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Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 21
ALL ABOUT OHIO
NATION PAGE 7
MURRAY WINS
GRAND SLAM
SPORTS PAGE 12
ACUPUNCTURE
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By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Crystal Springs Uplands School ofcials
will hear tonight whether the Belmont City
Council is favorable to a proposal to expand
into the citys highlands on Davis Drive by
building a new middle school or whether it is
time to nd a different site for the campus.
In July, the Planning Commission voted not
to recommend the project to the council but
CSUS, a nonprofit private school in
Hillsborough, has since sweetened its devel-
opment deal to the city by pledging a one-
time $1 million payment, $250,000 annually
and use of its turfed athletic eld.
While most of the council has been essen-
tially silent on the merits of the project,
Councilwoman Coralin Feierbach has pub-
licly made it clear she opposes the proposal
and has sent out a mass email to city residents
telling them why.
CSUS has also taken to conducting tele-
phone surveys and has sent out mailers to
Belmont residents detailing the proposal and
to seek input on the project leading up to
tonights public hearing.
Feierbach said those tactics are unaccept-
able to her. She has also made it a point to
detail how local school and other tax districts
will be hurt by the CSUS plan, since it is
exempt from paying property taxes.
Currently, the vacant ofce building on 6-8
and 10 Davis Drive generates about $150,000
annually in property taxes, with about a third
going to the city and the Belmont Fire
Protection District and the rest going to other
tax districts such as the Belmont-Redwood
School move in citys hands
Crystal Springs Uplands School seeks to expand in Belmont
Sept. 11 museum
agreement made
By Deepti Hajela
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK An agreement that
paves the way for the completion of the
Sept. 11 museum at ground zero was
reached on the eve of the 11th anniver-
sary of the terror attacks.
The memorandum of understanding
between the Port Authority of New
York and New Jersey and the founda-
tion that controls the National
September 11 Memorial & Museum
was announced Monday.
The museum was supposed to open
this month, but construction all but
ceased a year ago because of a funding
squabble between the foundation and
the Port Authority, which owns the
World Trade Center site.
Three powerful political figures
became entangled in the dispute: The
governors of New York and New Jersey
control the Port Authority, while New
York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg
is the foundations chairman.
By ensuring that no additional pub-
lic funds are spent to complete the memorial and museum,
Waste agency ready
to adopt new budget
Vote stalled for whistle-blower investigation
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After delaying adoption of next years budget by 10 weeks
due to a whistle-blower investigation, the agency overseeing
the countys garbage and recycling collection is set to take up
the item again at its meeting Wednesday.
With allegations of retaliation against South Bayside Waste
Management Authority Executive Director Kevin McCarthy
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Vendors showed off tools for innovation to boost science and math in the classroom at the College of San Mateo yesterday.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The United States has a serious lack of
qualied scientists, engineers and math-
ematicians to supply the countrys
changing workforce, Martha Kanter, the
U.S. under secretary for the Department
of Education, told a packed house at the
College of San Mateo yesterday.
An innovative new program to boost
science and math in the classroom called
Mentor Makerspace kicked off at
CSM yesterday.
Makerspace is a pilot program that
will get under way at 10 Bay Area
schools this fall and is the product of the
founders of Maker Faire, the annual
high-tech event held at the San Mateo
County Event Center every spring.
Kanter, the former chancellor at the
Foothill-De Anza Community College
Maker movement expands
Program links schools with tools for innovation
See SCHOOL, Page 23
See MAKER, Page 17
See opinion page 9
See page 21
See page 22
Inside
Tough task for those
compensating ill 9/11
workers
Sept. 11 health
program adds 50 types
of cancer
Can there be a
politics-free Sept. 11?
Panetta lauds Flight
93 passengers, crew
Sept. 11, 2012
See MUSEUM, Page 23
See BUDGET, Page 17
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the familys choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Singer Harry
Connick Jr. is 45.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
2001
Nearly 3,000 people were killed on
Americas worst day of terrorism as 19
al-Qaida terrorists hijacked four pas-
senger jetliners. Two planes smashed
into New Yorks World Trade Center,
causing the twin towers to fall; one
plowed into the Pentagon; and the
fourth was crashed into a eld in west-
ern Pennsylvania.
Each of us, when our days work is done,
must seek our ideal, whether it be love or
pinochle or lobster a la Newburg, or the
sweet silence of the musty bookshelves.
O. Henry (1862-1910)
Musician Moby is
47.
Rapper Ludacris is
35.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
Italian policemen attempt to stop Alcoa Incs workers as they protest against their dismissals from employment in front of
the Ministry of Employment building in Rome.
Tuesday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the lower 60s. Southwest
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the
lower 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Highs in the lower
60s. South winds around 5 mph...Becoming west in the after-
noon.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s. Northwest winds 5 to 10
mph.
Thursday: Partly cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Highs in the 60s to lower 70s.
Thursday night and Friday: Partly cloudy. Patchy fog.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 08 Gor-
geous George in rst place;No.09 Winning Spirit
in second place; and No. 06 Whirl Win in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:41.06.
(Answers tomorrow)
IGLOO THEME PLIGHT THIRST
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: When it came to his new hot-air balloon
designs, he had HIGH HOPES
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
BORHA
UNGOY
CEYMAR
TREARH
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
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Print answer here:
7 8 0
15 32 38 42 46 31
Mega number
Sept. 7 Mega Millions
4 5 16 20 33
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 0 1 9
Daily Four
6 9 2
Daily three evening
In 1777, during the American Revolution, forces under Gen.
George Washington were defeated by the British in the Battle
of Brandywine.
In 1814, an American eet scored a decisive victory over the
British in the Battle of Lake Champlain in the War of 1812.
In 1857, the Mountain Meadows Massacre took place in pres-
ent-day southern Utah as a 120-member Arkansas immigrant
party was slaughtered by Mormon militiamen aided by Paiute
Indians.
In 1862, short-story writer William Sydney Porter, better
known as O. Henry, was born in Greensboro, N.C.
In 1922, the British Mandate for Palestine went into effect.
In 1936, Boulder Dam (now Hoover Dam) began operation as
President Franklin D. Roosevelt pressed a key in Washington
to signal the startup of the dams rst hydroelectric generator.
In 1941, groundbreaking took place for the Pentagon, now
headquarters of the U.S. Department of Defense. In a speech
that drew accusations of anti-Semitism, Charles A. Lindbergh
told an America First rally in Des Moines, Iowa, the British,
the Jewish and the Roosevelt administration were pushing the
United States toward war.
In 1954, the Miss America pageant made its network TV debut
on ABC; Miss California, Lee Meriwether, was crowned the
winner.
In 1962, The Beatles completed their rst single for EMI,
Love Me Do and P.S. I Love You, at EMI studios in
London.
Actress Betsy Drake is 89. Sen. Daniel Akaka, D-Hawaii, is
88. Actor Earl Holliman is 84. Comedian Tom Dreesen is 73.
Movie director Brian De Palma is 72. Rock singer-musician Jack
Ely (The Kingsmen) is 69. Rock musician Mickey Hart (The
Dead) is 69. Singer-musician Leo Kottke is 67. Actor Phillip
Alford is 64. Actress Amy Madigan is 62. Rock singer-musician
Tommy Shaw (Styx) is 59. Sports reporter Lesley Visser is 59.
Actor Reed Birney is 58. Singer-songwriter Diane Warren is 56.
Musician Jon Moss (Culture Club) is 55. Actor Scott Patterson is
54. Rock musician Mick Talbot (The Style Council) is 54.
Actress Roxann Dawson is 54. Actor John Hawkes is 53.
Man arrested after
meth offer texted to officer
LEWISTON, Idaho An Idaho man
apparently trying to get the most bang for
his drug-purchasing buck accidentally
texted a narcotics detective while he
searched for people to join him in a
methamphetamine buy.
Police in Lewiston arrested 37-year-old
Aaron D. Templeton Wednesday on sus-
picion of conspiracy to deliver metham-
phetamine.
Court records say one of the police
detectives received a text Wednesday
morning asking if he knew anyone look-
ing for drugs. After determining it wasnt
his co-workers playing a joke, the detec-
tive arranged to meet the man to deliver
$150 that would be pooled with money
from other buyers to enable a bulk pur-
chase of meth.
Templeton was arrested when he
arrived at the designated meeting place.
Police say it all started with a wrong
number.
Neighbors: Cussing
cockatoo violates noise law
WARWICK, R.I. A Rhode Island
woman has been accused by her neigh-
bors of violating an animal-noise ordi-
nance by training her cockatoo to cuss.
The Providence Journal reports that
Lynne Taylor is accused in Warwick
municipal court of training the bird,
Willy, to say expletives.
The bird allegedly aimed the invectives
at the neighbors, who happen to be
Taylors ex-husband and his girlfriend.
A municipal judge on Thursday denied
Taylors request to dismiss the case.
The neighbors, Kathleen Melker and
Craig Fontaine, say they have been sub-
jected to repeated curses from the bird, at
one point for 15 minutes at a time.
The animal noise ordinance imposes a
small ne on any pet owner whose animal
creates habitual noise.
A judge has issued restraining orders
telling both women to have no contact.
Police: Man broke into
deli, stole cash and meat
DICKSON CITY, Pa. A bag of
stolen cold cuts has landed a northeastern
Pennsylvania man in the cooler.
Police say Leonard Taylor broke into a
Dickson City deli, made himself a sand-
wich then took off with a bag of cold cuts
and cash on Thursday. Ofcers say they
saw an intoxicated Taylor sitting on the
steps of a demolished home and counting
money. He told police hed been asked to
hold the bag of deli meat by a couple who
bummed a cigarette from him.
The Times-Tribune of Scranton reports
Taylor was arrested after police say they
checked a nearby deli and found signs of
a break-in. Police say a receipt found
with the meat linked the money to the
deli. Court records dont list an attorney
for Taylor.
Man charged with
trespassing at Miley Cyrus home
LOS ANGELES Los Angeles pros-
ecutors have charged a man with tres-
passing after his weekend arrest at the
home of actress-singer Miley Cyrus.
A city attorneys spokesman says Jason
Luis Rivera was charged Monday with
two counts of trespassing and one count
of resisting arrest.
River was arrested early Saturday after
police say he attempted to force himself
into Cyrus home. Police said at the time
he was carrying a pair of scissors and
claimed to be a friend of Cyrus.
Rivera is scheduled to be arraigned on
Monday. Jail records show the 40-year-
old is currently being held on $1,000
bail.
Ryan Reynolds
and Blake Lively wed
CHARLESTON, S.C. One of the
sexiest men alive is off the market. Again.
Ryan Reynolds wed Blake Lively in
Mount Pleasant, S.C., on Sunday night at
Boone Hall Plantation, according to a
person familiar with the ceremony who
requested anonymity because that person
wasnt authorized to speak on the matter.
Representatives for the actors didnt
return requests by the Associated Press
for comment.
While it is Livelys rst marriage,
Reynolds was previously wed to Scarlett
Johansson.
4 6 22 29 47 27
Mega number
Sept. 8 Super Lotto Plus
3
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BURLINGAME
Reckless vehicle. A person reported a van
driving so fast it went up on two wheels on
Drake Avenue and Hillside Drive before 5:17
p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 6.
Dog violation. A dog walker was reportedly
walking seven dogs through a park that only
allowed two dogs per person on the 1100
block of Airport Boulevard on Thursday, Sept.
6.
Suspicious behavior. A woman was reported
for taking apart the phones in her home to
check for listening devices on the 1500 block
of Meadow Lane before 1:23 p.m. on
Thursday, Sept. 6.
Annoyance. A man reported he didnt appre-
ciate a person tapping him on the back while
in church on the 1300 block of Bayswater
Avenue before 10:52 a.m. on Thursday, Sept.
6.
BELMONT
Suspicious circumstances. Four people were
reportedly removing two large palm trees from
Mezes Avenue before 7:46 p.m. on Sunday,
Sept. 8.
Animal call. Three people reported an injured
deer on Ralston Avenue before 9:26 p.m. on
Saturday, Sept. 8.
Citizen assist. A vehicle was reportedly egged
on Hallmark Drive before 7:37 p.m. on
Saturday, Sept. 8.
Police reports
Some CD people
Two men were harassing people and sell-
ing compact discs at a gas station on the
corner on Hopkins Avenue and El
Camino Real in Redwood City before
1:53 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 9.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A church volunteer accused of inappropri-
ate relationships with young boys he met
through graphic online ads will stand trial on
more than four dozen lewd act charges after a
judge found sufcient evidence of all but two
counts.
Brandon Hamm, 37, of San Francisco, has
pleaded not guilty to the charges stemming
from three separate cases but was held to
answer on all but two charges of lewd acts
with a minor because they involved a police
ofcer posing as a juvenile. The judge did
allow charges of attempted acts to go forward.
Hamm will enter a Superior Court plea
Sept. 25 and possibly set a trial date.
South San Francisco police rst arrested
Hamm in June after an
ofcer posing as a young
boy responded to his
online advertisement seek-
ing horny skater boys.
Over several weeks, the
two exchanged emails and
Hamm reportedly sent
photographs of his geni-
tals and requested the
same. A detective who
met Hamm at a pre-
arranged spot reported him having a backpack
full of sex toys, lubricant and a cellphone con-
taining child pornography.
Hamm was prepared to post bail when
investigators located another alleged victim
who was 14 when he responded to a 2009
Craigslist ad posted by Hamm.
In that case, Hamm allegedly responded to
the boys advertisement and investigators have
several emails between them detailing the
conduct. The email also reportedly included
references to former Penn State assistant
coach and convicted sex offender Jerry
Sandusky.
He is also charged in the case of a 15-year-
old boy who allegedly met Hamm in October
2010 and continued a relationship with him
through his June 22 arrest.
Hamm was a volunteer with the Peninsula
Metropolitan Community Church in San
Mateo but the congregation suspended him
following his initial arrest.
He remains in custody in lieu of $200,000
bail.
Church volunteer to trial on
dozens of lewd act charges
Brandon
Hamm
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A man convicted of rampaging through one
closed Redwood City business, looting two
others and attacking vehicles with a re extin-
guisher late last summer received a ve-year
suspended prison term for those crimes and an
unrelated weapon possession charge filed
while he was out of custody on bail.
Kevin Michael Dolf, 32, in March pleaded
no contest to second-degree burglary and van-
dalism in the rst case and later pleaded no
contest to felony possession of a shuriken, a
Japanese throwing star, and admitted commit-
ting a new felony while out on bail. He also
admitted having a prior criminal strike. At a
sentencing hearing for both cases, Dolf
received a ve-year, four-month suspended
prison term. He must also
spend a year in county jail
and serve three years pro-
bation.
Dolf was rst arrested
Aug. 14, 2011 after caus-
ing an estimated $18,000
worth of damage to down-
town Redwood City busi-
nesses. He began by
smashing out the wind-
shields and windows of three cars on Main
Street before continuing the so-called ram-
page inside a closed business. Dolf allegedly
broke the glass doors and windows of two
other businesses, ransacking the interiors and
putting stolen property in outside trash bins to
later be wheeled away.
When Redwood City police arrived, Dolf
allegedly barricaded himself inside one busi-
ness and hid inside a cabinet in hope of elud-
ing a police dog.
After police arrested Dolf, they reported he
appeared under the inuence of drugs and had
cocaine in his pocket.
A month after taking a plea deal in that case
and awaiting sentencing out of custody on
$50,000 bail, Dolf was arrested on suspicion
of possessing methamphetamine and the
shuriken.
Vandal sentenced for business rampage
Kevin Dolf
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Mistakes were made
in alerting the public about potentially danger-
ous pollution created by a huge re at a
Chevron Corp. renery last month, regulators
said Monday.
The disclosure came as the Bay Area Air
Quality Management District held a public
meeting in San Francisco to discuss its
response and the myriad investigations into
the Aug. 6 re that started after a leak in an old
pipe at the Richmond facility.
Regulators also told those who attended that
they are working to improve pollution moni-
toring during emergencies. District executive
ofcer Jack Broadbent said the initial, incor-
rect assertion that all air quality samples taken
near the renery re were safe clearly fell
short.
Officials: Mistakes made
in warning public of fire
4
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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property taxes and insurance
Govind Nair
Govind Nair, late of San Bruno and San Mateo County res-
ident since 1967, died Sept. 7, 2012, surrounded by his loved
ones at his home.
Husband of Sarojani Sara Vinod Nair
for 12 years, father of Neeta Maharaj (her
husband Reggie), Steven Nair (his wife
Christy), Ashwin Nair and his stepchildren
Shalini Lal (her husband Jerry), Rohit
Vinod, Abinash Vinod (his wife
Davika),Adish Vinod. Brother of Kalyini
Gopal. He is also survived by his nine
grandchildren and many nieces, nephews
and cousins and family. Many thanks to his doctors, nurses and
hospice caregivers especially Judy and Decie.
A native of the Fiji Islands, age 79 years.
A member of the San Bruno, Pacica and Magnolia South
San Francisco senior centers.
Funeral services will be Wednesday, Sept. 12 beginning at
10 a.m. at the Chapel of the Highlands, El Camino Real at 194
Millwood Drive in Millbrae. A procession will follow to Olivet
Memorial Park in Colma. Family and friends may visit on
Tuesday after 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. at the Chapel of the
Highlands. His family appreciates donations to the San Bruno
Fireghters Association.
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of
approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the
date of the familys choosing. To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjour-
nal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length
and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 200 words or without editing,
please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at
ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituary
STATE GOVERNMENT
Gov. Jerry Brown has
signed a bill by Assemblyman
Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, that
could save up to $35 million for
water customers in San Mateo,
Santa Clara and Alameda coun-
ties.
Assembly Bill 2167 which
the governor signed Friday allows the Bay Area Water
Supply and Conservation Agency (BAWSCA) to issue
bonds at a low interest rate for the repayment of regional
drinking water infrastructure improvement costs, accord-
ing to Hills office.
BAWSCA represents 24 cities and water districts, and
two private utilities, that purchase water wholesale from
the San Francisco regional water system. These entities
provide water to 1.7 million people, businesses and com-
munity organizations in San Mateo, Santa Clara and
Alameda counties, according to Hills office.
BAWSCAs members are wholesale water customers of
the Hetch Hetchy Regional Water System. AB 2167
would clarify that BAWSCA may use its bond authority to
repay the remaining debt owed to the City and County of
San Francisco pursuant to the 2009 Water Supply
Agreement.
It is estimated that BAWSCA members could save up to
$35 million over 25 years by financing this debt with
lower interest bonds, according to Hills office.
To coincide with a bill awaiting the governors signa-
ture and a public forum scheduled for today, state Sen. Joe
Simitian, D-Palo Alto, has released a televised public
service announcement on the importance of women know-
ing their breast density.
The 30-second public service announcement, which will
be distributed to cable access and other television chan-
nels in the 11th Senate District, features Santa Cruz res-
ident Amy Colton, a breast cancer survivor, nurse and
advocate, sharing her story of her breast cancer being
missed for seven years by mammograms because of dense
breast tissue.
The announcement, which is also posted on YouTube,
can be viewed at http://youtu.be/983ZhxNzgnw. Today,
Simitian, chair of the Senate Select Committee on
Breast Cancer Awareness and Detection, is hosting a
forum on the risks associated with dense breast tissue and
what women should be discussing with their doctors. The
forum is 5:30 p.m., today, Oshman Family JCC, 3921
Fabian Way, Palo Alto.
5
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
Advertisement
By Seth Borenstein
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Earth has
more than enough wind to power
the entire world, at least technically,
two new studies nd.
