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I.

Key English Test (KET)

KET is Cambridge ESOL's exam which recognises the ability to deal with everyday written and spoken English at a basic level. There are two versions of KET available: KET and KET for Schools. Both follow exactly the same format and the level of the question papers is identical. The only difference is that the content and treatment of topics in KET for Schools have been particularly targeted at the interests and experience of school pupils. 1.
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Is KET foryou?

Do you have basic English skills? Can you understand simple written English? Can you communicate in familiar situations? Can you understand short notices and simple spoken directions?

If this describes your skills now, or describes the level of skills you are working towards, then KET is the right exam for you. 2. What will KET do for you?

Cambridge ESOL is a department of the world-famous and historic University of Cambridge. Attaining one of its certificates is an achievement and a reward in itself. However, there are manyotherbenefitstotaking KET:
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a KET certificate is valid for life. You will not need to take the exam again KET is a truly international certificate, recognised around the world for business and study purposes thousands of employers, universities and government departments officially recognise KET as a basic qualification in English although KET is a basic exam, it offers a chance to find out your strengths and weaknesses in using English, and gives you a pathway to higher qualifications such as the Preliminary English Test (PET) and First Certificate in English (FCE) KET's 'Can Do' skills give you the confidence to use English in real situations.

'I decided to take the examination because Cambridge is a very famous university. After I took it, my English skills improved and I have experience of taking an international exam. Thank you.' Karan Ulhaka KET candidate 3. What will taking KET help you do?

KET is at Level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) an internationally recognised benchmark of language ability. The framework uses six levels to describe language ability from A1 to C2. 'Can Do' statements have been used to describe these levels in terms of real language skills. At A2 level, typical users can be expected to:
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understand and use everyday expressions and basic phrases introduce themselves and answer basic questions about your personal details interact with English speakers who talk slowly and clearly.

Your preparation for KET will give you these kinds of practical language skills. 4. What is involved in taking the KET exam?

KET has three papers: Reading and Writing: 1 hour 10 minutes

You will need to be able to understand simple written information such as signs, brochures, newspapers and magazines. You will also have to fill gaps in simple sentences and write a short piece of around 25 words. Listening: spoken reasonably slowly. Speaking: up to 10 minutes 30 minutes

You need to show your ability to understand announcements and other spoken material when

You will need to demonstrate you can take part in a conversation by answering and asking simple questions. Speaking tests are normally held with two candidates.

5.

Supporting you

As with all of Cambridge ESOL's certificates, there is a wide range of support to help you prepare for your exam. While you can choose to prepare for KET on your own, many candidates prefer to take the preparation courses run by private language schools and universities in many countries. You can access a variety of support materials from the Resources area of our website. These include a short booklet, Information for Candidates, and sample exam papers, which include sound files for the Listening test materials. Many publishers have produced a wide choice of books and other aids to help you prepare for taking KET. Ask your local bookshop for details. To help you prepare for KET, we provide your teachers with their own website so they can download sample exam papers, handbooks, and other teaching support material. 6.
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Resourcesavailable

Computer-based KET PracticeTests KET VocabularyList KET sample papers, (ZIP 17.9Mb) KET Information for Candidates, (PDF 763.6Kb) Orderpastpapers Booksforstudy KET Exam details and timetables for 2010 KET Exam details and timetables for 2011 Summary regulations for candidates (PDF 59Kb) ExamFAQs KET Teaching Resource and KET teacher downloads (including exam handbook and exam reports) Understanding your Statement of Results and Certificate (PDF 1.53Mb) 7. A world of opportunities worldwide recognition

KET is a truly international certificate, recognised by administrative, industrial, and servicebased employers as a qualification in intermediate English.

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It is also accepted by many educational institutions for study purposes. Companies such as Epson, Nestl, Motorola and KPMG all recognise the value of KET in their overseas offices.

Find more details on the organisations and universities that recognise KET. 'I took [KET]... because it provided an assessment of practical skills, and encouraged the development of my abilities which can be used in study. After I took the KET exam, I can see my English skills improving. This year, I will take PET exam.' ThanarakSrijaroensuk KET candidate 8. English foryourfuture

KET offers an easy to understand pathway to other, higher qualifications such as the Preliminary English Test (PET) and First Certificate in English (FCE). KET's 'Can Do' skills enable you to use English in real situations with confidence. KET exams use real-life situations and are especially designed to help you communicate more effectively in your own life and to focus your language learning on the skills you will actually need. Because KET exams focus on all four communication skills Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking you increase your confidence in using English in everyday situations. 9. Your results

Reading and Writing carries 50% of the total marks for KET, while Listening and Speaking both carry 25% of the marks each. Candidates can access their results through the Cambridge ESOL Results Online website. There are two Pass grades, Pass and Pass with Merit. Candidates judged not to have reached the required standard for KET receive the grades Narrow Fail or Fail. All candidates are given an exam report explaining how they performed in each of the papers. Certificates are awarded to candidates who achieve Pass grades. Once awarded, Cambridge ESOL KET certificates are valid for life.

Exam scripts are sent to Cambridge ESOL for marking and grading and the results are sent back to the centres. If you have any questions about your results, you should contact the centre where you took the exam. 10.
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Exam dates

KET Exam details and timetables for 2010 KET Exam details and timetables for 2011 11. Next steps a) Register

If you are studying English at the moment, speak to your teacher about how to enrol. If you are not studying at the moment, your nearest Cambridge ESOL exam centre will be able to advise you about how to register, fees, the dates of the exam and other arrangements. We have more than 2,000 centres in 130 countries. Please note that centres may set registration deadlines that are earlier than those published. Entries cannot be made directly to Cambridge ESOL. Already registered? Visit the Candidate Support site for exam preparation help. If you have a disability or a specific learning difficulty (such as dyslexia) it may be possible to ask for Special Arrangements to be made when taking the exam.

II. Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults (CELTA) Teaching English to speakers of other languages can be a highly rewarding career, offering you the chance to live and work abroad. You will need an internationally recognised teaching qualification, and CELTA highly regarded throughout the world gives you the skills you need and will make it easier to get a teaching job anywhere. III. What is CELTA? CELTA is an initial qualification for people with little or no previous teaching experience and opens up a whole world of exciting teaching opportunities. Because it is awarded by Cambridge

ESOL, part of the world-famous University of Cambridge, you can rely on its quality and recognition. Over 10,000 people successfully complete a CELTA course each year. IV. How does CELTA relate to TEFL/TESOL? 'TEFL' or 'TESOL' are terms often used to describe qualifications for English Language teachers. CELTA, the most widely taken initial TESOL/TEFL qualification of its kind in the world, was previously known as CTEFLA and the 'RSA certificate'. V. Who is CELTA for? People who want to work in Further, Adult and Community Education in England. CELTA forms the first stage of the Cambridge ESOL DTE(E)LLS and ADTE(E)LLS programmes. The DTE(E)LLS and ADTE(E)LLS qualifications meet the government's teacher training requirements for people who want to work in this sector. VI. What does CELTA involve? You can take CELTA full time (typically four to five weeks), or part time (from a few months to over a year). Yourchosencourse:
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teaches you the principles of effective teaching provides a range of practical skills for teaching English to adult learners gives you hands-on teaching practice.

There are five main units of learning:


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Learners and teachers, and the teaching and learning context Languageanalysis and awareness Language skills: reading, listening, speaking and writing Planning and resources for different contexts Developing teaching skills and professionalism.

You will be assessed throughout the course, with no final examination. An external assessor, appointed by Cambridge ESOL, moderates each course. There are twocomponents of assessment:

1. Teachingpractice You will teach for a total of 6 hours, working with classes at two levels of ability. Assessment is based on your overall performance at the end of the 6 hours. 2. Writtenassignments You will complete four written assignments: one focusing on adult learning; one on the language system of English; one on language skills; and one on classroom teaching. To be awarded the certificate you must pass both components. There are three grades Pass, Pass 'B' and Pass 'A'. VII. Who recognises CELTA?

CELTA is accepted throughout the world by organisations which employ English Language teachers. The Cambridge CELTA has been accredited by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) at Level 5 on the National Qualifications Framework. Cambridge ESOL also works with international ELT organisations to ensure the acceptance of CELTA globally. VIII. Am I eligible to apply?

Ideallyyoushould:
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have a standard of education equivalent to that required for entry into higher education be aged 20 orover have a standard of English which will enable you to teach at a range of levels.

Centres may still accept you if you do not have formal qualifications at this level but can demonstrate that you would be likely to complete the course successfully. Some centres may, at their discretion, accept applicants aged between 18 and 20. IX. How do I apply? CELTA courses are designed by individual centres, based on specifications produced by Cambridge ESOL. They are available at over 286 approved centres in 54 countries, providing almost 900 CELTA courses every year. Contact your chosen centre directly for detailed course information.

Apply to become a CELTA centre, using our online application form. Please note that the following US centres are no longer authorised to run CELTA or DELTA courses: IH Portland (US034) IH Santa Monica (US033) X. Resourcesavailable
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CELTA syllabus, PDF (PDF 78Kb) TeachingAwardsFAQs

XI.

What Is the TOEFL Test?

Nearly all colleges and universities across the United States use the TOEFL Test in their admissions process. TOEFL stands for Test of English as a Foreign Language. Read on to find out more information about the TOEFL Test. The TOEFL test (Test of English as a Foreign Language) is a test that measures the ability of non-native English speakers to use and understand the English language as its read, written, heard and spoken in the university classroom. The TOEFL Test is used by over 7,000 learning institutions around the world, according to the Educational Testing Service (ETS), www.ets.org. TOEFL Test results are used in many areas of higher education, including admissions, graduation requirements and scholarship eligibility. Preparing for the TOEFL Test There are many online tools to help students prepare for the TOEFL Test. Study guides, practice tests, flash cards and test question examples are provided on study-aid websites. Online and live courses that offer an instructor and practice in reading and writing are also available. Some of these courses and online tools are provided by colleges and universities. Students may also choose to employ other preparatory tools such as books and CD-ROMs. Taking the TOEFL Test The TOEFL Test is designed to evaluate a student's ability to not only write and read the English language, but to demonstrate English speaking skills as well. The test has two parts, the TWE

(Test of Written English?) and the TSE (Test of Spoken English?).The TOEFL Test is given in one of two formats--on paper or through the Internet. Paper-based TOEFL Test (PBT) There are over 4,500 testing centers around the world for those seeking to take the paper-based TOEFL Test. Students can register online or by mail after finding a local testing center. Valid identification and a registration number must be provided on the day of the test. Internet-based TOEFL Test (iBT) Students can register online, by phone, by mail or in person at a local testing center to take the Internet-based TOEFL Test. Test takers must take the iBT at one of these testing centers. The iBT is offered between 30 and 40 times per year.

