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JSTANDARD.COM
2012 81
N E W J E R S E Y
JewishStandard
Matisyahus post-Chabad spirituality
to shine at BergenPAC concert
No more
black and white
COMMUNITY
Local groups take action
on gun violenece 16
REMINISCENCE
Ed Koch, 1924-2013 18, 26
February 8, 2013 Vol. LXXXII No. 20 $1.00
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2 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
PUBLISHERS STATEMENT
Jewish Standard (USPS 275-700 ISN 0021-6747) is published weekly on Fridays with an additional edition every October, by the
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FYI
A puzzle for our readers
what do you think?
We are pleased to be able to offer you the Jerusalem Post crossword
puzzle.
This puzzle was created by David Benkof, who has been making
them since 1999. He creates them regularly for the Jerusalem Post
and other Jewish newspapers; so far, twice hes had a puzzle pub-
lished in the New York Times as well.
Benkofs puzzles draw on every aspect of Jewish life, from Israeli
cities to Jewish holidays to Hollywood luminaries to famous rabbis
to Yiddish expressions. He delights in occasional use of Jewish word-
play, misleading and trickery. Examples:
A reader seeing a 4-letter entry for Conservative Cantor? might
think about a woman chazzan, but the answer is ERIC Cantor, the
House Republican Majority leader.
A reader seeing a 7-letter entry for Where to find a nun in
December might think about churches and Christmas, but the
answer is DREIDEL, because the Hebrew letter nun is found there.
Benkof is from St. Louis. He made aliyah in 2010 and lives in
Jerusalem.
You can find our first puzzle on page 38 of this issue.
Then we want to hear from you.
Please let us know if you are interested in our continuing to pub-
lish crossword puzzles. Drop us an email at editor@jewishstandard.
com. If enough readers want the puzzle, we will continue to run it.
We look forward to hearing your verdict.
Joanne Palmer
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 20
If synagogues wish to prosper in the 21st century, the
emphasis need to be creating core members.
Alan Mark Levin, Fair Lawn
CANDLELIGHTING TIME: FRIDAY, FEB. 8, 5:03 P.M.
SHABBAT ENDS: SATURDAY, FEB. 9, 6:05 P.M.
NOSHES .................................................................................................. 4
BRIEFLY LOCAL .................................................................17
OPINION .............................................................................................. 18
COVER STORY.................................................................... 24
TORAH COMMENTARY .................................. 37
CROSSWORD PUZZLE ....................................38
ARTS & CULTURE ........................................................39
GALLERY ......................................................................................... 43
LIFECYCLE ...................................................................................44
CLASSIFIED ..............................................................................46
HOME DESIGN .................................................................... 48
REAL ESTATE ...................................................................... 49
Contents
NATIONAL
Obama to visit Israel 29
ARTS & CULTURE
Lore of the German losers 39
LOCAL
After Sandy,
recovering
memories 15
LOCAL
Reuniting survivors 6
LOCAL
It actually
tastes good! 14
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JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 8, 2013 3
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NY BOARD OF RABBIS PRESENTS
David Broza
LIVE AT TEMPLE EMANU-EL OF CLOSTER
Concert to Benefit New Jersey Hurricane Sandy Victims

Sunday, Feb. 10th / 1 Adar
6:00pm Concert
VIP Reception after the Concert

Tickets
$50 each
VIP Ticket Packages
$360: 2 Tickets + Signed CD
$500: 2 Tickets + Signed CD
+ VIP Reception with Artist
$ 1,000: 2 Premiere Tickets (first 3 rows)
+ Signed CD + VIP Reception with Artist
Invited Guests
Governor Christie
Senators Lautenberg & Menendez
Congressmen Garrett, King & Pascrell
To purchase tickets
please contact
Jessica Di Paolo
at 212.983.3521
or jdipaolo@nybr.org
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 5
Survivors reunited through local program
Marla Cohen
O
lga Jaeger and Marta Felberbaum both grew up
under Nazi occupation, in the same region, now
part of western Ukraine, an area that frequent-
ly changed hands between Ukraine, Czechoslovakia,
and Hungary. Both women were sent to Auschwitz as
teenagers.
But it wasnt until they ended up in a Displaced
Persons Camp in Bamberg, Germany, each trying to
make her way to the United States, that they met.
Separated by an ocean when Felberbaum left for
America, they kept in touch through letters. They later
worked in the same factory in New York, but over time
they lost touch with one another.
That is, until Caf Europa, a program of Jewish Family
Service of North Jersey, brought them back together
about eight years ago.
Its an opportunity to get together, Felberbaum said
of the program. We used to go to Teaneck at a restaurant
with two other girls. But its getting harder and were
getting older. So at least we get a ride. Its simpler.
The monthly program of Jewish Family Service of
Northern New Jersey offers aging Holocaust survivors
a chance to get together. The program, held at the Fair
Lawn Jewish Center on the first Tuesday of each month,
varies, with lunch, a ride, and a rotating program of
lectures, musical performances, and films.
But it is a long way from Uzhorod, where Felberbaum
was born, to Fair Lawn, where she now lives. Her father
was a wholesaler of wine and whiskey, buying directly
from vineyards and producing his own kosher wine.
We were religious people, she said.
She, her mother, and three sisters were deported to
the Uzhorod ghetto, and later, when she was 16, all were
sent to Auschwitz. When they arrived, and the cattle car
door opened after a grueling trip, her father disappeared
right away.
I was scared I would lose my mother right away, too.
She did. As they passed through Josef Mengeles
infamous selection, she and her sisters were selected
to live. But her mother was told to go to the right, and
Felberbaum still rues the moment she left her mothers
side. Although no one was certain what fate lay in store
for them, Felberbaum had an inkling when a Jewish capo
pointed ominously to a chimney. See that, Felberbaum
recounted him saying. You came in through the door
and youll go out through the chimney.
In the waning days of the war, Felberbaum was
liberated while on a train en route to another work camp.
It took her three months to make her way home, which
was under the control of the Soviet Union. Eventually,
she was reunited with her sisters. They survived by selling
cigarettes, loose tobacco, and white flour goods that
they could salvage from a store their father had owned
befor the war to the Red Army soldiers who occupied
the town.
Felberbaum left home, realizing there was little future
for her there. She found her way to the DP camp, and
there, housed in a long building where the German
cavalry had once kept its horses, she found others like
her, hoping for a future, looking to leave Europe behind.
I always say to Olga I had the nicest time in my life
in the DP camp, Felberbaum said. I was young. I didnt
have to worry about food. I was working.
I wouldnt call it a good time, Jaeger said dryly.
When each holiday time came, I cried. I needed my
parents. I had to fend for myself.
Despite their different take on that time, Felberbaum
and Jaeger have an easy camaraderie, born from shared
language and similar history. They consult each other
for the right English word when they cannot find the
right Yiddish, German, or Hungarian one. They finish
sentences for one another about their time together in
the camps, and really, their views about that time are not
so disparate.
There is a Slovak expression, I dont have nothing
and dont care about anything, Jaeger said. It was an
easy life.
Jaeger traveled a path similar to her friends. Born in
Bilke a small town now part of Ukraine, about an hour
and a half from where Felberbaum lived she and her
family got through the war in relative quiet until Nazi ally
Hungary invaded in April 1944. As they were finishing
the Passover seder, there came a knock at the door. The
Hungarian police ordered them to pack a suitcase and
head to the town synagogue. From there, they were
sent to the ghetto in Beregszasz, Hungary, then to a
brick factory, and eventually to Auschwitz, where they
separated Jaeger, her mother, and her sister from her
father and two brothers.
One morning, the guards took her mother and some
children away, telling Jaeger that her mother would be
Community
JS-6*
6 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
Marta Felberbaum, left, and Olga Jaeger at a recent meeting of Cafe Europa at the Fair Lawn Jewish Center.
Olga Jaeger is at the brides left, and Marta
Felderbaum is at her right, in a wedding held in the
Bamberg DP camp.
A common area at the Bamberg DP camp when the
two women lived there.
see SurvivOrS page 36
36 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
JS-36
watching them. It was a hoax, Jaeger said. They were
not caring for children. As her mother left, she told her
elder daughter, Take care of Olga, shes still a kid.
I was crying, Jaeger said. I miss my mother.
Another selection process came, and this time, Jaeger,
then 15, was pulled out with the children. She wanted to
go with her sister, who pulled her in front of a barracks
and yanked open the door. They both hid there.
This is how I survived, said Jaeger. My sister saved
my life.
After that she worked in a munitions factory from July
1944 through the following April. The end of the war was
approaching, although the inmates did not know that
until the English bombs fell. A few days later, the British
liberated the camp.
Jaeger never returned home. She and her sister were
cared for by the British in Czechoslovakia, then crossed
the borders illegally between Czechoslovakia, Hungary,
and Germany several times before ending up in the same
DP camp as Felberbaum in 1946.
In the camp, they became part of a group of young
women who shared similar experiences. The group of
friends would attend films in town each week, buying
the tickets on Friday before Shabbat. Watching soccer
matches and attending concerts replaced hard labor.
They attended weddings and celebrated holidays, as
each waited for word that she could depart for America.
Jews liberated by the Americans and British had
priority for immigrating to North America. Jaeger spent
six weeks in the camp before getting the green light to
go to Canada. She went to New York with the help of the
United Jewish Appeal, which then sent her to Atlanta,
where she attended school. Felberbaum sent letters
urging her friend to stay in school. You were lucky, she
noted wryly.
Felberbaum eventually came to New York to live
with relatives. She worked in a garment factory aligning
zippers, seams, and plaid patterns for 12 cents per item
of clothing. She married in 1951. She attended Jaegers
wedding four years later, but eventually they lost track of
each other when Felberbaum moved to California. They
met again when the JFS program put them in touch with
one another.
JFS has run Caf Europa for more than 11 years. It is
funded by the Conference of Material Claims Against
Germany, which provides some restitution and support
for the survivors of the Shoah. Because the funding is
limited, JFS helps subsidize the program, according to
the organizations executive director, Leah Kaufman.
The program attracts up to 80 people each session,
although holiday programs like that for Chanukah will
bring out nearly 100. Its a place they can come to where
theres an unspoken language, Kaufman said. These
are people who understand [one another] without them
having to talk about it.
The group provides socialization, allowing elderly
survivors the youngest are in the 80s to connect
with one another, and it provides a social network after
the loss of a spouse. The program also allows JFS to
identify and form relationships with the survivors in
order to better serve them, Kaufman said.
They all look forward to this one day a month, she
said. If it were up to many of them, theyd like to see it
meet more often.
Survivors From page 6
Healthy Kosher Cooking
with Susie Fishbein
Wednesday, Feb. 20
th
7-8:30 p.m.
CareOne at Teaneck
544 Teaneck Road, Teaneck
An invitation from
CareOne at Teaneck
Join us and Kosher by Design author Susie Fishbein, as she
demonstrates her time-tested methods of preparing and serving
delicious meals, followed by a book signing. Space is limited so
respond early!
RSVP by February 13
th
to
amarkowitz@care-one.com
CareOne at Teaneck 544 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666 201-862-3300
479656
Ill help you at every step of the way to create the
Israel experience of your dreams! Warm, personal
service! Onnie Schiffmiller, Licensed Tour Guide
onnie@israelwithlove.net
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ISRAEL WITH LOVE

Ill help you at every step of the way to
create the Israel experience of your
dreams! Warm, personal service!
Onnie Schiffmiller, Licensed Tour Guide
onnie@israelwithlove.net
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Tour Guiding
& Event Planning
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36 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
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Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 7
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Fair Lawn student leads the line-up in Bar-Ilan comedy
AbigAil Klein leichmAn
T
he student-run Bar Ilan Acting
Society at Israels Bar-Ilan
University is described on its web-
site as a means for the shy to become
outgoing, the nervous to find courage and
those who have a dream to find a means
to fulfill it.
Eighteen-year-old Levi Rybalov of Fair
Lawn has BIAS to thank for fulfilling his
dream of playing the lead on stage.
My first acting experience was in the
annual eighth-grade Holocaust play at
Yavneh Academy [of Paramus] in 2008,
where I played a German spy living in
Havana, Rybalov said. He graduated from
Fair Lawn High School last year and is
spending his gap year as a student in Bar-
Ilans Israel Experience (or XP) program.
Rybalov won the role of Devon in BIAS
January production of the comedic farce
Missing the Mark by Michael Maxwell.
The story follows a pair of high school-age
swindlers posing as Hollywood producers
trying to scam rich wannabe actresses.
Inevitably, the plan backfires.
Devon is one of those con men.
The character I played was a conniving,
manipulative, cunning, heartless con
artist trying to steal money from a bunch
of almost oblivious women. He fit my
personality rather well, Rybalov joked.
Although the character didnt have much
substance, he was a lot of fun to play, he
added.
The XP program accepts no more than
100 overseas students each year, and
encourages them to integrate into campus
life as much as possible. When hes not
acting, Rybalov spends his mornings in
Jewish study seminars and his afternoons
in academic courses at the universitys
Ramat Gan campus, just north of Tel Aviv.
He can transfer the credits hes earning to
the Macaulay Honors College at Lehman
College in the Bronx, where he will begin
his freshman year of college in the fall.
Im not entirely sure what I will major
in next year, he said. I enjoy history and
chemistry, and it also wouldnt be too
much of a stretch to study physics next
year. I hope to continue acting as a hobby.
The Yavneh drama was a turning point
for Rybalov, the son of Alla Granovsky
of Fair Lawn and Alexander Rybalov of
Israel. I had been curious about theater
but never did anything about it. After the
Holocaust play, I wanted to do it more
often, he said.
During his years at Fair Lawn High
School, Rybalov acted in a variety of
drama club productions, including a
Shakespearean comedy, Much Ado About
Nothing, and a tragedy, Othello.
Asked if the experience of putting on a
play was much different in Israel, Rybalov
noted that the director was extraordinarily
laid back. We just had so much fun at
practice and he was very relaxed, but it
came out really well, he said.
The troupe, including other English-
speakers among the general student body,
rehearsed about 40 to 50 hours for the
two-night presentation. Most Bar-Ilan
freshmen are at least three years older than
those in XP, because theyve completed
military or national service before starting
college.
I think I was the youngest by far, and I
think I was the only one with experience,
Rybalov said. Any singing involved? Oh
God, no, nobody wants to hear me sing,
he replied with mock horror.
His previous experience paid off,
however. During the performance, one
of the back doors to the stage wouldnt
open and I couldnt get on to the stage so
I just called out Im stuck! and the entire
audience broke out with laughter.
Theater is not the only extracurricular
activity in which Rybalov has participated.
One particular highlight was kayaking
and hiking in the Golan Heights at the
beginning of the program. I enjoyed every
minute.
What does he like best about Israel? He
doesnt have to think for more than half a
second. Better weather, better food.
Levi Rybalov in Missing the Mark
Courtesy BIAs/BAr-IlAn unIversIty
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8 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 8, 2013
Kosher power to the people?
Jerusalem rabbi behind controversial community kashrut certification to speak in Teaneck
LARRY YUDELSON
W
hen newly
ordained Rabbi
Yosef Leibowitz
left Yeshiva University in
New York to assume his
first pulpit in Berkeley,
California, some 40 plus
years ago, his classmates
jokingly bought him a gas
mask.
At the time, the
University of Californias
Berkeley campus was in the
news for student protests,
which Governor Ronald Reagan was
suppressed by sending out National
Guard helicopters armed with tear gas.
Now Leibowitzs son Aaron is in the
family business (Yosefs father also was
a rabbi, with a New York congregation),
serving a community in Jerusalem as
well as running a small yeshiva. Perhaps
fittingly for someone raised in Berkeley
in that turbulent time he finds himself
embattled, taking the side of free speech
against governmental authority. Though,
in a move Ronald Reagans libertarian
economic advisors might approve, he
is also fighting against a government-
enforced monopoly in particular, the
Israeli rabbinates control over kashrut
supervision. The free speech issue is
this: Can a restaurant declare itself
kosher without buying the
certification of the official
rabbinate, and paying its
inspectors?
The battle is not likely to
bring on tear gas or rioters;
for now, the struggle is
taking place in small
restaurants and newspaper
columns and Facebook
groups; ultimately, it may
spill over into the courts
and then, perhaps, Knesset
legislation. But just as
the Berkeley struggles heralded a new
American era a time of protest, fewer
limits on speech, and the rising star of
Governor Ronald Reagan as the voice of
the conservative backlash, Leibowitzs
struggles over kashrut both exemplify
and herald a changing balance between
religious observance, Israeli society, and
government regulation.
Leibowitzs yeshiva, Sulam Yaakov,
as well as the synagogue he led, is in the
Nachlaot neighborhood in Jerusalem,
which he describes as a little bit like the
Greenwich Village of Jerusalem, with a
very interesting mix of out-of-the box
people.
If Nachlaot is Greenwich Village, then
Salon Shabazi is a prototypical Village
coffee shop, designed to be part living
room for students living in apartments
too small for socializing, part cultural
salon. Its the sort of place where you
can find a musical act featuring a
modestly dressed, apparently Orthodox
female singer, two bearded-and-capped
musicians, and two more musicians
who appear secular. Not long after
Salon Shabazi opened, Leibowitz noted
that young people with kipport were
frequenting the cafe and that it had no
kashrut supervision.
I understood that they had ideological
objections to the legal requirements
for kashrut supervision. I proposed we
build a community-based, trust-based
supervision, he said.
In his vision of kashrut, rather than
the restaurant paying a supervisor, and
answering to him in terms of which
suppliers from whom to buy, supervision
would be a learning opportunity. He
would study the laws of kashrut with
the restaurant owners, they would be
open with their customers about their
standards of observance, and the kitchen
would be open for customers to inspect.
What would happen in the restaurant
would mirror what happens in a kosher
home, where a family maintains a
kosher kitchen without hiring an outside
supervisor.
Leibowitzs neighborhood efforts
coincided with a trend unfolding across
Jerusalem. A couple of Orthodox students
had started a Facebook page called
Kosher without certification to publicize
restaurants and coffee shops in the city
that claimed to be kosher but chose not
to have the chief rabbinates certification.
He publicly endorsed the effort. I
support the right of any restaurant to
claim that theyre kosher and place the
Who: Rabbi Aaron Leibowitz, dean of
Sulam Yaakov The Beit Midrash
for Community Leadership
Development
What: A talk on Alternative kashrut
in Jerusalem
Where: The Jewish Center of Teaneck
When: Wednesday, February 13,
at 7:45 p.m.
Too many words, too little time
R
abbi Leibowitz will be appearing at Limmud,
the convention of Jewish learning that will meet
in East Brunswick next weekend. And while he
will discuss the issue of alternative kashrut supervision,
he also will deal with the question of making prayer
meaningful. He will lead a Slow Down Shacharit ser-
vice and a session called Too Many Words! Why the
Siddur is Broken, and How We Can Fix It.
Many people experience the siddur as having too
many words. Its challenging for many people, even
people who are fluent in Hebrew, he explained.
Its not a question of the service taking too long.
Sincere spiritual practice requires time, he said.
Rather, The heart likes things simple. Theres
very little room left in our liturgy for the simplicity of
spending some time with a word before I have to move
on to the next.
Leibowitz has been experimenting with creative
formats to serve as a gateway into prayer.
Im looking for the quality of the words, not the
quantity of the words, he said.
One particular place where he likes to swap quantity
for quality is the Psukei dZimra portion of the morning
services. These preliminary psalms carry a minimal level
of obligation. Its not like the recitation of the Shema.
Usually, these dozen psalms are mumbled over the
course of a couple of minutes. But Leibowitz said that
the true obligation is the connection to the divine, not
mumbling words.
Pick one psalm, and read it through, and discuss it.
Let people express what different parts mean to them.
Then contemplate a few minutes in silence. Maybe take
one word from the psalm and chant it over and over
again.
Conversation and study works well for people
with more intellectual sensibility. For more spiritual
and New Age-y type of folks, spending 20 minutes just
chanting one word over and over again can be very
powerful and connecting.
Leibowitz has been running occasional services
like this in Jerusalem living rooms. He started by
approaching a non-religious family and asking them
to invite their friends for for an hour and a half on a
Shabbat morning. It was halachic. The men and women
sat separately. All the things that are absolute halachic
obligations we said, but theres so much that is not
obligatory, that it left a tremendous amount of time for
contemplation, for song, for meditation. At the end of
the session, without fail there was a volunteer to host
the next one.
Liebowitz said the feedback has been extremely
encouraging, both from people who had never been
at Shabbat services and people who had come their
whole life. Its heartbreaking the frustration people
express after a lifetime of prayer while never feeling its
something they want to do.
Larry Yudelson
Aaron Liebowitz
Performers at Salon Shabazi, reminiscent of a Village coffee shop.
See KOSHER POWER page 35
JS-35
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 8, 2013 35
responsibility on the consumer to learn about the level of
supervision the restaurant employs, he said.
A big part of the campaign is to transfer more
responsibility for kashrut to the consumer. Now the
consumer tends to rely on a piece of paper from the chief
rabbinate that says everything is kosher. The problem
is very often the certificate isnt worth the paper its
printed on. The level of supervision is very inconsistent.
Standards are minimal. The fact that the mashgiach
the supervisor is on the payroll of the restaurant
creates a huge conflict of interest.
Lets open up the market for certification and let the
agencies compete for the consumers faith, he said.
There is one set of alternative supervisions: That of the
various charedi courts, collectively known as badatz.
But, Leibowitz said, they dont provide a model for a
free market in kashrut supervision. Its not clear what
standards the rabbinate uses when it approves another
supervision; the supervising court has no transparency
in the standards it employs; and because they are only
allowed as an additional certification, anybody who
subscribes to those agencies is basically employing two
kashrut agencies. Theres no challenge to the monopoly
the chief rabbinate has over the industry, he said.
Not surprisingly, the rabbinate has not ignored the
challenge. It has issued citations to the restaurants
that are advertising themselves as kosher without
certification. In turn, the restaurants have refused to pay
the fines.
Everyone is waiting to see how it plays out,
Leibowitz said. There are huge legal questions as to
whether the citations are enforceable. In most cases, the
rabbinate has dropped the case before it came to court.
As drafted by the Knesset, the kashrut law is anti-fraud
regulation, not religious legislation. Some lawyers argue
that because its an anti-fraud law, there has to have been
actual fraud if violators are to be punished. If the food
is kosher but uncertified, it is not fraud to call it kosher,
according to this interpretation. That means that the
rabbinate would have to prove that the non-certified
restaurants actually are not kosher.
Liebowitz said his alternative certification project
reflects real, and huge, changes in Israeli, and
particularly Jerusalem, society.
Theres a large community of young people who
grew up in Orthodox homes and have gone what we
used to call off the derech off the path but still
hold dear a lot of the values they grew up with. Thats one
trend. The other trend is young secular Israelis who are
reclaiming a relationship to tradition. Theres a growing
community of autonomous observance. There are many
people who want to eat kosher food, but dont wear kipot,
dont feel the need for a rabbi to tell them its kosher.
Its an exciting thing. It reflects a drawing close of
the Israeli populace around a shared ground of valuing
Jewish identity.
Liebowitz sees a remix of Jewish identity in Israel,
exemplified by political parties such as Yair Lapids Yesh
Atid putting rabbis and Orthodox representatives onto
their lists.
We no longer can assume somebodys practice based
on what they look like. Thats huge. Thats good news.
I hope that heralds an end to the disenfranchisement
which has been directed at the non-observant
community from their Jewish identity and their Jewish
roots, he said.