But the research looks only at
physics, not nances. Other experts
note it would be too costly to put up
all the necessary wind turbines and
build a system that could transmit
energy to all consumers.
The studies are by two different
U.S. science teams and were pub-
lished in separate journals on
Sunday and Monday. They calculate
that existing wind turbine technolo-
gy could produce hundreds of tril-
lions of watts of power. Thats more
than 10 times what the world now
consumes.
Wind power doesnt emit heat-
trapping gases like burning coal, oil
and natural gas. But there have been
questions, raised in earlier studies,
about whether physical limits would
prevent the world from being pow-
ered by wind.
The new studies, done independ-
ently, showed potential wind energy
limits wouldnt be an issue.
Money would be.
Its really a question about eco-
nomics and engineering and not a
question of fundamental resource
availability, said Ken Caldeira, a
climate scientist at the Palo Alto
campus of the Washington-based
Carnegie Institution for Science. He
is a co-author of one of the studies;
that one appeared Sunday in the
journal Nature Climate Change.
Caldeiras study nds wind has
the potential to produce more than
20 times the amount of energy the
world now consumes. Right now,
wind accounts for just a tiny frac-
tion of the energy the world con-
sumes. So to get to the levels these
studies say is possible, wind pro-
duction would have to increase dra-
matically.
If there were 100 new wind tur-
bines for every existing one, that
could do the trick says, Mark
Jacobson, a Stanford University
professor of civil and environmental
engineering.
Jacobson wrote the other study,
published in the Proceedings of the
National Academy of Sciences. It
shows a slightly lower potential in
the amount of wind power than
Caldeiras study. But he said it still
would amount to far more power
than the world now uses is or is like-
ly to use in the near future.
Jacobson said startup costs and
fossil fuel subsidies prevent wind
from taking off. The cheap price of
natural gas, for one thing, hurts
wind development, he added.
Studies: Wind potentially could power the world
County to refund
$2.5M in taxes
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
County supervisors Tuesday
morning will sign off on nearly $2.5
million tax refunds from 15 entities
that were inaccurately charged over
the last three years.
The total change to the assess-
ment roll is $2.59 million but
because refunds are only issued for
taxes already paid, the total refunds
for 2009, 2010 and 2011 is $2.47
million.
Fixes to the tax roll are not
uncommon among the tens of thou-
sands of assessments yearly but
refunds, corrections or cancellations
of taxes beyond $50,000 require
approval by the Board of
Supervisors. They will do so on the
consent agenda.
The two largest changes are due
to Wal-Mart.com USA LLC which
in both 2009 and 2010 it erroneous-
ly included personal computers
located in Arizona and disposed-of
equipment. The company will be
refunded $323,289.19 for 2009 and
$256,068.70 for 2010.
A number of other changes to
Solaire/Archstone, Tanforan
Crossing and Bay Meadows are
required to reect a change in own-
ership.
The Board of Supervisors meets 9
a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10 in Board
Chambers, 400 County Government
Center, Redwood City.
REUTERS
China will order its dominant electricity distributors to source up to 15 percent of their power from renewable
energy including wind,but slow compliance means it may be years before the countrys struggling wind power
developers benet, industry executives say.
6
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
Why it matters:
The Economy
By Paul Wiseman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The issue:
The economy is weak and the job market brutal. Nearly 13
million Americans cant nd work; the national unemploy-
ment rate is 8.1 percent, the highest level ever three years after
a recession supposedly ended. A divided Washington has done
little to ease the misery.
Where they stand:
President Barack Obama wants to create jobs with govern-
ment spending on public works and targeted tax breaks to
businesses. Mitt Romney aims to generate hiring by keeping
income taxes low, slashing corporate taxes, relaxing or repeal-
ing regulations on businesses and encouraging production of
oil and natural gas.
Why it matters:
The economy didnt take off when the Great Recession
ended in June 2009. Growth has never been slower in the three
years after a downturn. The human toll is immense. Forty per-
cent of the jobless 5 million people have been out of
work for six months or more, their skills eroding and their
chances of finding good jobs fading. Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke has declared long-term unemploy-
ment a national crisis. Millions of Americans have simply
given up looking for work.
The agonizing recovery is the consequence of the deepest
recession since the 1930s. The economy lost a staggering 8.8
million jobs and has only clawed back 4.1 million, or 46 per-
cent. A nancial crisis dried up credit. Collapsing house prices
destroyed $6.5 trillion worth of home equity the biggest
source of wealth for most families. More than 1 in 5 home-
owners is stuck with a house worth less than the mortgage on
it. Feeling poorer, families have limited their spending and
paid down debts. Theyve had another reason to hunker down:
The weak job market has let employers keep wages low. For
most Americans, pay hasnt kept up with even modest ina-
tion.
Weeks after he took ofce, Obama pushed $862 billion
worth of tax cuts and government spending programs through
Congress. The package was meant to generate economic
growth and revive hiring. Romney and other Republicans
have declared the stimulus program a failure. But most econo-
mists and the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Ofce
say it kept unemployment from going even higher.
Still, faced with a persistently sluggish economy, Obama
proposed another plan last year to rev up hiring with increased
spending on public works projects and tax breaks to small
businesses.
P
rincipal Rita Gleason
announced the following
advanced placement scholars at
Notre Dame High School, Belmont:
Kavitha Arulmozhi 12, Kelsey
Clausing 12, Lyndall Colrain 12,
Amanda Dames 12, Elizabeth Holden
12, Katherine Kilmond 13, Catelyn
Poss 12, Hadley Sheppard 12,
Alexandra Tabing 12 (this years Daily
Journal Great Grad) and Cynthia
White 12 qualied for the advanced
placement scholar with distinction award
by earning an average score of at least
3.5 on all advanced placement examina-
tions taken and scores of 3 or higher on
ve or more of these examinations.
Soa Apitz 12, Brittany Brady 12,
Linnea Doan 12, Nicole Dudaney 12,
Camille Jackson 12, Sindhu
Madhavan 12, Molly Miram 12,
Allison Rogers 12 and Julie Takla 12
qualied for the advanced placement
scholar with honor award by earning an
average score of at least 3.25 on all
advanced placement examinations taken
and grades of 3 or higher on four or more
of these examinations.
Miranda Chan 13, Kyrstin Coon
13, Tara Davis 12, Dana Delucchi 12,
Erin Fitzgerald 12, Mary Gainey 12,
Kristen Henry 12, Emily Hosman 13,
Kristy Ip 13, Emily Johnston 13,
Kristina Kenny 12, Miranda Lee 13,
Aria Lindsey 12, Christina Matian
12, Lauren Williamson 12 and Yiting
Zheng 12 qualied for the advanced
placement scholar award by earning
scores of 3 or higher on three or more
advanced placement examinations.
***
On Sept. 14, College of San Mateo
honored nine decades of its athletic lega-
cy when it inducted 16 new members
into the Athletics Hall of Fame. The dis-
tinguished list of 2012 inductees repre-
sents a wide range of success and eras
over the past 90 years. Representing stu-
dent athletes are: Norm Angelini, base-
ball; Stacy Bergstedt, softball; Greg
Buckingham, swimming; Chris Diehl,
track; Jeff Fishback, track; Cindy
Galarza, basketball; Steve Hamann,
water polo; Ed Kertel, football; Frank
Pignataro, baseball; and Tom Scott,
football.
Representing coaches are: Oliver
Tex Byrd, track and field; Rich
Donner, swimming and water polo;
Mike Lewis, track and field; Steve
Shafer, football; Jack Thur, football;
and Berny Wagner, track and eld.
The 2012 class is highlighted by the
induction of former track and eld coach,
Byrd, founder of the National Junior
College Athletic Association 75 years
ago while he was at CSM. Joining Byrd
is his successor Wagner. The list also
includes former CSM head football
coaches Shafer and Thur. Shafer earned a
Super Bowl ring with the Baltimore
Ravens in 2001 while Thur spent more
than three decades coaching at CSM.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at
(650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
heather@smdailyjournal.com.
By Andrew Taylor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Congress
returned to Washington on Monday for
an abbreviated pre-election session in
which it appears likely to do the bare
minimum: making sure that the govern-
ment doesnt shut down.
Almost everything else of conse-
quence, most notably a set of automatic,
economy-rattling spending cuts and tax
increases that have been dubbed a scal
cliff, will get put off until a post-election
lame duck session and maybe beyond.
Top lawmakers hoped to unveil a six-
month spending bill later Monday that
would nance the governments day-to-
day operations until next March to give
the next Congress and whomever occu-
pied the White House time to work out a
nal solution on more than $1 trillion in
annual spending for the Pentagon and
other Cabinet departments.
Typically such temporary funding
bills, known in Washington parlance as
continuing resolutions, or CRs, freeze
spending at current levels. But the meas-
ure expected to be unveiled Monday
actually allows for a less than 1 percent
increase to every program to keep pace
with a slight increase in spending permit-
ted by caps set by last summers hard-
fought budget and debt accord.
The 2012 budget year ends on Sept.
30. But not a single one of the 12 annual
agency appropriations bills has become
law, requiring lawmakers to step in with
the stopgap funding measure to avoid a
disastrous partial shutdown of the gov-
ernment.
Congress returns for
pre-election session
Romney: Chicago teachers
turning backs on students
WASHINGTON Republican pres-
idential nominee Mitt Romney said
Monday that striking Chicago teachers
are turning their backs on thousands of
students and that President Barack
Obama is rooting for them. Obamas
top spokesman said the president has
not taken sides but is urging both the
teachers and the city to settle quickly.
Chicagos mayor, Obama ally Rahm
Emanuel, called Romneys statement
lip service as the contract dispute in
the nations third-largest school system
inserted itself into the hard-fought
presidential campaign.
Hours before he was to arrive in
Chicago to raise money for his cam-
paign, Romney said in a statement that
he chooses to side with the parents
and students depending on public
schools to give them the skills to suc-
ceed.
Around the nation
NATION 7
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Thomas Beaumont
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MANSFIELD, Ohio Its all about Ohio
again.
The economy has improved here, and so
has President Barack Obamas standing, put-
ting pressure on Republican Mitt Romney in a
state critical to his presidential hopes.
No Republican has won the White House
without winning Ohio, and Romney hopes to
catch Obama here by slashing at his jobs
record in working-class regions.
America doesnt have to have the long face
it has had under this president, the
Republican shouted Monday to a cheering
audience in hard-scrabble Mansfield, just
weeks after Obama visited. We can get
America rolling again, growing again.
In a sign of the states importance, hardly a
week goes without the candidates appearing in
Ohio. Same goes for their running mates;
Republican Paul Ryan was campaigning in the
Appalachian southeast Wednesday, following
a similar weekend trip by Vice President Joe
Biden, who is to return to the state Wednesday.
Less than two months
from Election Day, both
parties say their internal
campaign polling shows
Obama with a narrow lead
in Ohio, a Midwestern
state that offers 18
Electoral College votes
and has played an impor-
tant role in determining
every recent White House
race.
Numbers tell the story of the high stakes
and, perhaps, show why Obama has been able
to maintain an edge and why Romney
remains within striking distance.
The candidates and supportive outside
groups have spent a stunning $112 million on
TV advertising in the state one-sixth the
total spent nationwide. And Obama and
groups that support him have been outspend-
ing Romney and Republican-leaning inde-
pendent groups here all summer, outpacing
the GOP $2 million to $1 million last week
alone. Thats despite Romney having tapped
into his general election bank account last
week to boost his ads
here.
All year, the race here
has been close. A
Quinnipiac University
poll in April after
Romney locked up the
Republican nomination
showed a 1-point race
among registered voters
in the state. But two
recent polls Quinnipiac/CBS/New York
Times in August and July showed Obama
up 6 percentage points among likely voters,
and reaching 50 percent, a key marker for an
endangered incumbent.
Both Republicans and Democrats say
internal surveys show it tighter now, with
Obama leading by about 3 percentage
points.
Still, Democrats are almost giddy that
Obama has been able to show strength in
this manufacturing state, which suffered
during the recession but has seen its unem-
ployment rate fall from 7.7 percent in
January to 7.2 percent in July.
While Obama stayed in Washington on
Monday, the presidents team also reveled in
the fact that he edged Romney in monthly
fundraising $114 million vs. $111 mil-
lion for the first time in three months, as
well as in national opinion surveys that
showed the Democrats standing improving
a bit after his national nominating conven-
tion in Charlotte, N.C., last week.
In Ohio, Romney looked to take advan-
tage of Obamas absence, blistering the
president over deep defense cuts scheduled
as part of a deficit-reduction proposal.
Those possible cuts mean the city would
lose its 179th Air National Guard unit,
which would cost hundreds of jobs. Thats
on top of a GM plant that closed in nearby
Ontario, Ohio, two years ago.
It will be bad for employment if it goes
forward. It will also be bad for our national
security, Romney said, promising to block
such cuts as president.
Here and elsewhere, Obama is working to
spread a message of economic progress,
despite a national unemployment rate stuck
above 8 percent.
Crucial Ohio at the heart of presidential campaign
Mitt Romney Barack Obama
NATION 8
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SAN FRANCISCO Hewlett-Packard
Co. is planning to cut about 2,000 more jobs
than it had previously announced as CEO
Meg Whitman tries to turn the company
around.
In a regulatory filing Monday, the comput-
er and printer maker said it will eliminate
29,000 jobs by October 2014, up from the
27,000 cuts it announced in May when HP
employed about 350,000 people.
The company, which is based in Palo Alto
didnt explain why it had raised the number.
The revision comes amid signs that the
already slumping personal computer market
may weaken even further as an increasing
number of sleek smartphones and tablet com-
puters win over consumers.
The shift to mobile devices has hurt HP, the
worlds largest maker of PCs. HP is prepar-
ing to release a new line of tablets this fall
and has been trying to diversify into more
profitable lines of technology, such as busi-
ness software and consulting, but Whitman
has cautioned it will take several years for the
company to bounce back from a litany of
problems, including a
lack of innovation and
acquisitions that havent
panned out.
For instance, the dimin-
ished value of HPs 2008
acquisition of consulting
service Electronic Data
Systems saddled the com-
pany with an $8.9 billion
loss in its most recent
quarter.
About 8,500 workers already have accept-
ed early retirement offers. Most of those
employees left HP Aug. 31, according to
Mondays filing. The rest of the early retirees
will depart by the end of August 2013.
ISI Group analyst Brian Marshall estimat-
ed that HP will save an additional $200 mil-
lion annually by cutting an extra 2,000 jobs.
In May, the company had estimated its aus-
terity drive would reduce its annual expenses
by $3 billion to $3.5 billion.
The company expects to record charges
totaling $3.7 billion to cover the costs of pay-
ing departing workers and other cost-cutting
measures.
Zynga chief marketing,
revenue officer resigns
SAN FRANCISCO Jeff Karp, the chief
marketing and chief revenue ofcer at Zynga,
has become the latest executive to leave the
struggling online company behind FarmVille
and other games.
In August, Chief Operating Ofcer John
Schappert left the company after less than a
year and a half on the job. Schapperts exit was
followed by that of Mike Verdu, the companys
chief creative ofcer.
Karp was hired at Zynga Inc. in August 2011.
Zynga says the groups that Karp oversaw
have been moved to other divisions in the com-
pany. That means he is not being replaced.
We are grateful to Jeff for his contributions
over the last year and wish him well in his
future endeavors, Zynga said in a statement.
Draft order seeks to
improve U.S. digital defenses
WASHINGTON The Obama administra-
tion is preparing an executive order with new
rules to protect U.S. computer systems, after
Congress failed earlier this summer to pass a
cybersecurity bill. The provisions include vol-
untary standards for companies, a special coun-
cil run by the Homeland Security Department
and new regulations covering especially vital
systems, according to a draft of the order
obtained by the Associated Press.
But just weeks before the election, the White
House risks complaints that President Barack
Obama is anti-business from Republicans and
the same pro-business groups that killed the
legislation on Capitol Hill.
GoDaddy Web outage
takes out small-business sites
NEW YORK Thousands and possibly
millions of websites hosted by GoDaddy.com
went down for several hours on Monday, caus-
ing trouble for the mainly small businesses that
rely on the service.
A Twitter feed that claimed to be afliated
with the Anonymous hacker group said it was
behind the outage, but this couldnt be con-
rmed. Another Twitter account, known to be
associated with Anonymous, suggested the rst
one was just taking advantage of an outage it
had nothing to do with.
GoDaddy spokeswoman Elizabeth Driscoll
said the outage began shortly after 1 p.m. EDT.
By around 5:50 p.m. EDT, the GoDaddy.com
website and sites hosted by the company were
back up and running.
HP to dump 2,000 workers
Meg Whitman
Around the nation
OPINION 9
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
November election
Editor,
All of the experts and pundits claim
that Romney and Ryan are unlikeable
and unelectable. The polls show Obama
leading in the important swing states. Is
there something missing that we dont
know about? The Obama campaign has
recruited former president Bill Clinton
to join them on the campaign trail. If
Obama is likeable and leading in the
polls why do they need former
President Bill Clinton?
Keith C. De Filippis
San Jose
Leaf blowers
Editor,
Kudos to the mayor and folks of San
Mateo for trying for a leaf blower ban.
All the compelling reasons were men-
tioned in John Ebneters letter in the
Sept. 10 edition of the Daily Journal:
decrease in air quality due to constant
churning of dust, pollen and other par-
ticulates; spewing of toxic fumes;
obnoxious noise.
It is time for Palo Alto to follow San
Mateos lead and have the courage to
revisit this issue, after our failed leaf
blower ban on gas-powered machines.
The gas-powered leaf blowers have
again proliferated as any pedestrian or
biker in Palo Alto will tell you. San
Mateo would be wise to avoid the pit-
falls of Palo Altos awed enforcement
policy.
Steve Eittreim
Palo Alto
Tax the rich
Editor,
Your neighbor has ve cars, in pur-
chasing them; the neighbor has
enhanced the community by helping
all of the persons responsible for the
manufacturing, licensing, government
fees, insurance and supplies to operate.
You cannot afford a car at this time,
and believe that it is fair for you to
take one of your neighbors cars; in
doing so, you have helped no one but
yourself.
Your neighbor still has cars so he is
not really hurt, except now he is scared
to purchase any more for fear that you
or someone else will take it, too.
Now who are you hurting?
Randy Swan
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
By Art Kiesel
L
ast month, I wrote about pen-
sion reform and the governors
12-point plan toward achieving
some level of reform (Pension reform
in the Aug. 3 edition of the Daily
Journal). The Legislature has seemingly
been reluctant to address this issue until
recently. Quite frankly, I expected
Sacramento to pass on taking any
action on pension reform until at least
after the November election. However,
on Tuesday, Aug. 28, the state
announced legislation (AB 340) con-
cerning perhaps one of the most impor-
tant issues facing the nancial health of
municipalities: pension reform.
The process for this legislation is
shaping up to be much like other con-
troversial topics such as the state budg-
et and redevelopment. The state
Legislature has embraced last-minute
introduction of controversial legislation
as part of their methodology by allow-
ing very little time to analyze the merits
of such legislation. It does seem that
the people for whom our state elected
ofcials are supposed to represent are
not well served by the middle-of-the-
night tactics with the hasty process on
such important long-term issues.
The last budget, which contained
more than 700 pages, was presented
and passed in less than a week just so
our legislators could get paid, as dictat-
ed by Proposition 25. My experience
has told me that decisions made in
haste have seldom worked out in the
long run. The current pension reform
package was presented on Tuesday and
both houses of the Legislature are
expected to read, digest, gather input
from interested parties and form a well-
researched decision
by Friday. Along
with the pension
reform legislation
were other proposed
bills that the
Legislature consid-
ered in hopes of
speeding them
through the process
by the Aug. 31
recess. They were faced with many
bills to consider without really knowing
either their content or their long-term
ramications.