What is the TOEIC test? "TOEIC" stands for the Test of English for International Communication. The TOEIC test is an English language proficiency test for people whose native language is not English. TOEIC test scores indicate how well people can communicate in English with others in the global workplace. The test does not require specialized knowledge or vocabulary; it measures only the kind of English used in everyday activities. The TOEIC test is the world's leading test of English language proficiency in a workplace context. More than 4,000 corporations worldwide use the TOEIC test and more than I.4 million people take the test every year. What is the format of the TOEIC test? The TOEIC test is a two-hour, paper-and-pencil, multiple-choice test that consists of 200 questions divided into two separately timed sections:
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Section I: ListeningComprehension

This section consists of 100 questions and is delivered by audiocassette or CD. It is divided into four parts. Candidates listen to a variety of statements, questions, short conversations, and short talks recorded in English, then answer questions based on the listening segments. The entire Listening Comprehension Section takes approximately 45 minutes.

Part 1: Photographs 20 items (4-choice) Part 2: Question and Response 30 items (3-choice) Part 3: Short Conversations 30 items (4 choice) Part 4: Short Talks 20 items (4-choice)
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Section II: Reading

The Reading Section consists of 100 questions presented in written format in the test booklet. Candidates read a variety of materials and respond at their own pace to questions based on the materials. The entire Reading Section takes 75 minutes. Part 5: Incomplete Sentences 40 items (4 choice) Part 6: Error Recognition 20 items (4choice) Part 7: Reading Comprehension 40 items (4 choice) Candidates respond to test questions by marking one of the letters (A), (B), (C), or (D) with a pencil on a separate answer sheet. Although the actual testing time is approximately two hours, additional time is needed to allow candidates to complete the biographical questions on the answer sheet and to respond to a brief questionnaire about their educational and work history. What is the content of the TOEIC test? The TOEIC test was designed to meet the needs of the working world. The test questions are developed from samples of spoken and written language collected from various countries around the world where English is used in the workplace. Test questions include many different settings and situations, such as: Generalbusiness - contracts, negotiations, marketing, sales, business planning, conferences Manufacturing - plant management, assembly lines, quality control Finance and budgeting- banking, investments, taxes, accounting, billing Corporate development - research, product development

Offices - board meetings, committees, Ietters, memoranda, telephone, fax and e-mail messages, office equipment and furniture, office procedures Personnel - recruiting, hiring, retiring, salaries, promotions, job applications and advertisements Purchasing - shopping, ordering supplies, shipping, invoices Technical areas- electronics, technology, computers, laboratories and related equipment, technical specifications Housing/corporate property- construction, specifications, buying and renting, electric and gas services Travel - trains, airplanes, taxis, buses, ships, ferries, tickets, schedules, station and airport announcements, car rentals, hotels, reservations, delays and cancellations Dining out - business and informal lunches, banquets, receptions, restaurant reservations Entertainment - cinema, theater, music, art, media Health - medical insurance, visiting doctors, dentists, clinics, hospitals While the language from these settings provides the context of the test questions, candidates are not required to know specialized business and technical vocabulary. The TOEIC test is suitable for use in all environments where English is used by native speakers of other languages. Who takes the TOEIC test? TOEIC test takers include: people who use English in everyday work settings, such as businesses, hotels, hospitals, restaurants, airline industries, international meetings, conventions, and sports events managerial, sales, and technical employees in international business, commerce, and industry where English language skills are necessary people whose professional training will be conducted in English people who want to have an internationally recognized measure of English proficiency for their rsum or curriculum vitae

Who uses the TOEIC test and how is it used? 0rganizations The TOEIC test has become a recognized standard for many organizations around the world that need to evaluate the English proficiency of prospective or existing employees. Appropriate uses of the TOEIC test in organizations may include: Recruiting, promoting, and placing employees - organizations may use the TOEIC test to establish score standards, or benchmarks, based on the levels of English necessary to carry out particular responsibilities. These benchmarks are then used in making personnel decisions . Technical training - TOEIC test scores can be used to determine whether an individual has sufficient English proficiency to participate in and benefit from training that is conducted in English. Overseas assignments - TOEIC test scores can indicate whether an employee will be able to work and interact successfully if posted to an English-speaking country. Language training - TOEIC test scores can be used to identify employees who require further English language training, to set learning goals for them, and to check their progress. Intensive English Programs - Administrators of language programs find that the TOEIC test is an excellent placement tool and a valuable measure of post-training proficiency. Schools - Many universities and institutions of higher education require that their students take the TOEIC test prior to graduation. Who developed the TOEIC test? Educational Testing Service (ETS), an organization devoted to educational measurement and research in psychometrics and educational policy, designed and created the TOEIC test in I 979 at the request of a group of business leaders in Japan. Over the years, the TOEIC test was adopted in many other countries and quickly became the global standard for assessing English in work-related contexts. Who makes the TOEIC test? The Chauncey Group International Ltd., a subsidiary of ETS, develops and publishes the TOEIC test. The Chauncey Group International is a testing company that specializes in professional

licensing exams and in the certification of workplace skills and achievement. The Chauncey Group International headquarters are located in Princeton, New Jersey, USA; the European office (Chauncey Group Europe SA) is in Paris, France. What is the difference between the TOEIC test and the TOEFL test? The TOEIC and TOEFL tests were developed to serve different purposes. Therefore, the design, content, context, and ranges of proficiency that each test measures are also different. The TOEFL test was created by Educational Testing Service for foreign students seeking admission to colleges and universities in North America. Students planning to pursue undergraduate or graduate degrees in North America will wish to take the TOEFL test. Organizations that document employees' English proficiency and individuals who want to demonstrate their ability to use English in the workplace will prefer to use the TOEIC test. How is the TOEIC test scored? Each candidate uses a pencil to mark answers on the answer sheet. The scores are determined by the number of questions answered correctly. The number of correct responses in each section - Listening Comprehension and Reading - is converted to a number on a scale of 5 to 495. Adding the two section scores together gives a total score on a scale ranging from 10 to 990. There is no penalty for wrong answers. What do TOEIC test scores mean? When you register to take the TOEIC test, you will receive the TOEIC Examinee Handbook. This handbook provides information about TOEIC test scores and how they are used in various international settings. How can I register to take the TOEIC test or get information about taking the test? The TOEIC test is available throughout the world. TOEIC testing is most often arranged through corporations or other organizations that ask employees or job applicants to take the TOEIC test. If testing has not been arranged through your organization, please contact glyndwr@gol.com to find out when and where you can take the test. How can I do interactive TOEIC practice on my computer?

MINDSTORM - TOEIC CD-ROMis suitable for testing and has word games for general EFL, ESL, TOEFL and other English learning study. With Japanese, Korean, Indonesian, French, English, and Spanish help screens. Availableon Mac and Windows.

Keep in touch with glyndwr@gol.com to find out what interactive pages are available, or are under development.

XII.

Academic and General English A. IELTS English for International Opportunity

Educational institutions, along with employers and government immigration agencies, require proof of English language skills as part of their recruitment or admittance procedures. Increasingly, these organisations are using IELTS. 1. Worldwide recognition for study, work and immigration

IELTS is owned by Cambridge ESOL, the British Council and IDP: IELTS Australia. More than one million people a year are now using IELTS to open doors throughout the English-speaking world and beyond. IELTS is recognised by more than 6,000 organisations worldwide. The tests are available in more than 120 countries in over 500 locations, with test dates available up to four times a month. 2. Academic or General Training

The IELTS test come in two modules:


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Academic this module is for people wishing to study in English at undergraduate or postgraduate levels, and for those seeking professional registration General Training this module is for people wishing to migrate to an Englishspeaking country (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, UK), and for those wishing to train or study in English at below degree level

3.

The test

Candidates are tested in Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking. All candidates take the same Listening and Speaking tests. There is a choice between Academic and General Training in the Reading and Writing tests. The total test time is around 2 hours 45 minutes. The first three tests Listening, Reading and Writing must be completed in one day. The Speaking test may be taken, at the discretion of the test centre, in the period seven days before or after the other tests. 4. IELTS scores

The tests are designed to cover the full range of ability from nonuser to expert user. Test takers receive a score of 09, with 0 being for those who did not attempt the test, and 9 being for the most proficient users. Most universities accept scores between 67 as being suitable for undergraduate study in English. NEW Top Tips for IELTS Top Tips for IELTS Academic and Top Tips for IELTS General Training is the essential revision guide before you take the IELTS test. It can be bought from IELTS centres, bookshops and the Cambridge ESOL eShop. 5. Official IELTS Practice Materials

Official IELTS Practice Materials will give you an idea of what the test is like and whether your English is at the level required to take the IELTS test. It can be bought from IELTS centres, bookshops and the Cambridge ESOL eShop. 6. IELTS frequently asked questions from researchers

We frequently receive questions from researchers about IELTS with regard to its development and validation. Here are some of the more common questions with regard to the two variants of IELTS (General Training and Academic), how IELTS maps with the CEFR, IELTS use for immigration purposes and other subjects. Many of the questions have suggestions for further reading and research. Download the frequently asked questions from researchers (PDF 68Kb)

7.

Support for you

IELTS cares about you, your teachers and the people and organisations which will use your results. We demonstrate this through test availability and accessibility, practical support and responsive customer service. Our highly trained test centre administrators and examiners are the human face of IELTS and are there to help. Sample and practice materials can be downloaded free of charge to help you prepare for your test, and there are additional materials you can order to help you prepare. You can trust IELTS to provide security in test delivery, test administration and test results. Visit the IELTS website you can find out more about IELTS and how to apply to take the test.