Kosher power FROM PAGE 8
www.jstandard.com
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Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 9
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10 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
Hearts in the uttermost west
Onetime intermarried ridgewood family, now all Jewish, moves to hawaii
Joanne Palmer
W
hen we last heard from
them, 10 years ago in May,
the Armstrongs Sandra,
Donald, and their three children had
just moved from Ridgewood to Oahu.
Their story, as chronicled in the Jewish
Standard on May 2, 2003, had been dra-
matic enough to start with. Donald, who
worked on Wall Street, the son of a retired
U.S. Army general, a Presbyterian, mar-
ried Sandy Zimmerman, a somewhat
apathetic Jew. Their initial attempt to
bring their children up in both religions
gradually grew into a family growing ever
more actively Jewish. Donald studied
Judaism and he learned a great deal, but
he was always on the outside.
And then he was inside. Guided by
two husband-and-wife Conservative
rabbi couples Rabbis Noam Marans
and Amy Roth, and then Gil and Batya
Steinlauf, both men in turn rabbis of
Temple Israel and Jewish Community
Center Donald converted, becoming
a Jew.
In April 2003, Donald and Sandy
Armstrong had a second wedding cer-
emony, this one under a chuppah. The
next month, they went west. Very far west.
To the end of the western world.
Sandy Armstrong has written a book,
A Jewish Girl and a Not-So-Jewish-Boy,
about her familys experience as it went
from being interfaith to sharing a strong
single faith, and about what it is like to be
Jewish in a place she describes as sound-
ing very much like paradise.
They moved not knowing exactly what
to expect, she reports. We went because
Donald had been an Army brat, and he
lived here, in Hawaii, through part of mid-
dle school, when his father was stationed
in Viet Nam. Those were some of the best
years of his life.
And now he had just lived through
some of his most confusing years. He had
worked in finance on Wall Street; in the
aftermath of September 11 he lost his job.
He took the nice severance package he
was offered by his former employers, got
his and his wifes childrens enthusiastic
assent, bought a house in Hawaii, sold
their house in New Jersey, and moved.
Neither of us had jobs when we got
there, Armstrong said.
It was like jumping off a cliff into the
ocean. You just jump, and know youll
land okay.
It was sort of like Lech Lecha, the
Torah portion where God tells Abram to
go forth from your native land and from
your fathers house to the land that I will
show you.
In Hawaii, Donald Armstrong got
a job working blue-collar construc-
tion, Sandy Armstrong said. This was
a Wall Street guy. He rarely did anything
around the house. We hired everyone for
everything. But he started helping out
the construction crew that was remod-
eling the house they had bought I
called him one day, and he said, I cant
talk, Im welding the bathroom! and
that turned into a job, from which he is
now retired. Sandy Armstrong, who had
earned an undergraduate degree in edu-
cation from Rutgers, became certified to
teach special education in Hawaii, and
she now heads a Head Start inclusion kin-
dergarten class.
The Armstrongs Jewish life has grown,
too. Donald Armstrong is now president
of their shul, Congregation Sof Maarav,
a Conservative shul that is the western-
most synagogue in the western hemi-
sphere, his wife reported. We are the last
ones to close the gates on Yom Kippur.
Sof Maarav takes its name from the fa-
mous 11th-century Spanish poet Yehuda
HaLevi, who lived in what was the west-
ernmost part of the known world, and
certainly the westernmost Jewish com-
munity. My heart is in the East, and I am
in the uttermost West bsof Maarav
he wrote, soon before he took the trip
toward Israel, dying either before or as he
reached his goal. (Details of his death are
buried in legend.)
The shul was established more than
40 years ago, Armstrong said. It does not
employ a rabbi or cantor, although Mel
Libman, a retired Conservative rabbi, is an
active member who helps out with life-cy-
cle events, including conversions. Donald
Armstrong used his Wall Street-honed ne-
gotiation technique to help the shul buy a
cemetery, and Sandra Armstrong teaches
Hebrew. Donald learned to read Torah,
and he often does so.
When we lived in New Jersey, Don
rarely made it home for Shabbat dinner,
Sandra Armstrong said. It was always me
and the children.
Now, hes always here.
Shabbat dinner often is outside, under
the stars.
The Armstrongs find that it is not hard
to keep kosher in Hawaii. The local su-
permarket stocks kosher meat, and the
climate demands lighter meals anyway,
with more vegetables, rice, and fish.
Many Jews come to Sof Maarav on va-
cation, and many of the local Jews friends
and family visit, so there are often visitors
filling out the 80-family congregations
pews. It has hosted Shoah survivors and
survivors of the illegal immigration ship
Exodus in 1947. The combinations of
family members, guests, and friends from
the East Coast truly has been amazing,
Armstrong said. We are the hub of the
Conservative movement in the middle of
the ocean.
The shul does not have a building.
Services usually are held in the local
Unitarian church, but when holidays con-
flict, we have services right here, on our
lanai, she said. We have a Torah [scroll]
in our home. It has become a member of
our family, and we love it.
Standing outside in my yard during
services and listening to the music com-
ing from my living room is an indescrib-
able joy.
As strongly as she feels about the won-
ders of Hawaii, Sandy Armstrong feels
even more passionately about Judaism.
About 50 percent of Jews are intermar-
ried, and only about 25 percent of their
children are raised as Jews, she said. She
wants people to know about the outcome
of what used to be an intermarriage; what
was possible for her also is possible for
them.
Why not chose Judaism? she said.
Go for it. Raise your kids to be
Jewish. Why not choose Judaism over
Christianity? Its a wonderful religion.
An ocean away, Donald and Sandra celebrate their new Jewish life.
Photos courtesy sandra armstrong
Going to Hawaii with no job, Sandra Armstrong now is a special education teacher.
Caption Photo credIt
Why not chose Judaism?
Go for it. Raise your kids to
be Jewish. Why not choose
Judaism over Christianity?
Its a wonderful religion.
Sandra Armstrong
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A college for grown-ups
JCC University gears up for third semester
Lois GoLdrich
B
ergen County residents no longer
have to travel to New York for high-
quality educational programs, says
Kathy Graff, director of new initiatives at
the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly
and coordinator of the JCC University.
Weve got the same quality programs
and were more convenient, Graff said,
announcing the third semester of what she
calls a college for grown-ups.
When you go to college, you dont have
a context for learning, she said, explain-
ing that most people who go to the JCCs
educational venture are recent retirees,
trying to figure out what to do with their
second act.
We provide a way to keep learning at a
time when youre ready to receive it, she
said. Hopefully, were giving [attendees]
new ideas and filling their time in a pro-
ductive way.
Graff said that the project, created by
JCC program director Carol Leslie, includes
six sessions, each featuring two presenta-
tions. The spring semester drew about 70
participants.
Many people who attended previous
sessions are returning with friends, Graff
said, noting that the winter semester
six consecutive Thursdays from February
28 to March 21 will include presenta-
tions ranging from Arthur Millers Willy
Loman: Relevant Then, Relevant Now to
Emerging Microbial Diseases and Their
Likely Paths.
Past sessions also have explored di-
verse topics, from counterterrorism to the
changing face of communications.
The program, open to JCC members
and nonmembers, has brought in students
from towns throughout Bergen County.
Were getting people from all over,
even Rockland County, Graff said. Were
pleased that they are traveling for this. In
addition, she said, the program has attract-
ed equal numbers of men and women.
Graff said she has a lot of help in plan-
ning programs, working with a task force of
eight active JCC members.
We try to present a wide variety of
topics and seek out top professors and
experts in their fields, she said. We have
conversations about interesting topics and
we search to find the best people to do the
presentations. Were constantly looking at
whats out there, whats new, and the hot
topics of the day.
Graff said that what sets the JCC
University apart is that attendees not only
hear high-quality presentations but have
an opportunity to meet like-minded people
and form a community. We have a popula-
tion of adults who are really interested in
learning new things and hearing different
perspectives. This lets them stay involved
in whats going on and continue to learn.
JCC member Buddy Tell of Cresskill, a
member of the JCC University task force,
credited Graff with bringing in exciting
ideas but noted that the planning group is
not run in a dictatorial manner.
We want to bring people in who are
topical and particularly interesting as well
as people who can introduce a bit of con-
troversy, he said, noting that if task force
members dont think someone is the right
choice, theyll let Graff know.
We may say no, that wont fly, Tell said,
noting that the people on the task force
represent exactly the population Graff is
aiming to reach. If you dont have people
that stimulate you, youre not coming back.
Adults, basically retired people, need
stimulation during the course of the week,
he continued. You dont want to go run-
ning to New York. You can get it here, and
be part of this community.
He noted that the question-and-answer
session that follows each presentation is
particularly interesting.
We dont have dummies, he said.
People really get with it. They get up and
argue with the presenters. We always go
overtime.
The presenters enjoy that as well, Graff
said.
Presenters love our audience, she
said. They get so much back. Theyre ea-
ger to come again.
She said that the task force tries to put
together a balanced program, including
both hot-button issues and offerings in
theater, music, and art.
Noting the high quality of presenters,
she said that we havent had any duds
were lucky like that. Were not bringing in
people whose hobby is the topic and they
like to talk about it. Were bringing in top
experts. We want credentials.
Graff said shes learned that the people
attending her program really like politics.
So we try to have an element of that. We
also know that sometimes people think
something might not be interesting to
them but then they try it and find out that it
is. So we may go the unconventional route.
Our success encourages us to try new
things.
For more information about the
JCC University, call Kathy Graff at (201)
408-1454.
Buddy Tell asks a question after a talk
at the JCC University. Courtesy jCCotp
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 11
JS-12*
12 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
Knockin on Heavens Door
then learnin about what comes next rituals for death and mourning
AbigAil Klein leichmAn
EMERSON Cong. Bnai Israels Knockin
on Heavens Door workshop series begins
on Sunday, February 10, with a discussion
of Jewish customs and traditions about
death, funerals, shiva, and unveiling.
Three subsequent Sunday morning
sessions will cover funeral arrangements,
estate planning, Jewish views of the after-
life, and how to run a shiva minyan. All are
open to the public free of charge.
Rabbi Debra Orenstein explains that
the idea for the synagogues latest adult-
ed series came from congregants who
recently have suffered the deaths of family
members, as well as the untimely death of a beloved con-
gregant a year and a half ago. She will lead the sessions,
along with the shuls Cantor Lenny Mandel and guest
speakers.
People were getting a lot of exposure to Jewish
mourning customs but did not feel as informed as they
wished to be, she said. A time of tragedy, when you are
absorbed with your own grief, is not when you have the
power or energy or inclination to attend a class about
these rituals.
We felt that preparing for death and mourning is
something Jews want and need to know
about more deeply. When the time inevita-
bly comes for you to draw on that prepara-
tion, the resources and the rituals will be
more meaningful for you, she continued.
Most of us have at least a superficial ac-
quaintance with shiva and mourning, and
we tend to feel its usefulness, compassion,
kindness, and healing, but there is a sense
that we havent gotten deeply into it.
Orenstein, a Conservative rabbi who
was editor of Jewish Lights Lifecycles, a
book series that began in 1994, also sat on
the Rabbinical Assembly committee that
designed rituals and prayers for childbirth, pregnancy,
and miscarriage. I have a career-long interest in how
lifecycle events help us connect to God, Torah, and com-
munity, she said.
An article she wrote about the Jewish mourning pro-
cess for a Catholic publication on interfaith rites of death
will be among the texts upon which she will draw for the
series, along with biblical, talmudic, and other contem-
porary sources.
In the opening session, Orenstein will present a
timeline detailing what happens in traditional Jewish
observance after a death, why it happens, and how
those observances play out in different peoples lives.
Sometimes you have expectations and then in the mo-
ment things might be a little different, she said. Well
be peppering these discussions with individual stories.
The workshop will address peoples concerns about
what to do immediately after hearing of a close family
members death. People have said, I have been to shiva
minyans, but when my parent died I didnt know what
to do first. Cover the mirrors? Call the doctor? This is an
attempt to give step-by-step, practical tools but at the
same time, the spiritual meaning behind everything.
The second workshop, to be held March 3, is called
With a Little Help From my Friends. It will feature a
panel discussion about buying plots, selecting a funeral
home, preparing for funerals, prepaying for funerals, and
bringing a body back from out of state. Barry Wien, co-
owner of Eden Memorial, will lead that session. Louise
Reich, an estate planning and administration attorney
and congregation member, will focus on living wills,
health proxies, and preparing an estate. Orenstein and
Mandel will discuss organ donation, bequests, and chari-
table donations.
The third session, on April 14, will delve into Jewish
Rabbi Deborah Orenstein
A necessary conversation
Legislator supports effort to help fund adult briefs
lois goldrich
O
ver the past year, Marlene
Ceragno has been trying to
start a conversation about adult
absorbent products.
But unfortunately, said Ceragno, a rec-
reational therapist at the Senior Center of
the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades, Theres
been no movement on the stigma front.
I recently spoke at a Rotary Club meeting
and at first they couldnt look me in the
eye. But its a conversation that has to get
started. We didnt talk about dementia
years ago and now we do.
Still, progress is being made. In August,
the JCC brought together legislators in-
terested in helping seniors meet the costs
of purchasing absorbent products. One
of them, State Assemblywoman Valerie
Huttle (District 37), has taken the idea to
Trenton.
Ceragno spoke enthusiastically about
Huttles bill, Concurrent Resolution 166,
which asks Medicare to help fund adult
absorbent products.
That is my dream, Ceragno said. For
Medicare not just Medicaid to help
seniors who live solely off Social Security
checks to help pay for these very expen-
sive items.
Adult incontinence is a growing
concern as our population ages, Huttle
wrote in an email to the Jewish Standard.
Access to incontinence products can
help senior citizens remain in their
homes and communities longer.
Ceragno, who recently received her
masters degree in gerontology from
the University of Massachusetts, is her
90-year-old aunts primary caretaker. She
said that she had been shocked to learn
the high cost of absorbent products.
Invited to testify at a senior needs
hearing last year, she realized that the
problem was widespread, with some
seniors forced to choose between inconti-
nence products and food.
The latest information from the New
Jersey Foundation on Aging shows that
25 percent of seniors in the state cannot
cover basic needs such as food, so they
certainly cant afford these products, she
said.
Huttles resolution asks for Medicare
to consider funding these products for
people like my aunt, who get too much
Social Security to qualify for Medicaid but
cant afford basic needs. While the bill
has passed its first vote in the Assembly
health committee, she said, where it goes
from there, I dont know. I think it has a
long way to go.
Ceragno said that her goal is for the
United States to emulate Australia, which
provides funding for these products
through a system like that used for food
stamps. In the meantime, after doing
research on diaper banks around the
country, she has embarked on public
educational efforts, spurring the launch
of adult briefs drives throughout the
community.
One drive, held last summer at the
JCC, netted some 6,000 absorbent prod-
ucts. Another, held in September at
Englewood Hospital and Medical Center,
brought in more than 1,000. Ceragno also
was helped by a donor working with the
Red Cross and Somebody Cares America
who heard about her efforts and provided
her with 1,500 briefs.
It was a windfall, she said, noting
that it took two cars to bring the products
to Englewoods Center for Food Action,
Rabbi Meir Berger and Marlene Ceragno at the New Synagogue of Fort Lee.
see KNOCKiN page 32
see LegiSLatOR page 32
32 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
JS-32
beliefs about the afterlife. Its surprising to me how often
people say, I didnt know Jews believed in the afterlife, so
its important to communicate the history and philoso-
phy of those ideas and open it up for conversation and
questions, Orenstein said.
In the final session, Leader of the Pack, set for April
12, Mandel will train anyone 13 or older how to lead a
shiva minyan.
Were a very musical synagogue, so the committee
named each session after songs, Orenstein explained.
Its a tough topic, and they wanted to make it accessible
and friendly. We also want to communicate that you can
think of these ideas in a way that will enhance your life.
In the spring, the synagogue will host its next adult-ed
series on lifecycle events, All You Need is Love. The ses-
sions will be: One and One Make Two, about brit milah,
baby-naming, and conversion of non-Jewish babies; Do
You Want to Know a Secret, looking at invisible life pas-
sages such as coming out (or learning that your child is
gay), having a miscarriage, sending your last child out of
the nest, and achieving remission of a disease; and Got
to Get You into My Life, dealing with Jewish wedding rit-
uals and traditions, and the issue of interfaith marriages.
Each 10 to 11:30 a.m. session is self-contained. People
planning to attend are asked to RSVP to office@bis-
rael.com or (201) 265-2272, and to bring a nonperishable
food item to contribute to the congregations interfaith
food drive. Collection bins are in the lobby of the syna-
gogue at 53 Palisade Ave., Emerson.
For more information, call (201) 265-2272 or go to
www.bisrael.com. 5603345
which distributes them.
This month, the New Synagogue of Fort Lee is spon-
soring a drive for the entire community.
I felt that my rabbi Meir Berger has always
been a champion for seniors, she said, explaining that
while he had been enthusiastic about the idea at first, he
also was somewhat afraid of offending members of the
congregation.
I explained that its not for our congregation [but]
that were a drop-off point for all of Fort Lee and sur-
rounding communities, said Ceragno, who added that
she hopes that as people see the project moving forward,
other communities will host drives as well.
Audrey Cole, a synagogue administrator working on
the project with Berger, said that the rabbi, always an ad-
vocate for seniors, knows how expensive these products
are. When Marlene asked him to host the drive, he saw it
as another way to help seniors.
Cole said that while the collection has not yet formally
begun, the bin, which stands in the synagogues front
foyer, already is full.
Were getting a phenomenal response, she said.
People go through these products so quickly,
Ceragno said. They have to decide from month to
month whether to buy food or absorbent products.
Someone told me that a relative missed a simcha be-
cause of this. Since there are no programs that offer
financial assistance to seniors in need of adult briefs or
other incontinence products, millions of senior adults
are becoming unnecessarily homebound, she said.
To learn more about this subject, go to www.facebook.
com/adultcarebrief.
Knockin From page 12
Legislator From page 12
32 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
Registraton begins at
10 AM on February 13
(for new applicants)
and February 11 (for prior applicants)
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FREE, FUN, FABULOUS
10-day trip to Israel this summer
This trip is a gif from Taglit-Birthright Israel
*who have never partcipated
on a peer experience in Israel
This trip is organized by
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Jewish Federaton of Northern New Jersey
invites students and young professionals* (ages 18-26)
on a
Contact
Avinoam Segal-Elad
Community Shaliach and
Director, Center for Israel Engagement
201-820-3909 or avinoams@jfnnj.org
Kim Schwartzman
Campaign and
Young Leadership Coordinator
201-820-3936 or kimberlys@jfnnj.org
Jewish Federaton will host two buses this summer, one for 18-22 year olds
and one for 22-26 year olds. Join us and bring a friend!
Your hometown Federaton can help you through the registraton process.
Interested? Need more informaton? Know someone who is eligible?
Sherut-Galut is a unique service
designed to address the needs
of the many travelers from the
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Sherut-Galut is able to ofer
transportation fees at a fraction
of the cost of car services or taxis.
www.sherut-galut.com
205-2950
www.jstandard.com
JS-13
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 13
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JOSH LIPOWSKY
Y
ou might think that Mordy
Herzog, executive vice president
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has a favorite wine. He doesnt, and he
doesnt think you should either.
Its not about what is the most
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town. For Bayonne-based Royal Wines,
the annual event is more than just a
showcase of 200 wines it distributes
its an opportunity to expand the
publics knowledge.
The story of kosher wine has just
begun and we think there is a great,
great journey ahead of us, Herzog
said. When you look around, what you
see is happy people. Thats what this
event is about, happy people enjoying
themselves.
Herzog Wine Cellars debuted a new
2010 single vineyard Oakville Cabernet
Sauvignon, which retails for about
$75. The excitement of the new wine,
general manager of wine operations
Joe Hurliman said, was heightened by
the opportunity to talk about it with
experienced and novice wine drinkers
alike.
You get the story from the
winemaker, he said. They try a wine
and look at you and smile. You get that
positive response. What more could you
ask for at an event like this?
For Fran Greenman of Madison,
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event proves that kosher food and wine
actually tastes good.
Its nice to dress up every once in
a while and take the bakers clothes
off, said Adam Steinberg, co-owner of
Zadies Kosher Bakeshop in Fair Lawn,
who was there with his wife, Jessica, and
business partners Eric Mercado and
Josh Steinberg.
For first-timer Henry Frank of New
York, the draw was the food and wine,
but mainly the food, he said, noting
that sausage seems to be a big thing
here, and its excellent.
Sausage was easy to find, but bacon
substitutes seemed to be the hot trend
this year. Teanecks Gotham Burger, a
first-time attendee at the show, offered
BFLT Bites, with applewood-smoked
maple-glazed beef fry. Et Al, opened in
December in Vauxhall by Seth Warshaw
of Teanecks ETC Steakhouse, served a
lamb bacon-wrapped poached pear,
while Brooklyn-based meat company
Jacks Gourmet sampled FLT Facon,
Lettuce, Tomato sandwiches.
The event, Warshaw said, allows
us to come to the New York scene and
present what we have, and hopefully
they like it.
At the Silverleaf Caterers table, chefs
set up a Brazilian churrascaria station,
grilling seasoned steak and marinated
chicken on rodizio swords in the style of
the Brazilian barbecue, demonstrating
a new feature for weddings and
bnai mitzvah. After hearing
about the churrascaria style,
Jack Wasserman, who runs
Silverleaf, the catering arm of
Teanecks Butterflake, sent his
chefs to learn the techniques.
A lot of people love our stuff
and want to know how this
can translate into an event for
them, he said. Thats why we
do this.
The expo appeals to many
audiences, according to
Menachem Lubinsky, CEO of
Lubicom, a kosher industry
monitor and host of the annual
Kosherfest industry expo in the
Meadowlands. Lubinsky was on
the lookout for new trends and
innovations in kosher wine and
food.
Its all part of the upscaling
of kosher, he said. This event,
more and more restaurants are
appealing to this crowd. Its part of
an entire universe of developing kosher
to the next level. Its become a big social
event because of people in the area who
are interested in better wines and better
food. This is a good place to see a
good sample of it.
Its a great event that
celebrates the growth of the
kosher industry and reiterates
that market is being driven
by Jewish kosher consumers,
said Elie Rosenfeld, CEO of
Joseph Jacobs Advertising, which
represents kosher giants Empire
and Manischewitz.
The assorted carving stations
slicing up fresh, hot brisket,
pastrami, and corned beef were
big draws for Rabbi Levi Stone,
who came down from Westport,
Conn., with his wife, Chanie, but
the sweeter wines, like Teal Lake
and Moscato dAsti also grabbed his
attention.
In addition to what he described
as the never-ending delicacies, KFWE
provides just an unbelievable feeling
of togetherness and unity and good
kosher food, he said. What more
could you ask for?
JS-14*
14 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 8, 2013
Seth Warshaw of ETC Steakhouse in Teaneck offers samples to visitors.
PHOTOS BY JOSH LIPOWSKY
Rabbi Levi and Chanie Stone ventured from
Connecticut to Chelsea Piers.
Rabbi Shmuley Boteach of
Englewood enjoys a glass of wine.
Avi Rhoades, who used to live
in Teaneck, has a great time
sampling food and drink.
Joe Hurliman manages
wine operations for
Herzog Wine Cellars.
FLTs are Facon, lettuce, and tomato sandwiches.