California municipalities are drown-
ing under the nancial burden of unsus-
tainable pensions and I do not believe
that hastily decided reform is in their
best interest nor is it in the best interest
of its citizens. We in Foster City have a
$21 million pension liability and, with
only $13 million by the end of this s-
cal year, that money will have to come
from somewhere some current and
mostly future Foster City taxpayers.
Our salaries and related benets
expense is approximately 77 percent of
the general fund operating budget and
increasing each year.
What appears to be the main theme to
the pension reform package is placed
upon future employees to the system,
those hired after Jan. 1, 2012. Although
the proposed legislation should have
long-term nancial benets to munici-
palities, the short-term issues are being
ignored. Those hired after Jan. 1, 2012
will not be the ones drawing pensions
for at least 15 years or more. So what is
being done to address the funds to pay
those retiring during the next 10 years?
Must we live with the continuing drain
on the unsustainable pension system for
another 5, 10 or more years? Where are
the funds going to come from to pay
for these unfunded pensions? More
than likely it will come from our pock-
etbooks in the form of increased taxes,
reduced services or a combination of
both.
The governor has stated this pension
reform legislation will make fundamen-
tal changes that rein in costs. But those
cost savings he is talking about will not
be seen for at least 15 years. Very little
is being done to address the near-term
pension problem. Because of many
decades of court rulings concerning
public employee retirements and bene-
ts, little has been done. What is it
going to take to address the short-term
pension issue more municipalities
ling for protection under bankruptcy
laws? I do applaud Sacramento for at
least addressing the long-awaited and
controversial pension reform legislation
in this election season.
The economy is not roaring back and
pensions are out of control especially
with the increased retirements from the
baby boomers. I have always been
someone with a can-do look on life.
If someone sees an outcome other than
a pending train wreck in the nancial
future of municipalities, please assist
me with seeing it.
Art Kiesel is the mayor of Foster City.
He can be reached at akiesel@fosterci-
ty.org or 573-7359.
Pension reform part II
Sept. 11, 2012
I
s today a regular day yet? A mundane, average day
like any other, when talk is dominated by the
weather and the latest sports headlines, when there
is nothing good on television, when the worst thing that
happens is running out of toothpaste.
Is it now the kind of day when the first thought in the
morning is of strong coffee and briefly playing hooky
from work instead of realizing how quickly another year
has passed? Has
enough time come
and gone?
Eleven years after
Sept. 11, 2001, this
day still isnt ordi-
nary. Never will be
again. Even for those
who werent physical-
ly present when the
planes crashed or had
a loved one ripped
away cannot erase the
indelible images of
fire and smoke, the
feelings of shock and
helplessness. The
fear, the anger, some-
times even the numbness no wonder it felt like
nobody could ever forget, let alone go on with their
lives.
Even a year after a tragedy, when pieces are still
being picked up and the light of a future only beginning
to emerge, the edges of memory are still sharp enough
to wound. The vigils are plentiful, the tears quick to
come. Questions may still outweigh answers and its
hard to believe life was different a mere 365 days ago.
Two years pass, then five, then eight. By 10, the memo-
ries like rocks have tumbled around the mind enough to
dull, if not quite polish. What then does the 11th
anniversary bring new other than continuing proof that a
nation, a community or an individual can eventually put
one foot in front the other like so many others who sur-
vived past anguishes?
For those further removed from the loss, life is
undoubtedly a lot closer to normal. Get the kids to
school, remember to pick up milk, decide what outfit to
set out for the next day. And, oh yeah, today is Sept. 11.
Those whose memories arent a firsthand nightmare or
who dont still hear voices long gone cant be blamed
for feeling like there is little left to say.
Two years after Sept. 9, 2010, the day isnt ordinary
either. People in other parts of the nation likely dont
think of it as the day a San Bruno neighborhood was
torn apart. Those outside the Bay Area likely dont
recall immediately that the date marks the second
anniversary of the gas pipeline explosion and fire that
killed eight and turned an unremarkable night on the
Peninsula into something completely opposite. But there
is still plenty to remember, plenty to feel. The entire
nation not relating doesnt make the event any less valid
or important.
One year after Sept. 9, 2011, the day isnt ordinary
either, at least not for me. That is the day my father
passed away. Unlike Sept. 11, there will never be scores
of documentaries about the event. Unlike San Bruno,
there will not be memorials and lawsuits. There are no
headlines, no books. The loss is not that of a nation or a
community but of a daughter. And, tumultuous relation-
ship with him aside, its fair to say a year certainly isnt
enough time to remove the sting.
I dont know if two years will be enough either. Or
three or five or 10. Or 11.
So while those of us in the business of chronicling
history are often called upon to sum it up with some
perfectly astute turn of phrase, frankly there are no such
things as the right words for everybody or every
tragedy.
Possibly it shows my failings as a writer, but I cannot
pretend to do justice to the experience of 9/11. I cannot
be more than an outsider to the stomach-turning loss of
family and friends in San Bruno. Honestly, I dont real-
ly even have the precise words for my own lifes recent
commemoration.
Maybe the best thing then is not to try. Maybe the
best way to mark 11 years, two years and in my case
one year is simply to count each year passed as a
victory and another step toward reaching a semblance of
normal.
Michelle Durands column Off the Beat runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-
5200 ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a
letter to the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com
Guest
perspective
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Save Your Home
By Pallavi Gogoi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Stocks slipped on
Wall Street as troubling economic news
from China and the U.S. outweighed
optimism about more stimulus from the
Federal Reserve.
The Dow Jones industrial average fell
52.35 points to close at 13,254.29 on
Monday. The Standard & Poors 500
slipped 8.84 points to 1,429.08 and the
Nasdaq composite fell 32.40 points to
3,104.02.
The S&P 500 and Nasdaq were
dragged down more than the Dow by a
drop in Apples stock, the largest com-
ponent of both indexes. Apple, which is
expected to announce its new iPhone on
Wednesday, fell $17.70, or 2.6 percent,
to $662.74.
The stumble marks a pause in a rally
last week that took the Dow and the S&P
500 to their highest levels in more than
four years.
Stock markets rose around the world
last week after the European Central
Bank announced a long-anticipated plan
to support struggling countries in the
European Union.
Investors are hopeful that the Fed will
act this week to support the U.S. econo-
my. The monetary policymaking body of
the Federal Reserve meets on
Wednesday and Thursday. Many antici-
pate a third round of bond purchases or
other support for the nancial system.
Federal Reserve chairman Ben
Bernanke indicated in a speech last
month that the central bank is inclined to
provide new stimulus to the U.S. econo-
my if its needed.
Since the speech, the government
reported weak growth in jobs last month,
heightening the case for more stimulus.
There have also been new signs that
manufacturing and construction are
slowing down.
On Monday, the Fed also reported that
Americans cut back on their credit card
use in July for the second straight month,
suggesting many remain cautious in the
face of high unemployment and slow
economic growth. Total borrowing
dipped $3.3 billion in July from June to
a seasonally adjusted $2.705 trillion.
The economy is not going through a
nosedive, so Im not sure we need anoth-
er stimulus, said John Manley, chief
equity strategist at Wells Fargo
Advantage Funds. But Bernanke would
rather make a mistake going in early
with stimulus than not, especially since
the markets will not tolerate inaction.
There was also discouraging news out
of China, giving investors more reason
to worry that one of the most important
engines of the global economy is sput-
tering. Auto sales growth slowed in
August and imports shrank unexpected-
ly. Factory output also slid to three-year
low last month. The Chinese president
warned growth could slow further.
Stocks end lower
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Monday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
LeapFrog Enterprises Inc., down 80 cents at
$8.35
Shares of the educational toy maker fell after
retailer Toys R Us announced plans to launch
its own tablet computer for children.
Hewlett-Packard Co., up 1 cent at $17.43
The technology company said that it is
planning to cut about 2,000 more jobs than it
had previously announced,to a total of 29,000.
Transocean Ltd., down $1.65 at $45.95
The offshore drilling rig contractor is selling 38
of its shallow water rigs to Shelf Drilling for
about $855 million in cash.
Polaris Industries Inc., up $2.19 at $80.76
A Citi analyst said that sales of the companys
all-terrain vehicles are strong, according to
dealer checks theanalyst did.
Sprint Nextel Corp., up 12 cents at $5.15
A Nomura Securities analyst upgraded
shares of the cellphone company to Buy
from Neutral, saying that it is improving
margins.
Talisman Energy Inc., up 24 cents at $14.41
The Canadian oil and gas company said that
its president and chief executive agreed to
step down, effective immediately.
Nasdaq
Titan Machinery Inc., down $5.95 at $19.41
The farm equipment retailer posted lower-
than-expected second-quarter net income
and cut its prot prediction for the full year.
Geron Corp., down $1.62 at $1.28
The drugmaker ended an experimental
study of its cancer drug imetelstat and said
it doesnt expect it to succeed in a second
study.
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Together well go far
<< Raiders fall to Chargers in opener, page 12
Notre Dame-Belmont takes tennis title, page 13
Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012
GIANTS BASEBALL: LATE SURGE NOT ENOUGH, SAN FRANCISCO FALLS TO THE ROCKIES >>> PAGE 12
H
igh school offensive linemen often
spend most of their careers in
anonymity. Toiling selessly to
open holes for running backs, who get most
of the praise when they rip off a big play, or
backpedaling, trying to protect the quarter-
back, giving him enough time to throw the
ball before the defense collapses around him.
Every now and then, however, an offensive
lineman gets a chance
to have all eyes on
him and not
because he made a
glaring mistake. San
Mateos Amar
Kaddura got a chance
to be the focus of the
Bearcats highlight
reel during their 40-
21 loss to Aragon
Friday night, even if
the play didnt count.
Following San
Mateos rst touch-
down, the Bearcats
lined up to kick the extra point. The snap,
however, sailed over the head of place-kicker
Larry Campbell, who scrambled back to pick
it up. He briey thought of trying to run the
ball in from 25 yards out, but instead threw a
perfect spiral toward the end zone. To no one
in particular, really.
The only one waiting there was Kaddura,
who not only made the catch, but bulled his
way across the goal line with an Aragon
defender draped all over him.
After Kaddura was nally wrestled down,
his teammates mobbed him in the end zone.
Unfortunately, there would be no 2-point
conversion because as an offensive lineman,
he is ineligible to catch the ball. Unlike the
college or professional ranks where linemen
can declare themselves as eligible offensive
players which would allow them to catch the
A moment in
the spotlight
See LOUNGE, Page 15
Thaure leads stout Sacred Heart Prep defense
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Its tting that Sacred Heart Preps Daniel
Thaure plays the gator position on the foot-
ball eld for the Gators.
In two games this season, the Gators are
undefeated and at the heart of that success is a
defense that has given up only nine points.
Thaures play at the gator position has a lot to
do with that.
Like our coach keeps telling us: This is one
of the better defenses hes had at Sacred Heart
in a while, Thaure said. And I know a lot of
the players know that. But
he tells us, pride comes
before the fall. That moti-
vates us a lot. I dont want
our defense to get too
cocky. We try to humble
the team a lot and play
every game like its the
first game and we have
something to prove. I think
we plan on playing like
that the rest of the season.
You wouldnt blame Thaure and the Gators
for feeling condent. In last Fridays 27-3 win
over Mountain View, the Gators turned the
Spartans into a one-dimensional team. A
cohesiveness on defense was the key to the
win.
And in the middle of all that fun was
Thaure, who accounted for 11 tackles in the
win.
For his efforts, Thaure is the San Mateo
Daily Journal Athlete of the Week.
Honestly, I felt like our whole team was in
the zone that game, Thaure said. Everyone
was moving to the ball quickly. Our lineback-
ers were playing really well. Our defensive
backs were covering the at perfectly. I felt
we were really connected, talking to each
other and I felt like we stuck it to the
Mountain View offense. We shut them down
pretty well.
We knew No. 5 (Marcus Jones) was a pret-
ty big threat to our defense. So we read a lot
of the plays, how to read their sets and what to
know about them. We were coached well. We
knew they would attack the ats and I think
we covered that pretty well.
In shutting down Mountain View, the Gators
Athlete of the Week
Daniel Thaure
See GATORS, Page 15
Niners make a statement
REUTERS
After an impressive 30-22 road win against the Green Bay Packers, 49ers head coach Jim Harbaugh has his San Francisco team riding high.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA Jim Harbaughs San
Francisco 49ers showed all the same poise and
big playmaking ability not to mention dom-
inant defense against NFL MVP Aaron
Rodgers in a season-opening statement vic-
tory at Green Bay as they did in coming so
close to a Super Bowl last season.
Who said the reigning NFC West champions
couldnt do it all again even with a far more
daunting schedule?
Its a big win, three-time Pro Bowl running
back Frank Gore said Monday, a day after rush-
ing for a key 23-yard touchdown with 8:41 left
at Lambeau Field. Weve got to keep going,
keep working.
The Niners snapped an eight-game losing
streak in Green Bay dating to 1990. More than
that, they showed they are a legitimate NFC
contender for the second straight season.
From the day the schedule came out, many
looked at San Franciscos games and saw the
list as much more challenging than a year ago
starting in Week 1 on the road against the
Packers.
Even Harbaugh acknowledged his team
might not have as many wins in 2012. Now, the
Niners are 7-2 on the road since he took over
before last season and became NFL Coach of
the Year. That road mark ranks second in team
See 49ERS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Murray wins U.S. Open
REUTERS
Andy Murray celebrates a winner in Mondays U.S. Open nal.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK His considerable
lead, and a chance at history, slip-
ping away, Andy Murray dug deep
for stamina and mental strength,
outlasting Novak Djokovic in a
thrilling ve-set, nearly ve-hour
U.S. Open nal Monday.
It had been 76 years since a
British man won a Grand Slam sin-
gles championship and, at least for
Murray, it was well worth the wait.
Ending a nations long drought,
and snapping his own four-nal skid
in majors, Murray finally pulled
through with everything at stake on
a Grand Slam stage, shrugging off
defending champion Djokovics
comeback bid to win 7-6 (10), 7-5,
2-6, 3-6, 6-2.
Relief is probably the best word I
would use to describe how Im feel-
ing just now, Murray said, adding:
You do think: Is it ever going to
happen?
Yes, Murray already had showed
he could come up big by winning
the gold medal in front of a home
crowd at the London Olympics last
month. But this was different. This
was a Grand Slam tournament, the
standard universally used to meas-
ure tennis greatness and the
287th since Britains Fred Perry
won the 1936 U.S. Championships,
as the event was known back then.
He deserved to win this Grand
Slam more than anybody, Djokovic
said of Murray, who will rise to No.
3 in the rankings behind No. 1
Roger Federer and No. 2 Djokovic.
Murray vs. Djokovic was a test of
will as much as skill, lasting 4
hours, 54 minutes, tying the record
for longest U.S. Open nal. The
rst-set tiebreakers 22 points set a
tournament mark. They repeatedly
produced fantastic, tales-in-them-
selves points, lasting 10, 20, 30,
even 55 yes, 55! strokes,
counting the serve.
Giants rally falls short
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
.
DENVER Rockies pitcher
Alex White homered and Colorado
finally solved a struggling Ryan
Vogelsong, beating the San
Francisco Giants 6-5 Monday night
to snap a ve-game losing streak.
Buster Posey and Hunter Pence
went deep for the Giants, who lost
for only the second time in 10 road
games. San Franciscos lead in the
NL West was trimmed to ve games
over the idle Los Angeles Dodgers.
Trailing 6-2, the Giants got a two-
run homer from Posey in the sev-
enth inning off reliever Rex
Brothers and pulled within one in
the eighth. Brandon Crawford drew
a one-out walk from Matt Belisle,
pinch-hitter Aubrey Huff singled
and Angel Pagan followed with an
RBI double, his third hit of the
game.
Belisle got out of the jam by retir-
ing Marco Scutaro and Pablo
Sandoval.
Guillermo Moscoso (2-1) picked
up the victory by working two
innings, allowing one run on three
hits. Rafael Betancourt pitched a 1-
2-3 ninth for his 28th save in 33
chances.
Colorado manager Jim Tracy
was ejected in the bottom of the
seventh by second base umpire
Angel Campos after a heated argu-
ment over an inning-ending double
play. Campos ruled that Scutaro
tagged Josh Rutledge before
throwing to first to get Carlos
Gonzalez. Tracy, ejected for the
third time this season, argued that
Scutaro missed the tag.
The Rockies also lost catcher
Ramon Hernandez to a left ham-
string strain sustained while running
out a double in the fourth. He was
replaced by pinch-runner Wilin
Rosario, who advanced when Chris
Nelson reached on rst baseman
Brandon Belts elding error and
came home on Charlie Blackmons
double-play grounder.
Vogelsong (12-8) allowed four
runs and six hits over ve innings in
losing for the rst time in seven
career starts against the Rockies
while with the Giants. The outing
extended a tough stretch over his
last six starts since Aug. 13 in which
he has gone 2-3, allowing 28 runs
on 43 hits in 26 1-3 innings for an
ERA of 9.57.
As stay strong against Angels
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANAHEIM Jarrod Parker
pitched seven innings of three-hit
ball, Brandon Moss and Cliff
Pennington homered, and the
Oakland Athletics snapped the Los
Angeles Angels six-game winning
streak with a 3-1 victory Monday
night.
Coco Crisp hit a leadoff triple and
scored for the As, who opened a key
four-game series against their
California rivals with a measure of
revenge for the Angels three-game
sweep in Oakland last week. Those
are the only losses since Aug. 23 for
the As, who have won 13 of 16.
With his second straight impres-
sive start against Los Angeles after a
hard-luck loss last week, Parker (10-
8) and his bullpen held the Angels
surging lineup to four hits. Los
Angeles scored just one run for only
the second time in its last 22 games.
Ryan Cook worked the eighth,
and Grant Balfour nished unevent-
fully for his 17th save.
Dan Haren (10-11) pitched into
the seventh inning, allowing just
four hits and striking out four. But
Oakland turned those hits into three
runs, and Haren took his rst loss
since Aug. 16.
Torii Hunter drove in Mike Trout
with a third-inning double for the
Angels (77-64), who had won 11 of
12 and 15 of 18 in their desperate
late surge to join the playoff race.
With its rst home loss in seven
games, Los Angeles blew a chance
to pull within a half-game of
Baltimore (78-62) for the second
AL wild-card spot. Tampa Bay (77-
63) is between the Orioles and the
Angels.
Oakland (80-60), which is in the
rst wild-card slot, is 20 games over
.500 for the rst time since the end
of the 2006 season also the year
of the As last postseason appear-
ance. The As also pulled within
three games of idle Texas (83-57)
atop the AL West.
Oakland has won eight of the
clubs last 11 meetings at Angel
Stadium.
SPORTS 13
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Menlo College soccer bounces back nicely
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Lady Oaks brief two-game
road swing in Arizona concluded
with a win and a loss, after Menlo
College dropped their soccer opener
on Friday to Embry-Riddle (2-3-1),
before bouncing back with a 3-0
win over Arizona Christian (1-2-1)
on Saturday. The split moves the
Oaks record to 4-2 a victory
away from duplicating their 2011
win total.
The teams combined for four rst
half scores, with the Lady Oaks
coming out of the rst 45 minutes
down 3-1 the eventual nal out-
come.
