protocol and Standards. Internet Authentication Applications. Intrusion Detection. Firewalls and Intrusion Prevention Systems. At the end of this course the students will be able to: identify different security threats that are common today. compare and contrast current methods in implementing computer security. know the effectiveness of different standard encryption algorithms. know the methods used to write safe program code 1. 2. William Stallings & Lawrie Brown, Computer Security Principles and Practice, Pearson Education, 2008. Charles P. Pfleeger & Shari Lawrence Pfleeger, Security in Computing, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2007.

Learning Outcomes

References

143

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CST432 Microprocessors & Embedded Systems 4 Microprocessors, microcontrollers, microprocessor architecture. Registers, memory and addressing modes, instruction sets and assembly language programming, basic processor instructions. Macros, stacks and parameter passing, pointers, string manipulation, subroutines and modules. Microprocessor peripherals, I/O, interrupts and interfacing. Peripherals interfacing examples. At the end of this course the students will be able to: describe the features of microprocessors and microcontrollers, use of embedded systems. follow assembly language programming techniques. develop programmes in assembly language for peripheral control. 1. 2. 3. T. C. Wan, Fully ARMed NXT: ARM Assembly Language Programming Using the LEGO MINDSTORMS NXT (to be published). W. Hohl, ARM Assembly Language: Fundamentals and Techniques, CRC Press, 2009. S. Furber, ARM System-On-Chip Architecture, 2nd Edition, Addison-Wesley, 2000.

Learning Outcomes

References

144

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CST433 Advanced Computer Architecture 3 Computer systems: Bus system - computer components, computer functions, interconnecting structure and bus interconnection. Internal memory: Computer memory system overview. Semiconductor main memory. Cache memory. Power PC and Pentium II cache organisation. Advanced DRAM organisation. External memory: Magnetic disk. RAID. Optical memory. Magnetic tape. Input/Output: External devices. I/O modules. Programmed I/O. Interrupt-driven I/O. Direct Memory Access (DMA). I/O channels and processors. The internal interface - SCSI and FIREWIRE. Instruction sets: Addressing modes and instruction format - Pentium and Power PC. CPU structure and function: Register organisation. Cycle instruction. Pipelining instruction. Example - Pentium Processor and Power PC. RISC. Instruction level parallelism and superscalar processors: Design issues. Example - Pentium II, Power PC, MIPS R1000, Ultra SPARC-II, 1A64/Merced. Control Unit Operation: Hardwired implementation. Micro programmed control: Basic concepts. Micro instruction sequencing and execution. At the end of this course the students will be able to: identify the types of memory technology and buses in computer systems and describe their main characteristics. show how interrupts are used to implement I/O control and data transfers. describe superscales architectures and their advantages and characteristics. 1. 2. 3. W. Stallings, Computer Organization and Architecture, 7th Edition, Prentice-Hall, 2006. B. Wilkinson, Computer Architecture: Design and Performance, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall 1997. J. P. Hayes, Computer Architecture and Organization, 3rd Edition, McGraw-Hill, 1998.

Learning Outcomes

References

145

Course Code : Course Title : Units : Syllabus :