Facon, as its name implies, is faux bacon.
JS-15*
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 15
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Israel Programs Center
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OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Photo fixes
Operation Photo rescue restores storm-damaged pictures free
Joanne Palmer
A
fter peoples homes were devastated by
Superstorm Sandy, often they needed new
boilers, or roofs, or drywall. They couldnt
rebuild without those things, and they couldnt live
without them.
But there is very little sentiment attached to a boiler,
or a roof, or drywall. They are interchangeable func-
tional objects.
Photographs, though thats some-
thing else entirely.
Many people lost the records of their lives, and
of their parents and grandparents lives as well.
Floodwaters took black and white photos and left them
sodden masses of brown; color pictures often turned
into a bright swirl of indecipherable color.
Photographs are not necessary, the way boilers or
roofs or drywall are, but when they are destroyed people
feel less whole.
My parents live in Oceanside, on Long Islands south
shore, just a few miles from the beach. When the storm
hit, the ocean surged up Long Beach Road and almost
filled their basement. Everything in it was destroyed.
They replaced the boiler and the drywall (their roof
was fine), but they simply piled the ruined pictures in a
heap and left them sitting. It was too dispiriting to look
at them, but it was somehow too disloyal, too much like
giving up, to throw them away.
There might be something more symbolic than a
damaged picture left to rot, but its hard to come up with
it.
And then, help! From Kansas, of all places.
My mother read an article in Newsday, Long Islands
only remaining daily, about Operation Photo Rescue.
Its a group that uses pretty amazing technology, com-
bined with highly skilled volunteers experience and
instinct, to restore ruined photographs.
And it is free. These volunteers offer their service out
of a combination of basic goodness and the excitement
of the technical challenges the work provides.
The group was begun to help fix some of the damage
done by Hurricane Katrina in 2005; its founders recog-
nized that they could help rebuild peoples lives through
their combination of technology and art. There have
been a great many floods in recent years, and not only
the coasts are vulnerable. Rivers have overflowed their
banks, demolished levees, and ruined the towns built
up alongside them with depressing regularity, even as
politicians argue about climate change. There is a real
emotional and psychological need for the services of-
fered by Operation Photo Rescue.
People can bring the group up to 20 storm-damaged
photos. Those originals are photographed and re-
turned within an hour or so; the copied images, care-
fully made with high-end equipment (in New York,
it was done with a hugely expensive machine lent to
Operation Photo Rescue by the Metropolitan Museum
of Art), are put in virtual folders, where volunteers, who
could be anyplace in real life, take them out and fix
them. There is no risk to the originals, which are back
safely in their owners hands.
Margie Hayes, now the organizations president, had
been a technical writer before she was displaced in the
economic turmoil of 2008. Shed always been fascinated
by art, so she retrained as a graphic artist.
We met her on Sunday at the School for Visual Arts
in the Flatiron neighborhood, surrounded by art sup-
ply stores and precious artisanal coffee shops. The vol-
unteers wore white gloves to handle the photographs,
probably both because they didnt want to cause them
any further harm and because they didnt want to come
into contact with mold. (My parents had left the photo-
graphs to dry under glass, which is not ideal, I learned
later; it kept them from tearing, but it caused some of
the pigment to stick. If your photographs get wet, you
should remove them carefully from their frames while
they still are wet and put them carefully on a towel to
dry.)
Hayes, an open and cheerful woman, is from Kansas.
This was her first trip to New York; she was there from
Friday until Monday, and could spare time to see al-
most nothing. (I was able to take out my iPad to show
her Madison Square Park and the improbable glory
of the Flatiron Building; they were close enough that
I hope she managed to see them.) She was doing in-
take, assessing the photos and explaining the system.
She rejected one of ours, a rectangle that eventually
we realized was Andy and my wedding picture. Andys
Moroccan kippah was vaguely visible at the top, and my
white dress a blur of slightly lighter color. There wasnt
enough detail left for anyone to work with, she said.
But the others all could be fixed. They were pocked
and puckered but technique, knowledge, and imagina-
tion will save them.
Soon she couldnt say when we will get an enve-
lope with hard copy prints, and we will drive them back
out to Long Island and present them to my parents.
Another part of their lives will have been restored.
Thank you, Operation Photo Rescue.
Four grandchildren, in a photo that suffered only mild
water damage. It will be fixed.
Many people lost the records of
their lives, and of their parents and
grandparents lives as well.
First
Person
These dead shall
not have died in vain
Local interfaith groups work to try to contain gun violence
Joanne Palmer
T
he question of gun violence man-
ages to be both divisive and unify-
ing. Although many gun owners,
including many Jews, bristle reflexively
when the subject is broached, it also draws
many unexpected groups together.
Joel Mosbacher, rabbi of Beth Haverim
Shir Shalom, a Reform synagogue in
Mahwah, convened a meeting of local
clergy in January. It was meant to be the
first of a series of meetings, and gave
participants the chance to hash out ideas
and come to an action plan about which
they all could agree. True to his word, on
Sunday he held the next meeting this
one was for local activists, both clergy and
lay, to set strategy.
At the same time, local activists,
organized primarily by the Ethical Culture
Society of Bergen County and including a
large number of Jews, have been holding
a vigil every Sunday afternoon at Chestnut
Street Plaza on Cedar Lane in Teaneck.
Although these two groups developed
separately in response to the same
stimulus the murders in Newtown,
Connecticut they have now joined
forces.
The vigils goal is asking people to go
to their town councils and their mayors to
join Mayor Bloombergs group, New
York Citys mayor, Michael Bloomberg, has
founded a group called Mayors Against
Illegal Guns and for town councils
to pass resolutions to support Obamas
campaign to reduce gun violence, Steven
Tencer said. Tencer, who lives in Teaneck,
supports the group actively and has been
at most of its vigils. So far weve been
successful in New Milford and Fair Lawn.
Teanecks town council voted to pass the
legislation on Tuesday.
When they first began, the vigils drew
about 80 people, Tencer said; now, weeks
later, after the first shock has worn off, still
about 30 to 40 come.
Each week, another clergy member
organizes the vigil. Two Sundays ago, that
task fell to Rabbi Steven Sirbu of Temple
Emeth in Teaneck. Last Sunday, Rabbi Joel
Pitkowsky of Congregation Beth Sholom,
also in Teaneck, took charge.
From left, Rebecca Miller, Rabbi Elyse Frishman, Louis Lever, and Bari Hopkins
face the camera, and from left, Louis Milgrom, Naomi Gamorra, and Lisa Summers
watch them at Barnert Temple in Franklin Lakes.
Marc Abel, a congregant at Beth
Haverim Shir Shalom, speaks at the
meeting there on Sunday.
JS-16*
16 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
Rabbi
Joel Mosbacher
Rev. Steve Huston
see GUN VIOLENCE page 33
Its a time for the
community to come together
and express their feelings
about the need to curb
gun violence.
Rabbi Joel Pitkowsky
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 33
JS-33
Rev. Steve Huston
Its a time for the community to come
together and express their feelings about
the need to curb gun violence, and also to
check in, on a practical level, to find out
whats going on, Pitkowsky said.
Each leader can shape the vigil when
it is his or her turn, he said. Last week,
he read a few lines from the Declaration
of Independence and the last section of
the Gettysburg Address. It is rather for
us to be here dedicated to the great task
remaining before us, he began, reading
Abraham Lincolns profoundly moving
words, that from these honored dead we
take increased devotion to that cause for
which they gave the last full measure of
devotion that we here highly resolve that
these dead shall not have died in vain.
We cannot say that everyone who was
shot dead was a hero, Pitkowsky said,
and in fact it is a misuse of that word to
use it in that way, but I hope that we can
learn from their deaths, grieve them, and
hopefully make the world a better place.
Mosbacher said that there were 13
communities of faith at the meeting
he held in Mahwah, including Jews,
Christians, and Sikhs. The NAACP the
civil right organization whose initials
spell out the National Association for
the Advancement of Colored People
was there. There were about 125
people from various communities. We got
together to strategize about how to bring
about sensible gun violence prevention
legislation.
The goal now, he said, is to meet
with all of the New Jersey congressional
delegation. We want to work with people
across the state.
The group is not trying to take away
peoples guns, he stressed. Some people
feel theyd like to take a more aggressive
view, but our sense is that we want to try
for things that we actually can win, such as
background checks, limits on ammunition
clips, and a ban on assault weapons.
Weve been explicit and clear in every
forum, including this last one, that its not
about taking guns away from responsible
gun owners, Mosbacher continued. It is
about trying to ensure peoples safety.
Joy Kurland, the director of the Jewish
Community Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey,
was at the Mahwah meeting. Although
the JCRC has not yet had a chance to vote
on the issue at a board meeting, certainly
the rabbis and other people have been
involved, so we are involved, she said.
The Jewish Council for Public Affairs,
the JCRCs umbrella organization, is
holding its annual plenum in Washington,
D.C., March 9 to March 12, and a
resolution not just on gun violence but
also mass violence, which encompasses
the gun issue as well as the whole mental
health issue, will be on the agenda there,
she said.
Another participant at the Mahwah
meeting was the Reverend Steve Huston,
pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of
Ramsey.
I got involved in the meeting initially
because Rabbi Mosbacher invited me, and
after Newtown I felt it was time I needed to
stop being in the shadows and come out
in front and speak out, he said. We were
coming back from a family Christmas
dinner, got off the highway to avoid traffic,
and ended up driving through Newtown.
The heaviness of driving through that
town was so palpable, I thought, I need
to do something, I just dont know what it
is. Then he got the call from Mosbacher.
Huston is from Oklahoma. I grew up
in a hunting family, he said. When I was
not old enough to hunt, I was the hunting
dog; my dad would shoot the birds
generally doves and I would run out to
the field and grab them. When I was old
enough, my father would pick me up after
school, the shotguns would be in the back
of the car, and wed go out to the field and
shoot, and then come home and clean
them up and cook them for dinner.
I enjoyed the time with my father.
Wed hunt ducks and geese, and a lot of it
was the long drives with my father. That
was part of our relationship, and it was
wonderful to have that opportunity.
I also grew up in scouting. Part of
what we did was skeet shooting and
target shooting and learning gun safety. A
member of our church was our shooting
instructor. It was a very normal part of
growing up.
It wasnt until I got married that I
realized that other people didnt grow up
that way.
Hustons wife is from New York, and
we made the decision that when we had
children they have two we wouldnt
have guns in our house.
I remember being 8 or 9 years old, at a
friends house, getting hold of his fathers
pistol. I realized that I had to not do
anything with it, but I dont want it to be
part of my childrens growing up.
We dont want to have accidents, and
those kinds of accidents happen all the
time.
He is not antigun, Huston said. I dont
necessarily believe that arming everyone
is the solution, and I dont believe that
taking everyones gun away is the solution,
either.
Part of the reason for my entering this
conversation is to help lead a discussion
about finding some place where we can all
agree to move forward.
In many ways, our police forces have
become paramilitary forces, because
the arsenals that they are facing on the
street are increasing. They look more like
military than like police. At some point,
we have to stop and figure out how to
move in a different direction.
I dont know what that direction is, but
I know that we have to do something.
Gun violence From page 16
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Rinat dinner
set for early March
Congregation Rinat Yisrael in
Teaneck will hold its annual
dinner on Sunday, March 3, at
5 p.m., at Congregation Keter
Torah in Teaneck. Debbie
and Orin Golubtchik are
the guests of honor. Felicia
Grossman will receive the
Sruli Guttman Service award and Josh Sultanik is the
Young Leadership awardee. For information, call (201) 837-2795 or go to www.
rinat.org.
JS-17*
Bri efly local
Tribute concert honors
memory of Stephanie Prezant
Songs She Loved, an eve-
ning dedicated to remem-
bering Stephanie Prezant
and her enthusiasm for
life, is set for Saturday,
February 9, at 8 p.m., at
the Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades in Tenafly.
Stephanie Iris Prezant,
22, was from Haworth and
a senior at the University
of Delaware when she
died on April 29 after a
rock climbing accident
at the Mohonk Preserve
in New York State. She
was survived by her parents, Elana and Jeffrey Prezant,
a brother, Jonathan, a sister, Jacqueline, and her
grandparents, Tania and Philip Horn, and Louise and
Howard Prezant. Rabbi Mordecai Shain, executive
director of Lubavitch on the Palisades, conducted her
funeral, held at the JCC.
The concert will feature live music by friends and
family, including her father on guitars and vocal; her
brother on keyboard and vocals; her uncle, Bob Prezant,
on drums; and her cousins, Zach Prezant on bass, and
Sarah Fortinsky, vocals. Other musicians will include
Shlomi Pilo on keyboard and vocals; Udy Kashkash
on guitar and vocals; Ronen Milkay on saxophone;
Arlene Gould on vocals; Uri Kleinman on bass; and Gal
Gershovsky on drums. Special performers include Nancy
Follender, vocals, with Diane Honig, piano; and Erel Pilo,
vocals.
The concert costs $30 a person. Funds raised will help
support the Stephanie I. Prezant Maccabi Fund at the
JCCOTP, which encourages todays youth to embrace
athletics and sportsmanship with the same passion
that she embraced them. For information, call (201)
408-1406.
Stephanie Prezant
Courtesy JCCotP
Debbie and Orin Golubtchik
Photos Courtesy Cry
Felicia Grossman Josh Sultanik
Heshe and Harriet Seif
Photos Courtesy etzion
Etzion honorary dinner March 10
The Etzion Foundation will honor Rav Aharon
Lichtenstein, Rosh Yeshiva of Yeshivat Har Etzion (Gush),
in celebration of his upcoming 80th birthday, at its an-
nual dinner on March 10 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in
Manhattan. Heshe and Harriet Seif of Englewood are
guests of honor. Rabbi Yehuda and Michelle Sarna also
are being honored; he is Alumnus of the Year. For infor-
mation, call the Etzion Foundation at (212) 732-4874.
Rav Aharon
Lichtenstein
OU opens local office
The Orthodox Unions Institute of Public Affairs has
moved to a new office in Teaneck to house its New Jersey
operations. Its public affairs staff expanded to advocate
in New Jersey in 2011, concentrating on day school
educational affordability initiatives. Before moving to
Teaneck, the staff worked from OU headquarters in
Manhattan.
According to Josh Pruzansky, the institutes New Jersey
state director, The purpose of the creation of the New
Jersey office was clear to find a way to help ease the
financial strain on families sending their children to
Jewish day schools. In order to obtain what we seek in
Trenton we need to increase our voting turnout. That is
why we are coming to the community.
The new office is at 696 Palisade Avenue; there will
be satellite offices as well. For information on the OUs
IPA opening a satellite office in a community, or to
become involved with the OUs educational affordability
initiative, call 855-NJ-VOTES (658-6837) or go to www.
njvotes.org.
Klatskin Baker among
nature center honorees
Charles Klatskin and
Bruce Baker will re-
ceive the Tenafly Nature
Centers highest honor,
The Founders Award
for Conservation, at the
organizations annual
dinner and silent auc-
tion on Sunday, March
3, at the Clinton Inn in
Tenafly. Honorary chair
Jen Maxfield, a Tenafly na-
tive and local newscaster,
will serve as emcee.
Charles Klatskin and
Bruce Baker worked
together in 1976 to finalize the funding to preserve 274
acres of woodlands atop the Palisades. At the time,
Klatskin was a leader of the Jewish Community Center
of Englewood, the forerunner to the Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades in Tenafly. Klatskin, representing the JCC, was
able to secure the final $1 million necessary to bridge
the remaining financial gap in exchange for a 29-acre
parcel where the JCC would build its new center.
TNC will present the Volunteer of the Year award
to Paul Keyes, a local landscape architect, and special
thanks and recognition will be extended to the New
York-New Jersey Trail Conference for its work helping to
maintain TNCs seven miles of trails and for its efforts to
re-open trails after Superstorm Sandy.
For tickets, sponsorship opportunities, and
information on ads for a commemorative journal go to
www.tenaflynaturecenter.org/Annual-Dinner.
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 17
Taya Schwartzbard sits with her father, Adam
Schwartzbard, at morning minyan and says
the Shema at the World Wide Wrap at Temple
Emanu-El of Closter last week. The World Wide
Wrap is a project of the Federation of Jewish
Mens Clubs. BruCe Pomerantz
CareOne at Teaneck hosts Shabbaton
Ari MArkowitz
Last weekend, nine boys from the Torah Academy of
Bergen County spent Shabbat with our residents at
CareOne at Teaneck.
The Shabbaton began with a Kabbalat Shabbat ser-
vice that carried over into Shabbat dinner that many of
our residents shared with the TABC students. Dinner was
filled with zemirot and many of the residents sang along
and afterward Rabbi Duvy Nachbar from TABC gave a
shiur (lecture) for residents, students, and community
members.
Shabbat day began with morning services followed
by an elaborate hot kiddush with chulent, different types
of kugels, and zemirot with residents of CareOne, TABC
students, and community members.
On Shabbat afternoon, a group of 33 students from
the Rosenbaum Yeshiva of North Jersey and their rab-
bis joined the TABC students to play board games with
our residents. A group of 10 boys visited a resident with
dementia and sang to her. Her face glowed as she tried to
sing along.
Shabbat concluded with Mincha, sudah shlishit, and
Maariv.
One resident said: I havent experienced a Shabbat
like that in a very long time. CareOne at Teaneck strives
to give residents a homelike feeling while receiving the
quality care they require.
Ari Markowitz is the assistant administrator at CareOne
at Teaneck.
Bruce Baker, left, and
Charles Klatskin at the
Tenafly Nature Center.
Courtesy tnC
The halachah
of selling arms
Shlomo m. Brody
A
ccording to recently released data, Israel export-
ed approximately $7 billion of military equip-
ment in 2012, mostly to the United States and
Europe, but also to Southeast Asia and South America.
This is no doubt a lucrative enterprise, but is it the right
thing for the Jewish state to be doing from the point of
view of Jewish law?
Halachah frowns on store owners who sell guns to
irresponsible or violent customers. The notion that
salespeople may simply close their eyes to the potentially
harmful or unethical use of weapons remains foreign to
Jewish law. But how does this apply when it is a question
of countries and armies?
Legal perspectives on this question evolved in the
course of the talmudic period and in later centuries,
with Jewish law ultimately concluding, albeit somewhat
hesitantly, that it is permissible to sell weapons to
nations that will use them responsibly and protect the
safety of Jews. Although the talmudic sages initially
had drawn up an exhaustive list of weapons that it was
forbidden to sell to pagan nations, a later passage in
the Talmud raises the question Why then do we sell
them [weapons] nowadays? Rabbi Amis answer is, We
sell [them] to the Persians who protect us. By the 5th
century, it seems, Jews in Babylonia were selling arms
to local authorities, reflecting a generally cooperative
relationship with them. Christine Hayes has argued that
exceptions to the gun sale ban might have already existed
in the land of Israel in the 3rd century, as a parallel text in
the Jerusalem Talmud (Yerushalmi Avodah Zarah 2:1)
seems to indicate. In that text, the Talmud asserts that
the prohibition applies only to cities where no Jews live.
Once Jews live there, weapons sales remain permissible
either because they will serve to protect Jewish as well
as non-Jewish residents or, alternatively, because the
peaceful habitation of Jews within the city shows that
these Gentiles are not hostile to them.
Medieval commentators explained this Persian
dispensation differently, possibly in partial reflection of
their position within their own society. Rabbi Menachem
Editorial
A proud Jew remembered
I
t was 1968, a year of turmoil and assassinations, when
civil rights and military might were issues fought out
in the streets and on campuses, at lunch counters and
in boardrooms.
The politics of New York City was undergoing great
change. Ever since the mid-19th century, the machine
controlled it all, from who sat on a judges bench to who
collected the neighborhood garbage.
That began to change with the defeat several years
earlier of Carmine G. DeSapio, the longtime boss of
Democratic politics in Manhattan. He had been the
Democratic district leader in Greenwich Village, but his
power reached far beyond, from City Hall to the governors
mansion, and at times into the White House itself. He was
powerful enough to make it to the cover of Time magazine
in 1955.
Powerful men make powerful enemies, and DeSapio
made one in particular: former First Lady Eleanor
Roosevelt. She blamed him for ruining her sons political
career and dedicated herself to bringing him down.
In 1961, a group of dedicated reformers, in part egged
on by Roosevelt, managed to unseat DeSapio. He tried
comebacks in 1963 and 1965, both times losing the dis-
trict leaders race to Edward Irving Koch, whose own
seat of power was a first-floor loft that housed the Village
Independent Democrats. The VID was the hub of reform
politics in the city, and Koch was one of its most powerful
engines.
1968 also was the year after Israel had won the June
1967 Six-Day War and had taken the west bank, Gaza,
and parts of the Golan Heights. At the time, Israels only
concern was to modify its borders sufficiently to fend off
the next attack. It was anxious to return the overwhelming
majority of the land it had seized in routing the attacking
armies of Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. In a sense, it was hold-
ing the land hostage. Make peace, it said to the Arab states,
and you can have it all back, with some adjustments for
safe and secure boundaries, as United Nations General
Assembly Resolution 242 termed it.
Israel, however, was doing other things in Gaza and the
west bank. The Arab states had forced the Palestinian refu-
gees of 1948 to live in the most disgusting conditions in
what was laughably called refugee camps. There was no
running water, no electricity, no decent housing, no de-
cent anything. Israel, therefore, began to build new camps
beside the old ones. It opened new schools for the local
populations children and for those of the refugees.
The land may have been held hostage to negotiations
negotiations the Arab states rejected in their infa-
mous Three Nos declaration in Khartoum (no peace
with Israel, no recognition of Israel, no negotiations with
Israel) but Israel saw the administered territories as
one huge humanitarian aid project.
That is not how some saw it in the United States, how-
ever. Especially on the far left of the Democratic Party in
New York and around the nation, there was a movement
to label Israel a colonizing aggressor and an occupier, un-
deserving of aid or support.
Koch was running for a seat in Congress, seeking to
represent the so-called Silk Stocking District (officially
known as the 17th Congressional District) that had been
Mayor John V. Lindsays Upper East Side fiefdom until he
was elected mayor in 1966.
There was also a campaign to the side and below the
17th, in the 19th C.D., which was represented by a fiercely
pro-Israel Leonard Farbstein. The 19th was known as the
fishook district, because that is what it resembled. It
ran from the Upper West Side down to 23rd street, over a
couple of blocks and down to 14th street to the East River,
taking in all of lower Manhattan.
Sen. Eugene McCarthy, a Minnesotan, was seeking the
Democratic nomination for president, challenging fellow
Minnesotan Hubert H. Humphrey.
One evening at the VID, there was a candidates forum.
Allard K. Lowenstein was there, representing McCarthy.
Bella S. Abzug was there, large floppy hat atop her head,
testing the waters for a possible future run against
Farbstein. Other notables were there, as well, all dedicated
to ending the war in Vietnam.
Some, however, also were dedicated to ending United
States support for Israel (a campaign they and their al-
lies would take with them to the floor of the Democratic
convention later that year in Chicago). It was not only that
they saw Israel as a colonizer and a racist state, but they
saw taking on Israel as a way to defeat Farbstein, whom
they labeled Mr. Israel.
Lowenstein and Abzug were silent as these New
Democratic Coalition minions began their anti-Israel
tirade. Neither agreed with it or them, but neither wanted
to upset potential supporters. (Abzug, for her part, was
fiercely pro-Israel; she saw no parallel to Vietnam; as she
once told Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller, when he challenged
her, Israels cause was a just one.)