We didnt play poorly that rst
game, said Menlo College head
coach Scott Myers. We were in
some difcult conditions, the eld
was wet and we were able to deal
with it poorly those rst few min-
utes. The other team beat us on it.
But really the second half, we
turned it around and did extremely
well.
Menlo had their hands full early,
thanks to a rapid-re Eagles goal
just 1:57 into the match. Senior for-
ward Kelsey Anderson found the
back of the net to give Riddle the
quick 1-0 advantage. Anderson
would play a factor later in the rst
stanza, helping produce Riddles
second goal of the half by setting up
freshman Kalyn Goodenough in the
23rd minute for a 2-0 lead.
The Oaks responded behind jun-
ior Natalie Ingrams fth goal of the
season coming in the 24th minute,
but Goodenough was at it again
with a penalty shot score in the 31st
minute to give Riddle their 3-1
advantage.
The Lady Oaks would show their
resiliency just 24 hours later, rack-
ing up a 3-0 victory over the
Firestorm of Arizona Christian.
We set simple goals for the
weekend, Myers said. And really
we able to do that. The unique thing
about the second game was we were
able to start a couple kids in their
rst game, which was a key for us.
It shows us a bit about our depth.
The Oaks back line of the
defense, led by sophomore Kayla
Cisneroz, kept ACU to six total
shots throughout the course of 90
minutes.
Offensively, Ingram continued her
impressive early season play. The
San Jose native helped open the
scoring with an assist on an Amanda
Martinez goal in the 16th minute
and then put one in the back of the
net less than 10 minutes later.
Ingram now has six goals in six
games, while Martinez has scorched
in two herself.
She started off the season as a
defender and weve kind of moved
her to a forward, Myers said of
Ingram. And shes been extremely
successful for us because she has a
uniqueness to her that isnt found in
the girls game where shes willing
to go after it and be physical and
really work hard. Shes pretty
aggressive, which is a pretty big
thing for her.
Menlo expanded on their 2-0
intermission lead thanks to an Erika
Savela score in the 60th minute of
play. Savela had assisted on the
Ingram goal to give her a three-point
evening. Junior Erica Hunting set
up the Savela score with a through
ball to help push the Oaks margin to
3-0.
The defense and goalkeeper
Whitney Galindo took it from there,
as Galindo made ve saves for her
third shutout of the year. Menlo also
proved to be relentless in their
attack with 14 total shots, nine of
which were on point.
Savelas efforts for the week
earned her the Cal Pacs Player of
the Week award.
As of Sept. 8, Savela was rst in
the conference in assists (5), tied for
rst in game winning goals (1), sec-
ond in points (11) and shots (17)
and tied for sixth in goals (3).
Weve been fortunate early,
Myers said. Weve been able to
win games that have sent us on the
right track. The girls are getting a
taste for winning and they now
know what it takes to win.
On the Menlo mens soccer side,
the Oaks sent their fans home happy
in the 2012 Wunderlich Field open-
er, pulling through for a 3-1 victory
over Westmont College (1-1).
Two early second half scores
helped Menlo pull away, as the
Oaks turned a 1-0 advantage into a
3-0 cushion.
The win extends Menlos record
to 2-0-1.
Menlo College senior Alex
Palomarez had ve saves and was
selected as the California Pacic
Conference Mens Soccer
Defensive Player of the Week fol-
lowing his performances.
As of Sept. 8, Palomarez was rst
in the conference in goals against
average (.62), tied for first in
shutouts (1) and sixth in saves per
match (4).
NDNU VOLLEYBALL GETS
MIXED RESULTS AT ROUTE 92
The Route 92 Showdown had its
ups and down for the Notre Dame
de Namur volleyball team.
The second day of the Route 92
Showdown was more successful for
the Argos volleyball team as they
picked up their rst win of the sea-
son. NDNU rallied back from a
two-set decit to Holy Names to
take the nal three sets. However, in
the nightcap, the Argos fell to San
Francisco State in straight sets.
The Argos beat the Hawks 22-25,
18-25, 30-28, 26-24, 17-15.
Jennifer Jasper led all players
with a season-high 19 kills while
Brooke DeMiguel added 15 and
Kawai Robins-Hardy tacked on 12.
Michelle Hines had 28 digs with
Anna Jayo and Jaqueline Harper
combining for 49 assists. Jasper also
led the Argos with eight blocks.
In the nightcap, SFSU beat the
Argos in three sets.
The Gators came out on re, tak-
ing the rst two games by a score of
25-11 and 25-13. SFSU hit .281 in
the rst set before hitting .536 in the
second on 17 kills. In the third set,
NDNU tied the game at 23-23
before the Gators took the nal two
points to win the match.
DeMiguel paced the Argos with
nine kills while Anna Jayo dished
out 23 assists. Kell Ostello led the
way with 13 kills for San Francisco
State while Megan Johnson added
nine.
Jasper was named to the Route 92
All-Tournament team.
WINGATE-PEARCE
STRIKES AGAIN FOR ARGOS
Sophomore Mikhail Wingate-
Pearce once again delivered the
game-winning-goal, scoring with
1:25 remaining to give the Notre
Dame de Namur mens soccer team
a 1-0 victory over Westmont this
weekend.
Wingate-Pearce headed home a
free kick cross from Jesus Gonzalez
to help the Argos improve to 3-1.
The win marked the second
straight game Wingate-Pearce
ended for the Argos after scoring the
game-winner in overtime against
San Francisco State.
It also marked the third consecu-
tive game the center back has scored
a goal.
In the 89th minute, Miguel
Vasquez drew a foul on the left side,
giving NDNU a free kick.
Gonzalez lined up the kick and
delivered a perfect cross to the front
of the net. Wingate-Pearce then rose
above everyone to head the ball into
the right side of the goal.
The assist was Gonzalezs fourth
of the season in as many games
while Wingate-Pearce scored his
team-leading third goal.
The Argos held a 21-7 shot advan-
tage for the game, putting seven
shots on target. NDNU used three
goalies in the contest with Charvet
earning the victory with 54 minutes
of scoreless action.
Notre Dame-Belmont battles the heat, wins Tennis Classic
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Notre Dame High Schools varsi-
ty tennis coach Margaret Goldsmith
suspects her team elded a couple
of inquiries about their choice of
clothing Monday morning at school.
Instead of their usual uniforms,
the Lady Tigers sported champi-
onship swag from a hard-fought
tournament victory at the California
Girls Tennis Classic in Clovis.
The green-aqua colored T-shirts
were a testament to the teams per-
severance, Goldsmith said.
When your friends ask you, oh,
whats that? Tell them you earned
that, Goldsmith said, and the girls
were really excited to wear those
shirts and show off their success.
And Im hoping theres a trickle
down. People want to do things that
are successful. So I think its going
to be a huge motivator within the
school.
The Lady Tigers won four of their
ve matches over the weekend tour-
nament, taking the Division 7 title
4-2 in a match against Golden West
High School.
My girls played really, really
well, Goldsmith said. Being from
the Bay Area, they certainly werent
used to the temperatures. But they
just dug in, played well and it was
truly a team effort. We got contribu-
tions from everyone.
Goldsmith said her team battled
the elements, with temperatures
reaching 100 degrees on Friday and
98 on Saturday.
I denitely think that most of my
players played in the off-season,
Goldsmith said of her teams ability
to perform well despite the heat.
They played all summer long and
thats really where they dug deep.
Notre Dames road to the champi-
onship began with a team effort in
Fridays round robin play. Alivia
Horsely, Maddy Ching Lyddie
Daily and Riley McGlinichy went
undefeated in the round robin por-
tion of the tournament. Three of the
teams victories were of the 6-0
variety.
Going in we knew that we had to
win as many games as we possibly
could and thats really what deter-
mined us winning the round robin,
Goldsmith said. Those (round
robin matches) were huge.
Goldsmith highlighted the effort
See TIGERS, Page 16
SPORTS 14
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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history to George Seifert, who won his rst 16
road games.
Poise comes from condence. Youd be
darn surprised if they didnt have condence,
they work extremely hard, they prepare so
well and thats something that we need to
keep doing, Harbaugh said Monday. The
way we work, the way we prepare is one of
the best things weve got going for us. You
want to see that continue.
Alex Smith was an impressive 20 of 26 for
211 yards and two touchdowns for a 125.6
quarterback rating despite being sacked four
times. He has thrown 185 straight passes
without an interception to break Hall of
Famer Steve Youngs franchise mark of 184.
Smith, the 2005 No. 1 overall draft pick,
tossed only ve interceptions all of last sea-
son. He rallied his team from behind ve
times, including a 36-32 victory against the
favored Saints in the NFC divisional playoffs.
The defense that impressed each week dur-
ing the 2011 resurgence didnt back down
from Rodgers all day, either, capitalizing with
NaVorro Bowmans fourth-quarter intercep-
tion to set up Gores touchdown run.
You turn on the TV or you hear people say,
No, the Packers are going to beat them by
two or three touchdowns and you hear every-
body saying all this and that, linebacker
Patrick Willis said. But we know what we
have and we have complete condence in one
another here across the board offense,
defense and special teams. As long as we have
that and were still together, I think were
capable of doing anything.
And All-Pro kicker David Akers did it yet
again, nailing a 63-yarder for one of his three
eld goals on the day all from at least 40
yards. Akers set the NFL single-season record
for made eld goals with 44 in 2011, his rst
season with San Francisco.
Continued from page 11
49ERS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA Jim Harbaugh would
love it if his postgame handshake with Detroit
coach Jim Schwartz last season was ancient
history 11 months later.
If only. Not this week. Not with two unbeat-
en NFC powers set to face off in prime time
Sunday night, when the Lions visit the reign-
ing NFC West champion San Francisco 49ers
at Candlestick Park.
Harbaugh refers to it as a mini controver-
sy and completely irrelevant, eager to keep
the focus on the players for both teams.
Running back Frank Gore insists that every-
body has moved forward, especially after a
30-22 season-opening victory Sunday at
Green Bay.
Our approach with the mini controversies
are really to give them the attention that they
deserve, which isnt much, Harbaugh said
Monday. People who will choose to use that
to promote this game, or any other game, I
think are really missing the point. The game is
just so much bigger. As a rule of thumb, I have
too much respect for the men who play this
game, on both sides, and too much respect for
the game to give it anything (more) than it
deserves.
After a 25-19 comeback win last Oct. 16 at
Ford Field, Harbaugh infuriated Schwartz
with a rm handshake and backslap. The men
had to be separated as they left the eld.
Were past that. Coach isnt worried about
that, Gore said Monday, a day after rushing
for a crucial 23-yard touchdown with 8:41
remaining against the Packers.
As surprising as that moment was,
Harbaughs players got a bit of a thrill seeing
their leader become so charged up after a
monumental win that put them at 5-1 on the
way to a 13-3 record and a run to the NFC
championship game.
Yet there were the constant hassles of hav-
ing to answer questions about the incident
from friends and family everywhere, not to
mention from the media.
Harbaugh didnt even want to address
whether his players were red up from the
handshake. He said afterward he would work
to improve his postgame greetings, though he
also wouldnt elaborate Monday on how thats
going.
To put it next to the game itself is missing
the point in my opinion, Harbaugh said. I
dont really know that I have any more that I
could possibly add to it.
Harbaughs handshake a non-issue
Raiders drop MNF opener
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Philip Rivers and the San
Diego Chargers capitalized on their oppo-
nents mistakes instead of making errors of
their own.
Rivers threw a 6-yard touchdown pass to
Malcom Floyd and Nate Kaeding kicked ve
eld goals to spoil Dennis Allens debut as
Oakland coach by beating the Raiders 22-14
on Monday night.
The Raiders were looking to start a new era
on a positive note but were done in by an
offense that couldnt score a touchdown until
the nal minute and three botched punts after
an injury to Pro Bowl long snapper Jon
Condo.
The Chargers did enough to win on a night
they started undrafted rookie Mike Harris at
left tackle and were missing starting running
back Ryan Mathews and receiver Vincent
Brown to injuries.
San Diego protected Harris by throwing
short often with 16 of Rivers 24 completions
going to running backs and tight ends. Rivers
threw for 231 yards, but was sacked just once
and did not turn the ball over after having 20
interceptions a year ago.
Oakland had its own problems with injuries.
The absence of deep-threat receivers Denarius
Moore (hamstring) and Jacoby Ford (left foot)
left Carson Palmer mostly throwing under-
neath to Darren McFadden, who caught a
career-high 13 passes. A head injury to Condo
in the second quarter proved to be even more
signicant when backup long snapper Travis
Goethel had to ll in.
Early in the third quarter, the Raiders lined
up to go for it on fourth-and-2 from the San
Diego 48. But after a penalty for 12 men in the
huddle, Oakland decided to punt. Goethels
snap rolled back to Lechler, who was tackled
for a loss, giving San Diego the ball at the
Raiders 39. That set up a 28-yard eld goal by
Kaeding.
After Oakland was stopped on its next drive,
Lechler set up closer to Goethel, whose snap
made it back in the air. But Dante Rosario
broke through for the first block against
Lechler since 2006 a year before Condo
joined the team. The Chargers once again had
to settle for a short eld goal and led 16-6
heading into the fourth quarter.
Goethel rolled another snap back early in
the fourth quarter, once again giving San
Diego the ball in Oakland territory, setting up
Kaedings career-high tying fth eld goal to
make it 22-6.
Palmer nally got Oakland into the end
zone with 54 seconds left on a 2-yard pass to
rookie Rod Streater and the two connected for
a 2-point conversion to make it 22-14.
SPORTS 15
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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ball, there is no such rule in high school. As
a result, San Mateo was agged for having
an ineligible receiver downeld.
Not that the play impacted the game.
Aragon went on to win handily, but for a few
moments, Kaddura got to experience what it
feels like to be a receiver. As the referee
came to the sideline to get in position for the
ensuing kickoff, I told him, Aw, cmon. Let
him have it.
***
A pair of college seniors of which San
Mateo County fans are familiar are leading a
resurgence for the San Jose State football
program. Defensive end Travis Johnson
(Kings Academy) and running back
DeLeon Elkridge (Serra) had huge games
during the Spartans 45-13 win over U.C.
Davis Saturday, helping even the Spartans
record at 1-1.
Johnson had such a big game Saturday, he
was named the Western Athletic
Conferences Defensive Player of the Week.
He had six tackles including a team-
record four sacks during the win. Johnson
has 23 sacks during his college career, which
is the active leader in the nation.
Eskridge, who was held in check against
Stanford two weeks ago, broke loose for 130
yards and three touchdowns on 16 carries.
Eskridge, who spent his rst three seasons at
University of Minnesota, transferred to San
Jose State last year and sat out, per NCAA
rules. Also seeing some playing time for the
Spartans is former Woodside standout Jason
Simpson, who is now a junior with the
Spartans.
San Jose State coach Mike MacIntyre, in
his third year with the Spartans, has the team
on the upswing this season after slowly
building the program the last two years. Hes
focused on recruiting the top talent in the
Central Coast Section and that talent is start-
ing to pay off. Twenty-nine of the 108 play-
ers (27 percent) listed on the roster are from
schools in the CCS.
The Spartans game against Colorado State
will be broadcast on ESPN 3 at 5 p.m.
Saturday. A win would put San Jose State at
2-1 for the rst time since 2008, when the
Spartans nished 6-6.
***
The San Francisco 49ers pulled off one of
the biggest upsets on opening weekend of
the NFL season when they went into
Lambeau Field and beat the Green Bay
Packers at home for the rst time in 22 years.
I put upset in quote marks because Im not
that surprised the 49ers won the game. I also
would not have been surprised to see Green
Bay come out on top. Its only an upset in
that many experts had Green Bay winning.
A huge win? For sure. Given the Packers
won the Super Bowl two seasons ago, went
15-1 in the regular season last year and were
one of the experts favorites to represent the
NFC in the Super Bowl this season, the win
cannot be overstated. The offense looked
awesome at times, while the defense picked
up where it left off last season as one of the
best in the game.
However, it is just one game. A lot of fans
are already in a delirium, all but anointing
the 49ers a spot in the Super Bowl. Settle
down. Its only one game, an impressive
game to be sure, but just one game. What
happens if they lose to Detroit this week?
Those same fans crowing about the Super
Bowl will want Harbaugh red and Alex
Smith benched.
It was one game. Much like the players,
fans cant get too high following a win or too
low after a loss. Maintain an even keel and
lets wait until the playoffs before we anoint
anyone anything. I mean, if we based the
Super Bowl off one game, it would be 49ers
and Jets. Did you see how well the Jets
played Sunday? They put up even more
points than the 49ers.
Dont get me wrong. The win makes the
49ers one of the teams to beat in the NFC,
but that also means they will be getting
everyones best shot every week. No more
sneaking up on opponents this year or won-
dering if theyre for real. San Francisco is for
real. Now the 49ers have to go out and
cement its status as one of the best in the
NFL, beginning with the Lions Sunday night.
Gators put a lid on an offense that averaged
nearly 30 points a game last year.
We have a lot of veterans out there on D
from last year picking up where we left off,
Thaure said. And I feel like even though
some of our players on defense arent that big,
everyone is super aggressive to the ball and
the whole defense is just really quick. No mat-
ter who the running back is, or where every-
one plays, everyone ows to the ball pretty
well.
The Gators are in the middle of quite a start.
Theyre the only unbeaten Bay Division team
of the Peninsula Athletic League. And it looks
like theyre only getting better a week
before limiting the Spartans to three points,
they held Branham to six.
You just have to look at it like, we have one
more game left, Thaure said. We play every
game like its the last game. Our defense, we
just need to perform. When we start playing
teams like Terra Nova and Burlingame, that
have really strong offenses, we need to stop
them and keep playing like we can play.
Everyone needs to do their job.
Its great when we go into a game knowing
were the underdog and we come in and hit
them in the mouth the very rst play and
theyre not ready for us. I think we surprise
teams with how tough we are and how strong
we are. It gives us a good opportunity in the
game to take control.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
Continued from page 11
GATORS
16
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
of senior Meghan Ministri. While
she lost her match against
Ridgeview High School, Ministri
battled Amanpreet Sarai to the tune
of 6-7, 3-6 in a grueling 2 1/2 hour
marathon match played in that 100
degree heat. Those nine points were
big considering that Notre Dame
won the round robin portion of the
tournament via tie-breaker 59-49
based on total games won.
She fought for every single
point, Goldsmith said. Whether
we won or lost its really easy in
a second match after you lose a
tough tiebreaker to go away and she
didnt. Thats perseverance right
there.
On top of those four players,
Goldsmith said seniors Rebecca
Boghossian and Paige Kingery
stepped up big for the Lady Tigers.
Along with Ministri, the Lady Tiger
seniors showed incredible leader-
ship.
I was very impressed with all
three of them, Goldsmith said.
They gave their effort. They con-
tinued to motivate. As the matches
were going on, while theyre in their
own match, theyre going lets go
Tigers throughout the court.
Theyre condent. They work hard.
They show up day in and day out.
So I think strong leadership from
those girls in particular really set
the tone for the team. I think at a
certain level when you play tennis,
you might give up on yourself, but I
dont think any of those girls gave
up on the team.
The Lady Tigers werent the only
local team that performed well at
the California Girls Tennis Classic.
Playing in the tournaments top
division, Menlo High School placed
fourth.
According to Menlo head coach
Bill Shine, The singles players for
the Lady Knights were the highlight
of the two-day event. The girls had
an impressive win over the highly
ranked Corona del Mar team 4-3.