CST434 Wireless Network & Mobile Computing 3 Overview: Mobile Computing Industry. Mobile Terminals & Applications: Triple Play Services, Web 2.0 Applications. Devices and Mobile Terminals, Internet of Things, Wearable Computers. Software & Mobile Applications. Wireless Transmission Basics: Radio Frequency Spectrum. Propagation Characteristics. Interference. Modulation Schemes. Media Access. Mobile & Wireless Radio Technologies: Air Interface Technologies Infrastructure-based: 3G HSPA/HSPA+, 802.16 WiMAX, 4G LTE/LTE Advanced, TETRA, APCO25; Infrastructure-less: 802.11(x) Wifi, RFID, Sensor Nets (ZigBEE etc), Near Field Communications (NFC). Mobility, Handover & Routing: Mobility Protocols - Macro-mobility, Micro-mobility. Handover - Vertical & Horizontal, Media Independent Handover (MIH). Routing Protocols. Emerging Trends: Context-aware Computing. Cognitive Radios & Cognitive Radio. Networking. Location Based Services. SelfConfigured Networks Project: Project Overview - Explanation. Presentation. At the end of this course the students will be able to: explain the basics of wireless and mobile communications. follow the emerging trends of the industry in order to get in-depth view of three core elements of Devices, Network and Applications (DNA). report on current or advancement in the field by project presentation and technical report 1. Martin Sauter, Beyond 3G Bringing Networks, Terminals and The Web Together: LTE, WiMAX, IMS, 4G Devices and The Mobile Web 2.0, Wiley (USM: TK5103.4885.S261 2009, Eng), 2009. Abbas Jamalipour, The Wireless Mobile Internet: Architectures, Protocols & Services, Wiley (USM: TK5 103.4885.J27 2003, Eng), 2003. Holger Karl, Andreas Wilig, Protocols and Architectures for WSN, Wiley InterScience (USM: TK7872.D48.K18 2005, Eng), 2007.

Learning Outcomes

References

2. 3.

146

APPENDIX A LIST OF RECOMMENDED OPTION/INTER-DISCIPLINARY ELECTIVE COURSES Option courses are courses that can be chosen to replace courses that are specified under University courses such as co-curriculum or if exemption is given. Inter-Disciplinary Electives (8 units) must be taken by students in the Computer Science with Electives programme. The school recommends the following package of courses. Students are encouraged to explore a particular package rather than taking a few low level courses from a number of different packages.
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES Thinking Techniques HTV201/2 (Offered only in Semester I) Critical Thinking HPW101/2 Islamic Studies HIS213/4 HIS224/4 HIS315/4 SCHOOL OF PHYSICS Electronics ZCA102/4 ZCT106/4 (Prerequisite ZCA102/4) Energy & Environment ZCU100/2 SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES Economics SKW104/4 SEW211/4 Psychology STU231/4 STU242/4

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES MAA101/4 MAA111/4 MAA161/4

SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION YKT101/3 YKT102/3 YKT103/3

SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT AKW103/4 AKW104/4 AKP201/4 Sculpture VHA112/4 VHA221/4 VHA332/4

SCHOOL OF THE ARTS Graphics Design VHG112/4 VHG221/4 Photography VHF111/4 VHF221/4 VHF331/4

SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES, LITERACIES AND TRANSLATION English Language See 3.6 (C) (iv) Foreign Languages See 3.6 (C) (v)

This list of option courses is subject to changes made by the respective schools.

147

APPENDIX B
COURSE REGISTRATION GUIDELINE
TYPE OF COURSE (CODE) Core (T) (90 Units) YEAR I SEMESTER I CPT111/3 - Principles of Programming CPT114/4 - Logic & Applications CST131/4 - Computer Organisation SEMESTER II CPT112/4 - Discrete Structures CPT113/3 Programming Methodology & Data Structures CPT115/4 Mathematical Methods for Computer Science SEMESTER I CAT200/3 - Integrated Software Development Workshop CMT221/4 - Database Organisations & Design CST231/3 - Data Communications & Networks CST232/3 - Operating Systems Minor (M) or Elective (E) (20 Units) 4 Units (AKW104) 4 Units (Inter-Disciplinary) LMT100/2 - MUET Band 3/2/1 only LKM400/2 SHE101/2 LKM100/2 SEA205E/4 ENGLISH I (LSP300/2) ENGLISH I (LSP300/2) ENGLISH II (LSP404/2) ENGLISH II (LSP404/2) WUS101/2 4 Units (AKW103) 4 Units (Inter-Disciplinary) 3 Units* (Other Specialisation No. 1) YEAR II SEMESTER II CMT222/4 - Systems Analysis & Design CPT211/3 Programming Language Concepts & Paradigms CPT212/4 - Design & Analysis of Algorithms Specialisation No. 1/ 3 Units