Koch was not silent, however. The district leader and
congressional candidate in the WASPish tony district (he
was running against Whitney North Seymour, a man who
fit perfectly into the districts exclusive society, but who
nevertheless lost the race), raised his powerful frame, and
cut the NDC crowd down to size. Israel was not the issue,
he said; the three nos was the issue. Turn the three nos
into three yesses, and see how quickly Israel would move
toward peace. Israel, he said, was a state surrounded by
enemies who would destroy it.
He was a proud Jew, he said, and he was proud of the
Jewish state. And he would not allow it to be libeled for any
reason by anyone.
His passion silenced the room.
Yehi zichro baruch. May his memory be for a blessing.
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18 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
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Op-Ed
JS-19
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 19
Staying in love
with Israel
AlAn ElSnEr
W
hen I was 16, I fell in love not with a girl
but with Israel.
That summer, my family and I visited for
the first time, a three-week trip that left me entranced.
On the last day, August 29, 1970, I wrote in my diary: As
soon as I came, I had the idea that this is the country for
me, and this feeling increased every day I was here until
now I know this is my home.
My love affair only deepened through subsequent
kibbutz summers, volunteering for a year during the
Yom Kippur War and the eight years I lived in the coun-
try. And even after I left, my love never waned.
But developments in recent years have increasingly
prompted me to ask, what is it exactly about Israel that
I love? Am I in love with the Israel of 30 or 40 years ago,
or with the fantasy of an Israel that may never have truly
existed other than in the heroic descriptions of the pio-
neers and the half-real world of Leon Uris?
Theres a song by Yonatan Geffen and David Broza
that expresses this:
They say it was great here before I was born; And ev-
erything was wonderful, before I arrived.
The song goes on to list many of the classic images
of Zionisms heroic past: a pioneer riding a white horse
guarding the hills of Galilee on a dark night; Trumpledor
fighting off marauders and sacrificing his life; little Tel
Aviv miraculously sprouting on golden dunes; kib-
butzniks wearing short pants; evenings around camp-
fires passing the finjan.
Of course, legends are legends for a reason. King
Arthurs Camelot would have been a cold, stinking place
where life was nasty, brutish, and short had it ever exist-
ed. And its nave to expect life to live up to ones expecta-
tions at age 16. Nobody stays 16 forever.
In reality, Israel has found so many ways to preserve
the dream under incredibly difficult circumstances. Tel
Aviv today is far more vibrant and dynamic, and much
more beautiful than it was when I lived there in the
early 1980s. Israeli high-tech and pharmaceuticals are a
wonder of the world; its drip agriculture offers hope for
millions. So many of its people are incredibly creative,
inventive, entrepreneurial, humanistic, cultured and
compassionate.
But there is another side to Israel, which for me came
increasingly into focus during the recent election cam-
paign, although I was somewhat reassured by the vote
itself. This is the Israel that is triumphalist, riven by reli-
gious conflicts, exclusionary, hostile to women, skeptical
about democratic rights, and downright racist toward
Arabs.
Take for example Moshe Feiglin, who had a promi-
nent place in the Likud-Beitenu parliamentary list and
who has outlined a plan to pay Palestinian families
$500,000 each to emigrate. Feiglin once told an inter-
viewer: You cant teach a monkey to speak and you
cant teach an Arab to be democratic. Youre dealing
with a culture of thieves and robbers. Muhammad, their
prophet, was a robber and a killer and a liar. The Arab
destroys everything he touches.
One could dismiss Feiglin as an aberration but
hes not. He clearly represents the sentiments of many
thousands of Israelis.
Speaking in the documentary The Gatekeepers,
former Shin Beth chief Avraham Shalom bluntly said
Alan Elsner, a former Reuters journalist and author, is vice pres-
ident for Communications at J Street, a pro-Israel, pro-peace
advocacy group.
Ha-Meiri took a moral approach. We need to do our
share to help our society, he maintained, arguing that
the original prohibition applied only to the godless
barbarians of yesteryear. Others made more pragmatic
calculations: We need their help now, and we hope they
wont later turn their weapons against us (Nimukei
Yosef). Maimonides formulated this dispensation in
terms of an alliance: If Jews live among idolaters and
have established a covenant with them, it is permitted
to sell arms to the kings servants. In the 13th century,
Rabbi Yitzchak of Vienna further deemed such a sale
permissible even if the local ruler was at war with a city
known to have a Jewish population, though he hoped
that no harm would come to those Jews (Or Zarua
Avodah Zarah 132). Others argued that no unvarying
rule could be made, since the nature of Jewish-Gentile
relations varied according to time and place (Riaz al
ha-Rif). It remains clear, however, that this was not a
mere theoretical discussion: Many sources affirm that
Jews throughout the Middle Ages sold weapons or their
components to their Gentile neighbors, because it
benefited both parties and because they believed that
the non-Jews in any case could acquire weapons by other
means.
These talmudic dispensations allowing the sale of
weapons to non-Jews developed at a time when the Jews
lacked a sovereign state. What are the implications for the
State of Israels arms industry? One of the first scholars
to address this question was Rabbi Chaim David Halevi,
Tel Avivs Sephardic Chief Rabbi. In a brief responsum
written in the late 1970s, he cited the rationales offered
by Maimonides and Meiri in arguing that any sales
made to allies would secure mutually beneficial results.
While noting that Israeli sovereignty placed Jews in a
radically different position from the one they occupied
in 5th century Persia, he nonetheless contended that the
medieval justifications made it absolutely permissible
for Israel to sell weapons to friendly nations in exchange
for strategic benefits (Aseh Lecha Rav 1:19). Rabbi J.
David Bleich reached a similar conclusion, though he
indicated his uncertainty as to whether current Israeli
policy fully complied with halachic criteria: Sale of
arms to nations allied with Israel by means of a formal
or informal security pact would be justified. Absent
such agreement, arms sales would be forbidden unless
absolutely necessary by virtue of other considerations in
order to protect life, e.g., as part of a barter arrangement
designed to secure material necessary for self-defense
(Tradition 20:4). Those other considerations, of course,
might be interpreted quite broadly. It would certainly
justify Israels bribing Ethiopian and Sudanese leaders
with weapons in the 1980s to free Ethiopian Jews.
But would it justify arms deals with rogue nations or
unethical leaders who offer indirect political favors or
assistance in covert activities? And what happens when
the sales are made simply to obtain revenue in order to
keep the arms industry in the black?
These concerns led other scholars to raise serious
objections to the Israeli arms industry in the early 1980s.
Rabbi Yehuda Gershuni contended that international
arms sales could be justified only when they involved
nations that had Jewish citizens to protect or would
adhere to principles of ethical warfare. Otherwise, Israel
was providing a stumbling block that encouraged
unethical behavior by aiding and abetting rogue nations.
The fact that these countries could buy weapons from
other dealers could not justify any Jewish participation
in the shedding of blood, especially if the Israeli weapons
were deemed uniquely advantageous. Dr. Meir Tamari, a
senior economist at the Bank of Israel and a pioneering
figure in Jewish business ethics, leveled a more trenchant
critique. The Israeli arms industry had become an
industrial behemoth, he argued, and had expanded far
beyond what is required by military necessity. He further
warned that its clandestine arms trade would embroil
Israel in very dubious business, a warning that was
partly vindicated when Israels role in the Iran-Contra
affair was revealed. Most significant, Tamari bemoaned
the fact that economic considerations, as well as moral
carelessness, had led to the sale of Israeli arms, via direct
or indirect channels, to such countries as Chile, Iran,
South Africa, and North Korea, whose human rights
records were poor, to say the least. Indeed, it should
cause great shame to the Jewish state to learn that Israeli-
made weapons (almost certainly without governmental
approval) arrived via eastern Europe in Rwanda during
the height of the massacres of the Tutsis in the mid-
1990s, despite the fact that the defense ministry had
banned sales to that country.
Yet defenders of the Israeli arms industry, including
Rabbis Yaakov Epstein (Techumin 11) and Joseph
Polak (Tradition 24:3), have responded that even
when mistakes are made, the legacy of the Persian and
medieval European scholars fully legitimizes selling
weapons to foreign nations if the goal is to buttress
Israels own defense. Just as medieval Jews sold weapons
to their neighbors hoping that the weapons would not
be used later against them, so Israel must remain active
in weapons exports and hope that what it sells will be
used only as appropriate. Although military exports
bring Israel into murky moral waters, they are merely
part of the complexity of foreign affairs in a world in
which swords, not plowshares, continue to hold sway.
Fortunately, in the last decade, Israel has made great
strides in supervising the sale of Israeli-made weapons,
including the creation of a Defense Expert Control
Agency. This development followed American critiques
of aborted Israeli arms sales to China but grew more
generally from a greater international awareness that
genocide can be prevented only if the world tightly
regulates its weapons. Thus, Israel has pledged not to
sell weapons to human rights abusers and taken further
measures to prevent shady figures from becoming
intermediaries.
Yet there is no doubt that military exports will
continue to play a major role in Israeli foreign affairs.
Take Israels covert war against Iran. Beyond sanctions
and cyberwarfare, Israel has used arms exports to
strengthen its strategic hand against Iran. Russia,
for example, canceled the sale to Iran and Syria of
S-300 long-range anti-aircraft missiles, which military
experts deemed critical to stopping foreign attacks
on Iran. A few weeks later, Israel announced a new
sale to Russia of unmanned aerial vehicles, drones,
which the Russians realized they needed in 2008, after
Georgia used Israeli-made drones were used against
them effectively. Similarly, Israel continues to provide
drones to Azerbaijan, where tensions with Armenia
might explode into a broader conflict. Yet Azerbaijan
also borders Iran, thereby providing Israel with a central
location for reconnaissance and possible refueling in the
event of an air strike. Of course, arms sales always remain
a gamble, as todays ally might turn into tomorrows foe.
America learned that when it armed Afghanistan against
the Soviets; Israel today worries about what will done
with the arms it previously sold to Turkey, and who will
ultimately control the American weapons sold to Egypt
and Saudi Arabia, among others.
Can halachah provide a definitive answer to this
political and moral dilemma? Perhaps not. But it does
provide a framework of values to consider when setting
policy. We must hope that Israeli officials will take these
principles into consideration and that Israeli voters will
ask themselves which candidates combine the strategic
wisdom and moral fortitude to manage Israels booming
defense industry appropriately.
This article was first published by Jewish Ideas Daily
(www.jewishideasdaily.com), and is reprinted with
permission
see staying page 20
Yet there is no doubt that military
exports will continue to play a major
role in Israeli foreign affairs.
Opinions expressed in the op-ed and letters columns are not necessarily those of the Jewish standard. include a day-time telephone number with your letters. the Jewish
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20 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
Losing dues?
Please let me express my objection
to Time for Jews to lose the dues?
(January 18).
What is not understood by the
Synagogue Leadership Initiative is that
a synagogue is neither a club or a res-
taurant, it is a religious community. To
eliminate mandatory dues or make it
dependent on services rendered will do
two things.
First, it will devalue the whole value of
membership by making it free in many
cases as people attach value in depend-
ing on how much they pay. Secondly, it
eliminates individual responsibility for
the operation of the community by shift-
ing responsibility onto a few. People who
legitimately cannot afford dues should
not be excluded but members who can
afford it should pay their dues.
Rather than attracting people who
did not wish to pay their fare share, if
synagogues wish to prosper in the 21st
century, the emphasis need to be cre-
ating core members. In other words,
getting the member you already have
more involved in Jewish tradition and
synagogue life. Having more core mem-
bers is the most effective way of bringing
in others.
Alan Mark Levin
Fair Lawn
Humanity
and compassion
Bring more love (February 1) is a
wonderful piece! I was very moved by
Ms. Sturms humanity and compassion.
These people were fortunate to have
her with them as their lives in this world
were ending.
Sondra Wax
Aventura, Florida
What about the cat?
Bring more love (February 1) was a
beautiful and touching story about leav-
ing the world. Lisa Sturm related it in a
moving way.
I was troubled, though, by the part
about Annas cat. I hope it found a good
home after Anna passed away. Thats
what a noble alley cat whod been res-
cued deserves.
Michael Greenblatt
Wayne
He did very well
As a lover of history, I read the movie
review of Koch last week (February 1).
Eric A. Goldmans review brought back
memories of the times I had the privi-
lege of meeting Mayor Koch and being
in his company. Kudos to Neil Barsky for
his film in capturing the mayor and his
activities.
Meeting Mayor Ed Koch was an ex-
perience. He was a unique person who
had a great love of New York City, this na-
tion, and Israel. He never lost his Jewish
heritage. He was outspoken, frank, feisty,
had a great sense of humor, and always
spoke his mind. He was an original with
a quick, keen mind.
Mayor Koch was never afraid to say
what was on his mind and he loved
a good debate. No matter what ones
political connection, Ed Koch was a
compelling personality, never dull and
always offered his perspective on a wide
variety of issues.
As he liked to say, he was a liberal
with sanity. To me, he will always be
mayor of the greatest city and a true New
York iconoclast.
He took care of his own headstone,
quoting Daniel Pearls final words: My
father is Jewish, my mother is Jewish, I
am Jewish. How ironic that both men
died on a Friday, February 1, 11 years
apart.
As the review notes, the film ends
with the mayor standing at the entrance
to the bridge the Queensboro Bridge
that now bears his name. Whatever
you want to say about Ed Koch, he truly
bridged the gap and again made New
York the Big Apple, cultural capital of the
World.
Ed Koch will be sorely missed. I will
always remember the first words he said
to me How am I doing?
Grace Jacobs
Cliffside Park
Sons of pigs and apes
Ben Cohen is correct when he says that
Mohammad Morsis belief that Jews are
sons of apes and pigs is authentically
held and that asking him to recant is
like asking Hitler to apologize (Morsis
anti-Semitism reveals more about us
than him, January 25). However, Mr.
Cohen does not explain (and perhaps
does not understand) why the belief is
so strongly held. The Koran (believed
to be the literal word of God by Morsi)
states: Whomsoever God has cursed
(i.e., the Jews; see Sura 5:64 and 2.89)
He is wroth and made some of them
apes and swine (Sura 5.59-60). Other
Sura calling the Jews apes include 2.65
and 7.166.
Leon Taub
Fort Lee
Who are the leaders?
In his op-ed In Support of Obama
and Hagel (February 1), Rabbi Barry
Schwartz cites the need for a two-state
solution no less than five times. I doubt
many would argue with his sentiment if
it could truly lead to an enduring peace.
However, when Rabbi Schwartz goes on
to say that without a political agreement,
both Israelis and Palestinians will con-
tinue to lose hope, abandoning leaders
who speak of compromise, he loses
me. Im fairly certain that among the
leaders Rabbi Schwartz is referring to on
the Israeli side are Ehud Barak and Ehud
Olmert, both of whom, one publicly, the
other behind the scenes, made very gen-
erous land offers in the name of peace.
But who are the Palestinian leaders who
have spoken of compromise who are ref-
erenced in that sentence? Yassir Arafat
responded to Baraks peace overture
by starting the second intifada. Abbas
simply walked away from Olmerts of-
fer. How serious could either have been
about peace and compromise if they
didnt even make a counter offer? Has
any Palestinian leader ever spoken to his
people about the need for compromise
and peaceful coexistence to gain state-
hood, and along with it a healthy, vibrant
economy?
There is a reason why the Jews of
Israel, eternal optimists who stand to
benefit greatly from a peaceful resolu-
tion to the Palestinian conflict, become
less and less interested in talks with their
neighbors over time.
Robert Isler
Fair Lawn
Gun violence
is not epidemic
Joanne Palmers January 11 story, Doing
something about gun violence begins
with a falsehood (Gun violence has
become an epidemic in this country)
and goes downhill from there. The truth,
according the FBIs Uniform Crime
Statistics, is that gun violence has gone
down significantly over the past 20 years,
despite the expiration of the assault
weapons ban in 2004. Further, the ma-
jority of gun violence takes place in in-
ner cities, with guns that are purchased
illegally, and in most cases the victim
AND the assailant have prior crimi-
nal records. If gun control worked,
Chicago, which has both a handgun ban
and the dubious distinction of having
the highest gun murder rate in the coun-
try, would be a crime-free utopia. Jews,
who know better than most the conse-
quences of being defenseless, should
resist all efforts at further restricting the
right to own firearms. History has an aw-
ful habit of repetition.
Ron Soussa
Montville
that Israel has lost its way. The future
is very dark, he warned, after 40 years
of a harsh occupation that in his view
has degraded the morals of both the
occupiers and the occupied.
Whats perhaps most distressing about
Israels current direction is that almost
everyone, even on the political left, seems
to have given up on peace. Even in its
darkest days, Israelis once believed, as
Naomi Shemer sang, that peace was not a
dream and would come, if not tomorrow,
then the day after. That vital optimism
seems to have all but disappeared.
I understand that after the trauma of
the second intifada and the perceived
failure of the Gaza withdrawal, people
are suspicious and cynical. I understand
that constant rocket attacks make people
angry and defensive and disinclined
to take risks. But really, what is the
alternative to peace?
The attitude of many seems to be that
the status quo is quite bearable, even
when few believe its sustainable in the
long term. Theres a fin-de-sicle feeling
in some Tel Aviv circles, a feeling of lets
party all night as long as we can while
others bury themselves in work and
family and simply prefer not to think
about the future beyond next week or
next month.
What the last few years crystallized
for me is that it is possible and even
necessary to absolutely divorce my love
of Israel from its current politics. That,
in fact, is what our biblical prophets
did by appealing to our better selves.
Prime ministers, like the kings of ancient
Judea, come and go but the idea of
what Israel represents remains. We can
love Israel and still oppose settlements
and occupation and the denigration of
women and minorities. For me, its the
only way to stay in love.
Every lover idealizes the object of his
or her affections, and I guess that at this
point Im more in love with what Israel
was but also in what it can still become
than with many aspects of what it is
today. The Israeli national anthem says,
We have not yet lost hope and I have
not. I would no more stop loving Israel
than I would abandon my wife if, God
forbid, she became sick.
Its easy to be in love when you are 16
and full of idealism. The trick is sustaining
that love throughout a lifetime.
Letters
staying From page 19
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Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 21
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To merchants who have accepted Visa and
MasterCard at any time since January 1, 2004:
Notice of a 6+ billion dollar class action settlement.
Notice of a class action settlement authorized by the U.S. District
Court, Eastern District of New York.
This notice is authorized by the Court to inform you about an
agreement to settle a class action lawsuit that may affect you. The
lawsuit claims that Visa and MasterCard, separately, and together
with banks, violated antitrust laws and caused merchants to pay
excessive fees for accepting Visa and MasterCard credit and debit
cards, including by:
Agreeing to set, apply, and enforce rules about merchant fees
(called default interchange fees);
Limiting what merchants could do to encourage their customers
to use other forms of payment through, for example, charging
customers an extra fee or offering discounts; and
Continuing that conduct after Visa and MasterCard changed
their corporate structures.
The defendants say they have done nothing wrong. They say that
their business practices are legal and the result of competition,
and have beneftted merchants and consumers. The Court has not
decided who is right because the parties agreed to a settlement. On
November 27, 2012, the Court gave preliminary approval to this
settlement.
The SeTTlemenT
Under the settlement, Visa, MasterCard, and the bank defendants
have agreed to make payments to two settlement funds:
The frst is a Cash Fund a $6.05 billion fund that will pay
valid claims of merchants that accepted Visa or MasterCard
credit or debit cards at any time between January 1, 2004 and
November 28, 2012.
The second is an Interchange Fund estimated to be
approximately $1.2 billion that will be based on a portion
of the interchange fees attributable to certain merchants that
accept Visa or MasterCard credit cards for an eight-month
Interchange Period.
Additionally, the settlement changes some of the Visa and
MasterCard rules applicable to merchants who accept their cards.
This settlement creates two classes:
A Cash Settlement Class (Rule 23(b)(3) Settlement Class),
which includes all persons, businesses, and other entities that
accepted any Visa or MasterCard cards in the U.S. at any time
from January 1, 2004 to November 28, 2012, and
A Rule Changes Settlement Class (Rule 23(b)(2) Settlement
Class), which includes all persons, businesses, and entities that
as of November 28, 2012 or in the future accept any Visa or
MasterCard cards in the U.S.
WhaT merchanTS Will geT
from The SeTTlemenT
Every merchant in the Cash Settlement Class that fles a valid
claim will get money from the $6.05 billion Cash Fund, subject to a
deduction (not to exceed 25% of the fund) to account for merchants
who exclude themselves from the Cash Settlement Class. The
value of each claim, where possible, will be based on the actual or
estimated interchange fees attributable to the merchants MasterCard
and Visa payment card transactions from January 1, 2004 to
November 28, 2012. Payments to merchants who fle valid claims
for a portion of the Cash Fund will be based on:
The money available to pay all claims,
The total dollar value of all valid claims fled,
The deduction described above not to exceed 25% of the Cash
Settlement Fund, and
The cost of settlement administration and notice, money awarded
to the class representatives, and attorneys fees and expenses all
as approved by the Court.
In addition, merchants in the Cash Settlement Class that accept
Visa and MasterCard during the eight-month Interchange Period
and fle a valid claim will get money from the separate Interchange
Fund, estimated to be approximately $1.2 billion. The value of each
claim, where possible, will be based on an estimate of one-tenth of
1% of the merchants Visa and MasterCard credit card dollar sales
volume during that period. Payments to merchants who fle valid
claims for a portion of the Interchange Fund will be based on:
The money available to pay all claims,
The total dollar value of all valid claims fled, and
The cost of settlement administration and notice, and any
attorneys fees and expenses that may be approved by the Court.
Attorneys fees and expenses and money awarded to the class
representatives: For work done through fnal approval of the
settlement by the district court, Class Counsel will ask the Court for
attorneys fees in an amount that is a reasonable proportion of the
Cash Settlement Fund, not to exceed 11.5% of the Cash Settlement
Fund of $6.05 billion and 11.5% of the Interchange Fund estimated
to be $1.2 billion to compensate all of the lawyers and their law
frms that have worked on the class case. For additional work to
administer the settlement, distribute both funds, and through any
appeals, Class Counsel may seek reimbursement at their normal
hourly rates, not to exceed an additional 1% of the Cash Settlement
Fund of $6.05 billion and an additional 1% of the Interchange
Fund estimated to be $1.2 billion. Class Counsel will also request
reimbursement of their expenses (not including the administrative
costs of settlement or notice), not to exceed $40 million and up to
$200,000 per Class Plaintiff in service awards for their efforts on
behalf of the classes.
www. Payment CardSet t l ement . com
Si desea leer este aviso en espaol, llmenos o visite nuestro sitio web.
JS-23
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 23
LegaL Notice
To merchants who have accepted Visa and
MasterCard at any time since January 1, 2004:
Notice of a 6+ billion dollar class action settlement.
Notice of a class action settlement authorized by the U.S. District
Court, Eastern District of New York.
This notice is authorized by the Court to inform you about an
agreement to settle a class action lawsuit that may affect you. The
lawsuit claims that Visa and MasterCard, separately, and together
with banks, violated antitrust laws and caused merchants to pay
excessive fees for accepting Visa and MasterCard credit and debit
cards, including by:
Agreeing to set, apply, and enforce rules about merchant fees
(called default interchange fees);
Limiting what merchants could do to encourage their customers
to use other forms of payment through, for example, charging
customers an extra fee or offering discounts; and
Continuing that conduct after Visa and MasterCard changed
their corporate structures.