Continued from page 13
TIGERS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 87 54 .617
Atlanta 81 61 .570 6 1/2
Philadelphia 70 71 .496 17
New York 65 76 .461 22
Miami 63 79 .444 24 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 84 57 .596
St. Louis 75 65 .536 8 1/2
Pittsburgh 72 67 .518 11
Milwaukee 70 71 .496 14
Chicago 55 86 .390 29
Houston 44 97 .312 40
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 79 62 .560
Los Angeles 74 67 .525 5
Arizona 69 72 .489 10
San Diego 67 75 .472 12 1/2
Colorado 57 83 .407 21 1/2
MondaysGames
Philadelphia 3, Miami 1
Cincinnati 4, Pittsburgh 3, 14 innings
Washington 5, N.Y. Mets 1
Chicago Cubs 4, Houston 1
Milwaukee 4, Atlanta 1
Colorado 6, San Francisco 5
San Diego 11, St. Louis 3
TuesdaysGames
Miami (Eovaldi 4-11) at Philadelphia (Halladay 9-7),
4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Correia 10-8) at Cincinnati (Leake 7-9),
4:10 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 10-8) at N.Y. Mets
(Dickey 18-4), 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Germano 2-6) at Houston (Lyles 3-
11), 5:05 p.m.
Atlanta (T.Hudson 14-5) at Milwaukee (Estrada 2-
6), 5:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 14-10) at Colorado
(Chacin 2-5), 5:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 12-8) at Arizona (I.Kennedy
12-11), 6:40 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 79 61 .564
Baltimore 78 62 .557 1
Tampa Bay 77 63 .550 2
Toronto 64 75 .460 14 1/2
Boston 63 78 .447 16 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 76 64 .543
Detroit 73 67 .521 3
Kansas City 63 77 .450 13
Cleveland 59 82 .418 17 1/2
Minnesota 59 82 .418 17 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 83 57 .593
Oakland 80 60 .571 3
Los Angeles 77 64 .546 6 1/2
Seattle 67 74 .475 16 1/2
MondaysGames
Minnesota 7, Cleveland 2
Chicago White Sox 6, Detroit 1
Oakland 3, L.A. Angels 1
TuesdaysGames
Tampa Bay (M.Moore 10-9) at Baltimore (Mig.Gon-
zalez 6-4), 4:05 p.m.
Seattle (Er.Ramirez 0-2) at Toronto (Morrow 8-5),
4:07 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 13-10) at Boston (Lester 9-
11), 4:10 p.m.
Cleveland (U.Jimenez 9-15) at Texas (M.Harrison
15-9), 5:05 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 8-8) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy
10-10), 5:10 p.m.
Kansas City (W.Smith 4-7) at Minnesota (Diamond
11-6), 5:10 p.m.
Oakland (Straily 1-0) at L.A. Angels (Williams 6-7),
7:05 p.m.
WednesdaysGames
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
NL STANDINGS AL STANDINGS
PENINSULAATHLETIC LEAGUE
BayDivision
Sacred Heart Prep 2-0
Aragon 1-0
Burlingame 1-1
Menlo-Atherton 1-1
Half Moon Bay 0-2
Terra Nova 0-2
OceanDivision
Menlo School 2-0
Sequoia 2-0
South City 1-1
Jefferson 0-2
Kings Academy 0-2
Woodside 0-2
LakeDivision
Carlmont 1-1
El Camino 1-1
Mills 0-1-1
Capuchino 0-2
Hillsdale 0-2
San Mateo 0-2
WESTCATHOLICATHLETIC LEAGUE
Mitty 2-0
Riordan 2-0
Serra 1-0
Bellarmine 1-1
Sacred Heart Cath. 1-1
St. Ignatius 1-1
Valley Christian 1-1
St. Francis 0-2
PREP FOOTBALL
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFLSuspended Cleveland DB Joe Haden for
four games,without pay,for violatingthepolicyon
performance enhancing substances.
CHICAGO BEARSSigned OT Jonathan Scott.
WaivedPRyanQuigley.ReinstatedDTNateCollins
to the active roster.Signed TE Dedrick Epps to the
practice squad. Terminated the practice squad
contract of OT Cory Brandon.
GREEN BAYPACKERSReleased CB Brandian
Ross. Announced LB Erik Walden has been rein-
stated by the commissioner.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTSSigned G Trai Essex.
Waived T Mike Person and C A.Q. Shipley.
JACKSONVILLEJAGUARSSignedOTHerbTay-
lor and TE Stephen Spach. Released WR Brian
Robiskie and TE Colin Cloherty.
NEWYORK GIANTSSigned CB Terrence Fred-
erick and C Scott Wedige.Terminated the practice
squadcontractsof OTMatt McCantsandWRBran-
don Collins.
WASHINGTON REDSKINSSigned S Jordan
Pugh. Placed S Jordan Bernstine on injured re-
serve.
BASEBALL
Major LeagueBaseball
COMMISSIONERS OFFICESuspended free
agent RHP Frank Diaz, Cincinnati 3B Ernest
Vasquez and Cincinnati RHP James Walczak 50
games each following positive tests under the
Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment
Program.
AmericanLeague
OAKLAND ATHLETICSRecalled RHP Jesse
Chavez, INF Daric Barton and INF Jemile Weeks
from Sacramento (PCL).
National League
COLORADOROCKIESRecalled LHP Josh Out-
man from Tulsa (Texas).
LOSANGELESDODGERSNamed Renata Sim-
ril senior vice president,external affairs and Rafael
Gonzalez director of community relations.
TRANSACTIONS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets 1 0 0 1.000 48 28
New England 1 0 0 1.000 34 13
Miami 0 1 0 .000 10 30
Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 28 48
South
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets 1 0 0 1.000 48 28
New England 1 0 0 1.000 34 13
Miami 0 1 0 .000 10 30
Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 28 48
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000 44 13
Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 13 44
Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 16 17
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 19 31
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 31 19
San Diego 1 0 0 1.000 22 14
Oakland 0 1 0 .000 14 22
Kansas City 0 1 0 .000 24 40
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 24 17
Washington 1 0 0 1.000 40 32
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 17 16
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 17 24
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 24 17
Washington 1 0 0 1.000 40 32
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 17 16
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 17 24
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 27 23
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 41 21
Minnesota 1 0 0 1.000 26 23
Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 22 30
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 1 0 0 1.000 20 16
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 30 22
St. Louis 0 1 0 .000 23 27
Seattle 0 1 0 .000 16 20
SundaysGames
Chicago 41, Indianapolis 21
Minnesota 26, Jacksonville 23, OT
Houston 30, Miami 10
New England 34,Tennessee 13
Washington 40, New Orleans 32
Atlanta 40, Kansas City 24
N.Y. Jets 48, Buffalo 28
Detroit 27, St. Louis 23
Philadelphia 17, Cleveland 16
Arizona 20, Seattle 16
San Francisco 30, Green Bay 22
Tampa Bay 16, Carolina 10
Denver 31, Pittsburgh 19
MondaysGames
Baltimore 44, Cincinnati 13
San Diego 22, Oakland 14
Thursday, Sep. 13
Chicago at Green Bay, 5:20 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 16
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 10 a.m.
Arizona at New England, 10 a.m.
Minnesota at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, 10 a.m.
Oakland at Miami, 10 a.m.
Dallas at Seattle, 1:05 p.m.
Washington at St. Louis, 1:05 p.m.
Tennessee at San Diego, 1:25 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 1:25 p.m.
Detroit at San Francisco, 5:20 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 17
Denver at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m.
NFL
Rockies
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/18
@Colorado
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/6
Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/21
@Portland
3:30p.m.
NBC
10/27
@Chivas
7:30p.m.
CSN+
9/15
vs.Timbers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/19
@Seattle
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/23
@Dbacks
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/16
vs.FCDallas
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/29
Orioles
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/14
@Tigers
4:15p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/18
Orioles
6:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/15
@Rockies
5:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/12
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/12
Orioles
1:15p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/16
Rockies
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/17
@Dbacks
6:40p.m.
NBC
9/14
@Rockies
5:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/11
@Angels
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/13
@Dbacks
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/15
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/11
@Jets
10a.m.
FOX
9/30
vs.Seattle
5:20p.m.
NFL-NET
10/18
vs.Bills
4:25p.m.
CBS
10/7
@Arizona
5:30p.m.
FOX
10/29
vs.Giants
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/14
vs.Lions
5:20p.m.
NBC
9/16
@ Vikings
10a.m.
FOX
9/23
@Broncos
1:05p.m.
CBS
9/30
vs.Jaguars
1:25p.m.
CBS
10/21
BYE
10/7
@Chiefs
1:15p.m.
CBS
10/28
@Falcons
10a.m.
CBS
10/14
@Miami
10a.m.
CBS
9/16
vs.Steelers
1:25p.m.
CBS
9/23
LOCAL/WORLD 17
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Iraqi VP rejects unjust verdict in terror trial
BAGHDAD From self-exile in Turkey, Iraqs fugitive
vice president scoffed Monday at a Baghdad court that sen-
tenced him to the gallows for mastermind-
ing death squads against rivals, describing it
as a puppet of the prime minister and say-
ing he will not return to appeal the verdict.
The conviction of Tariq al-Hashemi, one
of the nations highest-ranking Sunni of-
cials, rids Shiite Prime Minister Nouri al-
Maliki of a top political foe while threaten-
ing to deepen the rift between Iraqs main
Muslim sects as the nation struggles to
achieve stability nine months after U.S.
troops withdrew.
Hours after the verdict was announced on Sunday, insurgents
launched erce bombings against mostly Shiite neighborhoods
in the capital, killing 92 and wounding more than 360 in one of
Iraqs deadliest days this year. In a statement posted on a mili-
tant website Monday, Iraqs wing of al-Qaida claimed respon-
sibility for the countrywide attacks and promised black days
ahead. Later in the day, a car bomb exploded outside a restau-
rant in southwest Baghdad, killing eight people and wounding
32, security and health ofcials said.
Appearing alternately affable and deant at a packed press
conference in Turkeys capital, al-Hashemi maintained his
innocence after being found guilty of organizing the murders of
a lawyer and a Shiite security ofcer.
The verdict is unjust, politicized, illegitimate and I will not
recognize it. It means nothing to me, al-Hashemi, who took
ofce in 2006, told reporters in Ankara. But I put it as a medal
of honor on my chest because it was al-Maliki, not anyone
else, behind it. For me, this proof that Im innocent.
Syrian defector says opposition can win
BEIRUT Syrias most prominent defector said in an inter-
view that aired Monday that he opposes any foreign military
intervention in the countrys civil war and that he is condent
the opposition can topple President Bashar Assads regime.
But Manaf Tlass, a Syrian general who was the rst member
of Assads inner circle to join the opposition, said the rebels
need weapons.
The Syrian people must not be robbed of their victory, they
must be given support, aid, arms, Tlass said in a recorded
interview that aired Monday on French television station BFM.
He called on outside powers to give the opposition all the
aid and support needed to topple Assad.
Foreign military intervention, however, could not provide a
solution to the conict, he said. The uprising against Assads
regime began in March 2011 with mostly peaceful protests
against the family dynasty that has ruled Syria for four decades.
But the battle has transformed into a civil war, and activists
estimate that at least 23,000 people have been killed.
Tlass defection in July was hailed as a resounding triumph
by many Syrian opposition activists. But many in the opposi-
tion are deeply suspicious of Tlass, saying he is just trying to
vault to power.
Around the world
Tariq
al-Hashemi
District, said the countrys education
system has been bogged down in an
engine of bureaucracy and needs to turn
to an engine of innovation.
We need to make education relevant
in the 21st century, Kanter said.
The Makerspace pilot program gives
students access to tools, materials and
expertise for developing creative proj-
ects that offer hands-on learning and
real-world science, technology, engi-
neering and mathematics applications.
Menlo School in Atherton is the only
San Mateo County school participating
in the pilot program.
One day, Kanter said, all public
schools should have access to the same
tools.
It is about learning through doing,
said Ron Galatolo, chancellor of the San
Mateo County Community College
District. Community colleges, he said,
have a mission to boost career and tech-
nical training.
Yesterdays event is part of the U.S.
Department of Educations third annual
back-to-school bus tour.
With funding from the Defense
Advanced Research Projects Agency, the
Mentor Makerspace program promotes
the collaborative practices of making in
high schools and introduces students to
tools for advanced manufacturing.
The programs developers are
OReilly Medias Make division, which
produces Make Magazine and Maker
Faire, and Otherlab, a developer of hard-
ware and software design tools.
On hand at yesterdays event were
several science vendors and school
teachers who showed their innovative
teaching tools and projects completed by
students.
Lenore Edman, co-founder of Evil
Mad Science in Sunnyvale, showed
some of the gadgets she sells so students
can learn programming and how to make
video games.
We teach programming with real-
world objects, said Edman, who brings
her gadgets to local schools for work-
shops.
The Nueva School in Hillsborough
teaches hands-on science for kinder-
gartners up to high school students.
Kim Saxe is the innovation lab
director at Nueva and brought some
of her student-made projects to yes-
terdays event at CSM.
The earlier children are exposed to the
sciences, the better, Saxe said.
Young people can grasp the concepts,
too, she said.
Some of the projects included solar-
powered houses and mechanical toys
designed and built by Nueva students.
The Mentor Makerspace program has
a goal of introducing low-cost maker-
spaces into 1,000 high schools over the
next three years.
It will provide information and train-
ing for teachers along with software
design tools and hardware for use in a
school environment.
The rst round of 10 pilot schools are
located in Northern California. The pro-
gram aims to encourage and support the
development of projects by students who
integrate new technologies and express
their own creativity. The projects can be
shared online and will be exhibited at the
annual Maker Faire, which occurs every
spring in San Mateo at the Event Center.
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne
Duncan and his senior leaders are criss-
crossing the country from Sept. 12-21,
leading a series of events as part of the
third annual bus tour reinforcing the
message that education drives
America.
Duncan is scheduled to visit the
Sequoia High School campus
Wednesday to kick off the bus tour.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: sil-
verfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
MAKER
by another employee behind them, the
board is set to adopt a $40 million budg-
et that calls for the elimination of the
agencys recycling coordinator.
That job is currently held by Cathy
Hidalgo, who alleged McCarthy was set
to eliminate her position out of the budg-
et because she repeatedly questioned
contracts she considered suspicious.
But McCarthy was cleared of any
wrongdoing by an outside consultant
two weeks ago and the board will con-
sider again a budget that calls for elimi-
nating Hidalgos $86,724-a-year job.
If the board approves the scal year
2012-13 budget, it would give McCarthy
the authority to eliminate the recycling
coordinator position, he wrote the Daily
Journal in an email Thursday.
The timing of any personnel decision
is simply that, a personnel decision that
I cant discuss any further, McCarthy
wrote in the email.
The budget the board will consider
Wednesday has been slightly amended
from the June 28 budget the board was
set to consider to reect substantially
reduced net income, from $3.26 million
to $1 million, due to a drop in paper
commodity prices, McCarthy wrote in
the email.
The budget also reflects nearly
$90,000 in additional budget cuts with
this proposed budget being 10 percent
lower than our adopted FY 2012 budget.
We have also cut our capital budget by
$80,000 which is a 21 percent cut,
McCarthy wrote in the email.
Hidalgos attorney would not speak on
the matter with the Daily Journal yester-
day.
The SBWMA, also known as
RethinkWaste, represents Atherton,
Belmont, Burlingame, East Palo Alto,
Foster City, Hillsborough, Menlo Park,
Redwood City, San Carlos, San Mateo,
San Mateo County and the West Bay
Sanitary District. It owns the Shoreway
Environmental Center in San Carlos and
its board is made up of staff members of
member cities.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: sil-
verfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
BUDGET
18
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Lindsey Tanner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO Acupuncture gets a thumbs-
up for helping relieve pain from chronic
headaches, backaches and arthritis in a review
of more than two dozen studies the latest
analysis of an often-studied therapy that has as
many fans as critics.
Some believe its only powers are a psycho-
logical, placebo effect. But some doctors
believe even if thats the explanation for
acupunctures effectiveness, theres no reason
not to offer it if it makes people feel better.
The new analysis examined 29 studies involv-
ing almost 18,000 adults. The researchers con-
cluded that the needle remedy worked better
than usual pain treatment and slightly better
than fake acupuncture. That kind of analysis is
not the strongest type of research, but the
authors took extra steps including examining
raw data from the original studies.
The results provide the most robust evi-
dence to date that acupuncture is a reasonable
referral option, wrote the authors, who
include researchers with Memorial Sloan-
Kettering Cancer Center in New York and sev-
eral universities in England and Germany.
Their study isnt proof, but it adds to evi-
dence that acupuncture may benet a range of
conditions.
The new analysis was published online
Monday in Archives of Internal Medicine. The
federal governments National Center for
Complementary and Alternative Medicine
paid for most of the study, along with a small
grant from the Samueli Institute, a nonprot
group that supports research on alternative
healing.
Acupunctures use has become more main-
stream. The military has used it to help treat
pain from war wounds, and California recent-
ly passed legislation that would include
acupuncture among treatments recommended
for coverage under provisions of the nations
new health care law. That law requires insur-
ance plans to cover certain categories of bene-
ts starting in 2014. Deciding specics is
being left up to the states.
Some private insurance plans already cover
acupuncture; Medicare does not.
In traditional Chinese medicine, acupunc-
ture involves inserting long, very thin needles
just beneath the skins surface at specic
points on the body to control pain or stress.
Several weekly sessions are usually involved,
typically costing about $60 to $100 per ses-
sion. Fake acupuncture studied in research
sometimes also uses needles, but on different
areas of the body.
Study: Placebo or not, acupuncture helps with pain
See STUDY, Page 20
Acupunctures use has become more mainstream.The military has used it to help treat pain
from war wounds,and California recently passed legislation that would include acupuncture
among treatments recommended for coverage under provisions of the nations new health
care law.
HEALTH 19
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Marilynn Marchione
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON Scientists are grow-
ing ears, bone and skin in the lab,
and doctors are planning more face
transplants and other extreme plas-
tic surgeries. Around the country,
the most advanced medical tools
that exist are now being deployed to
help Americas newest veterans and
wounded troops.
In Los Angeles, surgeons used
part of Michael Mills forehead to
rebuild his nose after a bomb disg-
ured him in Iraq.
In Pittsburgh, doctors used an
experimental therapy from pig tis-
sue to help regrow part of a thigh
muscle that Ron Strang lost in a
blast in Afghanistan.
In Boston, scientists are mak-
ing plans for the first implants of
lab-grown ears for wounded
troops after successful experi-
ments in sheep and rats.
In San Antonio and other cities,
doctors are testing sprayed-on skin
cells and lab-made sheets of skin to
heal burns and other wounds. The
ingenuity is impressive: One prod-
uct was developed from foreskin
left over from circumcisions.
Much of this comes from taxpay-
er-funded research. Four years ago,
the federal government created
AFIRM, the Armed Forces Institute
of Regenerative Medicine, a net-
work of top hospitals and universi-
ties, and gave $300 million in grants
to spur new treatments using cell
science and advanced plastic sur-
gery.
The whole idea is to bring all
these researchers together to devel-
op these great technologies that
were in early science to eventually
be ready for the troops, said
AFIRMs recently retired director,
Terry Irgens.
Now those who served are com-
ing home, and projects that once
had been languishing in labs are
making strides and starting to move
into clinics.
Strang is among those beneting.
The 28-year-old Marine sergeant
from Pittsburgh lost half of a thigh
muscle to shrapnel, leaving too little
to stabilize his gait. My knee
would buckle and Id fall over, he
said.