About CASAS

Help improve basic skills for education and workplace success... FocusonLearners
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Save time! One seamless CASAS eTests event combines locator and pre-test Questions are appropriate for ability level eliminate testing that is too easy or too difficult Learners receive feedback immediately with CASAS eTests

FocusonInstructors
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Automatic, local scoring provides immediate results Detailed reports show specific instructional needs Free, unlimited access to QuickSearch Online helps teachers find instructional materials

FocusonYourProgram
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Assess for as little as $1.50 per learner NRS approved Export results to your state or local MIS system

CASAS Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems is the most widely used system for assessing adult basic reading, math, listening, writing, and speaking skills within a functional context. CASAS is the only adult assessment system of its kind to be approved and validated by

the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Labor to assess both native and non-native speakers of English. Backed by more than 30 years of research and development in adult assessment, instruction, and evaluation, CASAS provides programs with the resources and expertise to establish a comprehensive performance accountability system, address core indicators of performance, integrate literacy and occupational skill instruction, and evaluate the effectiveness of adult education and literacy programs. CASAS assessment, training, and evaluation are based on the critical competencies and skill areas required for success in the workplace, community, and family. With the implementation of the CASAS system, programs can establish measurable goals, document learner outcomes, and report program impact to students, staff, local boards, and policy makers. "The CASAS assessment has greatly improved the accuracy when placing students at the appropriate level of instruction. Other tests that we have used have not been as accurate." - June Ansell, Chesapeake Public Schools - Adult Education, Virginia

As part of the 1993 revalidation process by the U.S. Department of Education Program Effectiveness Panel, CASAS submitted data supporting its effectiveness for both learners and programs. The findings document that learners enrolled in adult and alternative education programs that have implemented key elements of the CASAS system demonstrate significant learning gains, demonstrate increased hours of participation, and achieve increased goal attainment. This unique system includes more than 180 standardized assessments. Additionally, CASAS can develop customized assessment instruments to measure specific competencies based on program needs. Instructors can use the system to place learners in programs, diagnose learners instructional needs, monitor progress, and certify mastery of functional basic skills. A variety of assessment instruments measure functional reading, math, listening, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills in everyday life and work contexts for youth and adult learners. CASAS field tests and validates its assessments with both native and non-native speakers of English.

The CASAS Mission Statement The mission of CASAS is to assist adults functioning at or below a high school level in attaining the basic literacy skills to function effectively on the job, in the community, and in the family. We accomplish this by assisting state and local education, training, social service programs and businesses in the design and delivery of quality education and training programs that meet the needs of the participants by providing products and services in curriculum management, assessment, and evaluation systems.

The CASAS National Consortium is a national field-based consortium that identifies priority needs based on extensive feedback from adult education program providers, employment and training professionals, and business and industry representatives. The Consortium promotes the role of quality, learner-centered assessment as an essential component of an integrated learning system by addressing and developing assessment policy, products, and standards, and by identifying and disseminating exemplary practices. It provides a forum for leadership and advocacy for quality lifelong learning for family, work, and community. The Purpose of the National Consortium:
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establishinteragencycollaborationstrategies determine developmental needs for adult education throughout the country coordinate national field testing procedures for new assessment instruments collect and use data for different policymakers and funding sources plan for the CASAS National Summer Institute share effectiveimplementationstrategies

The Consortium provides members with ongoing opportunities to discuss innovations, trends, and policies related to learner assessment, curriculum and data management, and program evaluation. The National Consortium facilitates communication and networking among programs and states that are currently implementing CASAS in a variety of programs including ABE, ESL, employment training, workplace literacy, WIA, TANF/welfare reform, special needs, high school, and corrections. Participants include state level representatives, business and industry specialists, and CASAS certified trainers from 29 states, the District of Columbia, the Pacific Rim, and Singapore. The consortium meets each year in February and during the CASAS National Summer Institute in June.

CASAS helps meet the requirements of state and national initiatives and legislation that are influencing education, training and welfare systems:
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WorkforceInvestmentAct Welfarereforminitiatives School-to-Workefforts National Skills Standards Board Initiatives National Reporting System for Adult Education NationalEducationGoals 2000 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) SCANS (Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills) Equipped for the Future (National Institute for Literacy)

CASAS systems are used extensively throughout the country in programs such as:
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Workforcedevelopment Employmentpreparation, School-to-Work Employment training Welfarereform (TANF) Adult Basic Education (ABE) English as a Second Language (ESL) Corrections EvenStart/FamilyLiteracy Specialeducation Secondarylevelprograms Private Industries

ContactUs | Feedback

XIII.

Preliminary English Test (PET)

PET is an exam for people who can use everyday written and spoken English at an intermediate level. It covers all four language skills reading, writing, listening and speaking. Preparing for the exam is a popular way to develop and improve your language skills because it provides practical language practice in a variety of everyday work, study and leisure situations. PET reflects the use of language in real life, such as understanding signs and announcements, and is accepted by many employers as proof of ability to use English in clerical, secretarial or managerial jobs. It is also widely accepted for use in jobs where spoken English is necessary such as tourism, retail, construction, manufacturing and engineering. There are two versions of PET available: PET and PET for Schools. Both follow exactly the same format and the level of the question papers is identical. The only difference is that the content and treatment of topics in PET for Schools have been particularly targeted at the interests and experience of school pupils. Its revision time!Top Tips for PETanswers all your last-minute questions.

Find out more.

1.

Is PET for you?

Can you use English to:


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dealwitheverydayevents? read simple textbooks or magazine articles? write letters on familiar subjects? take notes in a meeting?

If this describes your skills now, or describes the level of skills you are working towards, then PET is the right exam for you. 2. What will PET do for you?

Cambridge ESOL is a department of the world-famous and historic University of Cambridge. Attaining one of its certificates is an achievement and a reward in itself. However, there are manyotherbenefitstotaking PET:
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a PET certificate is valid for life. You will not need to take the exam again PET is a truly international certificate, recognised around the world for business and study purposes thousands of employers, universities and government departments officially recognise PET as an intermediate qualification in English although PET is a basic exam, it offers a chance to find out your strengths and weaknesses in using English, and gives you a pathway to higher qualifications such as the First Certificate in English (FCE) PET's 'Can Do' skills give you the confidence to use English in real situations.

'Progressing along the proficiency ladder makes me feel confident in myself. I know where I'm going, what I have to do to achieve the English level I want. It makes me highly motivated. Preparing for the exams helped me discover the beauties of English.' Nguyen ThiKyBinh PET candidate 3. What will taking PET help you do?

PET is at Level B1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) an internationally recognised benchmark of language ability. The framework uses six levels to

describe language ability from A1 to C2. 'Can Do' statements have been used to describe these levels in terms of real language skills. At B1 level, typical users can be expected to:
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understand the main points of straightforward instructions or public announcements deal with most of the situations you might meet when travelling as a tourist in an Englishspeaking country ask simple questions and take part in factual conversations in a work environment write letters or make notes on familiar matters.

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Your preparation for PET will give you these kinds of practical language skills. 4. What is involved in taking the PET exam?

PET has three papers: Reading and Writing: 1 hour 30 minutes

You need to be able to read texts from signs, journals, newspapers and magazines and understand the main points. You will need to show you can use vocabulary and structure by completing tasks such as writing a short message, and a story or letter of around 100 words. You will also need to complete an exercise involving changing the meaning of sentences. Listening: 30 minutes (approx)

You will need to show you can understand the meaning of a range of recorded spoken material, including announcements and discussions about everyday life. You need to be able to follow the attitudes and intentions of the speakers. Speaking: 10-12 minutes

Candidates take the Speaking test in pairs. You have to show your spoken English by taking part in conversation, asking and answering questions, and talking freely about your likes and dislikes. 5. Supporting you

As with all of Cambridge ESOL's certificates, there is a wide range of support to help you prepare for your exam. While you can choose to prepare for PET on your own, many candidates prefer to take the preparation courses run by private language schools and universities in many countries.

You can access a variety of support materials from the Resources area of our website. These include a short booklet, Information for Candidates, and sample exam papers, which include sound files for the Listening test materials. Many publishers have produced a wide choice of books and other aids to help you prepare for taking PET. Ask your local bookshop for details. To help you prepare for PET, we provide your teachers with their own website so they can download sample exam papers, handbooks, and other teaching support material. 6.
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Resourcesavailable

Top Tips for PET, a new revision guide is now available for candidates to buy from centres, bookshops and the Cambridge ESOL eShop. PET Vocabularylist Computer-based PET PracticeTests PET Handbook for Teachers (PDF 278Kb) PET sample papers (ZIP 24.9Mb) PET Information for Candidates, (PDF 775Kb) Orderpastpapers Booksforstudy PET Exam details and timetables for 2010 PET Exam details and timetables for 2011 Summary regulations for candidates (PDF 59Kb) ExamFAQs PET Teaching Resource and PET teacher downloads (including exam handbook and exam reports) Understanding your Statement of Results and Certificate (PDF 1.53Mb) 7. A world of opportunities worldwide recognition

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PET is a truly international certificate, recognised by administrative, industrial, and servicebased employers as a qualification in intermediate English. It is also accepted by a large number of educational institutions for study purposes. Companies such as Coca-Cola, Nestl, Gillette and KPMG all recognise the value of PET in their overseas offices.

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Find more details on the organisations and universities that recognise PET.

'I took the exam because I wanted to find out how good I am at English. The day of the exam I felt very nervous because I've never had a similar experience before. But when I saw the tasks I felt safer and became calm. Every task was explained well and I'm just glad that I had the chance to do Bernd Koch PET candidate 8. English foryourfuture the exam.'

PET offers an easy to understand pathway to other, higher qualifications such as the First Certificate in English (FCE), and the Certificate in Advanced English (CAE). PET's 'Can Do' skills enable you to use English in real situations with confidence. PET exams use real-life situations and are especially designed to help you communicate more effectively in your own life and to focus your language learning on the skills you will actually need. Because PET exams focus on all four communication skills Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking you increase your confidence in using English in everyday situations. 9. Your results

Each skill carries 25% of the total marks. There are two Pass grades (Pass with Merit and Pass) and certificates are awarded to candidates who achieve these grades. Candidates who achieve a grade Narrow Fail or Fail are judged not to have reached the required standard for PET. Exam scripts are sent to Cambridge ESOL for marking and grading and the results are sent back to the centres. Candidates can also see them over the internet. If you have any questions about your results, you should contact the centre where you took the exam. Once awarded Cambridge ESOL PET certificates are valid for life. Candidates can access their results through the Results Online website. 10.
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Exam dates

PET Exam details and timetables for 2010 PET Exam details and timetables for 2011

11.

Next steps a) Register

If you are studying English at the moment, speak to your teacher about how to enrol. If you are not studying at the moment, your nearest Cambridge ESOL exam centre will be able to advise you about how to register, fees, the dates of the exam and other arrangements. We have more than 2,000 centres in 130 countries. Please note that centres may set registration deadlines that are earlier than those published. Entries cannot be made directly to Cambridge ESOL. Already registered? Visit the Candidate Support site for exam preparation help. If you have a disability or a specific learning difficulty (such as dyslexia) it may be possible to ask for Special Arrangements to be made when taking the exam.