The defendants say they have done nothing wrong. They say that
their business practices are legal and the result of competition,
and have beneftted merchants and consumers. The Court has not
decided who is right because the parties agreed to a settlement. On
November 27, 2012, the Court gave preliminary approval to this
settlement.
The SeTTlemenT
Under the settlement, Visa, MasterCard, and the bank defendants
have agreed to make payments to two settlement funds:
The frst is a Cash Fund a $6.05 billion fund that will pay
valid claims of merchants that accepted Visa or MasterCard
credit or debit cards at any time between January 1, 2004 and
November 28, 2012.
The second is an Interchange Fund estimated to be
approximately $1.2 billion that will be based on a portion
of the interchange fees attributable to certain merchants that
accept Visa or MasterCard credit cards for an eight-month
Interchange Period.
Additionally, the settlement changes some of the Visa and
MasterCard rules applicable to merchants who accept their cards.
This settlement creates two classes:
A Cash Settlement Class (Rule 23(b)(3) Settlement Class),
which includes all persons, businesses, and other entities that
accepted any Visa or MasterCard cards in the U.S. at any time
from January 1, 2004 to November 28, 2012, and
A Rule Changes Settlement Class (Rule 23(b)(2) Settlement
Class), which includes all persons, businesses, and entities that
as of November 28, 2012 or in the future accept any Visa or
MasterCard cards in the U.S.
WhaT merchanTS Will geT
from The SeTTlemenT
Every merchant in the Cash Settlement Class that fles a valid
claim will get money from the $6.05 billion Cash Fund, subject to a
deduction (not to exceed 25% of the fund) to account for merchants
who exclude themselves from the Cash Settlement Class. The
value of each claim, where possible, will be based on the actual or
estimated interchange fees attributable to the merchants MasterCard
and Visa payment card transactions from January 1, 2004 to
November 28, 2012. Payments to merchants who fle valid claims
for a portion of the Cash Fund will be based on:
The money available to pay all claims,
The total dollar value of all valid claims fled,
The deduction described above not to exceed 25% of the Cash
Settlement Fund, and
The cost of settlement administration and notice, money awarded
to the class representatives, and attorneys fees and expenses all
as approved by the Court.
In addition, merchants in the Cash Settlement Class that accept
Visa and MasterCard during the eight-month Interchange Period
and fle a valid claim will get money from the separate Interchange
Fund, estimated to be approximately $1.2 billion. The value of each
claim, where possible, will be based on an estimate of one-tenth of
1% of the merchants Visa and MasterCard credit card dollar sales
volume during that period. Payments to merchants who fle valid
claims for a portion of the Interchange Fund will be based on:
The money available to pay all claims,
The total dollar value of all valid claims fled, and
The cost of settlement administration and notice, and any
attorneys fees and expenses that may be approved by the Court.
Attorneys fees and expenses and money awarded to the class
representatives: For work done through fnal approval of the
settlement by the district court, Class Counsel will ask the Court for
attorneys fees in an amount that is a reasonable proportion of the
Cash Settlement Fund, not to exceed 11.5% of the Cash Settlement
Fund of $6.05 billion and 11.5% of the Interchange Fund estimated
to be $1.2 billion to compensate all of the lawyers and their law
frms that have worked on the class case. For additional work to
administer the settlement, distribute both funds, and through any
appeals, Class Counsel may seek reimbursement at their normal
hourly rates, not to exceed an additional 1% of the Cash Settlement
Fund of $6.05 billion and an additional 1% of the Interchange
Fund estimated to be $1.2 billion. Class Counsel will also request
reimbursement of their expenses (not including the administrative
costs of settlement or notice), not to exceed $40 million and up to
$200,000 per Class Plaintiff in service awards for their efforts on
behalf of the classes.
www. Payment CardSet t l ement . com
Si desea leer este aviso en espaol, llmenos o visite nuestro sitio web.
1- 800- 625- 6440 i nf o@Payment CardSet t l ement . com
hoW To aSk for PaymenT
To receive payment, merchants must fll out a claim form. If the
Court fnally approves the settlement, and you do not exclude
yourself from the Cash Settlement Class, you will receive a
claim form in the mail or by email. Or you may ask for one at:
www.PaymentCardSettlement.com, or call: 1-800-625-6440.
oTher BenefiTS for merchanTS
Merchants will beneft from changes to certain MasterCard and
Visa rules, which will allow merchants to, among other things:
Charge customers an extra fee if they pay with Visa or
MasterCard credit cards,
Offer discounts to customers who do not pay with Visa or
MasterCard credit or debit cards, and
Form buying groups that meet certain criteria to negotiate with
Visa and MasterCard.
Merchants that operate multiple businesses under different trade
names or banners will also be able to accept Visa or MasterCard at
fewer than all of the merchants trade names and banners.
legal righTS and oPTionS
Merchants who are included in this lawsuit have the legal rights
and options explained below. You may:
File a claim to ask for payment. You will receive
a claim form in the mail or email or fle online at:
www.PaymentCardSettlement.com.
Excludeyourselffrom the Cash Settlement Class (Rule 23(b)
(3) Settlement Class). If you exclude yourself, you can sue the
Defendants for damages based on alleged conduct occurring
on or before November 27, 2012 on your own at your own
expense, if you want to. If you exclude yourself, you will not
get any money from this settlement. If you are a merchant and
wish to exclude yourself, you must make a written request,
place it in an envelope, and mail it with postage prepaid and
postmarked no later than May28,2013 to Class Administrator,
Payment Card Interchange Fee Settlement, P.O. Box 2530,
Portland, OR 97208-2530. The written request must be signed
by a person authorized to do so and provide all of the following
information: (1) the words In re Payment Card Interchange
Fee and Merchant Discount Antitrust Litigation, (2) your full
name, address, telephone number, and taxpayer identifcation
number, (3) the merchant that wishes to be excluded from the
Cash Settlement Class (Rule 23(b)(3) Settlement Class), and
what position or authority you have to exclude the merchant,
and (4) the business names, brand names, and addresses of any
stores or sales locations whose sales the merchant desires to be
excluded.
Note: You cannot be excluded from the Rule Changes
SettlementClass (Rule 23(b)(2) Settlement Class).
Object to the settlement. The deadline to object
is: May 28, 2013. To learn how to object, see:
www.PaymentCardSettlement.com or call 1-800-625-6440.
Note: If you exclude yourself from the Cash Settlement Class
you cannot object to the terms of that portion of the settlement.
For more information about these rights and options, visit:
www.PaymentCardSettlement.com.
if The courT aPProveS The
final SeTTlemenT
Members of the Rule Changes Settlement Class are bound by the
terms of this settlement. Members of the Cash Settlement Class,
who do not exclude themselves by the deadline, are bound by
the terms of this settlement whether or not they fle a claim for
payment. Members of both classes release all claims against all
released parties listed in the Settlement Agreement. The settlement
will resolve and release any claims by merchants against Visa,
MasterCard or other defendants that were or could have been
alleged in the lawsuit, including any claims based on interchange
or other fees, no-surcharge rules, no-discounting rules, honor-
all-cards rules and other rules. The settlement will also resolve
any merchant claims based upon the future effect of any Visa or
MasterCard rules, as of November 27, 2012 and not to be modifed
pursuant to the settlement, the modifed rules provided for in the
settlement, or any other rules substantially similar to any such
rules. The releases will not bar claims involving certain specifed
standard commercial disputes arising in the ordinary course of
business.
For more information on the release, see the settlement agreement
at: www.PaymentCardSettlement.com.
The courT hearing aBouT
ThiS SeTTlemenT
On September 12, 2013, there will be a Court hearing to decide
whether to approve the proposed settlement, class counsels
requests for attorneys fees and expenses, and awards for the class
representatives. The hearing will take place at:
United States District Court for the
Eastern District of New York
225 Cadman Plaza
Brooklyn, NY 11201
You do not have to go to the court hearing or hire an attorney. But
you can if you want to, at your own cost. The Court has appointed
the law frms of Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi LLP, Berger
& Montague, PC, and Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP to
represent the Class (Class Counsel).
QueSTionS?
For more information about this case (In re Payment Card
Interchange Fee and Merchant Discount Antitrust Litigation, MDL
1720), you may:
Call toll-free: 1-800-625-6440
Visit: www.PaymentCardSettlement.com
Write to the Class Administrator:
Payment Card Interchange Fee Settlement
P.O. Box 2530
Portland, OR 97208-2530
Email: info@PaymentCardSettlement.com
Please check www.PaymentCardSettlement.com for any updates
relating to the settlement or the settlement approval process.
S
JS-24
Cover story
24 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
Larry yudeLson
T
he artist formerly known as
a chasidic superstar will be
appearing in Englewood
on Tuesday night.
And though you wont see peyos, you will most likely
hear a song named after the Baal Shem Tov, the 18th
century founder of chasidism.
It was just over a year ago that Matisyahu the
stage name of Matthew Paul Miller posted a picture
of himself shorn of the long beard, side curls, and black
hat that defined him when his first record was released
in 2004.
No more Chassidic reggae superstar, he wrote on his
website when he unveiled his new look.
At a certain point I felt the need to submit to a higher
level of religiosity to move away from my intuition and
to accept an ultimate truth. I felt that in order to become
a good person I needed rules lots of them or else I
would somehow fall apart.
Now, however, I am reclaiming myself. Trusting my
goodness and my divine mission.
The very title of his subsequent album, Spark Seeker,
released last summer, indicates that he hasnt put aside
things of the spirit. But now he sees himself as on an
ongoing spiritual quest, perhaps less certain that the
answers are outside him.
In the song Bal Shem Tov, he put it like this:
Search heaven and the seven seas
The answer lies inside you
You know it wont come easy
Youve got to find your own truth
(The song is also on Spark Seeker: Acoustic Sessions, re-
leased last week as Matisyahu kicked off the month-long
acoustic tour that brings him to Bergen Performing Arts
Center on February 12. For would-be listeners interested
in checking out the singer but not normally inclined to-
ward contemporary reggae or rap, the album provides a
gentler introduction to the music of Matisyahu, as well as
a preview of how he will sound.)
On the original album version of Bal Shem Tov,
before singing, speaking in Yiddish, he recites the story,
famous in Chabad circles, of the Baal Shem Tovs dream,
in which the founder of chasidism meets the Messiah
and asks him when he will come. The Messiah replies:
I will come when the wellspring of your teachings have
been spread throughout the world.
My understanding of it, Matisyahu said in an
interview with the Jewish Standard this week, is the
Messiah says you have to do the work here, in this world.
Its not like something mystic is going to happen and save
everybody.
A lot of people are waiting for the Messiah, waiting for
Godot. Theyre waiting for an event, theyre waiting for
the end of the world, the end of the Mayan calendar, for
this thing or that thing that is going to shake everything
up.
Change happens from within. We can change.
We can become different people. We can expand and
grow and evolve. It seems to me at least its my
understanding of this vision the Baal Shem Tov had
that the Messiah was saying, Im not coming until this
change has happened within people, within this world.
Im not the savior.
The teachings of the Baal Shem Tov are about the
oneness of God and the connection that God has to this
world. The basic stuff. Theres a lot of teachings, but the
basic gist of it is in every religion, and what everyone
spiritual is trying to do, to be a better person. Theres no
chidush, nothing new going on here. The Messiah is not
going to save the world. The world has to save itself. Then
the revelation of God will be here, he said.
In his song Buffalo Soldier, from Spark Seeker, he
puts it like this:
Dont judge a book by the cover
Every single being in this world is your brother
When I look upon the page and uncover
Ancient words that teach me to love ya!
So we burn to return to the mother
And we yearn to unlearn all they told ya about yourself
Who you are, what you should be,
Im gonna be free leave it up to me!
This might not sound radical. But compare it to King
Without a Crown, from his first album, Shake Off the
Dust... Arise, which reached 37 on Billboards pop chart:
Hashems rays fire blaze burn bright and I believe
Out of darkness comes light, twilight unto the heights
Crown Heights burnin up all through till twilight
Said, thank you to my God, now I finally got it right
And Ill fight with all of my heart, and all a my soul, and
all a my might

And I sing to my God, songs of love and healing


I want Moshiach now, time it starts revealing
till spiritual after all these years
Matisyahu to play
acoustic concert at
BergenPAC this week
For Matisyahus Chabad supporters, there was disap-
pointment, anger, and disbelief when he shaved his
beard. His recent concerts have continued to draw a cha-
sidic cohort but they only jump up and begin to sway
to the music at the end of the concert, when he sings his
older songs.
He rejects the suggestion that theres an inherent
rejection there.
Maybe they dont know the new record. Maybe theyre
not familiar with those songs. Maybe they were more
An acoustic evening with Matisyahu
Where: Bergen Performing arts Center,
30 n. Van Brunt street, englewood
When: tuesday, February 12, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: www.ticketmaster.com or 201-816-8160
JS-25
till spiritual after all these years
For Matisyahus Chabad supporters, there was disap-
pointment, anger, and disbelief when he shaved his
beard. His recent concerts have continued to draw a cha-
sidic cohort but they only jump up and begin to sway
to the music at the end of the concert, when he sings his
older songs.
He rejects the suggestion that theres an inherent
rejection there.
Maybe they dont know the new record. Maybe theyre
not familiar with those songs. Maybe they were more
familiar with the older songs. People have opinions about
things. Does it mater really? Do you think it matters?
Some argue that the essence of Yiddishkeit is to
answer a question with a question. Matisyahu hasnt lost
that spirit.
Why is he performing acoustic?
Why not? he replies.
For Matisyahu, going unplugged means a backing
band of acoustic guitar, electric guitar, and cello as
opposed to the classic dub trio of drum, bass, and guitar.
And its a chance to reconnect with older songs.
When I do it acoustically, I come back to the words, I
come back to the voice. It reconnects me to myself and to
the inspiration of the song, he said.
Im always redesigning songs. As a musician
trying to stay inspired by the music that you make, I
find it important to sing the songs and perform them
differently, while still holding the integrity of the songs.
People will know its the same song, but Im changing
certain things around. He pushes back against the effort
to choose a favorite song.
I dont have favorites in general. I dont have a
favorite kid. I dont have a favorite food. I dont have a
favorite friend. I dont have a favorite parent. I dont really
understand that concept of favorites. Things are good for
different times, he said.
Nor would he recommend a typical one.
If someone wants to sample just one song off the
new album, I would tell them to put on the record and
close their eyes and push the forward and back buttons a
bunch of time and whatever song it comes to is the song
they were meant to hear.
A bearded Matisyahu on a 2006 album cover;
above, Matisyahu today.
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 25
JS-26*
26 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
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Ed Koch, 1924-2013
Pugnacious new Yorker, passionate Jew till his dying day
Ron Kampeas and URiel Heilman
O
ne of the proudest moments of Ed Kochs life
came during a trip to Israel in 1990, in the midst
of the first Palestinian intifada.
Koch recently had left City Hall after 12 years as mayor
of New York City and was touring Jerusalem when a
Palestinian threw a rock at his group, striking Koch in
the head. The ex-mayor was bleeding a bit but wasnt
really hurt, and he mopped up the wound with his
handkerchief.
The incident would become one of Kochs favorite
stories, the moment, he would say, when I shed a little
blood for the people of Israel.
It was reflective of the pugnacity of the man who
served three terms as mayor of New York, spent nine
years in Congress, earned two battle stars as an infan-
tryman in Europe during World War II, wrote 17 books,
and spent the last two decades of his life as a lawyer, talk
show host, professor, and even restaurant critic, working
almost to his last day.
Koch, 88, died of congestive heart failure early on the
morning of Friday, February 1, at New York-Presbyterian
Columbia Hospital. He had been hospitalized twice in
recent weeks to drain fluid from his lungs. His death
came on the same day that Koch, a documentary
about his life, opens in theaters nationwide. (The film
was reviewed in last weeks Jewish Standard, also dated
February 1.)
Tributes to Koch immediately poured in from all
corners of the Jewish world, including the Israeli ambas-
sador to the United States, and both sides of the political
aisle.
Mayor Koch was a passionate and principled leader
and an outspoken defender of Israel and the Jewish com-
munity, Matt Brooks, the director of the Republican
Jewish Coalition, said. He chose principle over politics
and didnt engage in partisan bitterness.
The National Jewish Democratic Council hailed Koch
as a consummate and proud Jewish Democrat who ad-
vocated fiercely for the U.S.-Israel relationship and the
progressive domestic policies in which he truly believed.
Famous for greeting constituents with Howm I
doin?, the Jewish mayor presided over some of the citys
most difficult years, from 1978 to 1989, and helped spur
the recovery that would flourish under one of his succes-
sors, Rudy Giuliani.
Edward Irving Koch was born in the Bronx on
December 12, 1924, to Jewish immigrants from Poland.
The family moved to Newark when he was 9, after his
fathers fur shop closed during the Depression, but re-
turned to New York in 1941 when business picked up
again. After high school, Koch enrolled at City College
and worked as a shoe salesman, but his studies were
interrupted when he was drafted into the army in 1943.
He served in the infantry, and after the war he spent
time in Bavaria helping replace the Nazis who occupied
public posts with non-Nazis, according to the New York
Times. He was discharged in 1946 and went to law school
at New York University.
Koch got his start in politics as a Democratic district
leader in Greenwich Village, then worked his way up to
City Council, and in 1968 he beat incumbent Whitney
North Seymour Jr., a Republican, in a race for Congress.
Though he served in Washington for nine years, Koch
remained a creature of New York, saying he got the bends
whenever he stayed away from the city for too long, ac-
cording to the Times.
In 1977, Koch ran for mayor, upsetting Abraham
Beame, another Jewish mayor who oversaw a fiscal crisis
that brought New York to the edge of bankruptcy. Upon
taking office, Koch immediately set to cutting the mu-
nicipal budget, trimming the citys workforce, reaching a
settlement with unions, and securing federal aid that had
been denied to Beame. In his second term, he turned the
$400 million deficit he had inherited into a $500 million
surplus.
He won a third term with 78 percent of the vote, but
then things went sour. His administration was beset by
a series of corruption scandals, rising drug-related vio-
lence, and burgeoning racial tensions. Koch became the
target of black ire for closing a hospital in Harlem a
move he later conceded had been a mistake and for
saying that Jews would be crazy to vote for the Rev.
Jesse Jackson in the 1988 presidential primary, given
Jacksons support for Palestinians and his 1984 reference
to New York as Hymietown.
After losing his bid for election to a fourth term in
1989 when David Dinkins bested him in the Democratic
primary, Koch retired into a happy existence as a Jewish
Yoda, blessing or cursing political figures as he saw fit,
not always hewing to the prescripts of the Democratic
Party.
Mayor Koch brought a sense of humor to a tough job.
Mayor Koch was a passionate and
principled leader and an outspoken
defender of Israel and the Jewish
community.
Matt Brooks, Republican Jewish Coalition director
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 27
JS-27*
CONGRIGATION BITH TIIILLAH
PARAMLS, NJ

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AMIRICA-ISRAIL IRIINSHIP LIAGLI {AIIL)

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Congregation Beth tefillah Paramus, nJ
feBruary 9, 2013
shaBBat, Parshas mishPatim
invites you to a special address on
Te state of america
israel & middle east relations
by
uri Bar-ner
israeli ambassador to turkey - 1998-2001
senior advisor to the Chairman of the
america-israel friendship league (aifl)
Davening 9:00 am aDDress 11:00 am
Kiddush Celebrating the 44th anniversary of the Congregation to follow
(with Q+a with ambassador Bar-ner)
Congregation Beth tefillah
452 Forest Avenue Paramus, New Jersey 07652
www.CBTParamus.org* PH: 201-265-4100
446 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 201-692-0192 Fax 201-692-3656
www.maadan.com
RCBC
Maadan is owner operated
serving the community for 30 years.
All cooking is done on premises
with no preservatives.
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ed in a positive way the policy of the U.S.
on the Mideast, Koch wrote supporters
in an email.
Last year, Koch enthusiastically en-
dorsed Obama in a long video released
just before the election an appear-
ance Jewish Democrats credit with help-
ing boost Obamas Jewish numbers in
Florida, a critical swing state.
Yet in recent weeks Koch turned on
Obama again, making no secret of his
disappointment in Obamas choice of
Chuck Hagel, a former Republican sena-
tor with a fraught relationship with the
pro-Israel community, for secretary of
defense.
Frankly, I thought that there would
come a time when he would renege on
what he conveyed on his support of
Israel, Koch said of Obama in a January
7 interview with the Algemeiner, a Jewish
publication. It comes a little earlier than I
thought it would.
Rabbi Joe Potasnik, the executive
vice president of the New York Board of
Rabbis, said Koch told him his hero was
Harry Truman, another Democratic Party
leader who was not afraid to defy his base.
He admired independence, Potasnik
recalled in an interview on Friday.
Koch, who never married, held twin
passions he guarded ferociously: the
Jewish people and New York.
After the stone-throwing incident
in 1990, Koch took the stone and the
bloodstained handkerchief to a frame
shop, but the shop lost the stone and
substituted a fake which Koch spotted
immediately. He was placated only by a
letter from Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir, who praised him as the first
eminent American to be stoned in the Old
City. Instead of the stone, Koch framed
Shamirs letter, along with a photo of his
wound.
Kochs tombstone is engraved with
his name, his years as mayor, the Shema
prayer, and the final words of Daniel
Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter
murdered in Pakistan on Feb. 1, 2002, the
same date Koch died: My father is Jewish.
My mother is Jewish. I am Jewish.
His chosen burial place is a nonde-
nominational churchyard at the corner
of 155th Street and Amsterdam Avenue
selected because he could not imagine
spending eternity outside Manhattan.
JTA Wire Service
In his later years, Koch seemed
to swing like a pendulum between
Democrats and Republicans, and
both sides eagerly sought his political
imprimatur.
He endorsed Giuliani, a Republican,
in his successful mayoral bid in 1993
against Dinkins. He often shared the
stage and sometimes took it over at
endorsements for other Republicans, in-
cluding New York Gov. George Pataki, Sen.
Al DAmato, and New York City Mayor
Michael Bloomberg (who was only a part-
time Republican).
Koch stumped hard for George W.
Bushs presidential reelection in 2004,
and was not afraid to tell baffled Jewish
Democrats why: Bush had Israels back,
Koch said.
Four years later, Republicans hoped to
win a repeat endorsement for Sen. John
McCain (R-Ariz.), but Koch, alarmed at
what he saw as Republican plans to de-
grade the social safety net he had cham-
pioned as a congressman in the 1970s,
instead threw in with Barack Obama.
Almost as soon as Obama became
president, however, Koch became one of
his biggest Jewish detractors, lacerating
the president with criticism for his per-
ceived coolness to Israel.
I believe we are seeing a dramatic
change in the relationship between the
United States and the State of Israel that
adversely affects the State of Israel and
it is being orchestrated by President
Barack Obama, Koch said in early
2010, after a cool meeting between the
president and Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu. The president,
when he invited the prime minister of
Israel, Netanyahu, to the White House,
was extremely rude to him, treated him
as though he were a Third World tyrant.
In 2011, Koch endorsed Republican
Bob Turner for a special election to fill a
vacant congressional seat in New York in
what had been seen as a safe Democratic
district, even though the Democratic
contender, David Weprin, was both
Jewish and stridently pro-Israel. Turner
won, and many credited Kochs endorse-
ment with tipping the scales during the
campaign. When Obama subsequently
retreated from criticism of Israels settle-
ment policies, Koch claimed credit.