Now, after an experimental treat-
ment at the University of Pittsburgh
Medical Center, Im able to run a
little bit and play a light football
game with friends, he said. Its
been a huge improvement.
Its one example of the new
medicine in the works for troops.
The Associated Press conducted
more than a dozen interviews and
reviewed the latest medical research
to measure the progress and extent
of novel treatments under way for
wounded warriors. The results point
to some surprising feats of surgery
and bioengineering.
Growing new ears
Up to a thousand troops might
need an ear, and prosthetics are not
a great solution. A rod or other fas-
tener is required to attach them to
the head. They dont look or feel
natural and they wear out every cou-
ple of years. A matching ear grown
from a patients own cells would be
a huge improvement.
People have been working on
this for 20 years but havent been
able to overcome obstacles to mak-
ing it practical, said Cathryn
Sundback, director of the tissue
engineering lab at Massachusetts
General Hospital.
Her lab thinks its found the solu-
tion. Using a computer model of a
patients remaining ear, scientists
craft a titanium framework covered
in collagen, the stuff that gives skin
elasticity and strength.
They take a snip of cartilage from
inside the nose or between the ribs
and seed the scaffold with these
cells. This is incubated for about
two weeks in a lab dish to grow
more cartilage. When its ready to
implant, a skin graft is taken from
the patient to cover the cartilage and
the ear is stitched into place.
Scientists in her lab have main-
tained lab-grown sheep ears on
those animals for 20 weeks, proving
it can be done successfully and last
long-term. They also have grown
anatomically correct human ears
from cells. These have been
implanted on the backs of lab rats to
keep them nourished and allow fur-
ther research. But that wouldnt
happen with ears destined for
Surprising methods heal wounded troops
See TROOPS, Page 20
HEALTH 20
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Scientists arent sure what biological mech-
anism could explain how acupuncture might
relieve pain, but the authors of the new study
say the results suggest theres more involved
than just a placebo effect.
Acupuncture skeptic Dr. Stephen Barrett
said the study results are dubious. The retired
psychiatrist runs Quackwatch, a Web site on
medical scams, and says studies of acupunc-
ture often involve strict research conditions
that dont mirror how the procedure is used in
the real world.
The new analysis combined results from
studies of patients with common types of
chronic pain recurring headaches, arthritis
or back, neck and shoulder. The studies had
randomly assigned patients to acupuncture
and either fake acupuncture or standard pain
treatment including medication or physical
therapy.
The authors explained their statistical nd-
ings by using a pain scale of 0 to 100: The
patients average baseline pain measured 60; it
dropped to 30 on average in those who got
acupuncture, 35 in those who got fake
acupuncture, and 43 in the usual treatment
group.
While the difference in results for real ver-
sus fake acupuncture was small, it suggests
acupuncture could have more than a psycho-
logical effect, said lead author Andrew
Vickers, a cancer researcher at Memorial
Sloan-Kettering. The center offers acupunc-
ture and other alternative therapies for cancer
patients with hard-to-treat pain.
The analysis was more rigorous than most
research based on pooling previous studies
results, because the authors obtained original
data from each study.
Continued from page 18
STUDY
patients they would just be grown in a lab
dish until theyre ready to implant.
Weve solved all the technical problems,
Sundback said, and now they are ready to seek
approval from the Food and Drug
Administration to implant these into patients
probably in about a year. Its amazing how
much progress weve made with the AFIRM
funding.
Bioengineering muscles, bone and skin
A soldier lucky enough to keep his arms and
legs after a bomb blast still might lose so much
of a key muscle, like biceps or quadriceps, that
the limb cant be used properly. In some cases,
the patient has lost so much muscle that theres
nothing left for the surgeon to sew together,
said Dr. Stephen Badylak, a regenerative medi-
cine specialist at the University of Pittsburgh.
He is testing implants of extracellular
matrix connective tissue that holds cells
together to boost muscle mass. The matrix is
thought to release chemical signals that promote
regrowth of healthy tissue instead of scar tissue.
It changes the body from thinking, I need to
respond to injured tissue, to I need to rebuild
this tissue, Badylak said.
The material is supplied by a private compa-
ny ACell Inc. of Columbia, Md. and
comes from pigs. The immune system tolerates
it because it doesnt contain cells. It comes in
multi-layered sheets like slightly stiff gauze
and can be cut or molded to t the needed
shape.
Strang, who lost half of a thigh muscle, is
among the ve patients treated so far in an 80-
patient study. Doctors wait at least six months
after an injury to make sure all natural healing
has occurred, and put patients through intensive
physical therapy before implanting the matrix.
Continued from page 19
TROOPS
HEALTH 21
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Alex Katz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Sheila Birnbaum
is known in legal circles across New
York as the queen of torts for her
prowess in sorting out complicated
cases. But she may be up against her
most daunting task to date.
Since Attorney General Eric
Holder appointed her special master
of a Sept. 11 victims compensation
fund in May 2011, Birnbaum has
been responsible for evenhandedly
distributing $2.7 billion to ground
zero responders and others who
became ill after being exposed to dust
and ash from the smoldering ruins of
the World Trade Center.
The problem is, she doesnt quite
know how many people will be eligi-
ble for compensation.
We havent yet received the ava-
lanche of claims that might have been
expected, she said, noting that only
about 300 people have led eligibili-
ty forms so far. The fund will ulti-
mately receive thousands of applica-
tions, she predicts.
Nearly two years after President
Barack Obama signed the James
Zadroga 9/11 Health and
Compensation Act into law, about
40,000 responders and survivors
receive monitoring and 20,000 get
treatment for illnesses as part of the
World Trade Center Health Program
one of the laws two components.
But the other, Birnbaums fund com-
pensating the same kind of people for
economic losses, hasnt been as
quick to get off the ground.
Its not a matter of bureaucratic
foot-dragging, but rather an illustra-
tion of the complexities of key legis-
lation born of the attacks that took
place 11 years ago next week.
This is a lot more complicated
than meets the eye, said Birnbaum,
an attorney.
With time still left to submit
claims, some people are holding out
in the event that they become sick in
the near future. Others are waiting
until the National Institute for
Occupational Safety and Health of-
cially adds 14 broad categories of
cancer to the list of conditions cov-
ered by the fund.
The national institutes director, Dr.
John Howard, said in June that it
planned to expand coverage to
include scores of cancer types. An
institute spokeswoman would not
give a specic date for the announce-
ment, although Birnbaum said she
anticipates it this month.
Recently diagnosed with leukemia
and lymphoma, 55-year-old Brian
Casse hopes he can secure money
from the fund to support his wife and
children in case he takes a turn for the
worst. Casse, a retired reghter who
helped clear away the mountain of
rubble at ground zero, believes
theres little doubt his work at the site
is responsible for his illness.
Youve got people in this city who
went down there and did what we had
to do. And a lot of us got sick because
of it, Casse said. To make us now
ght for this money, its not right. In
the grand scheme of things, this
moneys a drop in the bucket.
Initially, the Zadroga Act named
for police Detective James Zadroga,
who died at age 34 after working at
ground zero included only a short
list of illnesses that qualied for com-
pensation. Cancer was excluded
because of a lack of scientic evi-
dence linking any form of the disease
to conditions in the debris pile.
To me, its common sense. If you
breathe in toxic fumes, youre going
to get cancer, said U.S. Rep. Carolyn
Maloney, a Manhattan Democrat
who helped author the bill.
But even Maloney conceded that it
is difcult to nd hard data proving
the connection between cancer and
the dust at ground zero. Thats why in
crafting the Zadroga Act, lawmakers
were careful to include mechanisms
that would allow for illnesses to be
added based on new scientic
research.
An inclusion of cancer on the list
will likely encourage more people to
le claims. Applicants will have to
provide evidence of their diagnosis
and time spent at ground zero, though
they do not need to enroll in the
health program to receive compensa-
tion.
Tough task for those compensating ill 9/11 workers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK The federal gov-
ernment has added about 50 types
of cancer to the list of Sept. 11
World Trade Center-related illness-
es that will be covered by a pro-
gram to pay for health coverage.
The National Institute for
Occupational Safety announced the
change Monday, the eve of the 11th
anniversary of the terrorist attacks.
The publication of this final
rule marks an important step in
the effort to provide needed treat-
ment and care to 9/11 responders
and survivors through the WTC
Health Program, NIOSH director
Dr. John Howard said in a state-
ment.
The institute said last June that it
favored expanding the existing
$4.3 billion Sept. 11 health pro-
gram to include people with 50
types of cancer. That move fol-
lowed years of lobbying by con-
struction workers, firefighters,
police ofcers, ofce cleaners and
others who fell ill in the decade
after the terror attack, which
destroyed the 110-story twin tow-
ers, spewing toxic dust.
NIOSH acted after an advisory
committee made up of doctors,
union officials and community
advocates recommended that can-
cer be added. Previously, the aid
effort had covered only people with
mostly less-serious ailments,
including asthma, acid reux dis-
ease and chronic sinus irritation.
While stories about rst respon-
ders struck by cancer are common,
there is still little scientic evi-
dence of elevated cancer rates con-
nected to World Trade Center dust
or other toxins at the ground zero
recovery site in lower Manhattan.
Scientists say there is little research
to prove that exposure to the toxic
dust plume caused even one kind of
cancer.
Questions about whether the dust
truly caused cancer were a reason
Congress did not include it in the
initial list of covered illnesses.
But some occupational health
experts expressed concern about
the presence of carcinogens in the
ash and soot, and the advisory
panel said it believed there were
enough toxins present that it was
plausible that some people with
heavy exposures might get cancer.
Elected officials praised
Mondays decision.
We have urged from the very
beginning that the decision whether
or not to include cancer be based
on science; Dr. Howards decision,
made after thorough consideration
of the latest available research and
data, will continue to ensure that
those who have become ill due to
the heinous attacks on 9/11 get the
medical care they need and
deserve, Mayor Michael
Bloomberg said.
New Yorks two U.S. senators,
Democrats Charles Schumer and
Kirsten Gillibrand, said in a state-
ment: Todays announcement is a
huge step forward that will provide
justice and support to so many who
are now suffering from cancer and
other illnesses.
There had been some concern
that adding cancer to the list of
covered conditions could strain the
programs resources. Congress
capped funding for the program at
$1.55 billion for treatment and
$2.78 billion for compensation
payments, and adding cancer to the
eligible diseases will not increase
the funding.
Sept. 11 health program
adds 50 types of cancer
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Firemen work around the World Trade Center after both towers collapsed
in New York.
NATION
22
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Jennifer Pelz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK The Sept. 11
anniversary ceremony at ground zero
has been stripped of politicians this
year. But can it ever be stripped of
politics?
For the rst time, elected ofcials
wont speak Tuesday at an occasion
that has allowed them a solemn turn
in the spotlight. The change was
made in the name of sidelining poli-
tics, but some have rapped it as a
political move in itself.
Its a sign of the entrenched sensi-
tivity of the politics of Sept. 11, even
after a decade of commemorating the
attacks that killed nearly 3,000 peo-
ple at the World Trade Center, the
Pentagon and a Pennsylvania eld.
From the rst anniversary in 2002,
the date has been limned with ques-
tions about how or even whether
to try to separate the Sept. 11 that
is about personal loss from the 9/11
that reverberates through public life.
The answers are complicated for
Debra Burlingame, whose brother
Charles was the pilot of the hijacked
plane that crashed into the
Pentagon. She feels politicians
involvement can lend gravity to the
remembrances, but she empathizes
with the reasons for silencing
ofceholders at the New York cere-
mony this year.
It is the one day, out of 365 days
a year, where, when we invoke the
term 9/11, we mean the people who
died and the events that happened,
rather than the political and cultural
layers the phrase has accumulated,
said Burlingame, whos on the board
of the organization that announced
the change in plans this year.
So I think the idea that its even
controversial that politicians would-
nt be speaking is really rather
remarkable.
Remarkable, perhaps, but a
glimpse through the political prism
that splits so much surrounding Sept.
11 into different lights.
Ofceholders from the mayor to
presidents have been heard at the
New York ceremony, reading texts
ranging from parts of the Declaration
of Independence and the Gettysburg
Address to poems by John Donne
and Langston Hughes.
But in July, the National Sept. 11
Memorial and Museum led by
Mayor Michael Bloomberg as its
board chairman announced that
this years version would include
only relatives reading victims
names.
Can there be a politics-free Sept.11?
REUTERS
A combination photograph shows (top) the World Trade Center towers
and the lower Manhattan skyline in this Aug. 30, 2001 le photo; and
(bottom) the same vantage point about 11-years later on Sept. 10, 2012.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SHANKSVILLE, Pa.
Defense Secretary Leon Panetta
says the Flight 93 National
Memorial in western Pennsylvania
is the final resting place of
American patriots.
Panetta visited the memorial
Monday for the rst time, paying his
respects to the 40 passengers and
crew members who died during the
terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.
He walked down to the wooded
area where the plane crashed and
met with relatives of people who
were on the plane.
United Flight 93 was traveling
from Newark, N.J., to San Francisco
when it was hijacked by four terror-
ists. The 9/11 Commission said the
terrorists likely wanted to crash the
plane into the White House or the
U.S. Capitol, but the jet went down
in a eld near Shanksville, Pa., after
passengers fought back.
Panetta lauds Flight 93 passengers, crew
REUTERS
U.S.Defense Secretary Leon Panetta
speaks in Shanksville, Penn.
It is the one day,out of 365 days a year,where,when we invoke
the term 9/11, we mean the people who died and the events
that happened. ... So I think the idea that its even controversial
that politicians wouldnt be speaking is really rather remarkable.
Debra Burlingame
DATEBOOK 23
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY, SEPT. 11
Board of Supervisors Proclamation
Kicks Off National Recovery
Month. 7:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. 7:30 a.m.
Coffee and snacks at Bridges
Program, 680 Warren St., Redwood
City. 8:30 a.m. Recovery Walk from
Bridges to Hall of Justice, 400 County
Center. Free. For more information
visit smchealth.org/rm.
Mental Health First Aid Instructor
Certification Training for the
Public. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Locations will be sent
to participants once they register.
Free. For more information or to
request an application call 573-2541.
Health screening for seniors. 9 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. San Bruno Senior Center,
1555 Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno.
For ages 60 and older. Those who
plan to participate should only
consume water and medicine 12
hours before blood tests (if
prescribed, diabetes medicines
should be delayed but blood
pressure medicines should be taken).
Exercise should not be participated
in the morning of the screening.
Appointments should be made with
the community center. Free. For more
information visit mills-peninsula.org.
Tuesday Tea. 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
800 Middle Ave., Menlo Park. $2
members, $3 non-members. For more
information visit www.penvol.org.
Dancing on the Square: Mambo
with Frederico Moreno of Eternal
Flame Dance School. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Downtown Redwood City, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information visit
redwoodcity.org/events/dancing.htm
l.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 12
Internet Marketing Seminar and
Small Business Fair. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
San Mateo County Event Center, 1346
Saratoga, San Mateo. Community
event for small business owners, self-
employed professionals and
marketing professionals. Learn
effective ways to market your
business via websites, social media
and blogs. Network with other
professionals. Lunch is included.
Sponsored by the Daily Journal. Bring
business cards. Free. For more
information visit
www.smdailyjournal.com/b2breg.
Mental Health First Aid Instructor
Certication Training for the Public.
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Locations will be sent
to participants once they register.
Free. For more information or to
request an application call 573-2541.
Free Marketing Seminar and Small
Business Fair. 8 a.m. registration, 9
a.m. seminar, noon networking and
lunch. San Mateo event Center,
Meeting Pavilion, 2495 S. Delaware
St., San Mateo. Internet marketing
success. One attendee will win $5,000
advertising schedule in the Daily
Journal. For more information call
344-5200 ext. 121.
City Talk Toastmasters Club Open
House. 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. County
Building, 455 County Center, Room
402, Redwood City. Learn to improve
your communication and leadership
skills. For more information call 743-
2558.
Seniors Classics Dance Party. 1:30
p.m. to 4 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite
G, Foster City. Advanced Beginner
Level Night Club Two Step Lesson
and dance party. $5. For more
information call 627-4854.
Healing Clinic. 7 p.m. Mills-Peninsula
Health Services, fourth floor
conference room, 100 S. San Mateo
Drive, San Mateo. Join us for
meditation, energy cleansing and
slow, easy movements. Small
donations for supplies welcome.Wear
loose clothing, do not wear scents
and arrive promptly. Not affiliated
with any religious group. Meets
second Wednesday of every month
at Mills-Peninsula Health Center. Free.
To RSVP email
weissb@sutterhealth.org.
Presentation by Marty Brounstein.
7 p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. Author of Two Among the
Righteous Few: A Story of Courage in
the Holocaust gives a presentation
on his true experience. Free. For more
information call 591-0341.
Daniel Castro (Club Fox Blues Jam).
7 p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $5. For more
information call 369-7770.
Phase2Careers Presentation. 7 p.m.
South San Francisco Conference
Center, 255 S. Airport Blvd. South San
Francisco. Author Susan RoAne will
be presenting her book,How to Work
a Room: Savvy Networking in a Digital
Age. $20 pre-registration before Sept.
5, $25 pre-registration after Sept. 5.
For more information call 483-1704.
Total Healing: The Meditation
Prescription. 7 p.m. Millbrae Library,
1 Library Ave., Millbrae. The
presentation will be given by Dr.
Marshall Zaslove. Free. For more
information call 697-7607.
Argentine Tango and Bachata
Classes. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.
Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster
City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City.
Beginning Argentine Tango Class,
Intermediate Argentine Tango Class,
and Argentine Tango Practica. For
more information call 627-4854.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 13
The New HR: Authentic Leadership.
7:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sequoia, 1850
Gateway Drive, Suite 600, San Mateo.
Presented by Northern California
Human Resources Association. $35
for general admission. Those who
plan to attend to register. Free for
NCHRA members. For more
information and to register visit
m360.nchra.org/event.aspx?eventID
=37092&instance=0.
Mental Health First Aid Instructor
Certification Training for the
Public. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Locations will be sent
to participants once they register.
Free. For more information or to
request an application call 573-2541.
Health screening for seniors. 9 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. Martin Luther King
Center, 725 Monte Diablo Ave., San
Mateo. For ages 60 and older. Those
who plan to participate should only
consume water and medicine 12
hours before blood tests (if
prescribed, diabetes medicines
should be delayed but blood
pressure medicines should be taken).
Exercise should not be participated
in the morning of the screening.
Appointments should be made with
the community center. Free. For more
information visit mills-peninsula.org.
RPEA Meeting. 10:30 a.m. San Mateo
Elks Lodge, 229 W. 20th Ave. Guest
speaker Lily Apt, Outreach and
Program Coordinator for Rebuilding
Together Peninsula. This organization
provides free home repairs for
income-qualied homeowners in San
Mateo and Northern Santa Clara
Counties. Lunch is $14. For more
information and to make reservations
call 207-6401.
Narfe Meeting. 11:30 a.m. Bersford
Recreation Center, 2720 Alameda de
las Pulgas, San Mateo. Terry Nagel will
give a talk on citizen and
neighborhood action. Free. For more
information call 345-5001.
Burlingame Lions Club
Membership Drive. Noon. 900
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame. Join the
Lions Club for lunch and see what
they are about. Free. For more
information call 245-2993.
Conservatorship. Noon. San Mateo
County Law Library, 710 Hamilton St.,
Redwood City. Attorneys Paul J.
Constantino and Colleen McAvoy will
provide an overview of what you
need to know regarding
conservatorship. Open to the public.
Free. For more information call 363-
4913.