Cambridge English: Advanced, also known as Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) is a highlevel qualification that is officially recognised by universities, employers and governments around the world. Candidates Cambridge English: Advanced at a glance Recognition Examformat Yourresults Whatto do next Support 12. Teachers
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Downloadthe free handbook Downloadsamplepapers More resourcesforteachers ExamBulletins Set texts Exam Dates

Cambridge English: Advanced at a glance

Cambridge English: Advanced is set at C1 level the second highest on the CEFR scale. C1 is the level of English required for demanding academic and professional settings. It shows thatyou are highlyproficient in English.

Cambridge English: Advanced:


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is developed by Cambridge ESOL - one of three major exam boards which form Cambridge Assessment Group (Cambridge Assessment). Cambridge Assessment, a notfor-profit department of the University of Cambridge, is Europes largest assessment agency. Cambridge Assessment sends out more than 20 million exams papers to over 150 countries around the world every year. gives an in-depth assessment of your ability and fluency at level C1/C2. This is the unparalleled qualification to prove that you have mastered English. You are well-placed in dealing with complicated academic and professional tasks in English. empowersyouto: y follow any academic course at university level y communicate effectively at managerial and professional level y participate with confidence in workplace meetings or academic tutorials and seminars y carry out complex and challenging research y stand out and differentiateyourself Top 13. World-classrecognition

The following are only a few of the international institutions which recogniseCambridge English: Advanced: University of Cambridge, UK University of Oxford, UK King's College London (University of London), UK California Institute of Technology (CALTECH), USA University of Pennsylvania, The Wharton School, USA McGill University, Canada Hewlett-Packard (HP) Microsoft KPMG IBM ACNielsen Sony Bosch DHL Credit Suisse

University of Toronto, Canada Monash University, Australia University of New South Wales, Australia Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong View the full recognition list.

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Top 14. Format of theexam

Cambridge English: Advanced has five papers each carries 20% of the total marks. Reading: 1 hour 15 minutes Shows you can deal confidently with different types of text. Writing: 1 hour 30 minutes Requires you to be able to write a variety of different items; such as essays, proposals, reports and reviews. Use of English: 1 hour Tests your ability to use the right words, tenses and idioms in the right situation, at the right time. Listening: 40 minutes Requires being able to follow and understand a range of spoken materials; such as lectures, speeches and interviews. Speaking: 15 minutes Tests your ability to communicate effectively in face-to-face situations. You will take the test with one or two other candidates. Top 15. Supportingyou

Access a wide range of support and preparation tips. Cambridge ESOL is here to help you every step of the way. Download sample papers and get advice online to help your exam preparation. Top Tips for CAEanswers all your last-minute questions. Many other international publishers have also produced a variety of books and materials to support Cambridge English: Advanced. Online verification will be available soon. Top

16.

Yourresults

Cambridge English: Advanced is a high-level exam for those who need to combine their knowledge of the English language with fluency and sophistication. Candidates receive a Statement of Results showing how they performed in each of the 5 papers: Reading, Writing, Use of English, Listening and Speaking. Exceptional candidates taking Cambridge English: Advanced sometimes display ability beyond the C1 level. To recognise this, candidates achieving Grade A will receive a Cambridge English: Advanced certificate at Level C2. Candidates achieving Grades B and C at Cambridge English: Advanced will receive certificates at Level C1. Reaching this level reflects your commitment to high standards and your passion for English. This qualification is accredited by Ofqual, the regulator of qualifications, examinations and assessments in England. Top 17. Step 1 Test yourlevel Take our free online test - Test your current level and see if Cambridge English: Advanced is the right exam for you. You may be interested in our other Level C1 qualifications:
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Whatto do next

Business English Certificate Higher (BEC Higher) International Legal English Certificate (ILEC) International Certificate in Financial English (ICFE)

Step 2 Contact your nearest exam centre Contact your nearest Cambridge ESOL exam centre for information about:
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howtoregister exam dates practicematerials preparationcourses.

Step 3 Takethechallenge! Once you have decided to take Cambridge English: Advanced, you are one step closer to achieving your dreams and ambitions. Step 4

Pass the exam with flying colours! Top 18.


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Resourcesforteachers

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Past Paper Pack for Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) Specially designed to provide teachers with everything they need to give students authentic practice for the Certificate in Advanced English examination Top Tips for CAE, a new revision guide which is available for candidates to buy from centres, bookshops and the Cambridge ESOL eShop. Speaking Test Preparation Pack for CAE Preparation pack for teacher/classroom use containing teachers' notes, photocopiable worksheets, candidate visuals and a DVD of students taking the Speaking test Computer-based CAE PracticeTests CAE Information for Candidates (PDF 964Kb) Orderpastpapers Booksforstudy Summary regulations for candidates (PDF 59Kb) Information on changes to the CAE Statement of Results (PDF 329Kb) ExamFAQs CAE Teaching Resources and CAE teacher downloads (including exam handbook and exam reports)

Download the CAE Handbook for Teachers (PDF 3Mb) for the updated CAE. Download sample papers www.candidates.cambridgeesol.org Top Latest exam information for teachers Bulletin 5, (PDF 134Kb) contains a summary of the updated FCE and CAE specifications together with an overview of the review process. Bulletin 6, (PDF 117Kb) provides a more detailed description of the Reading papers, along with a rationale for the changes and advice on preparing students for the exams. Bulletin 7, (PDF 121Kb) provides a more detailed description of the Writing papers, along with a rationale for the changes and advice on preparing students for the exams. Bulletin 8, (PDF 121Kb) provides a more detailed description of the English in Use papers, along with a rationale for the changes, and advice on preparing students for the exams. Bulletin 9, (PDF 934Kb) provides a more detailed description of the Listening papers, along with a rationale for the changes and advice on preparing students for the exams. Bulletin 10, (PDF 938Kb) provides a more detailed description of the Speaking papers, along with a rationale for the changes and advice on preparing students for the exams. 19. Set texts

In the updated CAE exam, questions on two set texts are included on the writing paper with one text specific question on each. 20. Exam dates

Cambridge English: Advanced can be taken 11 times a year from March to December 2010.

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CAE Exam details and timetables for 2010 CAE Exam details and timetables for 2011

XIV.

First Certificate in English (FCE)

FCE is an exam for people who can use everyday written and spoken English at an upperintermediate level. It is an ideal exam for people who want to use English for work or study purposes. 1. Updated FCE and CAE

In order to ensure our exams meet the needs of users, FCE and CAE have recently undergone a review and the examinations have been updated. The first session of the updated FCE and CAE exams took place in December 2008. Download the Handbook for Teachers for the updated FCE. Its revision time!Top Tips for FCEanswers all your last-minute questions.

Find out more. Bulletin 5, (PDF 134Kb) contains a summary of the updated FCE and CAE specifications together with an overview of the review process. Bulletin 6, (PDF 116Kb) provides a more detailed description of the Reading papers, along with a rationale for the changes and advice on preparing students for the exams. Bulletin 7, (PDF 121Kb) provides a more detailed description of the Writing papers, along with a rationale for the changes and advice on preparing students for the exams. Bulletin 8, (PDF 121Kb) provides a more detailed description of the Use of English papers, along with a rationale for the changes, and advice on preparing students for the exams. Bulletin 9, (PDF 934Kb) provides a more detailed description of the Listening papers, along with a rationale for the changes and advice on preparing students for the exams. Bulletin 10, (PDF 938Kb) provides a more detailed description of the Speaking papers, along with a rationale for the changes and advice on preparing students for the exams.

2. Can you...
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Is FCE for you?

understand texts from a wide variety of sources? use English to make notes while someone is speaking in English? talk to people about a wide variety of topics? understand people talking in English on radio or television programmes?

If this describes your skills now, or describes the level of skills you are working towards, then FCE is the right exam for you. 3. What will FCE do for you?

Cambridge ESOL is a department of the world-famous and historic University of Cambridge. Attaining one of its certificates is an achievement and a reward in itself. However, there are manyotherbenefitstotaking FCE:
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an FCE certificate is valid for life FCE is truly international, recognised around the world for business and study purposes thousands of employers, universities and government departments officially recognise FCE as a qualification in upper-intermediate English. FCE gives you a pathway to higher qualifications such as the Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) and Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) FCE's 'Can Do' skills give you the confidence to use English in real situations.

'I am working in an international environment which requires me to continuously improve my English. To pass the FCE at Grade B is certainly a commitment to that. After the exam I got the motivation to study more English and then decided to enrol in an MBA conducted in English.' Phan Hoang Hoa FCE candidate 'The course was so useful for me. My English writing and reading is much better and when I go back to my country it will be helpful for getting a new job.' Maria Fernandez Rechsteiner FCE Candidate 4. What will taking FCE help you do?

FCE is at Level B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) an internationally recognised benchmark of language ability. The framework uses six levels to

describe language ability from A1 to C2. 'Can Do' statements have been used to describe these levels in terms of real skills with language. For example, at B2 level, typical users can be expected to:
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understand the main ideas of complex pieces of writing keep up a conversation on a fairly wide range of topics, expressing opinions and presenting arguments produce clear, detailed writing, expressing opinions and explaining the advantages and disadvantages of different points of view.

Your preparation for FCE will give you these kinds of practical language skills. 5. What does FCE involve?

FCE has five papers: Reading: newspapers and magazines. Writing: 1 hour 20 minutes 1 hour

You will need to be able to understand information in fiction and non-fiction books, journals,

You will have to show you can produce two different pieces of writing such as a short story, a letter, an article, a report, a review or an essay. Use vocabulary. Listening: 40 minutes of English: 45 minutes

Your use of English will be tested by tasks which show how well you control your grammar and

You need to show you can understand the meaning of a range of spoken material, including news programmes, speeches, stories and anecdotes and public announcements. Speaking: 14 minutes

You will take the Speaking test with another candidate or in a group of three, and you will be tested on your ability to take part in different types of interaction: with the examiner, with the other candidates and by yourself.

6.