I believe the recent vote in the 9th
Congressional District in New York affect-
Koch was a fervent supporter of the Jewish people and Israel.
JS-28*
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Perlman and Helfgot
Concert to be a milestone for new Barclays Center
Chavie Lieber
W
ho knew the man behind the
Brooklyn homecomings of
Jay-Z and Barbra Streisand
had a thing for heimische melodies?
Bruce Ratner, the developer and
majority owner of the Barclays Center
arena in Brooklyn, which opened last
September with a Jay-Z show and hosted
borough native Streisand a month later,
holds a special place in his heart for can-
torial music.
My parents are both from eastern
European descent, so that type of Jewish
music is in my blood, Ratner said. I grew
up going to my Conservative synagogue
in Cleveland, where they had an amazing
cantor who I absolutely loved to listen to.
And as I got older, I was always buying
cantor CDs. The music is just so refined.
Ratner, the chairman and chief execu-
tive of the real estate development firm
Forest City Ratner Companies, is taking
personal pride in having spearheaded ef-
forts to put on the first Jewish event at the
venue: a February 28 concert featuring
the renowned Israeli-born violinist Itzhak
Perlman sharing the stage with Cantor
Yitzchak Meir Helfgot. The Barclays per-
formance follows the pairs collaboration,
Eternal Echoes: Songs and Dances for
the Soul, an album of Jewish music that
was released in August.
In an age where klezmer music has
gained a following in the downtown jazz
scene and Yiddish culture has experi-
enced something of a revival, Ratner is
optimistic that between Brooklyns hip-
sters and its chasidim, the show will find
an audience.
I know not everyone listens to canto-
rial music today, but if they really listen,
theyll find such a history behind it,
said Ratner, who became acquainted
with Perlman 30 years ago when their
daughters attended private school in
Manhattan together. Growing up, can-
tors used to be treated like rock stars, and
I think kids today unfamiliar with it will
really find this concert enjoyable.
A century ago, it was hardly uncom-
mon for cantors to perform at venues
like Barclays. Such cantors as Yossele
Rosenblatt and Zeidel Rovener were
mainstream stars, recording popular re-
cords and gracing the stages of Madison
Square Garden and Carnegie Hall.
Only about a third of Barclays 19,000
seats are going to be made available for
the Perlman-Helfgot show, but its still
likely to be one of the largest cantorial
concerts in the United States in nearly a
century.
I cant think of anything as big as
Madison Square Garden after Rosenblatt
or Rovner in the 20s, said Neil Levin, the
artistic director of the Milken Archive of
Jewish Music in Los Angeles.
Fans long have been taken with
Perlman, who as a boy was crippled by
polio, yet became one of the premier
classical musicians of his generation,
straddling classical and pop in a way
that many of his classical peers can only
envy. Perlman appeared at President
Obamas first inauguration and on the
soundtrack of the Oscar-winning 1993
film Schindlers List not to mention
on Sesame Street.
Perlman recalls the first time he heard
Helfgots voice at a concert in Israel.
I thought, That would sound excel-
lent with a violin! he said. I later ap-
proached him backstage and said, We
must make some music together.
With barely a month until the show,
Perlman said he and Helfgot have not yet
decided what they will play, but it proba-
bly will include a mix of new material and
old favorites and certainly the classic
crowd pleaser My Yiddishe Mama.
Their show is the first concert being
self-promoted by the Barclays Center, but
Ratner says he plans to host more Jewish
events.
Making more events for the Jewish
community is really important to me,
Ratner said. Its something that Ive al-
ways wanted to do, since the Brooklyn
market is so big, and Im going to treat
these events a little more differently.
Barclays will designate certain sections
for gender-segregated seating in an effort
to draw Orthodox patrons and is bring-
ing in kosher food purveyors. Some of
the proceeds will go to the Metropolitan
Council on Jewish Poverty as well as the
Perlman Music Program, a school for
gifted musicians in Manhattan.
The whole thing is very exciting,
Perlman said. I just hope things go well.
One time, an audience member got sick
during my performance, and I couldnt
help but think he was placed there as a
critic.
JTA Wire Service
Israel-born American violinist Itzhak
Perlman, left, will perform with
Manhattans Cantor Yitzchak Meir
Helfgot at Brooklyns Barclays Center
on February 28. It will be the new
arenas first Jewish event. Lisa-Marie
Mazzucco
JS-29
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 29
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Obama
to visit Israel
will his planned israel trip revive
israel-Palestinian peacemaking?
Ron Kampeas
WASHINGTON Is President Obamas plan to visit Israel
a sign that hes ready to take another shot at Israeli-
Palestinian peacemaking?
The White House announced Tuesday that Obama
would visit Israel in the spring, his first
trip there as president. He did go there
in 2008, when he was a candidate for
the Oval Office. This trip also will include meetings with
Palestinian Authority leaders and a visit to Jordan, the
White House said.
Obama spoke of the visit in a conversation with Israeli
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on January 28. The
White House did not announce dates.
The announcement appears to be a signal that the
president is serious about peacemaking, said David
Makovsky, an analyst with the Washington Institute for
Near East Policy, which has close ties with the Obama
and Netanyahu governments.
Part of the problem is that on all sides, theres disbe-
lief that peace is possible, Makovsky said. He wants to
engage both societies about why you cant give up. He
wants to engage on the gut level with Arabs and Israelis in
a way he hasnt until now.
In a region where symbols are important, Obamas
failure to visit during his first term as president was taken
by his opponents as a sign that Israel was not a high pri-
ority for him. It did not help Obamas popularity in Israel
when he omitted the Jewish state from a June 2009 visit
to the Middle East that included a major speech in Cairo
and a stop in Saudi Arabia.
As much as anything else, the spring trip may be
about reaching out to Israelis.
Im excited that President Obama is coming this
spring to reaffirm the deep ties between Israel and the
United States, Dan Shapiro, the U.S. ambassador to
Israel, said in a message in Hebrew on Twitter.
Netanyahu may have his own reasons for welcoming
such a visit now. For one, a U.S. president on Israeli soil
sends an unmistakable message to Israels enemies that
America stands with Israel.
It also helps Netanyahu politically. Netanyahu
emerged weakened from Israels January 22 elections,
and aides have told the Israeli media that they believe
voters stayed away from the prime minister over con-
cerns about his rapport with Obama.
The two leaders have had something of a fraught
relationship. There have been philosophical differences
about Israels settlement enterprise and the Palestinians,
disagreements about the red line for Irans nuclear pro-
gram, and perceived snubs on both sides.
During a March 2010 White House meeting,
Netanyahu was denied a photo opportunity with the
president, and Obama interrupted their meeting to
eat dinner. Last year, Netanyahu gave an enthusiastic
reception to Obama rival Mitt Romney during the 2012
campaign.
But the recent elections in both the United States and
Israel could mark a turning point.
In recent days, Netanyahu has indicated that he wants
to establish a coalition government that leans more to
the center than his last government. He also has identi-
fied diplomacy with the Palestinians as one of his top
priorities.
On the other side of the Atlantic, Obamas choice for
NEWS
ANALYSIS
www.jstandard.com
see obama to visit page 30
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 29
Emanu-el Delicatessen
52W Railroad Ave., Tenay, NJ
Tel/Fax: 201-266-8666 E-mail: emanu.el@walla.com
Sun-Thurs 7am-9pm Fri 7am-1 hr before Shabbat Sat closed
Be a Facebook Friend: Emanu-el Delicatessen
d"sb
Cholov Yisroel
Pas Yisroel
Hamantashen available
by the pound or package
Happy Purim
to all our customers
All invited
Feb. 21st 4-6 PM
for a
PURIM
FESTIVAL
in the store with clowns.
Bring kids in costume and enjoy
the mishloach manot available
Place your orders 3 days ahead
Fresh
Meat &
Fish
available
every
Tuesday to
Friday
Pinkie Nails
680A River Rd. New Milford, NJ
(Next to Burger King. Parking in rear)
201-265-7300 OPEN 7 DAYS
Manicure &
Hot Stone
Pedicure
$20
UV Gel
Color Gel
20% OFF
PRESENT COUPON
READERS
CHOICE
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JS-30*
30 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
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secretary of state, John Kerry, said in his Senate confir-
mation hearing that preventing Iran from acquiring a
nuclear weapon and advancing Israeli-Palestinian peace
would be his twin priorities in the job. Kerry since has
announced his own plans to visit Israel next month, and
among his first calls in his new job were conversations
with Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority President
Mahmoud Abbas.
Its a new beginning. Obama can have a serious
discussion with the Israeli prime minister at a time hes
heading a new government, said Dennis Ross, a counsel
at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy who was
Obamas top Middle East adviser until a year ago.
The president is interested in connecting with the
Israeli public. It allows him to show he cares about the
peace issues, but allows him to do so while discussing all
the issues, including Iran, Syria, and Egypt.
Aaron David Miller, a former U.S. negotiator who now
is vice president of the Wilson International Center for
Scholars, says both Obama and Netanyahu are being
driven to a rapprochement by exigency: Netanyahu by
his weakened political position and Obama by preserv-
ing his legacy.
One guy is caught in circumstances which require
improvement, and the other guy knows if he wants to get
anywhere hes going to have to figure out if he can work
with Bibi, Miller said, using Netanyahus nickname.
Debra DeLee, the president of Americans for Peace
Now, said in a statement that Obamas visit will give him
an opportunity to directly address the people of Israel
and lay out a compassionate, pragmatic vision for a fu-
ture Israel that enjoys security and peace, and that it is a
respected member of the community of nations.
But Danielle Pletka, vice president of the American
Enterprise Institute, said that if Obama is going simply to
advance a peace process that many Israelis and U.S. law-
makers believe is stuck because of Arab intransigence,
hes running a fools errand. It would be more useful, she
said, for him to use his Israel trip to discuss strategies at a
time of Middle Eastern turmoil.
If hes president of the United States, hes going to talk
about Iran and Hezbollah and Syria, Pletka said. If hes
the president of Barack Obamas dream house, hell talk
about the peace process.
JTA Wire Service
President obama, shown visiting the Western Wall in
July 2008, is expected to visit israel this spring.
Avi HAyon/FlAsH90/JTA
obama to visit From Page 29
JS-31
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 31
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5a!c Ends FrIday, Fcbruary 22
nd

bri efs
Hezbollah-linked terrorists
blamed for Burgas attack
Two men with links to the terrorist organization
Hezbollah were implicated in a terrorist attack in
Bulgaria that killed six, including five Israelis.
Hezbollah also financed the bomb attack on a tour
bus full of Israelis last July, Bulgarias Foreign Minister
Tsvetan Tsvetanov told reporters on Tuesday following
a six-hour Cabinet meeting. Bulgarian President Rosen
Plevneliev did not confirm nor deny reports that Bulgaria
would blame Hezbollah and Iran for the terrorist attack
before Tsvetznovs news conference.
There is a significant progress, but the investigation
is still not over, Plevneliev was quoted as telling the
Sofia news agency after a meeting Tuesday of Bulgarias
Consultative Council for National Security.
Israel has blamed both Hezbollah and Iran for the at-
tack, which also killed the Israeli tourists Bulgarian bus
driver. Iran has denied responsibility and accused Israel
of staging the attack.
A Bulgarian finding that Hezbollah was linked to the
attack could lead to its classification as a terrorist group
in the European Union.
The U.S. Congress in recent weeks has called on
European bodies to join the United States, Israel, Canada,
Australia, and New Zealand in designating Hezbollah as a
terrorist group.
British and Dutch officials pressed last year for con-
certed EU action against Hezbollah, a major player in
the Lebanese government, but other nations including
France have resisted efforts to blacklist the group in an
apparent effort to maintain good relations with Beirut.
French rapper Booba cyber-lynched
for mentioning Shoah
Dozens of anti-Semitic messages were left on the
Facebook page of the popular French rapper Booba
for vowing in a new song to avenge the victims of the
Holocaust.
Booba, the son of a Muslim father from Senegal, raps
in a song titled Master Yoda that was posted Saturday
on his Facebook page, Well avenge like victims of slav-
ery and the Shoah.
Among the 4,340 comments left on his post were com-
ments denying the Holocaust and calling for a new geno-
cide against the Jewish people, in violation of French
law on hate speech. Some comments used pejoratives
against Booba, the stage name of 36-year-old Eli Yaffa, for
mentioning the Holocaust.
A user identified as John KenNabii wrote, Fook the
Shoah, invented by Zionists to legitimize Israel. And
from another user, Bassim Abir: Fook your mother, you
and the Shoah, we piss on all the Arabs that listen to you.
JSS News, a French Jewish news site, termed the state-
ments cyber-lynching.
Dozens of comments contained the phrase shoa-
nanas, a combination of the Hebrew name for the
Holocaust with the French world for pineapple. Coined
by the anti-Semitic comedian Dieudonne, it is used as
a code word for denying the Holocaust seen to be too
vague to violate Frances law forbidding it.
On January 24, a French court ordered Twitter to
divulge details of French users who made similar
comments.
The post containing Master Yoda received 1,413
likes on Facebook. Booba has sold more than 1 million
albums in France.
JTA Wire Service
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 31
JS-34
34 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
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bri efs
U.S. judge dismisses Long Island eruv lawsuit
One of three federal lawsuits filed in connection with a
proposed eruv enclosure in a suburban New York beach
community was dismissed.
On Monday, U.S. District Court Judge Leonard Wexler
dismissed a suit brought by a group of Jewish residents
on Long Island opposed to the construction of the eruv,
an enclosure that permits religious Jews to carry items in
public on the Sabbath, the New York Times reported.
Proponents of the eruv in Westhampton Beach, N.Y.,
are affiliated with the Orthodox Hampton Synagogue,
which has had repeated run-ins with local residents fear-
ing an influx of Orthodox Jews to the seaside community.
Four projects supporting diversity receive Natan Grants
Four Jewish community projects in the United States,
Mexico, and Uruguay will receive grants from the Natan
Fund and the ROI Community.
On Monday, the Natan Grants for ROI Entrepreneurs
announced the grants. Totaling $37,000, they are given to
support innovative ideas for diversifying Jewish life.
The grants are going to:
Amy Beth Oppenheimers Faces of Israel program,
which uses an educational film to focus on questions of
Jewish identity, religious pluralism, and civil liberties.
Fabian Schamis Nefesh, a new school in Uruguays
Punta del Este Jewish community that is addressing
childrens needs and strengthening ties within the local
community.
Isidoro Hamuis Mexican Merkaba Fest, which aims
to create, promote, and explore local and foreign art-
ists and share Jewish culture and music with the greater
Mexican society;
And Robert Safersteins Friday Night Lights project,
a series of Shabbat dinners for gay Jewish profession-
als highlighting charitable organizations assisting the
LGBTQ community.
The new partnership between Natan and the
ROI Community, a member of the Charles and Lynn
Schusterman Philanthropic Network, was initiated as a
way of integrating Natans young philanthropists with
ROIs global network of emerging entrepreneurs and in-
novators, the groups said in a statement issued Monday.
The Natan Fund provides early-stage funding for cre-
ative approaches to challenges facing the Jewish people
and the State of Israel. The ROI Community provides
tools, support and space for Jewish innovators.
JTA Wire Service
JS-37*
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 37
Standard
A new
is on its way!
Dvar Torah
Mishpatim:
Winston Churchill and the ancient rabbis agree
Rabbi Ronald Roth
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Congregation Bnai Israel, Conservative
A
fter the grand revelation of the Torah at Mount
Sinai, this week the Torah portion consists of a
long series of laws and rules. Some are much
more mundane than the inspirational statements in the
Ten Commandments. One simply reads, Midvar shek-
er tirchak Keep far from a false matter. (Exodus 23:7)
Isnt it obvious that we need to be distant from lies?
A comment on truth and falsehood from a Midrash
in Yalkut Shimoni Bereshit 3 says the following, The
letters of the word truth [emet in Hebrew] rest on two
legs [the letters of that word aleph, mem and tav when
printed in Hebrew each touch the line beneath them
in two places], while the letters of the word falsehood
[sheker in Hebrew] have only one leg [as the letters for
that Hebrew word are shin, kof, and resh, which when
printed in Hebrew each touches the line underneath
them only once.] Truthful actions stand firm [on two
legs], actions based on falsehoods do not [they wobble
and fall on their single leg].
The Midrash does not stop at this point for they
know there are far too many lies in our world and truth
does not always triumph. It continues: The letters of
emet are far apart [they are the first, middle and last
letters of the Hebrew alphabet], whereas the letters of
sheker are bunched together [they follow each other
in the Hebrew alphabet]. The Midrash concludes with
something we all know to be accurate: Truth is hard
to attain [since its letters are distant] but falsehood
is readily at hand [just as its letters are next to each
other]. Or as Winston Churchill said, A lie gets halfway
around the world before the truth has a chance to get
its pants on.
The rabbis were aware that while ultimately truth
stands firm, lies are easily proclaimed and all too of-
ten believed. Therefore the Torah reminds us not just
to avoid them but to keep far from them. That is often
hard to do. Think of all the statements made during the
recent Presidential campaign. I dont care which candi-
date you backed, you know that many of the words in
the ads shown on television supporting him were exag-
gerated if not questionable. We assume that political
speech is not always credible. We also know that many
people get away with falsehoods and that is, pardon the
expression, the gospel truth.
I would like to believe that the world reflects a saying
I recall from my childhood that Cheaters never pros-
per. The rabbis of ancient times knew how tempting
it is to cheat and to lie, and how easy it is to get away
with it. I hope that each of us will be truthful and not
be tempted to lie. We should only live in a world where
those who are honest do prosper.
ERIC A. GOLDMAN
D
uring the Civil War, General William Tecumseh
Sherman gave orders to evacuate the city of
Atlanta and then burn it to the ground, a hor-
rendous moment in history recreated in the classic 1939
film, Gone with the Wind. The townspeople appealed
to the general, telling him that there were pregnant, sick,
and old people there. In response, the fierce and deter-
mined Sherman simply responded that War is cruelty
and you cannot refine it, and those who brought war in
this country deserve all the curses and maledictions a
people can pour out. Most Americans see the victory of
the Allied armies in World War II as a victory over tyranny,
but what of those on the other side who suffered at the
wars end?
It is hard for us to feel great compassion for the
Germans who were vanquished in a hard-fought war
that stemmed the tide of fascism. Most Americans
regard World War II as a just war. In Lore, an Australian,
British, and German co-production, writer/director Cate
Shortland turns the point of view away from what we are
used to seeing in cinema what the camp survivors,
who were left homeless, often without family, had to
endure. Instead, she looks squarely at the children of
a high-ranking Nazi officer and his wife, who choose
to leave their children behind and flee as the war ends
and Allied forces sweep the Motherland. But what of the
children? What responsibility must they bear? What is to
be their fate?
In November, Israeli filmmaker Chanoch Zeevis
Hitlers Children was screened at the Teaneck Film
Festival. It is a documentary study of the children of
many of Hitlers top lieutenants (and was reviewed here
on November 9.) What happened to those children? How
did they deal with their legacy? Zeevi asks the questions
and the people he interviews tell of their disdain for their
fathers, how they suffered, and how it took much time
for them truly to comprehend the extent of their parents
partnership with evil.
Cate Shortland draws on Rachel Seifferts The Dark
Room, a novel with three stories, each told from the
perspective of a young person trying to make sense of
Nazi Germany. Her film presents the story of four young
children, led by the eldest, 14-year-old Lore (Saskia
Rosendahl), who set out on a terrifying journey across
the devastated landscape in an effort to reach the safety
of their grandmothers home, more than 500 miles
away. We are witness to brutal postwar conditions as the
children make their way across forests, back roads, and
countryside, seeking food and shelter in a precarious
environment where uneasy townspeople eye them with
suspicion. As they journey, they see photographs posted
by the Americans and Russians showing the horrors the
Nazis had engineered. At first, there is total disbelief.
Clearly this is Allied propaganda! But just as the German
nation begins to understand the reality and ramifications
of Nazi actions, so do the children struggle to understand
the complicity of their parents.
Lore is a study in trauma, the anguish of a nation
trying to come to grips with its collusion in a disastrous
war and a policy of genocide and mass murder. These
four children, whose father was a hero just a few years
earlier, now must come to grips with what had taken
place under his watch and with both of their parents
active participation. Lore and her siblings grew up
trusting their parents and believing in their abhorrent
Nazi ideologies. In this story, Shortland wanted us to
understand Lore, her lack of empathy, her romantic
determination to keep believing, even when Germany
was suffering defeat. This might be difficult for us
to conceive, but Shortland does an impressive job
introducing us to the maturation of this gregarious and
thoughtful young woman, who has been raised always to
obey, never to question. Even as Lore gains the protection
of Thomas (Kai Malina), a man who appears to be a
Jewish survivor of the concentration camps, the epitome
of everything that she has been taught to hate, she still
holds onto her prejudicial beliefs. What will change her?
Cate Shortland is an Australian who has spent a great
deal of time in Germany and in post-apartheid South
Africa. She questions Australias uneasy relationship
with its colonial past and struggles with issues of
memory, collaboration, and responsibility. She says
that in crafting her film, she also was deeply affected
by the stories her Jewish husbands grandmother,
who left Berlin in 1936, told her about Germany.
As we have seen over the last decade and a half,
young Germans continue to struggle on film with
the legacy that their grandparents left the world.
Shortland, working with British and German
producers and fine young German actors, shot
this film in German (with English subtitles) and on
German soil. She wants to continue the discussion.
Lore will make you think and try to understand
and that is not easy.
The film opens today at the Lincoln Plaza and
Angelika theaters in New York.
Eric Goldman reviews cinema for The Jewish Standard.
You can follow him on twitter: @drgoldman.
JS-39*
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 8, 2013 39
Lore
German children
abandoned in postwar
Germany look for home
Abandoned by their parents, Lore and her siblings
cross a devastated land.
Lore confronts her parents Nazi beliefs.
Despite protection of a camp survivor, Lore retains her
prejudices.
Australian Cate Shortland questions her own coun-
trys past.
Arts & culture
Calendar
JS-40*
Or offers a Purim-themed morning, with
music, stories, crafts, and snacks, for 2- to
6-year-olds and their parents, 11:15 a.m. 56
Ridgewood Road. (201) 664-7422 or www.
templebethornj.org.
Purim in Wyckoff Temple Beth Rishon
holds its annual Purim carnival, 11:30 a .m.
Food, games, activities, and music and
dance. Proceeds support the TBR youth
group. 585 Russell Ave. (201) 891-4466 or
bethrishon.org.
Purim in Paramus The Jewish Community
Center of Paramus hosts its annual carnival,
with games, moonwalk, food, and prizes,
noon-2 p.m. Wear costumes. East 304
Midland Ave. (201) 262-7691.
David Broza Raanan Cohen
David Broza in Closter The New York Board
of Rabbis presents David Broza in concert
at Temple Emanu-El, 6 p.m. The Jewish
Standard is among the sponsors. Proceeds
benefit New Jersey Superstorm Sandy
victims. 180 Piermont Road. Jessica Di
Paolo, (212) 983-3521 or jdipaolo@nybr.org.
monday [february 11]
Heart disease in women Dr. Sarah L.
Timmapuri and registered dietitian Susan
Kraus lead a discussion Heart Disease:
What Women Want to Know, for the
sisterhood of Congregation Beth Sholom
in Teaneck, 6:30 p.m. Light supper. 354
Maitland Ave. (201) 833-2620.
tuesday [february 12]
Networking in Paramus Jewish Business
Network holds a breakfast at Whole Foods
Market, 8:15 a.m. 300 Bergen Town Center.
www.jbusinessnetwork.net.