Movies for School Age Children
presents Pirates: Band of Misfits.
3:30 p.m. San Mateo Public Library, 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. The movie
is rated PG and lasts 88 minutes.
Popcorn from Whole Foods will be
provided before the movie. Free. For
more information call 522-7838.
Things That Fly and Why presented
by CuriOdyssey. 4 p.m. Hillsdale
Shopping Center, Macys Center
Court, 60 31st Ave., San Mateo.
Children are invited to explore mobile
exhibits, as well as learn about the
forces behind the flight of mini-
rockets, paper helicopters and gliders.
Free. For more information call 345-
8222 or visit hillsdale.com.
South San Francisco Dental Cares
Free Dental Implant Seminar. 6 p.m.
to 7 p.m. South San Francisco Dental
Ofce, 2400 Westborough Blvd., Suite
205, South San Francisco. Dr. Stanley
Sun will host this free seminar on
dental implants. Space is limited to
15 seats. For more information and
to reserve a spot call 763-8792.
Erin Ann Thomas Discusses Her
Book Coal in Our Veins. 7 p.m.
Books Inc., 855 El Camino Real, Palo
Alto. For more information call 321-
0600.
Talk and technique on dealing with
psychological effects of injury. 7
p.m. Mills-Peninsula Health Services,
Garden Room, 100 S. San Mateo Drive,
San Mateo. Chris Nihil, employee
assistance professional at Mills, will
demonstrate a technique to help deal
with the many challenges of being
injured. Talk starts around 7:15 p.m.,
but participants are asked to arrive
at 7 p.m. Free. To RSVP call 696-4562.
How the Brain Identifies Birds:
Birding ID Like a Pro. 7 p.m. San
Mateo Garden Center, 605 Parkside
Way, Sane Mateo. For more
information visit www.sequoia-
audubon.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Shores Elementary and Sequoia Union
High school districts.
Feierbach calls the proposed $250,000
annual payment to the city by CSUS
meaningless because of the loss of
income to local schools and other tax
districts.
The school has also misled the public
in its mailers, she said.
How can we trust them? she said.
Vice Mayor Christine Wozniak said
the mailers, or iers, that CSUS has sent
out has given the public a false impres-
sion that the council has already
approved the project.
This is not the case. We discuss this
project for the rst time as a council
tomorrow night, Wozniak wrote the
Daily Journal in an email. They got this
erroneous impression in some cases
from the fliers that CSUS sent to
Belmont residents. Fliers that told them
to contact the city if they were in favor
of the project. In response, Ive had a
ood of emails and phone calls from res-
idents, many urging me to say to no to
CSUS.
But Councilman Warren Lieberman is
not ready to vote down the proposal just
yet.
The proposal the Planning
Commission heard is not the same the
council will hear tonight, he said.
This is a better nancial deal for the
city but is it enough? I havent made a
decision yet, he told the Daily Journal
yesterday.
Trafc in the area is Liebermans top
concern.
Trafc on Ralston is a nightmare and
a lot of it is related to Ralston Middle
and Fox Elementary schools, said
Lieberman, who has some ideas of his
own on how to solve trafc conditions in
the area. He plans to discuss them
tonight.
Trafc, too, concerns Feierbach but
she does not think CSUS can solve the
problem.
We need to keep it an ofce park. A
private school is an incompatible use,
she told the Daily Journal.
In an email sent to Belmont residents,
Feierbach wrote that the project would
have negative impacts on Waterdog
Lake; that the school would not enroll
enough Belmont students; that changing
zoning would discourage new business
from coming to the city; and that trafc
would increase to unacceptable levels.
CSUS sent out its own letter to
Belmont residents addressing
Feierbachs claims.
The private school rst came to the
city with an early plan to relocate to
Belmont in April 2011.
It has been a long time since that rst
meeting, Councilman David Braunstein
said. The amount of public response on
the matter has been wonderful, he
said.
Weve heard a lot from the residents
of Belmont, he said. Hopefully, the
council will listen to Crystal Springs and
residents and make an informed deci-
sion, Braunstein said. The proposal has
been modied substantially since it rst
came to the Planning Commission, he
said.
School ofcials said the City Council
offered early support for the plan then.
As part of the schools strategic plan,
in the works for years, it looked at 20
different properties for possible expan-
sion before deciding on the Davis Drive
property.
The school also boosted its nancial
offer to the city after listening to the
Planning Commission, Trustee Jill
Grossman told the Daily Journal yester-
day.
We were encouraged by the councils
positive response initially and we are
hopeful and optimistic it will see we will
be a good community supporter and
good neighbor, Grossman said. We
believe this project is mutually bene-
cial for both the city and the school.
Crystal Springs Uplands is a private
school which currently has a 10-acre
suburban campus in Hillsborough serv-
ing 350 students in sixth through 12th
grades. The school is hoping to expand
by opening a middle school serving up
to 240 students in sixth through eighth
grades on Davis Drive.
Currently, about 83,000 square feet of
commercial/ofce and warehouse build-
ings and 165 parking spots are situated
at 6-8 and 10 Davis Drive that has stood
vacant for years. CSUS wants to demol-
ish the current buildings and construct a
52,000-square-foot middle school with a
60-space parking lot, gymnasium/the-
ater/multi-purpose room and an all-
weather synthetic turf playing eld.
The buildings current ownership has
said it has had little luck attracting com-
mercial tenants to the complex and start-
ed negotiating with the private school
last year to purchase the land. The sale
has yet to be nalized, however.
Since tonights meeting includes a
public hearing, it could last for several
hours to let residents speak on the issue.
The Belmont City Council meets 7:30
p.m., tonight, City Hall, 1 Twin Pines
Lane, Belmont.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: sil-
verfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
SCHOOL
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said,
todays agreement puts in place a crit-
ical and long overdue safeguard to
finally protect toll payers and taxpay-
ers from bearing further costs, and, at
the same time, put the project on a
path for completion.
Bloomberg said the agreement
ensures that it will be restarted very
soon and will not stop until the muse-
um is completed.
The museum is important to the
families of those who died on 9/11
theyve contributed photos and memo-
ries of their lost loved ones, who
deserve a thoughtful tribute, he said.
Earlier Monday, before the agree-
ment was announced, Bloomberg was
asked if the museum could be finished
by 2013 if construction started soon.
We have to do it safely, and we
want to do it with the quality of work
that will stand up to time, he said.
Whether its doable by then, I dont
know. ... To me, the date is nowhere
near as important as the other two
things. Third I would say youve got to
do it within budget. You know, you can
work 24 hours a day, with enormous
overtime in this day and age, there
isnt the money for that. The date will
be great whenever we get it. And
nobodys going to remember whether
it was one months or three months
later.
The memorandum of understanding
announced Monday addresses issues
including coordination of the site and
general financial terms but doesnt go
into detail on specific levels of financ-
ing. The agreement outlines that the
memorial will have six months oper-
ating expenses on hand as net working
capital and that it will give the Port
Authority a security deposit equal to
six months utility expenses, but it
doesnt say what those figures are.
It remains unclear how the founda-
tion will cover the costs of running the
museum, once it does open, although
the agreement calls for the memorial
and the Port Authority to work togeth-
er to try for federal funding.
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said
in a statement he was gratified to be a
part of a unified commitment and
agreement with Governor Cuomo and
Mayor Bloomberg to immediately
resume around the clock construction
at the 9/11 Museum.
The underground museum is to
house such artifacts as the staircase
workers used to escape the attacks.
Visitors also will be able to see por-
traits of the nearly 3,000 victims and
hear oral histories of Sept. 11.
The memorial includes a plaza,
where waterfalls fill the fallen towers
footprints. Almost 4.5 million people
have visited it since it opened last
September.
Continued from page 1
MUSEUM
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Do not allow your friends
to convince you to do something that you really cant
afford. If you havent got the funds, be smart and
bow out.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If you fnd yourself vacil-
lating over some critical decisions, know that hesita-
tion will only breed complications. Instead, trust your
judgment and take bold action.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Usually you weigh both
sides of an issue, resulting in a balanced judgment.
Today, however, your thinking might be more self-
defeating than farseeing.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Guard against
inclinations to believe in everybody and to put
your trust in those who cannot measure up to your
expectations. If you fail to do so, disappointment is
very likely.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- If you dont have
an equal say, you might end up in a situation that is
something like a partnership, but not quite. Be very
careful.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- If you cannot arouse
enough enthusiasm to handle a tough assignment,
youd be better off temporarily postponing it until you
can muster up enough eagerness to do so.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Dont get too deeply
involved in a risky endeavor because in all likelihood
Lady Luck will be taking a day off. Without her as-
sistance, you arent apt to swing it alone.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Should an old, unre-
solved family issue surface in front of others, do your
best to quell it immediately, before it can make the
entire clan look self-serving and nasty.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- If someone comes up
with a better way of doing something, dont be so
quick to reject it. If you let your ego take command,
youll never improve.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Something signifcant
can be learned about budgeting if you take some
time to examine your fnancial situation realistically.
Dont just bewail your managerial failings -- correct
them.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Allowing dictatorial
inclinations to dominate your thinking could cause
you to assert your will on those over whom you have
no authority, making you look like a bully. Dont let
this happen.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Dont put any limitations on
your imagination, nor allow others to do so for you.
Be very sure that the thoughts that guide your think-
ing and actions are focused on the positive.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
9-11-12
MONDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
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ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Leaves in a bag
4 Floor pads
8 With, to Henri
12 Close kin
13 Elliptical
14 November word
15 Cold War org.
16 Carnival attraction
17 -- vera
18 Ranked in tennis
20 Genealogy abbr.
22 Pitcher Nolan --
23 Wild guess
25 Astrologers map
29 Tip of a pen
31 Allot
34 Big Ten sch.
35 Lions call
36 Mortarboard wearer
37 Fannie --
38 Former superpower
39 Cargo unit
40 Caterwauled
42 Mall event
44 Spore maker
47 Pacifc island
49 Spooked
51 Helm position
53 Slightly-used car
55 Born as
56 Arctic hazard
57 Commotion
58 Finish a cake
59 Passable (hyph.)
60 Right, on a map
61 Stage scenery
DOwN
1 Sounds of disapproval
2 The -- Sanction
3 Monks cloister
4 Rita of the movies
5 Greedy
6 Modicum
7 It runs on runners
8 Stop, to Popeye
9 Big cones
10 Ikes command
11 Fair grade
19 In a fog
21 PC key
24 Dressmakers cut
26 Major- --
27 What vidi means
(2 wds.)
28 Aylas creator Jean --
30 Its freezing!
31 Execs
32 Winged god
33 Pretty songbirds
35 More boorish
40 Bleachers shout
41 Elbow grease
43 Hasta --, amigo!
45 Sari wearers
46 Reunion attendee
48 Inventory wd.
49 Left Bank chums
50 Bug repellent
51 Sit-up muscles
52 Sign before Virgo
54 Depot info
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE
GET fUZZY
24 Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
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Monday 9/17/2012
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SAMTRANS
PUBLIC HEARINGS & MEETINGS NOTICE
PROPOSED CHANGES: BART PLUS TICKET
PARTICIPATION & SCHEDULE REDUCTION
Public Hearings
The San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans) will hold a
public hearing and take public comment on each of the follow-
ing topics 1) proposed discontinuation of District participation
in the BART Plus Ticket program and 2) proposed elimination
of underutilized bus schedules. The proposed changes would
go into effect in January 2013.
Proposals to be considered include:
Discontinuance of participation in the BART Plus Ticket
program
Elimination of a single Route 36 schedule departing
Dundee & Wicklow drives in South San Francisco at
8:10 a.m.
Elimination of a single Route 36 schedule departing
Evergreen Avenue & Mission Street in Daly City at 3:22 p.m.
Elimination of a single Route 72 schedule departing
Selby Lane & Serrano Drive in Atherton at 3:30 p.m.
The public hearings will be held:
Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012 at 3 p.m.
SamTrans Administrative Office
1250 San Carlos Ave., San Carlos
Prior to the hearings, comments may be sent by mail,
e-mail or phone to:
San Mateo County Transit District Board, District Secretary
P.O. Box 3006, San Carlos, CA 94070-1306
changes@samtrans.com 1-800-660-4287 or 650-508-6448
(TTY for hearing impaired)
Public Meetings
SamTrans also will hold two public meetings to present the
proposals and receive comments. The meetings will take
place:
Tuesday, Sept. 18 at 6 p.m.
War Memorial Community Center, 6655 Mission St., Daly City
Thursday, Sept. 20 at 4 p.m.
SamTrans Administrative Office, 1250 San Carlos Ave., San
Carlos
Hearing impaired and non-English speaking attendees may
arrange for sign language or foreign language translation by
calling 650-508-6242 or 650-508-6448 (TTY for hearing im-
paired) at least three business days prior to the hearing
and/or meeting they wish to attend.
Para servicio de traduccin en Espanol, llame SamTrans at
650-508-6242 por lo menos tres dias laborales antes de las
reuniones.
9/11/12
CNS-2372885#
SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
CALVARY
PRESCHOOL
OPEN
ENROLLMENT
Little Learners: age 2.5-3.5
Big Explorers: age 3.5-5
calvarypreschoolmillbrae.com
(650)588-8030
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
English Language & Literature
History & Social Studies
Grades 7-12
Essay Writing
Reading Comprehension
(650)579-2653
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish, French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont
DISHWASHER - Full time - hours
7.00am to 3.30pm - MUST WORK
WEEKENDS - needed for Assisted
Living Facility located in South San
Francisco. Apply in person to West-
borough Royale, 89 Westborough
Blvd., South San Francisco.
GENENTECH IN South San Francisco
seeks:
Research Associate. Purify and deter-
mine protein solubility and expression
levels of target proteins that are part of
our extensive small molecules drug de-
sign program. Req masters deg or for-
eign equiv in Biochem, Chem, Bio, or re-
lated field & 1 yr of exp. Mail resume
specifying Job ID 88-00402052 to Gen-
entech, c/o SB MS-829A, 1 DNA Way,
South San Francisco, CA 94080. EOE
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
WEEKLY
SALARY + BONUS
Flexible Hour,
Outside Position,
Full Training
NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
to $38.75 per hour
Call Mr. Cannon
(650)372-2810
VETERANS WELCOME
JEWELRY SALES
FUN! No Nights! Benefits & 401K!
(650)367-6500 FX:(650)367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
RESTAURANT -
Authentic Syrian Chef, minimum 3 years
exp. Full-time, starting at $12-14 per
hour. Send resume to
tastein2009@att.net
Taste in Mediterranean , 1199 Broadway
Burlingame.(650) 348-3097
TAXI DRIVER wanted. Pay cash every-
day. (650)766-9878
110 Employment
RESTAURANT -
Experienced line cook, Night / Week-
ends. Apply in person,1201 San Carlos
Ave., San Carlos.
WAREHOUSE/DRIVER - P/T Distributor
in San Carlos seeks employed person
with Van, SUV or covered Truck. Ware-
house work and delivery. (650)595-1768
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
26 Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journals
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in todays paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 515888
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
David Lee Ceccarelli
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, David Lee Ceccarelli filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: David Lee Ceccarelli aka
David L. Ceccarelli
Proposed name: David Ceccarelli Lee
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on September
26, 2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/16/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/15/2012
(Published, 08/21/12, 08/28/12,
09/04/12, 09/11/12)
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
WALTER LEE BARCELLOS
Case Number 122597
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: WALTER LEE BARCEL-
LOS. A Petition for Probate has been
filed by GEORGE CHARLES ROSAS in
the Superior Court of California, County
of San Mateo. The Petition for Probate
requests that GEORGE CHARLES RO-
SAS be appointed as personal represen-
tative to administer the estate of the de-
cedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: October 15, 2012 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, 1st Floor, Redwood City,
CA 94063. If you object to the granting
of the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Jackson A. Morris III
Law Offices of Jackson Morris III
974 Ralston Avenue, Ste. 2
Belmont, CA 94002
(650)595-0643
Dated: 09/07/12
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on September 11, 18, 25, 2012.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251868
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: SkyPark, 1000 San Mateo Ave.,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owners: SkyPark
Associates, A Limited Partnership, CA
and Airport Parking Services, Inc., A Cal-
ifornia Corporation - General Partner,
CA. The business is conducted by a Lim-
ited Partnership. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 1997.
/s/ Nicolle Judge /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
TS No. 12-0022638
Title Order No. 12-0038285
APN No. 035-096-140
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST, DATED 12/13/2005.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PRO-
TECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE
SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU
NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NA-
TURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON-
TACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby giv-
en that RECONTRUST COMPANY,
N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant
to the Deed of Trust executed by KAMI-
PELI FINAU, AND ATELIANA FINAU,
HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TEN-
ANTS, dated 12/13/2005 and recorded
12/21/2005, as Instrument No. 2005-
221800, in Book , Page , of Official Re-
cords in the office of the County Record-
er of San Mateo County, State of Califor-
nia, will sell on 09/25/2012 at 12:30PM,
At the Marshall Street entrance to the
Hall of Justice, 400 County Center, Red-
wood City, San Mateo County, CA at
public auction, to the highest bidder for
cash or check as de-scribed below, pay-
able in full at time of sale, all right, title,
and interest conveyed to and now held
by it under said Deed of Trust, in the
property situated in said County and
State and as more fully described in the
above referenced Deed of Trust. The
street address and other common desig-
nation, if any, of the real property descri-
bed above is purported to be: 1303
COBB STREET, SAN MATEO, CA,
944013617. The undersigned Trustee
disclaims any liability for any incorrect-
ness of the street address and other
common desig-nation, if any, shown
herein. The total amount of the unpaid
balance with interest thereon of the obli-
gation secured by the property to be sold
plus reasonable estimated costs, ex-
penses and advances at the time of the
initial publication of the Notice of Sale is
$629,915.38. It is possible that at the
time of sale the opening bid may be less
than the total indebtedness due. In addi-
tion to cash, the Trustee will accept
cashier's checks drawn on a state or na-
tional bank, a check drawn by a state or
federal credit union, or a check drawn by
a state or federal savings and loan asso-
ciation, savings association, or savings
bank specified in Section 5102 of the Fi-
nan-cial Code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state. Said sale will be made,
in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without cove-
nant or war-ranty, express or implied, re-
garding title, possession or encumbran-
ces, to satisfy the indebtedness secured
by said Deed of Trust, advances there-
under, with interest as provided, and the
unpaid principal of the Note secured by
said Deed of Trust with interest thereon
as provided in said Note, plus fees,
charges and expenses of the Trustee
and of the trusts created by said Deed of
Trust. If required by the provisions of
section 2923.5 of the California Civil
Code, the declaration from the mortga-
gee, beneficiary or authorized agent is
attached to the Notice of Trustee's Sale
duly recorded with the appropriate Coun-
ty Recorder's Office. NOTICE TO PO-
TENTIAL BIDDERS If you are consider-
ing bidding on this property lien, you
should understand that there are risks in-
volved in bidding at a trustee auction.