Prerequisite (Z) University (U) Compulsory (12 Units) - Local - International

Additional BM/ English/Option/2

Choose (A), (B) or (C) (A) Third Language Package: (6 Units) (B) Co-Curriculum Package: (3 - 6 Units) (C) Co-Curriculum/ Skill/Option: (3 Units) #Unit (#Courses) 15 - 20 (5 - 7) 17 - 18 (5 - 6) 19 - 20 (6 - 7) CO-CURRICULUM PACKAGE/(1-2)

LT_100/2

CO-CURRICULUM PACKAGE/(1-2)

16 - 20 (5 - 7)

*Can also be taken in Year IV Semester II

Note: For specialisation courses refer to Section 4.1 (Specialisations) for their corresponding numbers (Nos. 1 to 11) and for inter-disciplinry courses refer to Appendix A

148

APPENDIX B (contd.)
TYPE OF COURSE (CODE) Core (T) (90 Units) YEAR III SEMESTER I CAT300/2 - Group Innovation Project CAT301/2 - Research Methods & Special Topic Study SEMESTER II CAT302/12 - Industrial Training or CAT303/12 Undergraduate Research Training YEAR IV SEMESTER I CAT400/8(4) Undergraduate Major Project or CAT401/8(4) Undergraduate Research Project CAT402/2 Professional and Technopreneurship Development Specialisation No. 2/ 3 Units Specialisation No. 3/ 3 Units Minor (M) or Elective (E) (20 Units) 4 Units (AKP201) 3 Units (Specialisation No. 9/10/11) 4 Units (AKP302) 3 Units (Specialisation No. 9/10/11) Specialisation No. 4/ 3 Units Specialisation No. 5/ 3 Units Specialisation No. 6/7/8/ 3 Units 4 Units (AKP202) 3 Units (Specialisation No. 6/7/8) SEMESTER II CAT400/8(4) Undergraduate Major Project or CAT401/8(4) Undergraduate Research Project

University (U) Compulsory (12 Units) - Local - International Choose (A), (B) or (C) (A) Third Language Package: (6 Units) (B) Co-Curriculum Package: (3 - 6 Units) (C) Co-Curriculum/ Skill/Option: (3 Units) #Unit (#Courses)

HTU223/2

LT_200/2

LT_300/2

CO-CURRICULUM PACKAGE /(1-2) LHP456@/CO-C/ HTV201/OPTION/ (0 - 3) 15 - 19 (6 - 7) 12 - 13 (1 - 2) LHP456@/CO-C/ HTV201/OPTION/ (0 - 3) 12 - 16 (4 - 6) 13 - 14 (4)

@ For those choosing (C), LHP456: MUET 4/3/2/1 Compulsory; MUET BAND 6/5 - as English Language I or II requirements and these requirements must be replaced by other option course

Note: For specialisation courses refer to Section 4.1 (Specialisations) for their corresponding numbers (1 to 11)

149

APPENDIX C SEQUENTIAL/CONCURRENT PRE-REQUISITES


CST131 CST231 CST232 or CST Specialisation Courses (Network Computing/Distributed Systems & Security) CAT402 CAT302 CAT303 or CAT400 CAT401

CMT221 CMT222

CMT321 CAT300 CAT301

CMT Specialisation Courses (Multimedia Computing/Information Systems Engineering) (Except CMT321) CPT111 CPT113 CAT200 CPT212 CPT114 CPT112 CPT115 (YEAR I SEM II) (YEAR II SEM I) CPT Specialisation Courses (Software Engineering/Intelligent Systems) CPT211

(YEAR I SEM I)

(YEAR II SEM II)

(YEAR III SEM I)

(YEAR III SEM II)

(YEAR IV)

Sequential Sequential or Concurrent

150

APPENDIX D STUDENT LEARNING TIME (SLT)


Face to Face Learning No Student-Centred Learning (SCL) Tutorial Practical Other SCL Revision Course Code Lecture COMMON CORE COURSES 1 2 3 CPT113 3 28 7 7 0 CPT112 Discrete Structures 4 42 14 0 0 CPT111 Principles of Programming 3 29 9 15 0 18 (Assignments) 22 (Assignments) 39 (Assignments) 30 (Assignments) 0 30 (Assignments) 4 (Discussion) 14 0 40 (Assignments) 48 (Assignments) 53 70 42 10 15 10 2 4 2 2 3 2 138 (3.4) 170 (4.2) 137 (3.4) 57 60 13 10 2 2 3 2 162 (4.0) 164 (4.1) 53 54 10 6 2 3 2 0 160 (4.0) 151 (3.2) Course Title Unit LecturerCentred Learning Non Face to Face Learning or SCL e.g. Assignments, Exercises etc. Self-Learning Activity Preparation for Assessment Formal Assessment Continuous Assessment Final Assessment Total SLT

Programming Methodology & Data Structures Logic & Applications Mathematical Methods for Computer Science Computer Organisations Integrated Software Development Workshop 3 26 0 4 37 12 0 4 39 7 14 4 42 9 6 0

4 5 CPT115

CPT114

6 7 CAT200

CST131

151

APPENDIX D (contd.)
Face to Face Learning No Student-Centred Learning (SCL) Tutorial 7 7 0 35 (Assignments) 50 (Assignments) 56 Practical Other SCL 12 3 2 164 (4.1) 45 14 4 2 160 (4.0) Revision Course Code Lecture 8 CMT221 Database Organisations & Design Systems Analysis & Design 4 32 7 0 6 (Briefing and project discussion) 4 (Class discussion and presentation) 0 0 30 4 42 Course Title Unit LecturerCentred Learning Non Face to Face Learning or SCL e.g. Assignments, Exercises etc. Self-Learning Activity Preparation for Assessment Formal Assessment Continuous Assessment Final Assessment Total SLT

CMT222

10

CPT211

Programming Language Concepts & Paradigms Design & Analysis of Algorithms Data Communications & Networks Operating Systems Group Innovation Project 2 1 0 3 28 7 7 0 3 28 12 0 4 42 12 0

28

14

37

10

127 (3.1) 40 (Assignments) 30 54 40 10 10 2 2 2 2 162 (4.0) 124 (3.1)

11 12 CST231

CPT212

13 14 CAT300

CST232

25 (Assignments) 27 (In Class Group Presentation) 50

42 5

12 6

3 3

2 0

126 (3.1) 92 (2.3)

152

APPENDIX D (contd.)
Face to Face Learning No Student-Centred Learning (SCL) Tutorial 0 0 14 (Class perticipation and group discussion) 0 520 30 (Assignments) 28 Practical Other SCL 4 2 0 92 (2.3) Revision Course Code Lecture 15 CAT301 Research Methods & Special Topic Study 12 0 0 0 2 14 Course Title Unit LecturerCentred Learning Non Face to Face Learning or SCL e.g. Assignments, Exercises etc. Self-Learning Activity Preparation for Assessment Formal Assessment Continuous Assessment Final Assessment Total SLT

16

CAT302/ CAT303 CAT400/ CAT401 8 1 0 0

Industrial Training/ Undergraduate Research Training Undergraduate Project/ Undergraduate Research Project Professional & Technopreneurship Development 2 28 0 0 0 14 (Project Progress Review)

520 (13.0) 300 (Project) 15 3 3 0 336 (8.4)

17

18

CAT402

25 (Project)

28

87 (2.1)

SPECIALISATION CORE / OPTION / ELECTIVE COURSES 1 CMT223 Information Systems Theory & Management 3 27 0 0 15 (Case study and discussion, Educational visit, inivted speaker seminar) 0 28 0 25 (Assignments + Project) 42 14 3 2 128 3.2)

CMT224

Multimedia Systems

28

18 (Assignments + Lab)

42

12

133 (3.3)

153

APPENDIX D (contd.)
Face to Face Learning No Student-Centred Learning (SCL) Tutorial 5 0 0.5 (Presentation) 30 (Assignments) 44 Practical Other SCL 8 2 2 128.5 (3.2) Revision Course Code Lecture 3 CPT243 Software Requirements Analysis & Modelling Artificial Intelligence 3 28 14 0 0 3 34 0 0 8 (Seminar) 32 (Assignments + Project) 24 (Assignments) 3 37 Course Title Unit LecturerCentred Learning Non Face to Face Learning or SCL e.g. Assignments, Exercises etc. Self-Learning Activity Preparation for Assessment Formal Assessment Continuous Assessment Final Assessment Total SLT

CPT244

32

10

120 (3.0) 50 10 2 2 130 (3.2)

CST233

Information Security & Assurance Network Programming 3 21 0 21 0

CST234

40 (Assignments + Practical Training + Project) 10 (Class Discussion, Consultation, Case Study) 30 (Assignments)

28

122 (3.0)

CMT321

Management & Engineering of Databases Web Engineering & Technologies Computer Graphics & Visual Computing 3 34 7 3 28 0 8 3

34

44

10

132 (3.3)

8 9 CMT324

CMT322

0 0

30 (Assignments) 30 (Assignments)

38 44

10 10

4 2

2 2

120 (3.0) 132 (3.3)

154

APPENDIX D (contd.)
Face to Face Learning No Student-Centred Learning (SCL) Tutorial 0 14 7 (Class perticipation and group discussion) 2 (Discussion) 0 30 (Assignments) 20 (Assignments) 25 (Assignments) 42 Practical Other SCL 10 2 2 130 (3.2) Revision Course Code Lecture 10 CPT341 Software Design & Architecture 3 28 Course Title Unit LecturerCentred Learning Non Face to Face Learning or SCL e.g. Assignments, Exercises etc. Self-Learning Activity Preparation for Assessment Formal Assessment Continuous Assessment Final Assessment Total SLT

11

CPT342

Knowledge Management & Engineering Software Project Management, Process & Evolution Computer Vision & Image Processing Natural Language Processing Principles of Parallel & Distributed Programming Internet Protocols, Architecture & Routing 3 38 0 3 34 7 2 3 36 0 0 3 35 0 14 0 6 (Presentation) 0 3 42 0 0

34

40

10

124 (3.1) 42 12 3 2 121 (3.0)

12

CPT343

13 14 15 CST331 CPT346

CPT344

20 (Assignments) 30 (Assignments) 20 (Assignments)

49 42 43

10 10 16

2 2 5

2 2 2

132 (3.3) 128 (3.2) 129 (3.2)

16

CST332

20

30 (Assignments)

48

148 (3.7)

155

APPENDIX D (contd.)
Face to Face Learning No Student-Centred Learning (SCL) Tutorial 0 0 0 30 (Assignments) 30 (Assignments) 0 0 30 (Assignments) 42 42 Practical Other SCL 10 10 2 2 2 2 128 (3.2) 128 (3.2) 37 10 2 2 125 (3.1) Revision Course Code Lecture 17 18 CST334 Network Monitoring & Security E-Business Strategy, Architecture & Design Multimedia Information Systems & Management Decision Support Systems & Business Intelligence Animation & Virtual Reality Software Quality Assurance & Testing 3 28 14 3 28 0 20 0 3 26 0 0 3 35 5 0 0.5 (Presentation) 3 28 5 0 11 (Presentation) 3 33 9 (Discussion, Presentation) CST333 Distributed & Grid Computing 3 42 Course Title Unit LecturerCentred Learning Non Face to Face Learning or SCL e.g. Assignments, Exercises etc. Self-Learning Activity Preparation for Assessment Formal Assessment Continuous Assessment Final Assessment Total SLT

19

CMT421

20

CMT422

30 (Assignments)

42

124.5 (3.1)

21

CMT423

16 (Discussion)

24 (Assignments)

42

12

125 (3.1)

22 23 CPT441

CMT424

8 0

30

42 42

4 14

2 4

2 2

136 (3.4) 26 (Assignments + Project) 130 (3.2)

156

APPENDIX D (contd.)
Face to Face Learning No Student-Centred Learning (SCL) Tutorial 9 0 0 30 (Assignments) 30 30 (Assignments) 30 (Assignments) 30 42 Practical Other SCL 13 2 2 132 (3.3) 42 42 4 10 2 2 2 2 122 (3.0) 128 (3.2) 35 42 12 4 3 2 2 2 124 (3.1) 122 (3.0) 0 40 (Project) 40 10 2 2 134 (3.3) Revision Course Code Lecture 24 CPT443 Automata Theory & Formal Languages Intelligent Health Informatics Systems Security & Protection Microprocessors & Embedded Systems Advanced Computer Architecture Wireless Network & Mobile Computing 3 32 8 0 3 35 7 0 0 3 28 0 14 0 3 39 0 0 3 (Assignment presentation) 3 42 0 0 0 3 33 Course Title Unit LecturerCentred Learning Non Face to Face Learning or SCL e.g. Assignments, Exercises etc. Self-Learning Activity Preparation for Assessment Formal Assessment Continuous Assessment Final Assessment Total SLT

25 26 CST431

CPT444

27 28 CST433

CST432

29

CST434

157

SCHEDULE PLAN FOR GRADUATION


Core (T) Required Semester Course Code Unit Grade Semester Course Code Unit Grade Semester Course Code Unit Grade 90 Units 20 Units 15 Units Semester Minor (M)/Elective (E) University (U) Prerequisite (Z)/Audit (Y)/Others Unit Course Code Unit Grade

158

INDEX CPT111 CPT112 CPT113 CPT114 CPT115 CST131 CAT200 CMT221 CMT222 CMT223 CMT224 CPT211 CPT212 CPT243 CPT244 CST231 CST232 CST233 CST234 CAT300 CAT301 CAT302 CAT303 CMT321 CMT322 CMT324 CPT341 Principles of Programming (100) Discrete Structures (101) Programming Methodology & Data Structures (102) Logic & Applications (103) Mathematical Methods for Computer Science (104) Computer Organisation (105) Integrated Software Development Workshop (106) Database Organisations & Design (107) Systems Analysis & Design (108) Information Systems Theory & Management (109) Multimedia Systems (110) Programming Language Concepts & Paradigms (111) Design & Analysis Of Algorithms (113) Software Requirements Analysis & Modelling (114) Artificial Intelligence (114) Data Communications & Networks (116) Operating Systems (117) Information Security & Assurance (118) Network Programming (119) Group Innovation Project (120) Research Methods & Special Topic Study (120) Industrial Training (121) Undergraduate Research Training (121) Management & Engineering of Databases (122) Web Engineering & Technologies (123) Computer Graphics &Visual Computing (124) Software Design & Architecture (125) CPT342 CPT343 CPT344 CPT346 CST331 CST332 CST333 CST334 CAT400 CAT401 CAT402 CMT421 CMT422 CMT423 CMT424 CPT441 CPT443 CPT444 CST431 CST432 CST433 CST434 159 Knowledge Management & Engineering (126) Software Project Management, Process & Evolution (127) Computer Vision & Image Processing (129) Natural Language Processing (130) Principles of Parallel & Distributed Programming (131) Internet Protocols, Architecture & Routing (132) Distributed & Grid Computing (133) Network Monitoring & Security (134) Undergraduate Major Project (136) Undergraduate Research Project (136) Professional and Technopreneurship Development (136) E-Business Strategy, Architecture & Design (137) Multimedia Information Systems & Management (138) Decision Support Systems & Business Intelligence (139) Animation & Virtual Reality (140) Software Quality Assurance & Testing (141) Automata Theory & Formal Languages (141) Intelligent Health Informatics (142) Systems Security & Protection (143) Microprocessors & Embedded Systems (144) Advanced Computer Architecture (145) Wireless Network & Mobile Computing (146)

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