Rabbi Ziona Zelazo
CouRtesy JFsnJ
Celebrating love Rabbi Ziona Zelazo
discusses Love is in the Air: Cupid,
Cherubim, and Us, for Caf Europa, a
program of Jewish Family Service of North
Jersey, at the Fair Lawn Jewish Center, 11
a.m. Made possible by a grant from the
Conference on Jewish Material Claims
Against Germany, the Jewish Federation
of Northern New Jersey, and private
donations. 10-10 Norma Ave. (973) 595-
0111 or www.jfsnorthjersey.org.
and Josh Rabinowitz. 515 Cedar Lane.
(201) 530-5665 or www.chaikotapas.com.
Movie Toni Braxton and David Julian Hirsh
star in Twist of Faith on Lifetime, 8 p.m.
sunday [february 10]
Film in Leonia Congregation Adas Emuno
offers Bagels and Boxing. After Impact-
Jewish Boxers in America is screened, at
9:30 a.m., producer/director James Ford
Nussbaum will discuss his film, which
offers a behind-the-scenes look at some of
Americas great Jewish boxers. Bagels and
coffee. 254 Broad Ave. (201) 592-1712 or
www.adasemuno.org.
Benefit spinning Ride to Provide raises
money for local food pantries and family
service organizations. Sponsored by Temple
Emanu-El of Closter, it is at CORE Fitness,
Closter, 9:45-11:45 a.m. Each riders goodie
bag holds water, Gatorade, healthy snacks,
and a shirt. 91 Ruckman Road. (201) 750-
9997 or Corrubia@templeemanu-el.com.
Responding to anti-Israel rhetoric
Maayanot Yeshiva High School for Girls
in Teaneck hosts a program for Jewish
high school juniors and seniors on how to
respond to anti-Israel rhetoric on college
campuses, 10:15 a.m. Co-sponsored
by Jewish Federation of Northern New
Jerseys Jewish Community Relations
Council, Stand Up For Israel, the Bergen
County High School of Jewish Studies, and
the New Jersey Anti-Defamation League.
Light lunch; dietary laws observed. 1650
Palisade Ave. www.jfnnj.org/jcrc.
Author in Hoboken Aili McConnon tells
the story of Gino Bartoli, the most famous
Italian athlete of his generation, and his
heroic actions saving lives during the
Holocaust in the book Road to Valor: A
True Story of World War II Italy, The Nazis,
and the Cyclist Who Inspired a Nation at
the United Synagogue of Hoboken, 10:30
a.m. Brunch. 115 Park Ave. (201) 659-4000
or office@hobokensynagogue.org.
Toddler program in Tenafly As part of
the shuls Holiday Happenings program,
Temple Sinai of Bergen County offers a
Purim-themed morning, with music, stories,
crafts, and snacks, for 4-year-olds and their
parents, 10:45 a.m. 1 Engle St. (201) 568-
6867 or SAidekman@templesiniabc.org.
Toddler program in Washington Township
As part of the shuls Holiday Happenings
program, the sisterhood of Temple Beth
friday [february 8]
Shabbat in Teaneck The Jewish Center of
Teaneck offers Carlebach-style davening
at 5 p.m. On Saturday morning, Rabbi
Lawrence Zierler discusses The Green
Torah: Judaism and the Environment with
participants at his tisch after the 9 a.m.
service. Kinder Shul for 3- to 8-year-olds,
while parents attend services, 10:30. (201)
833-0515 or www.jcot.org.
Shabbat in Closter Rabbi David S. Widzer
and Cantor Rica Timman of Temple Beth
El lead a Purim-themed tot Shabbat,
5:15 p.m., with songs, stories, and crafts.
Chinese dinner at 5:45. 221 Schraalenburgh
Road. (201) 768-5112.
Shabbat in Paramus The JCC of Paramus
hosts a catered Shabbat dinner, 6:45 p.m.;
services at 8:30. East 304 Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7691 or office@jccparamus.org.
Shabbat in Emerson Congregation Bnai
Israel holds its monthly intergenerational
drumming circle to celebrate Purim, 8 p.m.
Drums provided; participants can bring their
own percussion instruments. 53 Palisade
Ave. (201) 265-2272 or www.bisrael.com.
saturday [february 9]
Shabbat book discussion in River Edge
Temple Avodat Shalom offers a discussion
of The Zookeepers Wife after services
that begin at 10:30 a.m. as part of the
Jewish Federation of Northern New Jerseys
One Book, One Community. Stella Teger,
TAS executive director, joins congregant
Barbara Markowitz in a dialogue about Let
Us Not Forget, a memoir by Markowitzs
mother, Irene Teger. Tegers story parallels
The Zookeepers Wife. 385 Howland Ave.
(201) 489-2463 or www.avodatshalom.net.
Comedy in Wayne Congregation Shomrei
Torah offers comedy with monologist Jon
Fisch; Sherry Davey, who recently was
named one of the Top 10 Comedians in
NYC by Improper Magazine, and Moody
McCarthy, 7:30 p.m. Hors doeuvres
and dessert; beer and wine for sale. 30
Hinchman Ave. (973) 696-2500.
Cabaret in Wyckoff Temple Beth Rishon
offers a cabaret with classical, Broadway,
opera, contemporary, jazz, classic rock,
Jewish and American folk music, along with
tap dancing by the Syncopated Seniors
Tap Dance Troupe, 7:30 p.m. Participants
include congregants Gale Bindelglass,
Jimmy and Linda Cohen, Phyllis Cole,
Jenna Daniels, Adam Friedlander, Hannah
Haas, Kerry Holder, Mark Kantrowitz, Judy
Kessler-Stein, Jane Koch, Arthur Mamber,
Ilan Mamber, Andrew Mordoff, Daniel
Polevoy, Ted Prosnitz, Jamie Rosenblum,
Sylvia Rubin, Jack Seidenberg, Jo-Ann
Skiena Garey, Fern Wilensky, Lindsay Wyck,
and Alice Yoo. Wine, cheese, and desserts.
BYOB. 585 Russell Ave. (201) 891-4466.
Eli Lebowicz
Josh Rabinowitz
Comedy in Teaneck Chai Ko Tapas Fusion
Steakhouse & Sushi hosts Rosh Chodesh
Adar Comedy Night, with dinner and a
show, 8-10 p.m. Comedy by Eli Lebowicz
40 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
David Weinstone and The Music for Aardvarks Band will perform two concerts for
children at The Jewish Museum in Manhattan, Sunday, February 10, 11:30 a.m. and
again at 2 p.m. Adults are asked to accompany their children. (212) 423-3337 or
TheJewishMuseum.org. CouRtesy JM
Leket Israel, Israels
national food bank
and largest food
rescue network,
sells printed Purim
cards. Every dollar
that is donated
provides 10
people with one
pound of fruit and
vegetables. It costs
$36 for 18 cards
and envelopes, $70
for 36, $90 for 54,
and $170 for 108.
Unlimited Purim ecards and video
cards are available for $18. To order,
call Elena at (201) 331-0070, ext. 2, or
go to www.leket.org.il/english/.
JS-41*
Matisyahu CouRtesy BeRgen PaC
Matisyahu in Englewood Matisyahu
performs at the Bergen Performing Arts
Center, 7:30 p.m. (201) 227 1030, www.
ticketmaster.com, or www.bergenpac.org.
thursday [february 14]
Networking in Jersey City HudsonJewish
hosts a Jewish business networking
breakfast with the Tribe, at the Museum of
Russian Art, formerly the CASE Museum,
8:30 a.m. 80 Grand St. Joshua Bernstein,
Info@HudsonJewish.org.
si ngles
saturday [february 9]
Pre-Purim party Celebrate Rosh Chodesh
Adar at a pre-Purim singles party for
modern Orthodox singles, 23-32, at Shaarei
Orah The Sephardic Congregation of
Teaneck, 8:30 p.m. Sephardi Panoply
includes a multimedia trivia game and
Middle Eastern dishes. Co-sponsored
by YUConnects and Yeshiva University.
1425 Essex Road. (516) 603-8141 or www.
yuconnects.com.
sunday [february 10]
Brunch in Caldwell New Jersey Jewish
Singles 45+ meets for a pre-Valentines Day
meet and mingle brunch at Congregation
Agudath Israel, 11:30 a.m. 20 Academy
Road. (973) 226-3600, meetup.com (use
group name) or singles@agudath.org.
tuesday [february 19]
The dating world The Orthodox Union
Singles Connection and Congregation
Shearith Israel of Manhattan present
Text, Email, Phone, or [Gasp] In-Person
Conversation: Matching the Medium to
the Message in the Dating World, for
singles, 22-35, 7 p.m. Moderators include
Marc Goldmann, founder of Saw You at
Sinai; social worker Naomi Mark; Helen
Greenfield, Saw You at Sinai matchmaker;
dating coach Sandy Weiner; matchmaker
Baila Sebrow; and Michael Feldstein,
a member of the Singles Task Force
Committee at YU Connects. Refreshments.
2 West 70th St. (212) 613-8300 or www.
oucommunity.org.
Bender, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. The fair includes
a moon bounce, an obstacle course,
slides, games, spin art, balloon animals,
magicians, clowns, hair and make up
booths, cotton candy, and prizes. A food
court will sell dairy items. 19-10 Morlot Ave.
(201) 791-7676.
i n new york
sunday [february 10]
Purim concert Acclaimed kids band
Mama Doni, led by Doni Zasloff Thomas,
celebrates Purim at the Museum of Jewish
Heritage A Living Memorial to the
Holocaust, 2 p.m. Original songs and a
costume parade, for children 3 to 10. Crafts
from 1-4. 36 Battery Place. (646) 437-4202
or www.mjhnyc.org.
monday [february 11]
Playwright speaking Jesse Eisenberg
(Oscar-nominated actor for his role as
Mark Zuckerberg in The Social Network)
speaks with novelist and Fordham law
professor Thane Rosenbaum at the 92nd
Street Y, 8:15 p.m., about his play, The
Revisionist, opening this month at the
Cherry Lane Theater. 1395 Lexington Ave.
(212) 415-5500 or www.92Y.org.
Hadassah meets The Pascack Valley/
Northern Valley Chapter of Hadassah
meets at Jewish Home Assisted Living
in River Vale, 2:30 p.m. The chapters
Hadassah Players performs a version of
The Calendar Girls. Refreshments. 685
Westwood Ave. (201) 664-1488.
friday [february 15]
Shabbat in Teaneck Temple Emeth offers
musical services, 8 p.m. 1666 Windsor
Road. (201) 833-1322 or www.emeth.org.
saturday [february 16]
Rummage sale in Washington Township
Sisterhood of Temple Beth Or holds a
rummage sale, 7:30-9:30 p.m.; and Sunday,
10 a.m.-1 p.m. On Monday, Bag Day, fill a
small bag for $3, a large one for $6, 4-8 p.m.
56 Ridgewood Road. (201) 664-7422, ext.
10, or www.templebethornj.org.
sunday [february 17]
Pre-Purim in Fair Lawn Shomrei Torah
hosts a pre-Purim extravaganza, Living
and Loving Life, in memory of Josh
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 41
Or offers a Purim-themed morning, with
music, stories, crafts, and snacks, for 2- to
6-year-olds and their parents, 11:15 a.m. 56
Ridgewood Road. (201) 664-7422 or www.
templebethornj.org.
Purim in Wyckoff Temple Beth Rishon
holds its annual Purim carnival, 11:30 a .m.
Food, games, activities, and music and
dance. Proceeds support the TBR youth
group. 585 Russell Ave. (201) 891-4466 or
bethrishon.org.
Purim in Paramus The Jewish Community
Center of Paramus hosts its annual carnival,
with games, moonwalk, food, and prizes,
noon-2 p.m. Wear costumes. East 304
Midland Ave. (201) 262-7691.
David Broza Raanan Cohen
David Broza in Closter The New York Board
of Rabbis presents David Broza in concert
at Temple Emanu-El, 6 p.m. The Jewish
Standard is among the sponsors. Proceeds
benefit New Jersey Superstorm Sandy
victims. 180 Piermont Road. Jessica Di
Paolo, (212) 983-3521 or jdipaolo@nybr.org.
monday [february 11]
Heart disease in women Dr. Sarah L.
Timmapuri and registered dietitian Susan
Kraus lead a discussion Heart Disease:
What Women Want to Know, for the
sisterhood of Congregation Beth Sholom
in Teaneck, 6:30 p.m. Light supper. 354
Maitland Ave. (201) 833-2620.
tuesday [february 12]
Networking in Paramus Jewish Business
Network holds a breakfast at Whole Foods
Market, 8:15 a.m. 300 Bergen Town Center.
www.jbusinessnetwork.net.
Rabbi Ziona Zelazo
CouRtesy JFsnJ
Celebrating love Rabbi Ziona Zelazo
discusses Love is in the Air: Cupid,
Cherubim, and Us, for Caf Europa, a
program of Jewish Family Service of North
Jersey, at the Fair Lawn Jewish Center, 11
a.m. Made possible by a grant from the
Conference on Jewish Material Claims
Against Germany, the Jewish Federation
of Northern New Jersey, and private
donations. 10-10 Norma Ave. (973) 595-
0111 or www.jfsnorthjersey.org.
Spreading Purim cheer
in Israel and abroad
Celebrate Purim with festive cards
to support Reuth Medical Center
in Israel. The 350-bed state-of-the-
art rehabilitation and chronic care
hospital treats soldiers and terror
victims among its many patients.
Inpatients and outpatients are
offered the latest techniques in
chronic pain management and have
access to quality-of-life programs
including music, drama, animal, and
garden therapies. It costs $18 for 5
cards, $36 for 10, and $72 for 25. Call
(212) 751-9255.
Sponsor Mishloach Manot for Jewish
American troops stationed abroad
through Kosher Troops. It costs $18
for 10 cards and $36 for 22. Call (845)
354-7762 or Sara@Koshertroops.com or
Ava@koshertroops.com.
Kosher vodka for Purim or anytime
With the spirit of celebration, southern California-based
King REX Spirits has produced 100 percent American-
made vodka, derived from American-grown corn. The
company uses a revolutionary all-natural patented
technology to remove impurities, resulting in a crystal
clear vodka. The nose has a mild hint of a sweet corn base
that leads to a gentle finish. The vodka is gluten free and
OK Kosher certified.
The unique handcrafted bottle is embellished with a
golden crown and Swarovski crystals. It is for sale online
at Liquorama.
Purim event
in Teaneck
All are welcome to the Berkshire
Bank in Teanecks Purim cele-
bration. The event on Thursday,
February 14, from 4 to 6 p.m.,
at the bank, 517 Cedar Lane in
Teaneck, includes pizza, ha-
mantashen, and raffles. For in-
formation, call Sharona at (201)
287-0008.
42 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
JS-42*
Central Park race benefits
halachic organ donation
The second annual Halachic Organ Donor Society
Race will take place on Sunday, March 3, at 10 a.m., in
Manhattans Central Park. The race will raise money
for the HOD Society. There will be 5K and 10K races for
adults and preteens, l8 to 12; walkers are welcome. Prizes,
including an iPhone and iPad will be awarded to the top
three finishers in both categories. A roundtrip ticket to
Israel will go to the person who raises the most money
for HODS.
HODS mission is to save lives by increasing organ
donations from Jews to all of humanity. HODS raises
awareness of halachic (Jewish legal) support for organ
donation and provides a halachic organ donor card.
HODS has saved more than 200 lives, educated more
than 330,000 Jews about organ donation, and recruited
hundreds of rabbis who now carry organ donor cards.
To register, go to www.hods.org/race, email jb@hods.
org, or call (212) 213-5087. All participants also will have
the option of creating an internet fundraising page to
raise funds toward the fee instead of paying it themselves.
Purim production in Teaneck
Benny Berlin, the popular Kinder Shul (Shabbat childrens
program) leader at the Jewish Center of Teaneck, has
produced a play with a new take on the Purim story.
The family-centered production will be performed on
Sunday, February 17, at 10 a.m., at the Jewish Center of
Teaneck. Its all-star cast features residents of the She-li
group home performing lead roles.
The intergenerational program is co-sponsored by the
JCT with the Chabad House and Congregation Shaarei
Tefilah.
Call (201) 833-0515, ext. 200, or go to wwwjcot.org.
Benny Berlin, seated, pictured with, from left, Ari
Schnipper, youth director of Congregation Shaarei
Tefillah, and actor Tzachi Frankel. CouRtesy JCt
Prayer series in Teaneck
The Teaneck General Store
and the Jewish Community
Council of Teaneck continue
a free lecture series with
Rabbi Dr. Eliezer Diamond. On
February 14, he will ask, When
Do We Get to Complain?
Contrasting Psalms and the
Siddur. On February 21, he will
tackle Preparing for Prayer:
Traditional and Contemporary
Techniques for Entering
Prayer. Both are at 7:30 p.m. at
the Teaneck General Store.
Eliezer Diamond is the Rabbi Judah Nadich Associate
Professor of Talmud and Rabbinics at the Jewish
Theological Seminary, where he teaches Talmud and rab-
binic literature.
Call (201) 530-5046 or info@teaneckgeneralstore.com.
Rabbi Dr. Eliezer
Diamond CouRtesy tgs
February 12
42 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
we welcome announcements of upcoming events.
announcements are free. accompanying pho-
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release will be published. Please include a day-
time telephone number and send to:
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JS-43*
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 43
gallery
1
Temple Sinai of Bergen County in
Tenafly celebrated Cynthia Powells
18th anniversary as its accompanist and
choir director. An abbreviated Shabbat
service was followed by a concert with
the Stonewall Chorale; Powell also is
that groups artistic director. Here, the
shul board president, Neal Klauser, gives
Powell a gift of appreciation. Ophelia a.
YudkOff
2
Children in the Glen Rock Jewish
Center Nursery School celebrated
Tu Bi-Shvat by making tree centerpieces
and sampling different fruits. COurtesY
GrJC
3
In anticipation of Tu Bi-Shvat,
participants of the Gallen Adult
Day Health Care Center, including Angel
DArminio of Paramus, pictured, worked
on creating artistic trees. COurtesY Gallen
4
Students from the David Rukin Early
Childhood Center Nursery School
at the Bergen County YJCC celebrated
Tu Bi-Shvat with a seder. YJCC Chief
Executive Officer Gary Lipman joined the
celebration. COurtesY YJCC
5
Staff members at the Jewish
National Fund recently visited Emek
HaShalom (Valley of Peace) Nature Park
in Israel. The nonprofit organization
Lotem, a JNF partner, provides accessible
hikes and outings at the ecological farm
to those with special needs and leads
nature clubs for people who are confined
to the indoors. Lotem also works with
groups from abroad, including Yachad.
JNF staffers, pictured, made olive oil in
an oil press that is accessible to people
with special needs in a Tu Bi-Shvat
workshop. COurtesY Jnf
6
The Puppy and Chick class at Gan
Yaldenu Tots in Bergenfield had a Tu
Bi-Shvat party. COurtesY GY
7
Andrew Mester, a seventh grader at Gerrard
Berman Day School and a School of Rock of
Wayne participant, sang lead vocals during a recent
fund-raising performance at the Canvas Clash in
Boonton. To mark his becoming a bar mitzvah, he
helped organize the event with all proceeds benefiting
Camp Sunshine in Casco, Maine. The facility supports
children with life-threatening illnesses and their
families by providing a free camp experience, including
accommodations, meals, onsite medical services, and
recreation activities. COurtesY GBds
8
The Jewish Community Center of Paramus
recently celebrated its 60th anniversary. At a
Shabbat service, members of three of the founding
families Henry and Lola Weber, Irene Reiss, and
Lotte and Fred Buff told some stories of those early
times. A luncheon followed. Here, they stand in front
of the cornerstone of the building, which dates to
1959. COurtesY JCCp
1
5
2
6
3
7
4
8
Lifecycle
JS-44*
44 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
MOHEL
Rabbi Gerald Chirnomas
TRAINED AT & CERTIFIED BY HADASSAH
HOSPITAL, JERUSALEM CERTIFIED BY
THE CHIEF RABBINATE OF JERUSALEM
(973) 334-6044
www.rabbichirnomas.com
Mediterranean
Pickles
Birth
Sydney Howard DeNardo
Sydney Howard DeNardo was born on January 9 at Greenwich
Hospital to Leigh Jennie and Frank DeNardo of Upper Nyack,
N.Y. Named for his grandfather, Howard Salzberg of Englewood
Cliffs, he weighed 8 pounds, 2 ounces, and joins a brother, Luca
DeNardo. Their grandparents are Joan Salzberg and Richard
Frieder of Closter and Dianne and Frank DeNardo of Putnam
Valley, N.Y., and Jane and William Watson of Ardsley, N.Y., are the
great-grandparents.
Mazal tov
Mazal tov to Marianne
Goodman, Robin Koval,
Lisa Schwartz, and Heidi
Walker, who celebrated be-
coming adult bnai mitzvah
at Temple Beth Rishon in
Wyckoff during Shabbat
services on February 2.
Orientation for the next class
is set for Tuesday, February
26 at 7 p.m.
Bnai Mitzvah
Emily Katz
Emily Katz, daughter of Roni
and Michael Katz and sister of
Ricky, Daniel, and Jason, cel-
ebrated becoming a bat mitz-
vah on February 2 at Temple
Emanu-El in Closter.
Sammie Moses
Sammie Moses, daughter of
Stacey and David Moses of
Haworth, celebrated becoming
a bat mitzvah on February 2 at
Temple Beth El in Closter.
Gabrielle
Pogrebinsky
Gabrielle Pogrebinsky, daughter
of Karina and Paul Pogrebinsky
of Woodcliff Lake, twin sister of
Justin, and sister of Isabella, 8,
celebrated becoming a bat
mitzvah on February 2 at
Temple Emanuel of the Pascack
Valley in Woodcliff Lake.
Justin
Pogrebinsky
Justin Pogrebinsky, son of Karina
and Paul Pogrebinsky of
Woodcliff Lake, twin brother of
Gabrielle, and brother of
Isabella, 8, celebrated becoming
a bar mitzvah on February 2 at
Temple Emanuel of the Pascack
Valley in Woodcliff Lake.
Matthew Zachem
Matthew Ross Zachem, son of
Andrea Glickhouse and Harvey
Zachem of Ridgewood and
brother of Jeffrey, celebrated be-
coming a bar mitzvah on
February 2 at Temple Israel and
Jewish Community Center in
Ridgewood. His grandparents
are the late Hannah and Sam
Glickhouse of Teaneck and the
late Elaine and William Zachem
of New York City.
oBituaries
Sylvia Ackerman
Sylvia Ackerman, ne Maurer,
formerly of North Bergen
and Coconut Creek, Fla., died
January 30 at the Jewish Home
at Rockleigh.
Predeceased by her
husband of 67 years, Harry,
she is survived by daughters
Dianne, Janet Siegel (Phillip),
and Linda Bleiweiss (Steven);
a brother, Alvin Maurer; five
grandchildren, and four
great-grandchildren.
Contributions can be sent to
Autism Speaks. Arrangements
were by Gutterman and
Musicant Jewish Funeral
Directors, Hackensack.
Rachel Berger
Rachel Rae Berger, 95, of
Paramus, formerly of Delray
Beach, Fla., Whippany,
Bergenfield, and Hackensack,
died January 29.
Predeceased by her
husband, Reuben, she is
survived by children, Jo-
Ann Winterfield (Harvey) of
Teaneck, and Allan (Susanne)
of Randolph; five grandchildren
and nine great-grandchildren.
Donations can be made
to the Lupus Foundation.
Arrangements were by Louis
Suburban Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Nanu Davis
Nanu Davis, 84, of Cliffside
Park, died February 3.
Arrangements were by Louis
Suburban Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Samuel
Moskowitz
Samuel Moskowitz, Ph.D., 86,
of Leonia, died February 3
at Englewood Hospital and
Medical Center.
Born in the Bronx, he was a
World War II Army veteran and
a psychologist.
Predeceased by his wife,
Gwen, in 1989, he is survived
by children, Andrew of
Washington, D.C., Jon of New
York City, and Susan of Leonia.
Arrangements were by Eden
Memorial Chapels, Fort Lee.
Arlene R. Peller
Arlene Peller, 67, of Paramus,
formerly of Staten Island and
Queens, died January 30.
A graduate of City University
of New York, she earned
a masters from Yeshiva
Universitys Wurzweiler School
of Social Work and an ABD from
New York University. She was a
self-employed licensed clinical
social worker and a professor at
Montclair State and Bloomfield
colleges. She was a member
of the National Association of
Social Workers.
Surviving are her husband,
Melvin; children, Judy Carmeli
(Jeff), Robert (Shoshana),
and Darrin (Jessica); and nine
grandchildren.
Donations can be made to
the American Diabetes or the
American Heart associations.
Arrangements were by Louis
Suburban Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Ira Rubin
Ira Stephen Rubin, 82, of Edison,
formerly of Elmwood Park and
Paramus, died on February 6 at
JFK Medical Center in Edison.
Born in the Bronx, he was a
self-employed mathematician
in the computer industry.
He is survived by his chil-
dren, Eric of Elgin, Ill., Lori Beth
Kimmel of Manalapan, and
Jeffrey of Boca Raton, Fla.; and
four grandchildren.
Arrangements were by Eden
Memorial Chapels, Fort Lee.
Hortense
Schreiber
Hortense Schreiber, ne Fink,
94, of Elmwood Park, died
February 5 in Hackensack.
Born in Des Moines,
Iowa, she was a homemaker.
Predeceased by her husband,
Louis, in 2000, and a son, James,
in 1982, she is survived by her
son, Ron, of River Edge.
Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.
Obituaries
are prepared with
information provided by
funeral homes. Correcting
errors is the responsibility
of the funeral home.
JS-45
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 45
327 Main St, Fort Lee, NJ
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Thelma Spivack
Thelma Spivack, ne Goresky, 88, of Franklin Lakes,
formerly of Chestnut Ridge, N.Y., died February 2 at
home.
Born in Montreal, she is survived by children, Ellen
Frey of Franklin Lakes, Berel of Virginia, and Simon of
New York City; a brother, Henry Goresky of Canada; and
four grandchildren.
Arrangements were by Eden Memorial Chapels,
Fort Lee.
Arthur Weis
Arthur Martin Weis, 87, of Montclair and Allendale, died
January 20.
A Navy veteran, he attended the U.S. Naval Academy
and after an honorable discharge he graduated from
the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and joined Curtiss-
Wright. A patent attorney, he graduated from Rutgers
Law School and invented a nuclear thermionic fuel cell
used as a power supply for spacecraft in the 1960s. He
was the founder of Capintec Inc., a supplier of nuclear
medical equipment systems, and received lifetime
achievement awards from the Society of Nuclear
Medicine.
He was active in the Passaic Jewish community
serving as president of Beth Shalom Reform Temple
and Temple Emanuel of North Jersey.
He is survived by his wife, Bernice; a son, Eric (Fern);
a sister, Marcia; and grandchildren Joshua and Sarah.
Donations can be sent to the Federation of Jewish
Mens Clubs, Jewish National Fund, or the Masorti
Foundation for Conservative Judaism in Israel.
Arrangements were by Jewish Memorial Chapel in
Clifton.
Jane Zimel
Jane Zimel, 59, died on February 2, 2013 in Saddle Brook.
Born in Paterson, she worked in the Paterson school
system for over 30 years. She graduated from Emerson
University and earned a masters from William Paterson
University.
She is survived by a sister, Helena Wilson (Dr.
Howard); a niece, Emily H. Wilson and cousins Deborah
Zimel Margolis, Eleanor Miller, Dorey Neilinger, and
Douglas Feltman.
Arrangements were by Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.
This weeks
Torah
commentary
is on page 37.
Jewish books illustrated
by Sendak sold at auction
Two rare Jewish books illustrated by Maurice Sendak
were sold at auction days before the posthumous publi-
cation of a new book he wrote.
At Swann Galleries in New York, Good Shabbos,
Everybody by Robert Garvey sold for $1,440, and
Happy Hanukah Everybody by Hyman and Alice
Chanover sold for $1,920. The books were published
in the 1950s by the United Synagogue Commission on
Jewish Education; Sendaks immensely popular Where
the Wild Things Are came out in 1963.
The books were real finds for Sendak collectors,
said Christine von der Linn, senior specialist of art and
illustrated books for Swann, adding that they were in
unusually good condition and both were signed by
Sendak.
Sendaks newest book was published Monday, nine
months after his death last May. My Brothers Book,
published by Harper Collins, combines poetry and art.
It is the last book he wrote. A tribute to his brother Jack,
who died 18 years ago, it is a lyrical work that deals with
separation, longing, and reunion.
The auction last week, part of a sale of books and
art by 20th century illustrators, included the sale of
a rare first edition of Where the Wild Things Are for
$18,000 that includes a humorous inscription to Reed
Orenstein, a friend and collector of Sendaks work who
died in 2010. The first edition was among 62 lots of
Sendak items from Orensteins collection.
One of the more comprehensive collections of
Sendaks work held by private collectors, this was the
first of Sendaks work to come on the market since his
death, according to von der Linn. Other items in the sale
included another rare first edition of Where the Wild
Things Are without an inscription that sold for $6,240.
While some people initially criticized Where the
Wild Things Are for what they saw as its overly dark im-
agery, the tale of how a rebellious boy hero, Max, tames
the dark and ghoulish creatures that inhabit many chil-
drens nightmares was instantly popular among chil-
dren. The book, which has sold more than 10 million
copies and been translated into 15 languages, made
the Brooklyn-born son of Jewish immigrants one of the
most influential childrens writers of the 20th century.
JTA Wire Service
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48 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
Kiwi Closets
Adam J. Goldberg
171 Garfeld Avenue
Passaic Park, NJ 07055
T 973-471-9696 F 973-471-7610
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APPRAISALS
We are CLOSING THE SHOWROOM of our historic Paterson
locaton. We will, though, keep all other operatons in Paterson
running. Our plan is to open a new showroom in Bergen County.
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PRICES MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE RESULTED IN PRIOR SALES. ALL SALES ARE FINAL. FIRST COME FIRST SAVE. PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.
CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY PREVIOUS OFFER. VISA/MC AMEX APPROVED CHECKS AND CASH ACCEPTED. . SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
We are CLOSING THE SHOWROOM of our historic Paterson
locaton. We will, though, keep all other operatons in Paterson
running. Our plan is to open a new showroom in Bergen County.
We must, therefore, sell-of our Paterson Showroom inventory.
We are ofering our LARGEST DISCOUNTS in Greenbaum history!
HUNDREDS of heirloom quality Oriental Rugs, Greenbaum
Customs, Antques, Fine Artwork, Accessories and Fine Furniture
from around the world! First come, First to save.
Before we move to our new home give our incredible one of kind
items a new home in yours.
PRICES MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE RESULTED IN PRIOR SALES. ALL SALES ARE FINAL. FIRST COME FIRST SAVE. PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.
CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY PREVIOUS OFFER. VISA/MC AMEX APPROVED CHECKS AND CASH ACCEPTED. . SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
We are CLOSING THE SHOWROOM of our historic Paterson
locaton. We will, though, keep all other operatons in Paterson
running. Our plan is to open a new showroom in Bergen County.
We must, therefore, sell-of our Paterson Showroom inventory.
We are ofering our LARGEST DISCOUNTS in Greenbaum history!
HUNDREDS of heirloom quality Oriental Rugs, Greenbaum
Customs, Antques, Fine Artwork, Accessories and Fine Furniture
from around the world! First come, First to save.
Before we move to our new home give our incredible one of kind
items a new home in yours.
PRICES MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE RESULTED IN PRIOR SALES. ALL SALES ARE FINAL. FIRST COME FIRST SAVE. PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.
CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY PREVIOUS OFFER. VISA/MC AMEX APPROVED CHECKS AND CASH ACCEPTED. . SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
Open
Sunday
home desi gn
Kitchen remodeling checklist
Mark J. Donovan
A
kitchen remodeling checklist is
paramount if you want to have
a successful kitchen remodel.
A top-level checklist is composed of a
sequence of tasks that should be per-
formed in order to achieve a success-
ful outcome. I say sequence because
a specific order in working through a
remodeling project is essential. If you
dont follow the proper steps, you inevita-
bly will spend more time and money and
experience more headaches and hassles
in completing your kitchen remodel.
At the top of your checklist should be
defining the objectives of your kitchen
remodel. Ask yourself what you want to
achieve with your new kitchen in regard
to features and space, how much money
you want to spend on it, and when you
want it completed. Answering those three
basic questions will help you to establish
a top-level budget and a timeline for
completing the project.
Next on the checklist is to develop a
set of kitchen design plans and the key
elements that you want to incorporate
into those plans. For most homeowners,
it makes sense to work with a professional
kitchen designer, as they can provide you
with wonderful tips on the latest kitchen
cabinetry and countertop features and
actually can generate detailed kitchen
design plans for you.
The most important element of a
kitchen remodeling project or any ma-
jor home remodeling project for that mat-
ter is hiring the right contractor. Hiring
the wrong contractor often leads to large
cost overruns, schedule delays, and ma-
jor frustrations. In the worst cases, it can
lead to the project never being completed
and the contractor stealing from you by
buying excess materials for your project
and then skimming the materials for an-
other job. Make no mistake: These types
of problems are very common when the
wrong contractor is hired.
Consequently, when you embark on
a kitchen remodeling project, make sure
your checklist includes a thorough pro-
cess for hiring the right contractor. Often
the kitchen designer can help in this
process, as well. Whatever you do when
it comes to hiring a contractor, make sure
to check the references of each prospec-
tive contractor and study pictures of their
complete projects. If it is at all possible,
go out and visit one of their most recently
completed projects. Also, make sure
they are a licensed kitchen remodeling
contractor in your state and that they are
properly insured. Finally, keep in mind
that the more thorough a contractors bid,
the more accurate it is likely to be in terms
of cost and schedule. Look for quality bids
that include detailed schedules and a
complete bill of materials.
Once your kitchen remodeling plans
are in place and you know what the ex-
pected costs are for your project, visit
your local building inspector to pull any
necessary permits. Failing to pull the nec-
essary permits could cost you greatly in
terms of steep fines and hassles.
With permits in hand, you can begin
to do the actual remodeling work. A
well-planned kitchen remodeling project
should take only a couple of weeks to
complete. During the actual remodeling
phase, talk with your contractor about
once a day to see whether there are any
issues that must be addressed and to
ensure that the project is on track for an
on-time completion.
By following this top-level checklist,
your chances of a successful kitchen re-
model skyrocket. Enjoy your new kitchen!
Creators.com
Mark J. Donovans website is http://www.
HomeAdditionPlus.com.
JS-49
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 49
Allan Dorfman
Broker/Associate
201-461-6764 Eve
201-970-4118 Cell
201-585-8080 x144 Offce
Realtorallan@yahoo.com
The Colony
in ForT lee
Serving Bergen County since 1985.
1BR 1.5 Baths. Updated. $134,900
1BR 1.5 Baths. Total renovation.
$229,900
2BR 2.5 Baths. B Line (East and West).
Total renovation with laundry. $599,000
3BR 2.5 Baths. High foor renovated.
Owner says sell! $499,000
RENTAL 1 BR 1.5 Baths. Renovated.
$2200 per month.
AMY AXELROD
Licensed Real Estate Salesperson
aaxelrod@citihabitats.com
201.638.9575
(Bergen County bred, Manhattan resident)
Looking to buy, sell or rent in NYC?
all you have to do is call Amy!
(Bergen County bred, Manhattan resident)
AMY AXELROD
Licensed Real Estate Salesperson
aaxelrod@citihabitats.com
201.638.9575
Looking to buy, sell or rent in NYC?
all you have to do is call Amy!
240 Grand Avenue
Englewood, NJ 07631
201.568.3300
info@anhaltrealty.com
www.anhaltrealty.com
355 Broad Avenue, Englewood
4 Bedrooms, 3 Full Bathrooms. Lot size 100 x 146.
Near houses of worship. $605,000
EnglEwood East hill
officE ExclusivE
Real Estate Associates
Ann Murad, ABR, GRI
Sales Associate, Silver Level 1997 2000, 2002, 2009, 2011, 2012
NJAR Circle of Excellence Gold Level, 2001, 2003-2006
Offce: (201) 573 8811 ext. 316
Direct: (201) 664 6181, Cell: (201) 981 7994
E-mail: anniegetsitsold@msn.com
123 Broadway, Woodcliff, NJ 07677
Each Offce Independenty Owned and Operated
ANNiE GEtS it SoLd
Interest Rates Are
At An All Time Low!
Please contact us for
refnance options to reduce
the payment on your current
mortgage or for a new loan
to purchase a home.
Classic Mortgage, LLC
Serving NY, NJ & CT
25 E. Spring Valley Ave., Ste 100, Maywood, NJ
201-368-3140
www.classicmortgagellc.com
MLS #31149
Larry DeNike
President
MLO #58058
ladclassic@aol.com
Daniel M. Shlufman
Managing Director
MLO #6706
dshlufman@classicllc.com
ProminentProperties.com
90 County Road | Tenafy, NJ 07450 | 201.568.5668
10 Offces Serving Northern and Central New Jersey
Each Offce Independently Owned & Operated
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORT UNI T Y
Big Slice of Heaven $649,000
Exquisite large 3-bedroom, 3-full bath apartment (aprx.
2250sf) with huge terrace, commanding panoramic
views of NYC & GWB, and gorgeous sunset & mountain
views to the west. Its time to treat yourself to the
luxury lifestyle, hotel-like services and accommodations
that are uniquely The Plaza in Fort Lee.
Philip Soo & Susy M. Soo
Sales Associate & Broker/Sales Associate
551-265-7521 cell
soorealtors@gmail.com
Stunning Victorian Englewood, NJ
Fully Renovated Victorian on approx 1.22 acres of beautifully
landscaped property! 6 BRs/6.5 Baths. Gourmet Kitchen,
Covered Porch, Formal Dining Room, 4 Fireplaces,
Carriage House, In-ground Heated Swimming Pool,
Gleaming Hardwood Floors and Much More!
For a private showing, contact
Doris Cohen, Realtor/Sales Associate
Prominent Properties / Sothebys
C: 201-218-0731 T: 201-585-8080
1608 Lemoine Ave., Fort Lee www.ProminentProperties.com
Open HOuses
teaneck
1231 Longfellow Ave 1-3 PM $314,900
Everything Is DONE!! Room For All. LR/Fplc, Music Rm, FDR,
Sunlit, Mod Kit. Study. 4 BRs, 2 Bths. Fin Bsmnt/Summer Kit.
C/A/C.
78 Oakdene Ave 2-4 PM $319K
Beautiful Col. on Landscaped Prop. Spacious & Bright. Porch,
LR/Fplc, FDR, EIK, 3 BRs, 1.5 Bths. FinBsmnt. H/W Flrs. Walk
to NY Buses, Shops, Parks & Houses of Worship.
For Our Full Inventory & Directions
Visit our Website
www.RussoRealEstate.com
(201) 837-8800
READERS
CHOICE
2012
FIRST PLACE
REAL ESTATE AGENCY

FEB 10TH OPEN HOUSES
330 Edgewood Ave, Tnk $845,000 2:00-4:00pm
688 Forest Ave, Tnk $444,900 1:00-3:00pm
145 Sussex Rd, Bgfld $310,000 12:00-2:00pm
JUST SOLD
189 Lindbergh Blvd, Tnk 1487 E Terrace Circle, #1, Tnk
V&N - NOTABLE HOME
Exquisite, glass-domed entry hall w circular staircase & curved
banister. Surfaces in kit & baths include onyx, marble & granite.
Double butlers pantry, front/back staircase. All brs are ensuite,
master br w fplc & balcony. $3,850,000
Upscale Location! Classic Col w custom renovations. LR/fplc,
large FDR, double appliance Chefs Kitchen, 2.5 baths, full Guest
Suite in fin bsmnt. $699,000
FOLLOW V&N TEAM ON
FACEBOOK AND TWITTER
www.vera-nechama.com
201-692-3700
REAL ESTATE & buSi nESS noTES
Caring for aging parents
Are you a member of the Sandwich Generation, juggling
career, home life and the needs of aging parents? If so,
Caring for our Aged Parents, a program sponsored by
Holy Name Medical Center, will address many of your
concerns, including nutrition, socialization, helpful re-
sources, and the importance of caring for yourself in the
midst of it all.
The free program is Monday from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. in
Marian Hall at the Medical Center. Presenters include a
nurse, a dietician, and a social worker. To register call the
hospital at 1-877-HOLY-NAME (1-877-465-9626) or visit
www.holyname.org.
JS-50
50 Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013
FRIEDBERG
TM
EQUAL HOUSI NG
OPPORTUNITY
768-6868
ALPINE/CLOSTER
871-0800
CRESSKILL
666-0777
RIVER VALE
568-1818
ENGLEWOODCLIFFS
894-1234
TENAFLY
Visit us on the Internet to learn more about our properties and services:
www.friedbergproperties.com
Congratulations
To Our Top Achievers
For 201
We Move Nationally & Internationally
3221854-01
Freidberg
Thu Jan 19, 2012
3x8.5
process
Pat Griffin
subnite
Barbara
This ad is copyrighted by North Jersey Media Group
and may not be reproduced in any form, or replicated
in a similar version, without approval from North Jersey Media Group.
2
Ravit Advocat
Nicole Idler
Miriam Kim
Lavdrim Cami
Orna Jackson
Miriam Lambert
Farrah Feggelle
Soci Kayserian
Nana Landi
Eleen Gong
Skip Kelley
Margaret Martini
Jennifer Hamani
Gabrielle Kemavor
Catherine Olsen
Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us for your complimentary consultation
Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
10 LEXINGTON COURT 184 SHERWOOD PLACE 360 AUDUBON ROAD 248 CHESTNUT STREET
386 CUMBERLAND STREET 249 EVERETT PLACE 300 BROAD AVENUE 167 VAN NOSTRAND AVE
121-B E. PALISADE AVE 350 ELKWOOD TER 113 E. HUDSON AVE 400 JONES ROAD
370 ELKWOOD TER 280-290 E. LINDEN AVE 136 E. HAMILTON AVE 98 HILLSIDE AVE
289 SUNSET AVENUE 571 NEXT DAY HILL DR 440 ELKWOOD TER 139 CHESTNUT STREET
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NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
ENGLEWOOD SHOWCASE
SELLING YOUR HOME?
Call Susan Laskin Today
To Make Your Next Move A Successful One!
2013 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
BergenCountyRealEstateSource.com Cell: 201-615-5353
201-837-6220
VillageHomesNJ.com
Marc Stein
Broker/Sales Associate
Cell 201-522-9733
Liora Kirsch
Sales Associate
Cell 201-679-2230
$399,000
HASTINGS STREET
TEANECK
Prime location situated
on a 50x120 lot. 3 large
bedrooms, 1.5 Baths.
Lots of room to expand.
N
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W

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!
UNDER CONTRACT
143 Frederick Place, Bergeneld
379 Newbridge Road, Bergeneld
495 Sagamore Avenue, Teaneck

RECENTLY SOLD
244 Knickerbocker Road, Dumont
594 Maitland Ave, Teaneck
1269 Sussex Road, Teaneck
368 Winthrop Road, Teaneck
Sale at Les Tout Petits
Les Tout Petits, the girls clothing designer,
is having a back room sample sale on
Friday, Saturday, and Monday. The sale
features bathing suits, resortwear, special
occasion dresses for spring events, and
new leggings, and sportswear. Sold in
better specialty stores from Manhattan
to Malibu, the items are priced up to 70
percent off retail. The store is at 600 Grand
Avenue, Ridgefield. (201) 941-8675.
Save 30% at Judaica House
The Judaica House, located in Teaneck,
has been in business since 1974, and
is one of the countrys largest and old-
est Jewish book stores. Their annual 30
percent off sale is now in progress. All
Hebrew and English titles, including
cookbooks, reference books, childrens
books, prayer books, bibles, and gen-
eral titles are now on sale. Prices are at
or below online prices, and a closeout
section offers discounts as high as 70
percent.
The sale ends Friday, February 22.
Marrow drive
in Teaneck on Sunday
Akiva Lipshitz will host a donor recruit-
ment drive at his bar mitzvah celebration
party to register potential bone marrow
donors at Congregation Bnai Yeshuran in
Teaneck on behalf of the Gift of Life Bone
Marrow Foundation. The drive will ben-
efit patients suffering from various blood
cancers and diseases who are in need
of a bone marrow transplant. The drive,
scheduled on February 10, will run from
11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Testing is fast and painless. Although
there is no cost for a volunteer to join the
marrow registry, there is a $60 lab pro-
cessing fee for each kit. Gift of Life relies
on the generosity of donations to help
offset these costs. If you are between the
ages of 18 and 60 and in general good
health, you are eligible to be screened and
join the worldwide registry for patients in
need. A simple swab from the inside of
your cheek is all it takes to determine if
you are a match.
JS-51
Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 51
Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us for your complimentary consultation
Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
10 LEXINGTON COURT 184 SHERWOOD PLACE 360 AUDUBON ROAD 248 CHESTNUT STREET
386 CUMBERLAND STREET 249 EVERETT PLACE 300 BROAD AVENUE 167 VAN NOSTRAND AVE
121-B E. PALISADE AVE 350 ELKWOOD TER 113 E. HUDSON AVE 400 JONES ROAD
370 ELKWOOD TER 280-290 E. LINDEN AVE 136 E. HAMILTON AVE 98 HILLSIDE AVE
289 SUNSET AVENUE 571 NEXT DAY HILL DR 440 ELKWOOD TER 139 CHESTNUT STREET
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NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
ENGLEWOOD SHOWCASE
JS-52
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RCBC
*
Duncan Hines
Yellow Cake Mix
16.5 oz.
$1.99
Fresh & Healthy
Sliced Cheese
All Types
2 for $5
Apple & Eve
Apple Juice
64 oz.
$2.99
Amnons
Regular Large
Slices Pizza
Frozen 36 oz.
$9.99
Krasdale Granulated
Sugar
4 lb.
$2.89
Hunts
Tomato Sauce
8 oz.
2 for $1
Dannon Yogurt
All Flavors
6 oz.
59
Sterns
Hamantashen
18 oz.
$3.99
* While supplies last the week of February 10.
Mashgiach Temidi / Open 7:00 am Sunday through Friday Now closing Friday at 2:30 pm
1400 Queen Anne Rd Teaneck, NJ 201-837-8110
Now Serving French Toast
and Real Fruit Smoothies
at Lazy Bean
Full
Purim
Selection