Supporting you

As with all of Cambridge ESOL's certificates, there is a lot of support to help you prepare for your exam. Most candidates prefer to take the preparation courses run by language schools and universities. You can access a variety of support materials from the Resources area of our website. These include a short booklet, Information for Candidates, and sample exam papers, which include sound files for the Listening test materials. Many publishers have produced a wide choice of books and other aids to help you prepare for taking FCE. Ask your local bookshop for details. To help you prepare for FCE, we provide teachers with their own website so they can download sample exam papers, handbooks, and other teaching support material. 7. Past Resourcesavailable Paper Pack for First Certificate in English (FCE)

Specially designed to provide teachers with everything they need to give students authentic practice for the First Certificate in English examination
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FCE Information for Candidates (PDF 717Kb) Top Tips for FCE, a new revision guide which is now available for candidates to buy from the Cambridge ESOL Shop Speaking Test Preparation Pack for FCE Preparation pack for teacher/classroom use containing teacher's notes, photocopiable worksheets, candidate visuals and DVD of students taking the Speaking test. Computer-based FCE PracticeTests FCE Handbook for Teachers (PDF 2.8Mb) Orderpastpapers Booksforstudy FCE Exam details and timetables for 2010 FCE Exam details and timetables for 2011 Summary regulations for candidates (PDF 59Kb) Information on changes to the FCE Statement of Results (PDF 331Kb) ExamFAQs

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FCE Teaching Resource and FCE teacher downloads (including exam handbook and exam reports) 8. A world of opportunities worldwide recognition

FCE is a truly international exam, recognised by thousands of industrial, administrative and service-based employers as a qualification in intermediate English. It is also accepted by a wide range of educational institutions for study purposes. Companies such as American Express, Agfa-Gevaert GmbH, Siemens and Procter & Gamble all recognise the value of FCE in their overseas offices.

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Find more details on the organisations and universities that recognise FCE. 9. English foryourfuture

FCE offers a clear pathway to higher qualifications such as the Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) and Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE). FCE's 'Can Do' skills enable you to use English in real situations with confidence. FCE exams use real-life situations and are especially designed to help you communicate more effectively in your own life and to focus your language learning on the skills you will actually need. Because FCE exams focus on all four communication skills (Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking) plus the use of English, you increase your confidence in using English in everyday situations. 10. Marking

Exam scripts are sent to Cambridge ESOL for marking and grading and the results are sent back to the test centres. 11. Your results

Each component of the exam carries 20% of the total marks. Candidates can access their results through the Cambridge ESOL Results Online website. There are three Pass grades, A, B and C candidates reaching these grades are awarded a certificate. Candidates achieving grades D or E do not receive a certificate.

Information on changes to the FCE Statement of Results (PDF 331Kb) If you have any questions about your results, you should contact the centre where you took the exam. 12. Exam dates

FCE can be taken in March, June and December.


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FCE Exam details and timetables for 2010 FCE Exam details and timetables for 2011 13. Next steps a) Register

If you are studying English at the moment, speak to your teacher about how to enrol. If you are not studying at the moment, your nearest Cambridge ESOL exam centre will be able to advise you about how to register, fees, the dates of the exam and other arrangements. We have more than 2,000 centres in 130 countries. Please note that centres may set registration deadlines that are earlier than those published. Entries cannot be made directly to Cambridge ESOL. Already registered? Visit the Candidate Support site for exam preparation help. If you have a disability or a specific learning difficulty (such as dyslexia) it may be possible to ask for Special Arrangements to be made when taking the exam.

XV.

Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

CPE is Cambridge ESOL's most advanced exam. It is aimed at people who use English for professional or study purposes. 1. Can you... Is CPE for you?

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use English to advise on, or talk about complex or sensitive issues? understand the finer points of documents, correspondence and reports?

If this describes your skills now, or describes the level of skills you are working towards, then CPE is the right exam for you. 2. What will CPE do for you?

Cambridge ESOL is a department of the world-famous and historic University of Cambridge. Attaining one of its certificates is an achievement and a reward in itself. However, there are manyotherbenefitstotaking CPE:
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a CPE certificate is valid for life, you never need to take the exam again CPE is truly international, recognised around the world for business and study purposes hundreds of employers, universities and government departments officially recognise CPE as proof of proficiency in English CPE's 'Can Do' skills give you the confidence to use English in real situations. 3. What will taking CPE help you do?

CPE is at Level C2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) an internationally recognised benchmark of language ability. The framework uses six levels to describe language ability from A1 to C2. 'Can Do' statements have been used to describe these levels in terms of real skills with language. For example, at C2 level, typical users can be expected to:
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understand with ease virtually everything they hear and read make accurate and complete notes during a presentation understandcolloquialasides talk about complex and sensitive issues without awkwardness express themselves precisely and fluently.

Your preparation for CPE will give you these kinds of practical language skills. 4. What does CPE involve?

CPE has five papers:

Reading 1 hour 30 minutes You will need to be able to understand the meaning of written English at word, sentence, paragraph and whole text level. Writing 2 hours You will have to show you can produce a number of different items such as a short story, a letter, an article, a report or a composition, each of about 300350 words. Use of English 1 hour 30 minutes Your use of English will be tested by tasks which show how well you can control your grammar and vocabulary and how well you can summarise information. Listening: 40 minutes (approx) You need to show you can understand the meaning of a range of spoken material, including lectures, news programmes and public announcements. Speaking: 19 minutes You will take the Speaking test with another candidate or in groups of three, and you will be tested on your ability to take part in different types of interaction: with the examiner, with the other candidates and by yourself. 5. Supporting you

As with all of Cambridge ESOL's certificates, there is a lot of support to help you prepare for your exam. Most candidates prefer to take the preparation courses run by language schools and universities. You can access a variety of support materials from the Resources area of our website. This includes a short booklet, Information for Candidates, and sample exam papers, which includes sound files for the Listening test materials. Many publishers have produced a wide choice of books and other aids to help you prepare for taking CPE. Ask your local bookshop for details. To help you prepare for CPE, we provide teachers with their own website so they can download sample exam papers, handbooks, and other teaching support material.

6.
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Resourcesavailable

Past Paper Pack for Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) Specially designed to provide teachers with everything they need to give students authentic practice for the Certificate of Proficiency in English examination CPE sample papers, (ZIP 23.9Mb) Speaking Test Preparation Pack for CPE Preparation pack for teacher/classroom use containing teacher's notes, photocopiable worksheets, candidate visuals and DVD of students taking the Speaking test CPE Information for Candidates, (PDF 2.3Mb) Orderpastpapers Booksforstudy CPE Exam details and timetables for 2010 CPE Exam details and timetables for 2011 Summary regulations for candidates (PDF 59Kb) Information on changes to the CPE Statement of Results (PDF 333Kb) ExamFAQs CPE Teaching Resource and CPE teacher downloads (including exam handbook and exam reports) 7. A world of opportunities worldwide recognition

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CPE is a truly international exam, recognised by hundreds of employers as proof of proficiency in English and also by universities and colleges as proof of ability to study in English to undergraduate level. Companies such as Coca-Cola, IBM, Nestl, Sony, Procter & Gamble and Nokia recognise the value of CPE in their overseas offices.

Find more details on the organisations and universities that recognise CPE. 8. English foryourfuture

CPE's 'Can Do' skills enable you to use English in real situations with confidence. CPE exams use real-life situations and are especially designed to help you communicate more effectively in your own life. Because CPE exams focus on all four communication skills - Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking you increase your confidence in using English in everyday situations.

9.

Marking

Exam scripts are sent to Cambridge ESOL for marking and grading and the results are sent back to the test centres. 10. Your results

Each component of the exam carries 20% of the total marks. Candidates can access their results through the Cambridge ESOL Results Online website. There are three Pass grades, A, B and C candidates reaching these grades are awarded a certificate. Candidates achieving grades D or E do not receive a certificate. Information on changes to the CPE Statement of Results (PDF 333Kb) If you have any questions about your results, you should contact the centre where you took the exam. 11. Exam dates

CPE can be taken in June and December.


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CPE Exam details and timetables for 2010 CPE Exam details and timetables for 2011 12. Next steps a) Register

If you are studying English at the moment, speak to your teacher about how to enrol. If you are not studying at the moment, your nearest Cambridge ESOL exam centre will be able to advise you about how to register, fees, the dates of the exam and other arrangements. We have more than 2,000 centres in 130 countries. Please note that centres may set registration deadlines that are earlier than those published. Entries cannot be made directly to Cambridge ESOL. Already registered? Visit the Candidate Support site for exam preparation help.

If you have a disability or a specific learning difficulty (such as dyslexia) it may be possible to ask for Special Arrangements to be made when taking the exam.

13. work

English for your future: Cambridge ESOL certificates for the world of

The Business English Certificates The Business English Certificates (BEC) are internationally recognised qualifications that show employers your skills for using English in the workplace. BEC is an ideal English language exam if you are preparing for a career in business. There are three different levels of BEC: BEC Preliminary, BEC Vantage and BEC Higher. 14. Is BEC for you?

If your English language ability is sufficient for most simple communications, such as shopping, you may consider progressing towards BEC. You should have an understanding of, or interest in, the world of work, business and commerce. 15. Why take BEC?

More than ever, a good knowledge of English is needed to succeed in international business and commerce. If you can show you have relevant language skills, you'll have a great advantage in the jobs market and much greater flexibility if you want to work abroad. BEC can help you show that you have learned English to an appropriate standard and can use it in a business context. The BEC exams are aligned with Levels B1 to C1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages an internationally recognised benchmark of language ability. The framework uses six levels to describe language ability, from A1 to C2. 'Can Do' statements have been used to describe these levels in terms of real skills with language, such as being able to write a report, or take a telephone message. This means that preparing for BEC will help you develop real-life skills and the confidence to use them.

BEC is also linked with the UK Qualifications and Curriculum Authority's National Standards for Literacy, within the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). 'BEC has helped develop cross-cultural communication skills and overall development of the students. It has had an impact on confidence levels through international certification. It has also introduced unfamiliar situations and helped stimulate creative thinking and analysis' Laura Cirello, Head Learning and Development, JP Morgan Treasury and Securities Services, Mumbai 16. Recognition

BEC is officially recognised by more than a thousand educational organisations, employers, ministries, government bodies and professional organisations throughout the world as a suitable qualification for business use. Leading international companies such as Sony Ericsson, Shell, Vodafone, Bayer, Coca-Cola and HSBC have all recognised BEC in their offices around the world. To find out how recognising BEC can benefit your business please visit www.CambridgeESOL.org/WoW Search our recognition database. Will a pre-2002 BEC certificate still be recognised? 'Working in a marketing department of a foreign company requires very good business communication skills in English, both in written and oral form. BEC has helped me to standardise my Business English and reach to an international business communication level.' PhanThu Ha BEC candidate

17.
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Exam dates

BEC Exam details and timetables for 2010


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BEC Preliminary BEC Vantage BEC Higher

BEC Exam details and timetables for 2011


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BEC Preliminary BEC Vantage BEC Higher

18.

Nextsteps a) Register

To register for the exam, you need to contact an exam centre authorised by us to run BEC at least 10 weeks before the exam. Entries cannot be made directly to Cambridge ESOL. The centre will give you full information about the fees for taking BEC, the dates of the tests and other arrangements. Please note that centres may set registration deadlines that are earlier than those published. Many candidates take a preparation course before entering for BEC. If you are studying English at the moment, speak to your teacher about preparing for BEC. If you are not studying at the moment, your nearest Cambridge ESOL exam centre will be able to advise you. Find a centre. If you have a disability or a specific learning difficulty (such as dyslexia) it may be possible to ask for Special Arrangements to be made when taking the exam. Already registered? Visit the Candidate Support site for exam preparation help. b) Computer based BEC

The BEC examination is now available as a computer based test. You can take the reading, writing and listening parts of the test on a computer using an attractive and easy to understand interface, while the speaking test is conducted face to face. With Computer-Based BEC you also have the flexibility of more test dates and registration much nearer to the exam date. The standard pen and paper version will continue to be available. c) Results

A single, overall grade is awarded, based on the aggregate of marks gained in the four components (Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking). There are no Pass/Fail marks for individual papers, so you do not need to reach a particular level in any component in order to

achieve a Pass in the examination. You will also receive a Statement of Results which shows your performance in each paper against the scale Exceptional Good Borderline Weak. The report will indicate your relative performance in each skill. If you pass, you will be awarded a certificate from University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations. Once awarded, Cambridge ESOL BEC certificates are valid for life. 19.
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Resourcesavailable

Past Paper Pack for BEC Preliminary, BEC Vantage and BEC Higher Specially designed to provide teachers with everything they need to give students authentic practice for the BEC Preliminary examination Speaking Test Preparation Pack for BEC Preliminary. Preparation pack for teacher/classroom use containing teacher's notes, photocopiable worksheets, candidate visuals and DVD of students taking the Speaking test.
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Sampleworksheet

Speaking Test Preparation Pack for BEC Vantage. Preparation pack for teacher/classroom use containing teacher's notes, photocopiable worksheets, candidate visuals and DVD of students taking the Speaking test.
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Sampleworksheet

Speaking Test Preparation Pack for BEC Higher. Preparation pack for teacher/classroom use containing teacher's notes, photocopiable worksheets, candidate visuals and DVD of students taking the Speaking test.
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Sampleworksheet

Samplepapers
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BEC Preliminary sample papers (ZIP 11.9Mb) BEC Vantage sample papers (ZIP 15.6Mb) BEC Higher sample papers (ZIP 15.6Mb) Order CB BEC PracticeTests BEC Preliminary information (PDF 677Kb) BEC Vantageinformation (PDF 548Kb) BEC Higher information (PDF 574Kb)

InformationforCandidates
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Orderpastpapers Booksforstudy BEC Exam details and timetables for 2010


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BEC Preliminary BEC Vantage BEC Higher BEC Preliminary BEC Vantage BEC Higher

BEC Exam details and timetables for 2011


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Summary regulations for candidates (PDF 59Kb) UnderstandingyourStatement of Results


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BEC Preliminary (PDF 1.40Mb) BEC Vantage (PDF 348Kb) BEC Higher (PDF 349 Kb)

XVI.

Teaching Knowledge Test (TKT) 1. 'An important stepping stone in your career'

2.

What is TKT?

The Teaching Knowledge Test (TKT) is a test from Cambridge ESOL about teaching English to speakers of other languages. It aims to increase teachers' confidence and enhance job prospects by focusing on the core teaching knowledge needed by teachers of primary, secondary or adult learners, anywhere in the world. This flexible and accessible award will help you to understand:
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different methodologies for teaching the 'language of teaching' the ways in which resources can be used the key aspects of lesson planning classroom management methods for different needs.

After taking TKT, teachers who want to develop their knowledge further can progress to Cambridge ESOL's well-established Teaching Awards, such as ICELT and CELTA. 3. Who is TKT for?

TKT gives teachers a strong foundation in the core areas of teaching knowledge needed in the English language teaching classroom. It is ideal for all teachers, whatever their background and teaching experience, and is also suitable for people who would like to teach English but do not yet have a teaching position. There are no formal entry requirements. However, anyone wishing to take TKT is strongly advised to have at least an intermediate level of English Level B1 of the Council of Europe's Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) e.g. PET, IELTS band score of 4. 4. What does TKT involve?

Most teachers are likely to follow a preparation course before taking the test but you can also prepare yourself through your own reading and study, if you prefer. TKT has three core modules. These can be taken together in one exam session or separately, in any order, over three sessions. Each module consists of a test of 80 objective questions, lasting 80 minutes, which require you to select the correct answer and mark this on a computerised answer sheet. Module 1 Language and background to language learning and teaching:
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describing language and language skills background to language learning background to language teaching

Module 2 Planning lessons and use of resources for language teaching:


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planning and preparing a lesson or sequence of lessons selection and use of resources and materials.

Module 3 Managing the teaching and learning process:


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teachers' and learners' language in the classroom classroom management.

TKT uses an indicative glossary of english language teaching terminology that is regularly reviewed and revised to ensure that all modules reflect continuing developments in core area of teaching knowledge. The current glossary, released in August 2009, can be downloaded from the link on this page. a) Results

Results for TKT are described as being in one of four band scores, 1-4. TKT band descriptors (PDF 17Kb) This document outlines what each of the four band scores means in terms of ability for each of the three core TKT modules. There is no Pass/Fail. Every candidate receives a certificate for each module taken. TKT results are issued through centres approximately two weeks after receipt of answer sheets by Cambridge ESOL. 5. Resourcesavailable

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TKT handbook and sample papers (PDF 930Kb) TKT Information for Candidates (PDF 408Kb) TKT Glossary (PDF 349Kb) Online TeacherResources 6. Three optional modules of TKT are available - these can be added to the

three core modules above, or can each be taken completely independently TKT: Practical - NEW This award offers teachers the opportunity to gain certification for their practical teaching abilities, and can be taken at any stage in their career. TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning tests a candidates knowledge of Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) and the practice of planning, teaching and assessing curriculum subjects taught in English. CLIL describes an evolving approach to teaching and learning where subjects are taught and studied through the medium of a non-native language. In CLIL, learning a curricular subject in a

second, third or sometimes fourth language involves best practice from a range of different educational contexts. TKT: Knowledge About Language English teachers need to be both linguistically aware and able to understand the difficulties students may encounter in the language learning process. To help meet this need, TKT: Knowledge About Language tests a candidates knowledge of the language systems needed by teachers for planning and teaching their lessons. Entries for TKT: Practical; TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning and TKT: Knowledge about Language can be made at approved centres. Please note: existing TKT centres do not need to re-apply to become TKT: Practical or CLIL/KAL centres.

TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY OF EL SALVADOR LANGUAGES SCHOOL ENGLISH DEPARTMENT MODULE V: ENGLISH STANDARDIZED TESTS AND CERTIFICATIONS The most widely accepted tests at the scenarios Professor: Edgar Ayala

Student: Arturo Sigenza

Due: March 3rd/2011

The certificate is the most marketable qualification to have, though requirements vary in different countries and teaching institutions.

Courses for Cambridge CELTA are given under license by centers all over the world, 286 places as of mid-2007. The CELTA course is generally both more difficult and more expensive than other courses, but of similar duration anywhere from four weeks of intensive studies to several months of part-time classes. Job ads routinely ask for "CELTA or equivalent" rather than just wanting a "TEFL certificate". Trinity College London has a Cert TESOL that is also taught in many places and also widely accepted. It is "or equivalent" for those ads. If you plan to make a career in the field, consider more advanced training such as a diploma course (Cambridge DELTA or Trinity Dip TESOL) or a Masters degree. These are required for most teacher training or head of school jobs and for some of the best teaching jobs. Quite a few universities offer ESL/EFL training, often both a Certificate program and a Master's degree. A few offer a Master's program designed for teachers working overseas, with most work done by correspondence. One way to travel--or to pay for your travels--is to get a job overseas teaching English. If you want to spend several years in a destination, this is a popular way to earn a living. Jobs worth considering as a long-term prospect--or even as a career--are widely available. They generally require qualifications and experience; see Certificates below. In some positions, the benefits include airfare and housing. Other jobs might do to supplement a backpacker's income, or even let you live somewhere interesting for a year. For some of these types of jobs, especially in remote areas, anyone who looks foreign and speaks some English can get work. However this varies greatly from country to country and type of institution. Speaking the local language is not generally required, though it may be quite useful in beginner classes and may make your stay more pleasant in other ways. The students are learning ESL (English as a Second Language) or EFL (English as a Foreign Language) or ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages). For the teacher, add a T for teaching to get TESL, TEFL or TESOL, or just call the field ELT (English Language Teaching). A recent trend in the field is to do a lot of ESP (English for Specific Purposes), designing custom courses depending on what the learners need to use the language for. One branch of this is EAP (English for Academic Purposes), preparing students for study abroad. These are more commonly used in the US than elsewhere TOEFL: for admission to US universities The TOEFL test is the most widely respected English-language test in the world, recognized by more than 7,500 colleges, universities and agencies in more than 130 countries. Wherever you want to study, the TOEFL test can help you get there. The TOEFL iBT test, administered in an

internet-based format, is an important part of your journey to study in an English-speaking country. In addition to the test, the ETS TOEFL Program provides tools and guides to help you prepare for the test and improve your English-language skills. IELTS :for British, Australian and NZ universities (Canadian universities might use either) IELTS is the worlds proven English test. Over 1.4 million candidates take the test each year to start their journeys into international education and employment. You can rely on IELTS - the test that sets the standard. IELTS is recognized by more than 6000 institutions in over 135 countries. TOEIC: a business English test from the TOEFL people Since 1979, organizations around the world have used the TOEIC test to hire, place and promote employees. BULATS: a business English test from the IELTS people BULATS is an economical and easy-to-use testing and reporting system for individuals and companies seeking a quick and reliable way of assessing language skills for the workplace. BEC: Business English Certificates are from Cambridge. There are three exams at different levels. The Business English Certificates (BEC) is internationally recognized qualifications that show employers your skills for using English in the workplace. BEC is an ideal English language exam if you are preparing for a career in business. There are three different levels of BEC: BEC Preliminary, BEC Vantage and BEC Higher. CPE: is also from Cambridge; it is their highest level exam. Cambridge English: Proficiency, commonly known as Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) is our most advanced exam, and is for learners who have achieved an extremely high level of skill in the English language. Some ESL students may also need or want to take other tests to get into foreign universities. These are not ESL tests, but pre-admission tests designed for native English speakers. Theyinclude: SAT: and ACT: forundergraduateadmissions The SAT and SAT Subject Tests are a suite of tools designed to assess your academic readiness for college. These exams provide a path to opportunities, financial support and scholarships, in a

way that's fair to all students. The SAT and SAT Subject Tests keep pace with what colleges are looking for today, measuring the skills required for success in the 21st century. GRE: for graduate programs If you are taking the GRE General Test soon, or need your score reports before November 2011, you should take the current GRE General Test. Register early to get your preferred test date and location. Important News: The GRE revised General Test is coming August 2011. There are a lot of exciting changes in the works. New question types. New test-taker friendly format. And many more benefits.

Proficiency Guidelines

ACTFL PROFICIENCY GUIDELINES

The 1986 proficiency guidelines represent a hierarchy of global characterizations of integrated performance in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Each description is a representative, not an exhaustive, sample of a particular range of ability, and each level subsumes all previous levels, moving from simple to complex in an "all-before-and-more" fashion. Because these guidelines identify stages of proficiency, as opposed to achievement, they are not intended to measure what an individual has achieved through specific classroom instruction but rather to allow assessment of what an individual can and cannot do, regardless of where, when, or how the language has been learned or acquired; thus, the words "learned" and "acquired" are used in the broadest sense. These guidelines are not based on a particular linguistic theory or pedagogical method, since the guidelines are proficiency-based, as opposed to achievement-based, and are intended to be used for global assessment. The 1986 guidelines should not be considered the definitive version, since the construction and utilization of language proficiency guidelines is a dynamic, interactive process. The academic sector, like the government sector, will continue to refine and update the criteria periodically to reflect the needs of the users and the advances of the profession. In this vein, ACTFL owes a continuing debt to the creators of the 1982 provisional proficiency guidelines and, of course,

to the members of the Interagency Language Roundtable Testing Committee, the creators of the government's Language Skill Level Descriptions. ACTFL would like to thank the following individuals for their contributions on this current guidelines project: Heidi Byrnes James Child Nina Levinson Pardee Lowe, Jr. Seiichi Makino Irene Thompson A. Ronald Walton

These proficiency guidelines are the product of grants from the U.S. Department of Education.

ACTFL, Inc., February 1989

Proficiency Guidelines Generic Descriptions-Speaking Novice The Novice level is characterized by the ability to communicate minimally with learned material. Novice-Low Novice-Mid Oral production consists of isolated words and perhaps a few high-frequency phrases. Essentially no functional communicative ability. Oral production continues to consist of isolated words and learned phrases within very predictable areas of need, although quantity is increased. Vocabulary is sufficient only for handling simple, elementary needs and expressing basic courtesies. Utterances rarely consist of more than two or three words and show frequent long pauses and repetition of interlocutor's words. Speaker may have some difficulty producing even the simplest utterances. Some Novice-Mid speakers will be understood only with great difficulty. Able to satisfy partially the requirements of basic communicative exchanges by relying heavily on learned utterances but occasionally expanding these through simple recombinations of their elements. Can ask questions or make statements involving learned material. Shows signs of spontaneity although this falls short of real autonomy of expression. Speech continues to consist of learned utterances rather than of personalised, situa-tionally adapted ones. Vocabulary centers on areas such as basic objects, places, and most common kinship terms. Pronunciation may still be strongly influenced by first language. Errors are frequent and, in spite of repetition, some Novice-High speakers will have difficulty being understood even by sympathetic interlocutors. The Intermediate level is characterized by the speaker's ability to: create with the language by combining and recombining learned elements, though primarily in a reactive mode; initiate, minimally sustain, and close in a simple way basic communicative tasks; and ask and answer questions. Able to handle successfully a limited number of interactive, task-oriented and social situations. Can ask and answer questions, initiate and respond to simple statements and maintain face-to-face conversation, although in a highly restricted manner and with much linguistic inaccuracy. Within these limitations, can perform such tasks as introducing self, ordering a meal, asking directions, and making purchases. Vocabulary is adequate to express only the most elementary needs. Strong interference from native language may occur. Misunderstandings frequently arise, but with repetition, the Intermediate-Low speaker can generally be understood by sympathetic interlocutors. Able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated, basic and communicative tasks and social situations. Can talk simply about self and family members. Can ask and answer questions and participate in simple conversations on topics beyond the most immediate needs; e.g., personal history and leisure time activities. Utterance length increases slightly, but speech may continue to be characterized by frequent long pauses, since the smooth incorporation of even basic conversational strategies is often hindered as the speaker struggles to create appropriate language forms. Pronunciation may continue to be strongly influenced by first language and fluency may still be strained. Although misunderstandings still arise, the Intermediate-Mid speaker can generally be understood by sympathetic interlocutors. Able to handle successfully most uncomplicated communicative tasks and social situations. Can initiate, sustain, and close a general conversation with a number of strategies appropriate to a range of circumstances and topics, but errors are evident. Limited vocabulary still necessitates hesitation and may bring about slightly unexpected circumlocution. There is emerging evidence of connected discourse,

Novice-High

Intermediate

IntermediateLow

IntermediateMid

IntermediateHigh

Advanced

particularly for simple narration and/or description. The IntermediateHigh speaker can generally by understood even by

interlocutors not accustomed to dealing with speakers at this level, but repetition may still be required. The Advanced level is characterized by the speaker's ability to: converse in a clearly participatory fashion; initiate, sustain, and bring to closure a wide variety of communicative tasks, including those that require an increased ability to convey meaning with diverse language strategies due to a complication or an unforeseen turn of events; satisfy the requirements of school and work situations; and narrate and describe with paragraph-length connected discourse.

ACTFL, Inc., February 1989

Proficiency Guidelines

AdvancedHigh

Able to satisfy the requirements of everyday situations and routine school and work requirements. Can handle with confidence but not with facility complicated tasks and social situations, such as elaborating, complaining, and apologizing. Can narrate and describe with some details, linking sentences together smoothly. Can communicate facts and talk casually about topics of current public and personal interest, using general vocabulary. Shortcomings can often be smoothed over by communicative strategies, such as pause fillers, stalling devices, and different rates of speech. Circumlocution which arises from vocabulary or syntactic limitations very often is quite successful, though some groping for words may still be evident. The Advanced-level speaker can be understood without difficulty by native interlocutors. Able to satisfy the requirements of a broad variety of everyday, school, and work situations. Can discuss concrete topics relating to particular interests a$d special Melds of competence. There is emerging evidence of ability to support opinions, explain in detail, and hypothesize.,The Advanced-Plus speaker often shows a well developed ability to compensate for an imperfect grasp of some forms with confident use of communicative strategies, such as paraphrasing and circumlocution. Differentiated vocabulary and intonation are effectively used to communicate fine shades of meaning. The Advanced-Pius speaker often shows remarkable fluency and ease of speech but under the demands of Superior-level, complex tasks, language may break down or prove inadequate. The Superior level is characterized by the speaker's ability to: ^participate effectively in most formal and informal conversations on practical, social, professional, and abstract topics; and support opinions and hypothesize using native-like discourse strategies. Able to speak the language with.sufficient accuracy to participate effectively in most formal and informal conversations on practical, social, professional, and abstract topics. Can discuss special fields of competence and interest with ease. Can support opinions and hypothesize, but may not be able to tailor language to audience or discuss in depth highly abstract or unfamiliar topics. Usually the Superior level speaker is only partially familiar wjth regional or other dialectical variants. The Superior level speaker commands a wide variety of interactive strategies and shows good awareness of discourse strategies. The latter involves the ability to distinguish main ideas from supporting information through syntactic. lexical and suprasegmentalfeatures (pitch, stress, intonation). Sporadic errors may occur, particularly in low-frequency structures and some complex highfrequency structures more common to formal writing, but no patterns of error are evident. Errors do not disturb the native speaker or interfere with communication.

Superior

Superior

Generic Descriptions-Listening These guidelines assume that all listening tasks take place in an authentic environment at a normal rate of speech using standard ' '* Novice- or near-standard norms. Understanding is limited to occasional isolated words, such as cognates, borrowed words, and high-frequency social conventions. Low Essentially no ability to comprehend-even short utterances. Able to understand some short, learned utterances, particularly where context strongly supports understanding and speech is clearly audible. Comprehends some words and phrases from simple questions, statements, high-frequency commands and courtesy formulae about topics that refer to basic personal information or the immediate physical setting. The listener

requires long pauses for assimilation and periodically requests repetition and/or a slower rate of speech. Novice-High Able to understand short. learned utterances and some sentencelength utterances, particularly where context strongly supports understanding and speech is clearly audible. Comprehends words and phrases from simple questions, statements, high-frequency commands and courtesy formulae. May require repetition, rephrasing and/or a slowed rate of speech for comprehension. Able to understand sentence-length utterances which consist of recombinations of learned elements in a limited number of content areas, particularly if strongly supported by the situational context. Content refers to basic personal background and needs, social conventions and routine tasks, such as getting meals and receiving simple instructions and directions. Listening tasks pertain primarily to spontaneous face-to-face conversations. Understanding is often uneven; repetition and rewording may be necessary. Misunderstandings in both main ideas and details arise frequently. *ACTFL Inc., February 1989

Intermediate-Low

Proficiency Guidelines

IntermediateMid

Able to understand sentence-length utterances which consist of recombinations of learned utterances on a variety of topics. Content continues to refer primarily to basic personal background and needs, social conventions and somewhat more complex tasks, such as lodging, transportation,, and shopping. Additional content areas include some personal interests and activities, and a greater diversity of instructions and directions. I faming tasks not only pertain to spontaneous face-to-face conversations but also to short routine telephone couveisa-tions and some deliberate speech, such as simple announcements and reports over the media. Understanding continues to be uneven. Able to sustain understanding over longer stretches of connected discourse on a number of topics pertaining to different times and places; .however, understanding is inconsistent due to failure to grasp main ideas and/or details. Thus, while topics do not differ significantly from those of an Advanced level listener, comprehension is less in quantity and poorer in quality. Able to understand main ideas and most details of connected discourse on a variety of topics beyond the immediacy of the situation. Comprehension may be uneven due to a variety of linguistic and extralinguistic factors, among which topic familiarity is very prominent. These texts frequently involve description and narration in different time frames or aspects, such as present, nonpast, habitual, or imperfective. Texts may include interviews, short lectures on familiar topics, and news items and reports primarily dealing with factual information. Listener is aware of cohesive devices but may not be able to use them to follow the sequence of thought in an oral text. Able to understand the main ideas of most speech in a standard dialect; however, the listener may not be able to sustain comprehension in extended discourse which is propositionally and linguistically complex. Listener shows an emerging awareness of culturally implied meanings beyond the surface meanings of the text but may fail to grasp sociocultural nuances of the message. Able to understand the main ideas of all speech in a standard dialect, including technical discussion in a field of specialization. Can'follow the essentials of extended discourse which is propositionally and linguistically complex, as in academic/professional settings, in lectures, speeches, and reports. Listener shows some appreciation of aesthetic norms of target language, of idioms, colloquialisms, and register shifting. Able to make inferences within the cultural framework of the target language. Understanding is aided by an awareness of the underiying organizational structure of the oral text and includes sensitivity for its social and cultural references and its affective overtones. Rarely misunderstands but may not understand excessively rapid, highly colloquial speech or speech that has strong cultural references. Able to understand all forms and styles of speech pertinent to personal, social and professional needs tailored to different audiences. Shows strong sensitivity to social and cultural references and aesthetic norms by processing language from within the cultural framework. Texts, include theater plays, screen productions, editorials, symposia, academic debates, public policy statements, literary readings, and most jokes and puns. May have difficulty with some, dialects and slang.

IntermediateHigh

Advanced

AdvancedHigh

Superior

Distinguishe d

Generic Descriptions-Reading These guidelines assume all reading texts to be authentic and legible. NoviceLow Novice-Mid

NoviceHigh

Able occasionally to identify isolated words and/or major phrases when strongly supported by context. "(." .. " Able to recognize the symbols of an alphabetic and/or syllabic writing system and/or a limited number of characters in a system that uses characters. The reader can identify an increasing number of highly contex-tualized words and/or phrases including cognates and borrowed words, where appropriate. Material understood rarely exceeds a single phrase at a time, and rereading may be required. Has sufficient control of the writing system to interpret written language in areas of practical need. Where vocabulary has been learned, can read for instructional and directional purposes standardized messages, phrases or expressions, such as some items on menus, schedules, timetables, maps, and signs. At times, but not on a consistent basis, the Novice-High level reader may be able to derive meaning from material at a slightly higher level where context and/or extralinguistic background knowledge are supportive.

ACTFL, Int., February 1989

Intermediate-Low Able to understand main ideas and/or some facts from the simplest connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs. Such texts are linguistically noncomplex and have a clear underlying internal structure, for example chronological sequencing. They, impart basic information about which the reader has to make only minimal suppositions or to which the reader brings personal interest and/or knowledge. Examples include messages with social purposes or information for t$e*widest possible audience, such as public announcements and short, straightforward instructions dealing with public fife. Some misunderstandings wffl occur. Intermediate-Mid Able to read consistently with increased understanding simple connected texts dealing with a variety of basic and social needs. Such texts are still linguistically noncomplexand have a clear underlying internal structure. They impart bask information about which the|bader has to make minimal suppositions and to which the reader brings personal interest and/or knowledge. Examples may include short, straightforward descriptions of persons, places, and things written for a wide audience. Able to read consistently with full understanding IntermediateHigh simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the reader has personal interest and/or knowledge. Can get some main ideas and information from texts at the next higher level featuring description and narration. Structural complexity may interfere with comprehension; for example, basic grammatical relations may be misinterpreted and temporal references may rely primarily on lexical items. Has some difficulty with the cohesive factors in discourse, such as matching pronouns with referents. While texts do not differ significantly from those at the Advanced level, comprehension is less consistent. May have to read material several times for understanding. Advanced Able to read somewhat longer prose of several paragraphs in length, particularly if presented with a dear underlying structure. The prose is predominantly in familar sentence patterns. Reader gets the main ideas and facts and misses some details. Comprehension derives not only from situational and subject matter knowledge but from increasing control of the language. Texts at this level include descriptions and narrations such as simple short stories, news hems, bibliographical information, social notices, personal correspondence, routinized business tetters and simple technical material written for the general reader.

Advanced-High Able to follow essential points of written discourse at the Superior level in areas of special interest or knowledge. Able to understand parts of texts which are conceptually abstract and linguistically complex, and/or texts which treat unfamiliar topics and situations, as well as some texts which involve aspects of target-language culture. Able to comprehend die facts to make appropriate inferences. An emerging awareness of the aesthetic properties of language and of its literary styles permits comprehension of a wider variety of texts, including literary. Misunderstandings may occur. Superior Able to read with almost complete comprehension and at normal speed expository prose on unfamiliar sub-jects and a variety of literary texts. Reading ability is not dependent on subject matter knowledge, although the reader is not expected to comprehend thoroughly texts which are highly dependent on knowledge of the target culture. Reads easily for pleasure. Superior-level texts feature hypotheses, argumentation and supported opinions and include grammatical patterns and vocabulary ordinarily encountered in academic/professional reading. At this level, due to the control of general vocabulary and structure, the reader is almost always abteto match the meanings derived from extralinguistic knowledge with meanings derived from knowledge of the language, allowing for smooth and efficient reading of diverse texts.

Occasional misunderstandings may still occur; for example, the reader may experience some difficulty with unusually complex structures and low-frequency idioms. At the Superior level the reader can match strategies, top-down or bottom-up, which are most appropriate to the text. (Top-down strategies rely on real-world knowledge and prediction based on genre and organizational scheme of the text. Bottom-up strategies rely on actual linguistic knowledge.) Material at this level will include a variety of literary texts, editorials, correspondence, general reports and technical material in professional fields. Rereading is rarely necessary, and misreading is rare. Distinguished Able to read fluently and accurately most styles and forms of the language pertinent to academic and professional needs. Able to relate inferences in the text to real-world knowledge and understand almost aD socio-linguistic and cultural references by processing language front within the cultural framework. Abte to understand a writer's use of nuance and subtlety. Can readily follow unpredictable turns of thought and author intent in such materials as sophisticated editorials, specialized journal articles, and literary texts such as novels, plays, poems, as well as in any subject matter area directed to the general reader. Generic Descriptions-Writing NoviceLow Able to form some letters in an alphabetic system, in languages whose writing systems use syllabaries or characters, writer is able to both copy and produce the basic strokes. Can produce romanization of isolated characters, where applicable. ACTFL, Inc., February 1989

NoviceMid NoviceHigh

Able to copy or transcribe familiar words or phrases and reproduce some from memory . No practical communicative writing skills. Able to write simple fixed expressions and limited memorized material and some recombinations thereof. Can supply information on simple forms and documents. Can write names, numbers, dates, own nationality, and other simple autobiographical information as well as some short phrases and simple fists. Can write an the symbols in an alphabetic or syllabic system or 50-100 characters or compounds in a character writing system. Spelling and representation of symbols (letters, syllables, characters) may be partially correct. Able to meet limited practical writing needs. Can write short messages, postcards, and take down simple notes, such as telephone messages. Can create statements or questions within the scope of limited language experience. Material produced consists of recombinations of learned vocabulary and structures into simple sentences on very familiar topics. Language is inadequate to express in writing anything but elementary needs. Frequent errors in grammar, vocabulary, punctuation, spelling and in formation of nonalphabetic symbols, but writing can be understood by natives used to the writing of nonnatives. Able to meet a number of practical writing needs. Can write short, simple letters. Content involves personal preferences, daily routine, everyday events, and other topics grounded in personal experience. Can express present time or at least one other time frame or aspect consistently, e.g., nonpast, habitual, imperfective. Evidence of control of the syntax of noncomplex sentences and basic inflectional morphology, such as declensions and conjugation. Writing tends to be a loose collection of sentences or sentence fragments on a given topic and provides little evidence of conscious organization. Can be understood by natives used to the writing of nonnatives. Able to meet most practical writing needs and limited social demands. Can take notes in some detafl on familiar topics and respond in writing to personal questions. Can write simple letters, brief synopses and paraphrases, summaries of biographical data, work and school experience. In those languages relying primarily on content words and time expressions to express time, tense, or aspect, some precision is displayed; where tense and/or aspect is expressed through verbal inflection, forms are produced rather consistently, but not always accurately. An ability to describe and narrate in paragraphs is emerging. Rarely uses basic cohesive elements, such as pronominal substitutions or synonyms in written discourse. Writing, though faulty, is generally comprehensible to natives used to the writing of nonnatives.

IntermediateLow

IntermediateMid

IntermediateHigh

Advanced

Advanced-High

Able to write routine social correspondence and join sentences in simple discourse of at least several paragraphs in length on familiar topics. Can write simple social correspondence, take notes, write cohesive summaries and resumes, as well as narratives and descriptions of a factual nature. Has sufficient writing vocabulary to express self simply with some circumlocution. May still make errors in punctuation, spelling, or the formation of nonalphabetic symbols. Good control of the morphology and the most frequently used syntactic structures. e.g., common word order patterns, coordination, subordination, but makes frequent errors in producing complex sentences. Uses a limited number of cohesive devices, such as pronouns, accurately. Writing may resemble literal translations from the native language, but a sense of organization (rhetorical structure) is emerging. Writing is understandable to natives not used to the writing of nonnatives. Able to write about a variety of topics with significant precision and in detail. Can write most social and informal business correspondence. Can describe and narrate personal experiences fully but has difficulty supporting points of view in written discourse. Can write about the concrete aspects of topics relating to particular interests and special fields of competence. Often shows remarkable fluency and ease of expression, but under time constraints and pressure writing may be inaccurate. Generally strong in either grammar or vocabulary, but not in both. Weakness and unevenness in one of the foregoing or in spelling or character writing formation may result in occasional miscommunication. Some misuse of vocabulary may still be evident. Style may still be obviously foreign.

Superior

Able to express self effectively in most formal and informal writing on practical, social and professional topics. Can write most types of

correspondence, such as memos as well as social and business letters, and short research papers and statements of position in areas of special interest or in special fields. Good control of a full range of structures, spelling or nonalphabetic symbol production, and a wide general vocabulary allow the writer to hypothesize and present arguments or points of view accurately and effectively. An underlying organization, such as chronological ordering, logical ordering, cause and effect, comparison, and thematic development is strongly evident, although not thoroughly executed and/or not totally reflecting target language patterns. Although sensitive to differences in formal and informal style, still may not tailor writing precisely to a variety of purposes and/or readers. Errors in writing rarely disturb natives or cause miscommunication.

O ACTFL, Inc., February 1989