You will be bidding on a lien, not on a
property itself. Placing the highest bid at
a trustee auction does not automatically
entitle you to free and clear ownership of
the property. You should also be aware
that the lien being auctioned off may be a
junior lien. If you are the highest bidder
at the auction, you are or may be respon-
sible for paying off all liens senior to the
lien being auctioned off, before you can
receive clear title to the property. You
are encouraged to investigate the exis-
tence, priority, and size of outstanding
liens that may exist on this property by
contacting the county recorder's office or
a title insurance company, either of
which may charge you a fee for this infor-
mation. If you consult either of these re-
sources, you should be aware that the
lender may hold more than one mort-
gage or deed of trust on the property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The
sale date shown on this notice of sale
may be postponed one or more times by
the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a
court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the
California Civil Code. The law requires
that information about trustee sale post-
ponements be made available to you and
to the public, as a courtesy to those not
present at the sale. If you wish to learn
whether your sale date has been post-
poned, and, if applica-ble, the resched-
uled time and date for the sale of this
property, you may call 1-800-281-8219
or visit this Internet Web site www.recon-
trustco.com, using the file number as-
signed to this case 12-0022638. Infor-
mation about postponements that are
very short in duration or that occur close
in time to the scheduled sale may not im-
mediately be reflected in the telephone
information or on the Internet Web site.
The best way to verify postponement in-
formation is to attend the scheduled sale.
RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800
Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI
VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone/Sale Informa-
tion: (800) 281-8219 By: Trustee's Sale
Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A.
is a debt collector attempting to collect a
debt. Any information obtained will be
used for that pur-pose. FEI #
1006.166293 9/04, 9/11, 9/18/2012
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251743
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Nicks Honda/Acura Service,
775 California, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Nick & Cathy Susan Ther-
oux, 2090 Sullivan St., San Mateo, CA
94403. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
07/27/12.
/s/ Nick Theroux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251852
The following person is doing business
as: Dimitris Painting Service, 1400 Hop-
kins Ave., Apt. 203, REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94062 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Dimitri Zlatev, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Dimitri Zlatev /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251793
The following person is doing business
as: Sierra Leadership, 1760 Pierce
Street, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Si-
erra Leadership, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liabiltiy Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Eric Nitzberg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251922
The following person is doing business
as: Gold Star Seafood Supply Company,
513 Mayfair Avenue, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Star Group
International LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liabiltiy Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Louis Shum /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251739
The following person is doing business
as: Bayby Boot Camp-Redwood City,
San Carlos, Belmont, 1246 North Rd.,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Tracee
Gonzalez, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 08/01/2012
/s/ STracee Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251670
The following person is doing business
as: Alta Off the Avenue, 415 Floribunda
Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Windy Hill PV Seven, CA. The business
is conducted by Limited Partnership.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 06/19/2012
/s/ J. Blosshard /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251951
The following person is doing business
as: Startup-CFO.com, 126 Second Ave
#200, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
Maureen Hurley, 15 Garcia, San Francis-
co, CA 94127. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 08/01/2012.
/s/ Maureen Hurley /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252009
The following person is doing business
as: Daly City Auto Body Center, 250 San
Pedro Road, DALY CITY, CA 94014 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Shum & Ma Corporation, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 08/08/2012.
/s/ Chi Yin Shum /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251779
The following person is doing business
as: Hire Me 101, 956 Mission Road,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Milan L. Truong, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 08/01/2012.
/s/ Milan Truong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251974
The following person is doing business
as: Dorians Electrical Co., 417 West-
moor Avenue, DALY CITY, CA 94015 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Dorian C. Yeung, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Dorian C. Yeung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/23/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251693
The following person is doing business
as: Biomed Esthetics, 303 Twin Dolphin
Dr., 6th floor, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94065 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Dermeso, Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Stephanie Sanchez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251990
The following person is doing business
as: Skin Technologies, 40 Eddystone Ct.,
Redwood City, CA 94065 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Dermeso,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Stephanie Sanchez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252102
The following person is doing business
as: Canaan Express, 336 Grand Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Alferdo Fiqueroa, 140 Mateo Ave., Daly
City, CA 94014. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Alferdo Fiqueroa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/31/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12, 09/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252081
The following person is doing business
as: Pacific Care Home, 3647 Pacific
Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: J & I,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/01/2012.
/s/ Wilhelm O. Ick /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/12, 09/18/12, 09/25/12, 10/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252080
The following person is doing business
as: Pacific Care Home, 3653 Pacific
Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: J & I,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/01/2012.
/s/ Wilhelm O. Ick /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/12, 09/18/12, 09/25/12, 10/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252073
The following person is doing business
as: Brickgems, 30 Bellevue Avenue, DA-
LY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Jenna Huie,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Jenna Huie /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/12, 09/18/12, 09/25/12, 10/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252191
The following person is doing business
as: BF Imports, 108 Associated Road,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
James E. Barrett Corp., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Rosie S. Barrett /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/12, 09/18/12, 09/25/12, 10/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251879
The following person is doing business
as: Rich Agency Insurance Services,
1735 E. Bayshore Rd. #3B, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94063 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Rich Consultants,
INC., CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Tom R. Rich /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/16/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/18/12, 08/25/12, 09/01/12, 09/08/12).
203 Public Notices
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 240537
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Ariel
Accessories Express, 336 Grand Ave,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
The fictitious business name referred to
above was filed in County on 8/19/10.
The business was conducted by: Marya
S. Figueroa, same address.
/s/ Marya S, Figuroa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 08/31/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 09/04/12,
09/11/12, 09/18/12, 09/25/12).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 229633
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Pa-
cific Care Home, 3653 Pacific Blvd., SAN
MATEO, CA 94403. The fictitious busi-
ness name referred to above was filed in
County on 10/16/08. The business was
conducted by: R & M Fatooh, same ad-
dress.
/s/ Mary Fatooh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 08/30/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 09/11/12,
09/18/12, 09/25/12, 10/02/12).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 229634
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Pa-
cific Care Home, 3647 Pacific Blvd., SAN
MATEO, CA 94403. The fictitious busi-
ness name referred to above was filed in
County on 10/16/08. The business was
conducted by: R & M Fatooh, same ad-
dress.
/s/ Mary Fatooh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 08/30/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 09/11/12,
09/18/12, 09/25/12, 10/02/12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
FOUND!
LOST, SUNGLASSES at Bridge Point
Shopping Center. Reward,
(650)726-9160
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY BJORN potty $10 (650)595-3933
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
DEX SAFE Sleeper Ultra bed rail $10
(650)595-3933
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
296 Appliances
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. SOLD!
ANTIQUE TRAIN set from the 40's com-
plete set in the box $80 OBO (650)589-
8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHILDHOOD COMIC book collection
many titles from the 70's & 80's whole
collection $50 OBO (650)589-8348
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FIVE RARE Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee
Baseball Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoen-
dienst, Mitchell, Hegan), Each $20, All
$95, (650)787-8600
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
RARE BASEBALL CARDS
Five Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee Baseball
Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoendienst,
Mitchell, Hegan), All $95, (650)787-8600
ROCK MEMORABILIA Rolling Stones
Tour Guide, From 70s. $50 obo
(650)589-8348
SPORTS CARDS 50 Authentic Signa-
tures $60 all, (650)365-3987
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6 diam. Brown speckle
enamelware, $20., (650)341-3288
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD 2,000 some rare 1st
Edition, $60 all, (650)365-3987
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
27 Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Favorite texting
partner, for short
4 In a crooked
position
9 Form
14 Lords Prayer
opener
15 Deli counter unit
16 What actors
have to learn
17 Barcelona gold
18 Kin of Skoal!
19 Like much pub
ale
20 Yes, indeed
23 Parlor or den
24 Kindergarten
basics
25 Dinner table
dispenser
32 Restful resorts
35 Mystery writer
Stout
36 Et __
37 Destiny
38 Calculates
40 Parisian
negative
41 Like bees
attacking
43 Computer
network acronym
44 Talk show
moderator
45 Sentrys
question
48 It replaced the
punt in Ireland
49 Shade trees
52 Tenth novel in
Sue Graftons
Alphabet
series
58 Lite cigarette
boast
59 Messing of Will
& Grace
60 Afternoon potful
61 Hold holdings
62 Best-case
63 Brain scan, for
short
64 Stuck __: Elvis
hit
65 Funeral song
66 Brief titles for the
starts of 20-, 25-,
45- and 52-
Across
DOWN
1 Blessing
2 Much ado
about
something
3 Bilbo Bagginss
nephew
4 Postulate
5 Hunk
6 Garment for Rob
Roy
7 Quitos nation:
Abbr.
8 Place to grab a
screwdriver at
home?
9 Sits sloppily
10 Doesnt exactly
tell
11 Not pro
12 __ moss
13 Parapsychology
subj.
21 Didnt mean to
do that
22 Like a banned
book, perhaps
26 First, to Franco
27 Wooden pin
28 Rejoice
29 Lotto-like game
30 Mythical archer
31 Talk wildly
32 Chopped side
dish
33 High-end
34 Welks upbeat
38 Frills, ribbons,
ruffles, and such
39 Bit of arena
support
42 In olden days
44 Skippers area
46 Morally base
47 Wine and dine
50 Measured (out)
51 Look of derision
52 Rivers of
comedy
53 Just doing my
job
54 User of the
Force
55 Over, in Hanover
56 Wet blanket, so
to speak
57 Luggage
attachments
58 Sgt., e.g.
By Victor Barocas
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
09/11/12
09/11/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
300 Toys
AMERICAN FLYER train set $75 OBO
SOLD!
ANTIQUE ELECTRIC train set with steel
engine full set from the 50's $75 OBO
(650)589-8348
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 SOLD!
PLASTIC TOY army set from the 70's
many pieces $50 (650)589-8348
TONKA BULL Dozer from the 50's or
60's $50 obo (650)589-8348
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
STICKLEY STYLE solid oak Mission
Chair, SOLD!
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
303 Electronics
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NIGHT STANDS $20, obo (650)952-
3063
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$30 SOLD!
PROSCAM 36" color TV with cabinet
and 2 glass doors like new $90 obo
(650)952-3063
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COFFEE TABLE set (3piece) mint con-
dition, dark wood, coffee table 53x24x16
high, end tables 27x22x22, $99.00,
(650)578-9208
NIGHT STANDS $35, (650)952-3063
304 Furniture
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 (650)343-4461
KITCHEN TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT. Like New. Olive/green.
33" High, 60" wide, 42" deep. Very com-
fortable. $20.00 or B/O (650)578-1411
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
304 Furniture
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 (650)592-
2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ Hutch, Stained
Green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
SOFA/LOVESEAT SET, mint condition,
7-ft sofa, 58 inch loveseat, brown, 6
matching pillows $99.00, (650)578-9208
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STIFFEL LAMPS (2) mint condition,
brass base, beige shade, includes easy
tap on/off $50.00, (650)578-9208
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COCKTAIL GLASSES - beautiful, rich,
smokey hue, oak tree design, wide base,
set of 12, $25., (650)341-8342
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
3 ALUMINUM ladders 8', 16', & 28' good
condition all for $90 SOLD!
49 TOOLS Varity of tools all for $98,
SOLD!
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
308 Tools
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DEWALT COMBO 14.4v - Drill, saw,
charger, 2 batteries. $40.00 cash, firm.
SOLD through the Daily Journal!
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
MICRO METER Set, 0 to 12. 12 mikes
Total, $75, SOLD!
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TABLE SAW- Craftsman 10" saw. brand
new, never used $85. SOLD!
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 SOLD!
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, SOLD!
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) classics featuring
older women, $25. each, (650)212-7020
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, Mystery, Romance,
Biography, many authors, hard cover,
paperbacks, many authors, mint condi-
tion. 50 cents each (650) 578-9208.
BOOKS 20 HARDCOVER WW2 USMC
Korea, Europe. SOLD!
BROADWAY by the Bay, Chorus Line
Sat 9/22; Broadway by Year Sat. 11/10
Section 4 main level $80.00 all.
(650)578-9208
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, spots,
glass, interior, paint, chamois, $25.00
(650)578-9208
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HYPO ALERGETIC Pillows (2) Great for
those with alergies, easy to clean,
$10.00 both, (650)578-9208
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
MASSAGER CHAIR - Homedics, Heat,
Timer, Remote, like new, $45. SOLD
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $10. (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $18
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
4 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual $10
obo (650)873-8167
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, never used,
$15., Burl, (650)347-5104
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
PETMATE DOG CARRIER - XL size,39
1/2 L x 27 W x 30 like new, $95. firm,
SSF, (650)871-7200
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
28 Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
WILL PAY Cash for vintage designer
handbags. Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Gucci,
etc. (650)593-0757
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MENS navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping trim, 2 pock-
ets. Medium. $10., (650)341-3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COWBOY BOOTS size 9 Black - superb
condition $40 (650)595-3933
COWBOY BOOTS size 9 Silver.gray
good condition $30 (650)595-3933
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GEORGE STRAIT Collection Resistol
oval shape, off white Hat size 7 1/8 $40
(650)571-5790
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES PLUS Clothing - mint condition,
Fancy/plain sweaters, tops, dresses, out-
fits, summer and winter. $4.00 each,
(650)578-9208
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner: navy
fleece, $15. (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
316 Clothes
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE 1930 Ermine fur coat Black full
length $35 650 755-9833
WESTERN/COWBOY SHIRTS
7 pearl snap front, snap pockets XL and
XXL, $12 - $15 (650)595-3933
WOMENS SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, size 12,
$10., (650)341-3288
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8x4x2, SOLD!
FLUORESCENT LIGHT Fixture, New in
Box, 24, $15 (650)341-8342
TILES, DARK Red clay, 6x6x1/2 6
Dozen at 50 ea (650)341-8342
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOYS BICYCLE with Helmet. Triax,
Good Condition, $50, San Mateo
(650)341-5347
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
COMPLETE PORTABLE BASKET-
BALL SYSTEM - by Life Time, brand
new, $100., Pacific, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels. $50
San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
ORBITREK LEG & arm workout ma-
chine - SOLD!
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TREK TRANSPORT BICYCLE CARRI-
ER - brand new, SOLD!
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20 rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., (650)368-0748
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
HONEYWELL PENTAX 35mm excellent
lens, with case $65. SOLD!
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
2005 SCION TC $6,000, 100k Runs
Excellent, (650)583-1543
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 2,500
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
TENT TRAILER, Good Condition Sleeps
6. Electric, Water Hook-ups, Stove,
$1,700 obo, (650)345-7750
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
People you can trust;
service you can trust
NORDIC MOTORS, INC.
Specializing in Volvo, Saab,
Subaru
65 Winslow Road
Redwood City
(650) 595-0170
www.nordicmotors.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
670 Auto Parts
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
CAR COVER / CAMRY, not used, in
box. $12. SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
HUSHER
CONSTRUCTION
Full Service General Contractor
Remodels and Additions
Residential, Commercial
Lic #789107
www.husherconstruction.com
(650)873-4743
NORTH HOMES
Additions, Bathes,
Kitchens,
Driveways, and Decks.
(650)232-1193
www.northhomes.biz
Lic.# 97583
Contractors
J & K
CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Additions & Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath remodeling,
Structural repair, Termite &
Dry Rot Repair, Electrical,
Plumbing & Painting
(650)548-5482
neno.vukic@hotmail.com
Lic# 728805
Cleaning
Cleaning
GALA MAIDS
Residential
& Commercial
14 Years Experience
Excellent References
(650)773-4516 (650)773-4516
www.galamaids.com
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete Brickwork Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers Landscaping
Tile Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
Construction
29 Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
I do them all!
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Gardening
Servicing Hillsborough,
Burlingame, Millbrae,
and San Mateo
We are a full service
gardening company
650 218-0657
Quality
Gardening

Weekly Lawn Care
Hedges, Fertilizing,
Leaf Blowing
Rose Care
Get ready for
Fall planting

Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance Clean
Ups Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Window
Glass Water Heater Installation
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bathroom Remodels
Electrical, Roofing.
Fences, Tile, Concrete, Painting,
Plumbing, Decks
All Work Guaranteed
(650)771-2432
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Landscaping
COMPLETE TREE
SERVICE
Stamp Concrete
Brick Work
BEST PRICES!
Licensed & Insured
(650)222-4733
New Lawns
Lawn Renovations
Sprinklers
General CleanUp
Commercial
& Industrial Maint.
Fisher Garden
& Landscape
Since 1972
(650) 347-2636
sher-garden-landscape.com
FREE ESTIMATES QAC. Lic. C24951
Landscaping
LEAKPROFESSIONALS
LEAKS? SAME DAY SERVICE!
Valves Sprinklers
Wiring Broken Pipes
Retrofits
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST
PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
KITCHEN & BATH
REMODELING
50% off cabinets
(manufacturers list price)
CABINET WORLD
1501 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(650)592-8020
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
30 Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
BUSINESS
TRANSACTIONS
Robert Preskill, Esq.
Tech & Media Contracts
Franchise and Licensing
Call (415) 377-3919
robert@preskilllaw.net
CBN# 221315
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383 (650)357-8383
Food
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
STAND UP &
TRAIN!
Train at Home & Reach your
Fitness Goals
Group Classes or
One On One
using TRX Suspension &
Kettlebell training ,
Custom Designed fitness
program
Call Chris Nash
(650)799-0608
alternativewayfitness@gmail.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754 650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
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John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
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www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
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LEGAL
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preparation: Divorce,
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Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
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Marketing
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Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
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667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
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1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
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2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
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951 Old County Road
Suite 1
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650-654-2829 650-654-2829
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Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
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590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
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Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
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sterlingcourt.com
WORLD 31
Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Ahmed Al-Haj
and Lolita C. Baldor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANAA, Yemen An airstrike
killed al-Qaidas No. 2 leader in
Yemen along with six others travel-
ing with him in one car on Monday,
U.S. and Yemeni ofcials said, a
major breakthrough for U.S.-backed
efforts to cripple the group in the
impoverished Arab nation.
Saeed al-Shihri, a Saudi national
who fought in Afghanistan and
spent six years in the U.S. military
prison at Guantanamo Bay, was
killed by a missile after leaving a
house in the southern province of
Hadramawt, according to Yemeni
military ofcials. They said the mis-
sile was believed to have been red
by a U.S.-operated, unmanned
drone aircraft.
Two senior U.S. ofcials con-
rmed al-Shihris death but could
not conrm any U.S. involvement in
the airstrike. The U.S. doesnt usu-
ally comment on such attacks
although it has used drones in the
past to go after al-Qaida members in
Yemen, which is considered a cru-
cial battleground with the terror net-
work.
Yemeni military ofcials said that
a local forensics team had identied
al-Shihris body with the help of
U.S. forensics experts on the
ground. The U.S. and Yemeni mili-
tary ofcials spoke on condition of
anonymity because they werent
authorized to release the informa-
tion to the media.
Late Monday, after speculation
surfaced that the attack was carried
by a U.S. drone, Yemens Defense
Ministry issued a statement saying
al-Shihri and six companions were
killed during an operation by
Yemeni armed forces in Wadi
Hadramawt, but it did not elaborate
on how they were killed.
Yemeni military officials said
they had believed the United States
was behind the operation because
their own army does not the capaci-
ty to carry out precise aerial attacks
and because Yemeni intelligence
gathering capabilities on al-Shihris
movements were limited.
A brief Defense Ministry state-
ment sent to Yemeni reporters on
their mobile phones earlier in the
day only said that an attack had tar-
geted the militants. It did not speci-
fy who carried out the attack or
when it took place.
Al-Shihris death is a major blow
to al-Qaidas Yemen branch, which
is seen as the worlds most active,
planning and carrying out attacks
against targets on and outside U.S.
territory. The nation sits on the
southern tip of the Arabian
Peninsula and is on the doorstep of
Saudi Arabia and fellow oil-produc-
ing nations of the Gulf and lies on
strategic sea routes leading to the
Suez Canal.
Al-Qaidas No. 2 in Yemen killed in airstrike
REUTERS
Yemeni armed forces have killed Saeed al-Shihri, a man seen as the
second-in-command of Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula.
32 Tuesday Sept. 11, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL