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Information contained in this document is accurate as of 17 September 2010.

The financial tables in this document have

been updated on 31 October 2010.

1.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................................................................ 1

TABLE I. SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS AND FUNDING (GROUPED BY CLUSTER) ......................................... 4 TABLE II. SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS AND FUNDING (GROUPED BY APPEALING ORGANIZATION) ............... 5 2. CONTEXT, RESPONSE TO DATE AND SCENARIOS ................................................................ 9 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 3. Context and Scale of the Disaster ..................................................................................... 9 Response to Date ............................................................................................................ 12 Funding to Date ............................................................................................................... 20 Revision of the Response Plan ....................................................................................... 21 Scenarios ......................................................................................................................... 22

NEEDS ANALYSIS ...................................................................................................................... 24 3.1 3.2 3.3 Relief Needs .................................................................................................................... 26 Early Recovery Needs ..................................................................................................... 29 Strategic Priorities for Response ..................................................................................... 34

4.

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY AND PRIORITIES FOR RESPONSE ..................................... 36 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Key Challenges ................................................................................................................ 36 Implementation Strategy: Overcoming Key Challenges .................................................. 37 Targeting Strategy ........................................................................................................... 38 Coordination .................................................................................................................... 38 Monitoring and Evaluation ............................................................................................... 39

5.

CLUSTER RESPONSE PLANS ................................................................................................... 40 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9 5.10 5.11 5.12 5.13 Overview and Project Selection Criteria .......................................................................... 40 Agriculture ........................................................................................................................ 43 Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) .................................................... 48 Community Restoration ................................................................................................... 52 Coordination and Support Services ................................................................................. 57 Education ......................................................................................................................... 60 Food ................................................................................................................................. 64 Health ............................................................................................................................... 68 Logistics and Emergency Telecommunications ............................................................... 74 Nutrition ............................................................................................................................ 77 Protection ......................................................................................................................... 80 Shelter/Non-Food Items ................................................................................................... 85 WASH .............................................................................................................................. 89 LIST OF PROJECTS AND FUNDING TABLES ............................................................. 94

ANNEX I.

Table III. List of Response Plan Projects (grouped by cluster), with funding status of each .............. 94 Table IV. Total Funding per Donor (to projects listed in the response plan) ..................................... 119 Table V. Summary of Humanitarian Funding for the Pakistan ......................................................... 120 floods outside the Response Plan ..................................................................................... 120 Table VI. Total International Humanitarian Funding per donor to the Pakistan floods ...................... 124 ANNEX II. ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ........................................................................... 127

Please note that response plans are revised regularly. The latest version of this document is available on http://www.humanitarianappeal.net. Full project details can be viewed, downloaded and printed from fts.unocha.org.

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

1.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Over the course of the 2010 monsoon season, Pakistan experienced the worst floods in its history. Heavy rainfall, flash floods and riverine floods combined to create a moving body of water equal in dimension to the land mass of the United Kingdom. The floods have affected 78 districts out of a total of 141 districts in Pakistan, and more than 18 million people one-tenth of Pakistans population devastating villages from the Himalayas to the Arabian Sea. More than 1,700 people have lost their lives, and at least 1.7 million homes have been damaged or destroyed. As of the publication of this revision, seven weeks since heavy rainfall and flash floods claimed their first victims, flood waves continue to devastate the southern province of Sindh, where the full extent of losses and damages may not be known for several more weeks. The Pakistan Initial Floods Emergency Response Plan (PIFERP) was launched on 11 August seeking an initial $459 million to respond to the immediate relief needs of flood-affected people. This revised Response Plan, which takes into account fresh needs assessments, fluctuating beneficiary figures, and an extended planning and budgeting horizon, 1 seeks $1.9 billion to enable international partners (UN organizations and NGOs) to support the Government of Pakistan in addressing the residual relief needs and early recovery needs of floodaffected families for the next twelve months. A midterm revision will be carried out in the first quarter of 2011 to provide more refined data and analysis on early recovery needs. The overarching goal of this plan is to prevent excess morbidity and mortality and to enable floodaffected communities to return to their normal lives. The consequent strategic objectives are:
Revised Floods Emergency Response Plan Key parameters
Duration Number of people affected 12 months (August 2010 August 2011) 18 million people

Key milestones

Target beneficiaries

Official end of monsoon season rabi (spring harvest) and kharif (fall harvest). Planting for rabi: Sept-Oct Start of winter WASH 14 million Health 11 million Shelter 8.8 million Agriculture 7 million Food 6.2 million Protection 5 million Education 1.3 million Nutrition 460,000 Community Restoration (varies by sub-sector; average of 55% of people in need) Funding request per

beneficiary 1. Ensure adequate public health of the flood$1,938,207,278 $97 affected population through an integrated approach or survival strategy combining Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH), health, food and nutrition. Public health surveillance will identify priority areas for the restoration of basic WASH, health and nutrition facilities and services. 2. Provide food assistance and other social protection measures to offer a basic safety net, especially to the most vulnerable. 3. Support sustainable solutions through the provision of shelter assistance, prioritizing interventions that can span emergency shelter, transitional shelter and core housing needs. 4. Restore on and off-farm livelihoods, with a focus on agriculture, livestock, and protection and restoration of productive assets. 5. Restore basic community services and supporting the re-establishment of public administration, health, and education systems.

Total funding requested

Working in support of and in close coordination with the Government of Pakistan and its National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) and other stakeholders, the humanitarian community in Pakistan continues to make all efforts to reach as many of the affected as possible. It is recognized, however, that the sheer scale of the disaster and the unprecedented number of vulnerable people exceeds the capacity of any single stakeholder. The geographical scale of this disaster and the

All dollar signs in this document denote United States dollars. Funding for this Response Plan should be reported to the Financial Tracking Service (FTS, fts@reliefweb.int), which displays continually updated reports on requirements and funding. 1

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

number of affected people makes this a bigger and more complex situation than almost any other ever faced by the humanitarian community. However, the system is scaling up: for example there are now 76 operational organizations in the WASH Cluster, compared to 27 at the start of the floods. With resources stretched even more thinly than usual by the sheer magnitude of the disaster, humanitarian organizations have a clear responsibility to ensure an effective, needs-based response. Strategies therefore draw directly on the evidence and analysis gathered through the completed needs 2 assessments, including the initial Vulnerability Assessment , the Multi-Cluster Rapid Assessment 3 Mechanism (MCRAM) , and government baseline data on all affected districts and communities. The impact and results of the humanitarian communitys contribution will be measured against a set of agreed key performance indicators at the strategic, cluster and project levels. Monitoring and reporting against these indicators will be based on the roll-out of a recently developed Single Reporting Format. This tool, successfully piloted in two of the affected federating units, will allow partners to demonstrate their progress against the strategies presented in this document via a monthly online reporting format. Humanitarian actors will seek to closely coordinate their activities with other partners, including civil and military authorities, civil society, and the private sector to ensure that assistance reaches as many affected people as possible. Humanitarian assistance will be guided by the principle of impartiality and non-discrimination, regardless of status as nationals or refugees and will focus especially on the 4 most vulnerable. Gender equality has been integrated into this response plan in a manner fully consistent with the policy commitments and practices of the Government of Pakistan. Different sets of strategic key performance indicators have been developed for relief and early recovery, which will allow the impact of relief projects and early recovery projects to be measured separately. Where baselines do not exist, the number of people who have been confirmed as affected will serve as a baseline for project-specific performance. Activities of clusters will be developed against key performance indicators that clearly outline the proportion of the baseline that will be targeted. A comprehensive monitoring and evaluation framework has been developed to report against indicators and objectives. Although the resources required to meet all the humanitarian needs caused by the floods could be reckoned as higher than $2 billion, the Humanitarian Country Team has confined itself to this figure for this publication to be sure that its member organizations can fully use the requested resources. As organizations continue to deploy capacity and more information about needs emerges, the sum of requested resources is likely to move accordingly. This revised plan is the product of the Humanitarian Country Team and reflects its collective estimate of the situation and best possible response, devised on the basis of close consultation with the Government of Pakistan. This plan should be considered a living document whose elements will continue to evolve as consultations continue, new information emerges, and additional capacity deploys.

2 Initial Vulnerability Assessments have been carried out by the World Food Programmes Vulnerability Analysis and Mapping Unit in August and September 2010 in Balochistan, KPK, Sindh and Punjab,. 3 A MCRAM took place in four flood-affected provinces from August 24-31. The aim of the assessment was to reach a purposive though not statistically representative sample of the most affected districts and communities and produce a snapshot of beneficiary-identified needs. Randomly selected villages, as well as camps, collective centres and sites of spontaneous displacement in the worst-affected districts were surveyed across a total of 28 districts; 3 in GB, 8 in KP, 8 in Punjab and 9 in Sindh. The male and female assessment teams carried out the assessment in more than 320 villages, conducting male and female structured community group discussions at each village and interviewing over 2800 households. http://www.pakresponse.info/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=4b4fjMGogtc%3d&tabid=86&mid=526 A survey of surveys continues to be refined by an inter-agency Assesments Working Group that was established during the early phases of the response. The Working Group will continue to ensure that overlap between assessments is minimised. 4 For the purposes of this response plan, vulnerability is defined in line with the definition of the Government of Pakistan of vulnerable groups, i.e. socially marginalized groups, women headed households, children, landless, non-ID-card holding Pakistani nationals, older people and people with disabilities, chronic diseases and serious medical conditions.

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Background: Basic Humanitarian and Development Indicators for Pakistan


Most recent data Population Sex ratio (males per 100 females) Economic Status Gross domestic product per capita Percentage of population living on less than $1.25 per day Adult mortality Maternal mortality Under-five mortality Life expectancy Number of health workforce (medical doctors + nurse + midwife) per 10,000 population Measles vaccination rate Prevalence of undernourishment in total population Under-five global acute malnutrition (GAM) rate Food security indicator Proportion of population without sustainable access to an improved drinking water source Primary School Enrolment (net percentage) Secondary School Enrolment (net percentage) European Commission Directorate-General for Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection(ECHO) Vulnerability and Crisis Index score UNDP Human Development Index score 168 million people 108.5 $1,013 22.6% (2000 2007) 206/1,000 (194 female/218 male) 320/100,000 live births 90.4/1,000 66.2 4/10,000 Source Statistics Division, Ministry of Economic Affairs and Statistics, Government of Pakistan Statistics Division, Ministry of Economic Affairs and Statistics, Government of Pakistan World Bank: Key Development Data & Statistics 2008 UNDP Human Development Report (HDR) 2009 WHO: Core indicators UNICEF: Childinfo statistical tables UNICEF: Childinfo statistical tables UNDP HDR 2009 WHO: Core indicators: 2004 2007: United Nations Statistics Division FAO Statistics: Prevalence of undernourishment UNICEF: State of the Worlds Children, 2009 International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) GHI UNDP HDR 2009

Health

80% 23% (2003-2005) 13% Global hunger Index (GHI): 21.7 (2008: Alarming) 10% (2006)

Food & Nutrition

WASH

Education

74/57 m/f 33/26 m/f

UNICEF State of the Worlds Children 2009

Other Vulnerability Indices

Vulnerability Index: 2 Crises Index: 3 0.572: 141 out of 182 (Medium Human Development)
st

ECHO Global Needs Assessment results 2010

UNDP HDR 2009

5 Number of children enrolled in primary or secondary school, regardless of age, expressed as a percentage of the total number of children of official primary school age. (UNICEF SoWC 2009, p 137).

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Table I. Summary of Requirements and Funding (grouped by cluster)


Pakistan Floods Relief and Early Recovery Response Plan 2010 as of 31 October 2010
http://fts.unocha.org
Compiled by OCHA on the basis of information provided by donors and appealing organizations.

Cluster Original requirements ($) A AGRICULTURE CAMP COORDINATION AND CAMP MANAGEMENT COMMUNITY RESTORATION COORDINATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES EDUCATION FOOD SECURITY HEALTH LOGISTICS AND EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS NUTRITION PROTECTION SHELTER & NONFOOD ITEMS WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE CLUSTER NOT YET SPECIFIED Grand Total -

REQUIREMENTS Total Revised requirements ($) B=C1+C2+C3 170,552,906 Early Recovery ($) C1 170,552,906 Relief Relief/Early Recovery ($) C3 Funding

FUNDING TO DATE Unmet requirements ($) B-D 108,340,950 D/B 36% % Covered Uncommitted pledges ($) E -

($) C2

($) D 62,211,956

12,829,817

12,829,817

4,323,596

8,506,221

34%

167,073,420

152,254,698

14,818,722

8,161,687

158,911,733

5%

156,250,000 56,200,000

18,895,517 83,402,534 573,284,476 199,044,064 83,306,454 152,693,094 86,365,884 96,080 420,591,382 106,106,956

18,895,517

7,473,772 7,497,024 238,312,206

11,421,745 75,905,510 334,972,270 139,814,537

40% 9% 42% 30%

2,651,842 1,125,000 1,100,000

6,571,224

59,229,527

15,624,000

50,476,269

49,103,514

1,372,755

35,968,096

14,508,173

71%

14,150,847 2,000,000 105,000,000

44,605,727 52,932,153 321,089,320

20,945,251 25,213,234 126,765,004

17,560,397 14,795,328 191,147,660

6,100,079 12,923,591 3,176,656

22,756,898 11,467,590 95,226,381

21,848,829 41,464,563 225,862,939

51% 22% 30%

110,500,000

244,021,075

138,454,115

101,529,907

4,037,053

57,857,885

186,163,190

24%

459,724,847

1,938,207,278 956,550,640

928,579,763 53,076,875

150,221,174 760,707,792

- 150,221,174 1,177,499,486

0% 39%

2,820,684 7,697,526

NOTE: Pledge: Commitment: Contribution:

"Funding" means Contributions + Commitments a non-binding announcement of an intended contribution or allocation by the donor. ("Uncommitted pledge" on these tables indicates the balance of original pledges not yet committed.) creation of a legal, contractual obligation between the donor and recipient entity, specifying the amount to be contributed. the actual payment of funds or transfer of in-kind goods from the donor to the recipient entity.

The list of projects and the figures for their funding requirements in this document are a snapshot as of 31 October 2010. For continuously updated information on projects, funding requirements, and contributions to date, visit the Financial Tracking Service (www.reliefweb.int/fts).

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Table II.

Summary of Requirements and Funding (grouped by appealing organization)


Paskistan Floods Relief and Early Recovery Response Plan 2010 as of 31 October 2010
http://www.reliefweb.int/fts
Compiled by OCHA on the basis of information provided by donors and appealing organizations.

Appealing organization

Original requirement ($) A

Revised requirement ($) B 2,093,687 249,448 2,909,500 15,930,500 50,847 140,736 357,986 6,493,594 2,490,200 8,583,466 747,866 735,750 2,096,588 100,000 134,965 152,400 3,145,144 91,528 8,939,391 103,289 4,721,345 1,427,450 154,364 946,473 256,713 118,236 266,500 800,000 8,135,658 4,534,144 12,777,471 3,605,229 713,085 731,500 1,625,000 106,998,074 335,745 75,000 2,645,562 515,442 2,709,942 261,500

Carryover ($) C -

Funding

Total resources available ($) E=C+D 500,000 9,796,696 229,863 3,055,865 674,068 5,419,733 348,763 26,572,338 51,380,852 411,822 -

Unmet requirements ($) B-E 2,093,687 249,448 2,409,500 6,133,804 50,847 140,736 357,986 6,493,594 2,490,200 8,583,466 747,866 735,750 2,096,588 100,000 134,965 152,400 2,915,281 91,528 8,939,391 103,289 1,665,480 1,427,450 154,364 946,473 256,713 118,236 266,500 800,000 7,461,590 4,534,144 7,357,738 3,256,466 713,085 731,500 1,625,000 26,572,338 55,617,222 335,745 75,000 2,233,740 515,442 2,709,942 261,500

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($)

($) D

E/B 0% 0% 17 % 61 % 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 7% 0% 0% 0% 65 % 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 8% 0% 42 % 10 % 0% 0% 0% 0% 48 % 0% 0% 16 % 0% 0% 0%

F 100,000 65,531 -

AAGAHI ABKT ACF ACTED ADO AF AIMS Organization AJKRSP AKDN AKRSP AMRDO ARC ARC AWS Bedari BF BFO BRDS BRSP CAMP CARE International CDF CDO CGN-P Children First CHIP CMDO CORDAID CRS CSWC CW CWS DDF DDO DSTC ERF (OCHA) FAO FDO FF Focus Humanitarian Assistance FPHC FRD GPP

500,000 9,796,696 229,863 3,055,865 674,068 5,419,733 348,763 26,572,338 51,380,852 411,822 -

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN


Appealing organization Original requirement ($) A GRHO HAI Hayat HF HHRD HI HIN HRDN ICDI IDEA IDSP IFC IFT IHS IMC INTERSOS IOM IPHD IR Pakistan IRC IRD Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V. JPI Khyber Aid KWES KWH Malteser International MCDO MDF Mercy Corps MERLIN MHI MOJAZ Foundation MSI Muslim Aid NCCR NCHD NGOs NIDA NRC NRSP NWHO OCHA OWO OXFAM GB OXFAM Netherlands (NOVIB) PADO PAI PAIMAN PakRDP Revised requirement ($) B 420,641 2,558,424 124,410 880,000 2,345,130 4,077,721 7,142,615 496,300 96,752 859,060 133,000 1,819,747 172,000 754,118 9,200,741 647,350 114,138,574 303,859 2,440,719 17,757,911 4,375,698 12,000,119 1,259,845 280,000 427,399 91,855 3,311,851 275,170 149,526 202,500 8,014,018 249,618 737,305 250,000 11,348,441 7,329,479 368,000 6,386,895 9,217,654 138,031 10,900,000 250,000 47,740,729 244,969 350,000 1,121,884 8,819,069 180,559 Carryover ($) C Funding Total resources available ($) E=C+D 215,946 131,062 237,950 34,530,974 242,775 5,581,944 315,499 1,592,136 4,919,008 1,818,596 4,304,937 10,017,610 244,969 292,419 215,946 131,062 237,950 34,530,974 242,775 5,581,944 315,499 1,592,136 4,919,008 1,818,596 4,304,937 10,017,610 244,969 292,419 Unmet requirements ($) B-E 420,641 2,342,478 124,410 880,000 2,345,130 3,946,659 7,142,615 496,300 96,752 859,060 133,000 1,819,747 172,000 754,118 8,962,791 647,350 79,607,600 303,859 2,197,944 12,175,967 4,375,698 11,684,620 1,259,845 280,000 427,399 91,855 1,719,715 275,170 149,526 202,500 3,095,010 249,618 737,305 250,000 11,348,441 7,329,479 368,000 4,568,299 9,217,654 138,031 6,595,063 250,000 37,723,119 350,000 1,121,884 8,526,650 180,559 E/B 0% 8% 0% 0% 0% 3% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 3% 0% 30 % 0% 10 % 31 % 0% 3% 0% 0% 0% 0% 48 % 0% 0% 0% 61 % 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 28 % 0% 0% 39 % 0% 21 % 100 % 0% 0% 3% 0% % Covered Uncommitted pledges ($) F 2,651,842 -

($) D

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN


Appealing organization Original requirement ($) A Pattan PES Philanthrope PIDS Plan PODA PRDP PRDS PRSP PRWSWO QC RAHBAR RANNA RDO RDP READ Foundation RHD RI RSPN SACHET SARHAD SAWERA SC SDF SDTS SEPRS Shelter Cluster Consortium Shirkat Gah SOCIO SPO SRSO SRSP SSD STEP Sungi SYCOP SYWO Sukkur Takhleeq Foundation Taraqee Foundation Trocaire UN Agencies UN Agencies and NGOs (details not yet provided) UNAIDS UNDP UNDSS UNESCO UNFPA UN-HABITAT UNHCR 15,624,000 444,100,847 Revised requirement ($) B 498,404 166,000 3,155,000 516,526 701,921 868,000 960,000 5,738,740 4,027,614 258,569 11,675,245 726,667 234,000 327,546 2,248,975 668,200 162,052 2,018,634 11,516,435 81,822 507,040 80,000 116,579,892 269,530 230,328 1,469,210 165,650 1,050,000 349,257 9,063,162 3,135,913 1,232,833 213,145 261,813 164,270 362,000 344,767 250,000 996,226 561,000 82,182,333 3,959,391 6,178,000 29,138,791 55,767,091 134,587,454 Carryover ($) C Funding Total resources available ($) E=C+D 1,133,121 631,869 249,399 37,115,601 344,592 250,000 327,473 1,133,121 631,869 249,399 37,115,601 344,592 250,000 327,473 103,739,527 1,999,956 250,000 1,001,604 8,515,325 3,007,625 72,909,777 Unmet requirements ($) B-E 498,404 166,000 3,155,000 516,526 431,200 868,000 960,000 5,738,740 4,027,614 258,569 11,043,376 726,667 234,000 327,546 1,999,576 668,200 162,052 2,018,634 11,516,435 81,822 507,040 80,000 79,464,291 269,530 230,328 1,469,210 165,650 1,050,000 4,665 9,063,162 3,135,913 1,232,833 213,145 261,813 164,270 362,000 344,767 668,753 - 103,739,527 - 1,999,956 561,000 81,932,333 2,957,787 6,178,000 20,623,466 52,759,466 61,677,677 E/B 0% 0% 0% 0% 100 % 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 5% 0% 0% 0% 11 % 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 32 % 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 99 % 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100 % 33 % 0% 0% 0% 0% 25 % 0% 29 % 5% 54 % % Covered Uncommitted pledges ($) F 1,000,000 1,755,153 -

($) D

- 103,739,527 1,999,956 250,000 1,001,604 8,515,325 3,007,625 72,909,777

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN


Appealing organization Original requirement ($) A UNICEF UNIFEM UNOPS WASFD WFP WHO WVI WVP WWOP YMSESDO YPP GRAND TOTAL NOTE: Pledge: Commitment: Contribution: Revised requirement ($) B 251,107,771 2,710,400 14,309,224 280,273 553,373,699 104,631,122 634,420 2,642,532 172,865 130,272 274,250 Carryover ($) C Funding Total resources available ($) E=C+D 91,558,631 247,017,835 27,819,632 760,707,792 27,819,632 Unmet requirements ($) B-E 159,549,140 2,710,400 14,309,224 280,273 306,355,864 76,811,490 634,420 2,642,532 172,865 130,272 274,250 1,177,499,486 E/B 36 % 0% 0% 0% 45 % 27 % 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 39 % % Covered Uncommitted pledges ($) F 1,125,000 1,000,000 7,697,526

($) D 91,558,631

- 247,017,835

459,724,847 1,938,207,278 "Funding" means Contributions + Commitments

- 760,707,792

a non-binding announcement of an intended contribution or allocation by the donor. ("Uncommitted pledge" on these tables indicates the balance of original pledges not yet committed.) creation of a legal, contractual obligation between the donor and recipient entity, specifying the amount to be contributed. the actual payment of funds or transfer of in-kind goods from the donor to the recipient entity.

The list of projects and the figures for their funding requirements in this document are a snapshot as of 31 October 2010. For continuously updated information on projects, funding requirements, and contributions to date, visit the Financial Tracking Service (www.reliefweb.int/fts).

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

2.
2.1

CONTEXT, RESPONSE TO DATE AND SCENARIOS


CONTEXT AND SCALE OF THE DISASTER

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Over the course of the monsoon season in July and August 2010, Pakistan experienced the worst floods recorded in its history. Heavy rainfall, flash floods and riverine floods combined to create a moving body of water equal in dimension to the land mass of the United Kingdom. The floods have affected more than 18 million people, or more than one-tenth of Pakistans population, devastating villages from the Himalayas to the Arabian Sea. More than 1,700 people have lost their lives, and at least 1.7 million homes have been damaged or destroyed. Nearly 90% of the 1.7 million registered Afghan refugees reside in the flood-affected areas. As of the publication of this revision, seven weeks since heavy rainfall and flash floods claimed their first victims, flood waves continue to devastate the southern province of Sindh, where the full extent of losses and damages may not be known for several more weeks. As flood waters have started receding in northern and central parts of the country, access to affected populations has significantly improved, and millions of women and men have been reached with emergency aid. Assessments indicate that approximately half of those affected require some kind of external assistance to meet their immediate needs, most particularly food, clean drinking water, access to health care, and shelter. Nearly two months after the disaster started, basic utilities such as electricity and gas supply have now been restored in most of the affected areas. However, key social services - including water, sanitation, healthcare, housing/shelter, and education - have all suffered serious damage as a result of the floods, and will take months to restore to their previous state. The floods have destroyed many dikes, embankments and other infrastructure (water channels, link roads and rural infrastructure). These not only need to be rebuilt, but drastically improved to prevent future similar disastrous effect. Any reconstruction should aim at avoiding rebuilding risks, while recognizing that people will have to live with floods as they have done for centuries. The disaster and its aftermath are a direct threat on Pakistans prospects of achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), particularly with regards to education, health, poverty reduction, and mother and child health. Depending upon the environmental management of housing reconstruction, there may be threats to Pakistans MDG on the environment as well. Many years of hard work to achieve progress on the MDGs will have been literally wiped away by the floods and it will take many years of even harder work to get back on track. If relief and life-saving measures are not immediately accompanied and followed by actions to ensure a swift recovery of the affected areas and the country as a whole, there is a potential risk of large numbers of people entering a downward spiral of increasing vulnerability. Early recovery will be key to providing a bridging plan for the restitution of millions affected by the floods. The nature of this disaster has created a unique situation where government and the humanitarian community have had to engage in rescue, relief and early recovery simultaneously across different geographical areas. The World Bank and the Asian Development Bank, with support from the United Nations, are undertaking a Damage and Needs Assessment (DNA) with the aim to map the damage to the countrys infrastructure and economic losses and outline a plan for financial and macroeconomic stabilization and the countrys reconstruction and recovery, including rebuilding livelihoods of the most affected groups, the cost of which is likely to run up to many billions of United States (US) dollars. However, there is an immediate need to start up early recovery activities to ensure that peoples lives saved through the relief effort can be sustained and that spontaneous recovery efforts at community level can be supported until such time that the medium-term reconstruction and recovery efforts will start taking effect. This will not only facilitate the swift transition to full reconstruction and recovery, but also potentially shorten the dependence on relief assistance. Early recovery is therefore a critical part of the humanitarian response.

10

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

11

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

2.2

RESPONSE TO DATE

Government of Pakistan The response of the Government of Pakistan is being organized at various levels, including at the federal, provincial and district levels. The overall leadership for donor coordination rests with the Economic Affairs Division (EAD), whereas the NDMA is responsible for overall coordination of disaster response efforts by both the government and the international community. The NDMA works closely with federal ministries, government departments, the armed forces, UN agencies and donors to mobilize, receive and deploy relief goods. The NDMA is also the coordination body for logistical operations in support of the relief operation. In the provinces, response activities come under the overall leadership of provincial chief ministers. Provincial governments are made up of various line departments. Provincial administrations are headed by chief secretaries. Provincial Disaster Management Authorities (PDMAs) play a critical role as an interface for the humanitarian community. District-level administrations are led by district coordination officers, under whom executive district officers are responsible for district-level line departments. The following is a brief overview of key achievements of the Government as of 17 September:
Helicopters deployed Boats deployed People rescued Tents provided Relief camps established Food packets/meals ready-to-eat provided Food items dispatched Health services provided 61 1238 1.4 million 310,000 5,392 Approx. 2.6 million 53,403 metric tons (MTs) 4.7 million people

The Pakistani military is one of the major national organisations active in the disaster relief operation. There are also approximately 2,500 international troops deployed upon the request of and in support of the Government of Pakistan. The main assets provided are helicopters, field hospitals and water treatment capabilities. NDMA is responsible for tasking the Pakistani and international militaries deployed, and coordinates all requests for national and international military support to humanitarian organizations on the federal level. In the provinces, the Pakistan Civil Administration is filling a similar role. A UN Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination function is located in the OCHA Office to advise and facilitate the relations between international humanitarian organizations and military units in the relief operation. A table summarizing beneficiaries, objectives, and achievements to date appears on page 14.

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Displaced people wait in line for a food distribution in a camp for flood victims in Sukkur, Pakistan. FAO/Truls Brekke

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Beneficiaries (revised numbers) Approximately 1,000,000 rural households (apx 7 million people*: small holding farmers average land holding of the particular area). *assumes family size of 7 people

Consolidated Table of Beneficiaries, Objectives, and Achievements as of 15 September 2010


Objectives/activities (revised) AGRICULTURE In close partnership with relevant local authorities and communities, enable vulnerable farming households (small land holders, landless and sharecroppers and women headed households) displaced and affected by floods to: revive/resume productive agricultural activities contribute to livelihood recovery, ensure food security and self reliance.

Achieved to date

Approximately 1,821,000 people reported as of 1 September by PDMAs and the Education Cluster to be residing in makeshift sites and collective facilities like schools including 376,000 women 355,000 males 1,090,000 children (of which 320,000 are under five years of age). Of this number, an estimated 1 million people will not have returned by end October and 500,000 by end 2010

CAMP COORDINATION AND CAMP MANAGEMENT Ensure coordination with government, PDMAs, and local government actors including district coordination officers and executive district officers, strengthening links between camp management and authorities. Facilitate coordinated and effective service delivery of all sector partners providing relief in temporary shelters and makeshift encampments. Ensure gender-sensitive service provision amongst all partners providing relief and early recovery assistance to flood-affected Pakistanis living in temporary sites. Plan and establish camps as required including access, drainage, water, electricity, site preparation according to standards Information collection/management, including sex/age disaggregated data, promote effective information sharing amongst national, provincial and local authorities and humanitarian service providers. Facilitate mass-information outreach so as to promote transition from displacement to free and informed return and rehabilitation. Coordinate with and advise government/site administrators on phased return plans and land tenure issues so as to address settlement needs of Pakistanis still not returned or moved to new communities Advise and plan closing/decommissioning of collective facilities and encampments sites Strengthen capacity of government actors and partner organizations involved in camp coordination and management, including by strengthening government capacity at the district level to effectively

Rapid agriculture damage assessment missions conducted in 39 out of 79 flood-affected districts. The assessments were conducted in ten of the most floodaffected districts between August 20 27, 2010. 200,000 flood-affected families assisted: 150,000 with agricultural inputs and 50,000 with livestock support. Distribution of supplementary animal feed and veterinary support completed in Kohistan (5,700 families) and continues in Nowhera and Charsadda districts in KPK (12,600 families). Planned soil surveys in areas where flood waters have receded, starting in KPK and assessments of damage and needs in the fishery and aquaculture. CCCM task force meetings are underway in Islamabad and in the provinces. CCCM partner agencies have met to discuss planning and mapping of resources/needs as well as training requirements. Steps are underway to establish contact with the National Database Registration Authority at provincial levels and rapid assessments are underway. Agencies are examining training needs in site planning and camp management at field and district levels. Further site planners are being mobilised from KPK to support field activities. Mobilisation activities in collective centres and temporary camps are being planned to facilitate greater participation of beneficiaries. Partners are most active at field level, particularly in Sindh province where the number of collective centres and camps is greatest. Agencies are reviewing standardised camp profile monitoring forms and the UNHCR Project Tracking Database utilised in Iraq. Sindh CCCM partners have prepared a camp profile monitoring form which is undergoing final revision and will be implemented to ensure standardised data collection

14

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Beneficiaries (revised numbers)

Objectives/activities (revised) coordinate relief and early recovery activities. Ensure identification of feasible sites and appropriate site planning As provider of last resort, plan and erect temporary camps including access routes, water, drainage, electricity pylons, storage facilities, etc

Achieved to date and monitoring. In Balochistan, returns are underway, with some people moving out of Quetta who arrived in recent weeks. Discussions are underway with local partners in regard to mapping/needs assessment. In KPK, IDPs are leaving schools/colleges. As they depart they receive tokens that can be used to redeem non-food items. Returns in Punjab are reported to be quite advanced. The expected longer duration of sites in Sindh due to ongoing flooding is causing agencies to prepare work plans for extended camp-based populations and the creation of possible new sites to shelter people being moved out of schools/colleges which reopen and other settlements. NTR

In recognition of the highly differential impacts throughout the country, and the need for tailoring the response to the resulting needs, the target beneficiaries are the relevant most-affected percentages of the approximately 20.5 million in the affected provinces and regions.

10.1 million of the most vulnerable flood-affected individuals

Of the 20 million flood-affected people, services will be targeted in areas with a total catchment of 8 million potential beneficiaries

COMMUNITY RESTORATION Restore access to essential services (health, education, employment, markets) through employment-intensive rehabilitation of basic/critical infrastructure of flood-affected communities and households at risk; Reduce environmental hazards and disaster risk exacerbated by or resulting from the floods in ways that facilitates the safe and resilient recovery of livelihoods of the affected population; Revive non-farm livelihoods of flood-affected communities through access to income generation and decent employment opportunities; Ensure community ownership and lay the foundations for sustainable recovery by restoring public administration capacities and functions, reactivating participation of women in community-based organizations and promoting partnerships between local authorities, communities and private sector entities. FOOD ASSISTANCE The food cluster aims to save lives, avert hunger and improve livelihoods of 10.5 million flood-affected people by a) continuing to provide relief food assistance to those who remain unable to meet their immediate food needs, and b) initiating early recovery activities to enable these populations to rebuild their livelihoods. HEALTH Reduce the burden of avoidable death and illness through life-saving interventions among flood-affected populations of Pakistan, ensuring that women and men can access health services equally

6.3 million people assisted with food rations during the relief phase. 73,000 mt of food distributed.

4 million people reached with medical supplies and treatments. Emergency reproductive health services provided to 59,664 patients. 1,222 deliveries conducted, in addition to 7,395

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Beneficiaries (revised numbers) for relief efforts of which 300,000 children under five 1,760,000 women of childbearing age of whom 193,200 women will be pregnant in any given month and nearly 29,000 will require some type of intervention at 6. delivery Early recovery interventions will target a total catchment of 11 million people. 1.3 million children

Objectives/activities (revised)

Achieved to date ante-natal and 1,636 post-natal consultations. 445,000 children vaccinated against polio, 428,000 vaccinated against measles. Over 338,000 children received vitamin A supplementation. 165 static health units and almost 1,200 mobile health units operating.

Ensure that all children, adolescents and young people affected by the floods have access to safe learning opportunities. Provide opportunities for teachers and other education personnel to gain skills to address emergency issues and support quality teaching and learning. Identify and provide life-skills for learners to cope with the crises and disaster risk reduction (DRR) skills that are provided through protective and learner-centred methodologies. Ensure that the Education Cluster coordinates all strategies and activities effectively with other clusters, including early recovery. Provide Parent Teacher Association/School Management Committee (PTA/SMC) and education authorities with skills to support teaching and learning for teachers and children in emergency and recovery situations. Strengthen policy framework for education in emergencies, including DRR strategies at national, provincial and district levels.

EDUCATION

Rapid assessment of affected educational infrastructure completed in four districts. 347 Temporary Learning Centers benefiting 32,950 children including 13,800 girls. Some 6,488 adults are benefiting from 397 adult literacy centres. Communication material on proper use of school buildings by IDPs, developed and disseminated to all affected provinces. Cluster coordination mechanism established; Education cluster focal points deployed in all affected provinces and humanitarian hubs. Checklists for mainstreaming gender into flood response activities in education for teachers and implementing agencies, developed and translated into local languages. 196 school in a box kits, 103 recreation kits, 19,805 school retention kits and other essential school supplies distributed to the TLCs (Temporary Learning Centers).

UNFPA: Inter-Agency Field Manual on RH Settings Humanitarian Settings- Pakistan Emergency Floods.

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Beneficiaries (revised numbers) Cluster partners and humanitarian community

Ensure continuous delivery of lifesaving aid to populations inaccessible by surface means. Enable the humanitarian community to respond and operate effectively in flood-affected areas.

LOGISTICS AND EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS

Objectives/activities (revised)

Achieved to date

460,000 (23% children and women (representing of the affected population), with the following breakdown: 300,000 children aged 0- 59 months 160,000 pregnant and lactating women

To provide nutritional support and treatment for malnourished under-five, and pregnant and lactating women through community and facility based programmes; To control and prevent micronutrient deficiencies among children aged 624 months and pregnant and lactating women; To promote appropriate infant and young child feeding practices; To set up nutrition surveillance system and strengthen existing nutrition information system; To strengthen capacity of implementing partners, including government and NGOs; To strengthen coordination of nutrition interventions Ensure equal access to appropriate relief and early recovery assistance for flood-affected people, with a focus on those with specific needs. Ensure that vulnerable people are protected from violence, abuse, exploitation and discrimination. Ensure free and informed return, reintegration and/or durable solutions in safety and dignity for displaced vulnerable populations. Advocate for the rights of people, with specific emphasis on vulnerable groups.

NUTRITION

6 Logistics Cluster Hubs (Peshawar, Gilgit, Multan, Sukkur, Hyderabad, Islamabad) 13 maps issued on the website covering accessibility and logistics hubs/air ops 2290 MT of relief cargo moved by air to inaccessible locations 523 sorties to date 10 inaccessible locations reached by air 7 UNHAS assets delivering emergency relief to inaccessible areas 22,141 m2 of total storage space made available. Security telecommunication services established in Sukkur and Multan. ICT support provided to humanitarian community in Multan, Sukkur and Hyderabad, as well as in Islamabad, Peshawar, Quetta, Lahore, Abbotabad, Muzaffarabad and Buner. 17,762 children and 29,462 PLW reached with supplementary food rations. 18,179 children and 18,722 PLW received micro-nutrient supplementation. 3,538 children de-wormed and 8,313 mothers and community members sensitized on infant and young child feeding and hygiene practices. More than 30 Supplementary Feeding Programmes (SFP) and 30 out-patient therapeutic programmes (OTP) are functional in flood-affected districts.

5 million vulnerable people, of whom the majority is women and children. Further, the cluster plans to reach more than 16 million beneficiaries and key stakeholders with information and messaging.

PROTECTION

147 static and 22 mobile CFSs established nationally providing more than 45,066 children with educational and recreational activities. 24-hour help-lines are operating in Peshawar, Mardan and Swabi (KPK) and Karachi (Sindh), providing counselling and referral services to children in women. 114,834 NFIs (mostly clothes and shoes) distributed to women and children in Punjab and KPK.

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Beneficiaries (revised numbers)

Objectives/activities (revised) Ensure coordinated and effective delivery of protection assistance under the Protection Cluster and Sub Clusters.

Achieved to date 2,141 women and 25,629 children provided with psychosocial support. Out of 397 unaccompanied and separated children identified, 264 have been reunified with family members. 10 Social Welfare Centers established in affected provinces to ensure referral and monitoring. 4 provincial level protection clusters activated, 5 child protection sub-clusters activated. 195,721 tents and 245,517 tarpaulins distributed (over 317,000 households served), in addition to 466, 500blankets, 100,000 kitchen sets and 103,000 units of bedding/mats. 82,000 tents and 459,500 plastic tarpaulins are reported to be in the pipeline, as well as 1,006,000 blankets, 104,000 kitchen sets and 334,000bedding sets and mats.

Of the 1.8million houses damaged and destroyed, the Shelter & NFIs Cluster will target1.44 million households (apx 8.8 million people)* in the relief phase The number of targeted beneficiaries for the early recovery phase will be established by assessments as the situation evolves *assumes family size of 7 people

The objective of the relief phase is to provide life-saving emergency shelter solutions including distribution of tents or tarpaulins and NFIs, to address the rapidly increasing need. Currently, the humanitarian community needs to redirect its focus toward underserved provinces in the country. Provincial breakdown of damaged/destroyed housing units as follows: 1,060,680: Sindh 500,000: Punjab 191,215: Khyber Paktunkhwa 75,261: Balochistan 4,614: Federally Administered Tribal Area 9,138: Other federating units The early recovery phase will focus on providing a safe and durable shelter solution, minimising further displacement and encouraging return of populations in a dignified and sustainable manner. The vast majority are expected to rapidly return to their place or origin and the shelter cluster will support the creation of core shelter, prioritizing the use of local material Contribute to a measurable improvement in WASH-related morbidity and mortality among the affected population through the efficient, effective, and timely implementation of WASH emergency and early recovery programs, targeted at flood-affected women, men, children, and other vulnerable categories (the elderly, the disabled, etc).

SHELTER AND NFIs

13.3 million people currently in urgent need of safe drinking water and basic sanitary assistance

WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE

Cluster partners and humanitarian community

Ensure effective coordination between the Government of Pakistan and the humanitarian community, including by engaging with the National Disaster Management Authority, and by supporting and strengthening its overall coordination role. Ensure strong, inclusive and on-site humanitarian coordination in the emergency phase including by working closely with district coordination

COORDINATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES

3.18 million people supplied with potable water on a daily basis. Hygiene kits supplied to more than 920,000 people, latrines provided to more than 288,000. 365,000 people reached through inter-personal hygiene messaging. Humanitarian Country Team Meeting, Inter-Cluster Coordination Meetings, and General Coordination Meeting (GCM) operational in Islamabad. Humanitarian Coordination Centres in Peshawar (covering KPK), Multan (covering Punjab) and Sukkur (covering northern Sindh) and Hyderabad (covering southern Sindh).

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Beneficiaries (revised numbers)

Objectives/activities (revised) officers and provincial disaster management authorities strengthening the capacity of these actors as appropriate. Ensure inter-cluster coordination, accountable planning, information management and secretariat services to strengthen coordination structures that support coherent, efficient and effective response to immediate and medium-term humanitarian needs and early recovery Ensure dissemination of timely information products that support implementation of the humanitarian response plan by highlighting priority needs, gaps and duplications Ensure and refine strategic planning and advocacy to promote principled action, equitable distribution of support/services and a seamless transition from humanitarian response to early recovery Strengthen inter-agency needs assessments in line with the priorities and plans of the Government of Pakistan. Ensure timely and accurate communication of cluster activities to the affected communities through the Mass Communications Programme Promote the use and the analysis for sex disaggregated date for emergency response programming

Achieved to date Inter-Cluster Coordination Meetings operational in all hubs. District Coordination Meetings operational in all severely affected districts of KPK and partially established in severely affected districts of Punjab, Sindh and Balochistan. Multi-Cluster Rapid Assessment carried out in four provinces The humanitarian response Gender Task Force (GTF) in Islamabad, Peshawar and Multan.

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

2.3

FUNDING TO DATE

The Pakistan Initial Floods Emergency Response Plan requested $460 million for projects in seven clusters. Initial funding for the response plan was swift, with commitments and pledges for the plan totaling more than $307 million by the end of August (67% of initial requirements). An additional $490 million had been pledged or committed outside the framework of the inter-agency plan by that time, for total international humanitarian contributions of $797 million. Funding reported to projects inside and outside this response plan can be viewed on the OCHA Financial Tracking Service (FTS) at:http://fts.unocha.org/pageloader.aspx?page=emerg-emergencyDetails&emergID=15913. Although the pace of contributions decreased significantly during the first two weeks of September, funding for the Response Plan increased to $412 million (89.6% of original requirements) by 15 September. As of 17 September, the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) had released nearly $30 million and has pledged an additional $10 million to nine UN agencies and IOM in response to the widespread flooding in Pakistan. The Emergency Relief Coordinator approved the first allocation of $16.6 million by 10 August to jumpstart life-saving activities. A second allocation of $13.3 million was released between 27 August and 1 September to bolster and expand operations. CERF funds are supporting emergency shelter and NFIs (30%), food (25%), health care (18%) and water and sanitation services (16%) as well as vital common services for the humanitarian community, including telecommunications, aviation services and security. The Emergency Response Fund (ERF) was activated at the beginning of September to provide international and national NGOs, UN agencies, and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) with rapid and flexible initial funds to respond to the floods. By mid-September, more than 30 projects in the priority Food, Health, WASH, and Shelter and NFI Clusters had been selected for funding, for a total of more than $8 million. These projects are being implemented in Balochistan, KPK, Punjab, and Sindh. Six donors and numerous private individuals have contributed $12.6 million to the fund. Total requirements increased substantially during the response plan revision, highlighting significant funding gaps in several clusters, including agriculture, community restoration, and education which were added during the revision.

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

More than 70 countries and numerous private corporations have responded to the Pakistan floods through cash and in-kind contributions to the Government of Pakistan and humanitarian partners on the ground. Several large telethons have raised hundreds of millions of dollars in Kuwait, Switzerland, Saudi Arabia, the United Kingdom, and the United Arab Emirates. Significant financial contributions to the overall response have also come from Pakistan-based civil society organisations and private donors.

2.4

REVISION OF THE RESPONSE PLAN

The Initial Floods Emergency Response Plan, launched well before the peak of floods and the scale of the disaster became evident, focused on rescue and immediate relief for the growing number of victims. Now that in most parts of the country the waters have receded or are rapidly receding, those 7 displaced by the floods have started to return to their damaged homes and lands to salvage what is left of their possessions and rebuild their lives. While there are remaining relief needs to be addressed for a period of up to six months, the main challenge is to rapidly shift towards helping people rebuild their lives over the next 12 months and to prevent the unnecessary delays in rehabilitation and mitigation measures adopted for prevention of recurrence of the humanitarian crisis. The Government of Pakistan is keen to ensure that this shift from relief to early recovery happens as soon as possible. Given the slow progression of the floods from KPK in the north-west to Sindh in the south, return is already well underway in most flood-affected districts, though people are still being rescued in parts of Sindh. As a result, different parts of the country require a mixture of relief and recovery support, with an emphasis mainly on recovery in the North and a shift from relief to recovery expected to follow swiftly in the South. For the purpose of providing clarity and guidance on defining the type of support needed in different parts of the country at different stages and enabling the Government of Pakistan and the international community to monitor and accurately measure progress in overcoming the current humanitarian crisis, the following definitions are being used: Humanitarian aid/assistance: The purpose of humanitarian aid or assistance is to save lives, alleviate 8 suffering and maintain human dignity. Relief (or Emergency Relief) is the part of humanitarian assistance that seeks to: directly preserve life, health and safety directly protect livelihoods and dignity Early Recovery is the part of humanitarian assistance that seeks to: prevent further deterioration of and restoring basic living conditions, services and livelihoods prevent further deterioration of or restore national capacities to lead, manage and sustain recovery processes build on relief and support spontaneous recovery efforts to prevent the recurrence of crisis and create conditions for future development Thus, while relief is life-saving and immediate, early recovery is life-sustaining and time-critical. It is essential that assistance provided under both headings is carried out in close coordination with the authorities, in particular at the district level, in a manner supportive of the efforts of the Government of Pakistan and fully consistent with its primary responsibility to meet the needs of the flood-affected population.

Throughout this document the words displaced and displacement are used in reference to persons who have been temporarily forced by the floods to leave their homes and/or areas of origin by the floods. 8 Good Humanitarian Donorship, Stockholm, 2003, and endorsed by Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development/ Development Assistance Committee (OECD/DAC) in April 2005.
7

21

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

2.5

SCENARIOS

Best-case scenario: Flood waters recede quickly in all affected parts of the country and displaced people are able to return to their homes and lands in a matter of weeks, in time for the rabi planting season, one of two principal crop seasons in the country, which begins in October, with harvest between April and May. Adequate provision of seeds, tools and other agricultural inputs enable a good harvest and the phasing-out of food assistance within the next six months for the vast majority of affected people. The onset of winter in the northern districts is later than normal due to mild weather conditions, meaning that adequate housing can be provided/restored without the need to provide winterized transitional shelter. Most relief support can be phased out after a few months and the country can move swiftly to recovery. Most likely scenario: Flood waters recede quickly in some parts of the country and allow displaced people to return to their homes and lands in a matter of weeks, in time for the rabi planting season. However, some parts of the country (particularly in Sindh) remain flooded for several more weeks and waters remain stagnant, delaying peoples return and causing them to miss the rabi planting season. The onset of winter in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, the Federally Administered Tribal Areas, and other federating units in the countrys north is normal, allowing many but not all houses to be repaired and livestock winterized. Significant but steadily decreasing pockets of relief needs will remain for up to six months, while recovery efforts can start immediately. Core elements of most likely scenario Effects on humanitarian needs and operations Different needs and response modalities required in different parts of the country Prolonged food assistance (beyond six months) required in areas where rabi planting not possible Risk for disease outbreaks in areas that are still flooded Prolonged disruption of critical services in areas that are still flooded Reduced coping strategies for vulnerable and poorest segments of population that continue to live in displacement and/or camps or remained in flooded areas Winterization of shelter and livestock a priority, especially in the north. Steady reduction in relief support in central provinces and increase in early recovery support Markets and prices remain inflated in cut-off areas until regular road networks and bridges are restored. Steady improvement in access to affected areas and communication networks. Need for strong and effective coordination structures across areas and clusters to ensure timely, needs-based and appropriate assistance Some restrictions on humanitarian access due to limitations on movement on goods as well as people (humanitarian workers, especially international staff, as well as affected population)

Onset of winter in the north, steady normalization in central provinces, and pockets of stagnant waters in parts of the south

Access is restored across most of the affected areas, with some remaining gaps in regular road networks Large number of diverse actors carrying out relief and early recovery activities across many geographical areas Continuing concerns related to the safety and security of operaitons

Worst-case scenario Flood waters recede slower than expected due to drainage problems, failure to close recent breaches, and/or extreme weather at the end of the monsoon, preventing significant numbers of people from returning in time for the rabi planting season. Onset of winter in the north is earlier and more severe than normal, allowing for only partial winterization. Large and persistent pockets of relief needs will remain for the entire six months period under this revised Response Plan and possibly beyond, potentially hampering or delaying recovery efforts in places.

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

In both the worst- and best-case scenarios, there is a need for re-thinking the humanitarian response within a longer term perspective as part of the framework of the global climate change scenario, as scientific predictions have suggested monsoon-related catastrophes will happen more often. The present impact of the catastrophe has had profound changes on the physical and human geography of the Indus river basin. The MCRAMsurvey statistics should be coupled with inputs from specialized agencies such as the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT) and United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in order to provide a more systematic input into the new human and physical geography.NDMA and the Government of Pakistan in general should be supported and strengthened for disaster risk management to respond to future disasters.

Fever-ridden Jeber Sadikr, 4, is cared for by his mother at a makeshift shelter on an elevated road after floods displaced them from their home. FAO/Truls Brekke

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

3.

NEEDS ANALYSIS

Beyond the immediate life-threatening effects, the floods are expected to have a significant negative impact on Pakistans development prospects over the coming years. The damage to economic infrastructure and agriculture is immense. Irrigation, drainage and storage facilities are heavily affected. Farmers who lost their crops and who are not able to plant their fields by November are likely to remain dependent on food assistance or other forms of social transfers until well into 2011. Hundreds of thousands of others lost their shops or other small businesses. Food prices are likely to be unstable. Prices for seeds and other agricultural inputs are expected to rise. The humanitarian consequences of the disaster are immense, with more than 20 million people affected by the floods. The degree of severity to which people have been affected by the floods varies depending on their particular losses and damages. Government and humanitarian community needs assessments have now been carried out in all affected provinces to identify severely affected families who require life-saving humanitarian assistance. Baseline figures for losses and damages by province are as follows: 9 Affected populations and damages by federating unit
(http://www.pakresponse.info/figures/ListofAffectedDistricts_13Sept.xls

Province Punjab

Deaths 110

Injured 350

Houses Damaged 500,000

Population Affected 8,200,000

Sindh

199

1,072

1,098,720

7,000,000

Severely affected 10 districts Muzzafargarh, Rajanpur, Mianwali, R.Y. Khan, Layyah, D.G. Khan, Bhakkar Kashmore, Shikarpur, Jacobabad, Larkana, QambarShahdadkot, Thatta, Dadu, Jamshoro Tank, D.I. Khan, Kohistan, Peshawar, Charsada, Nowshera, Lower Dir, Upper Dir, Shangla, Swat

Moderately affected districts Multan, Sargodha, Khushab, Jhang S. Benazirabad, Hyderabad, Matiari, T.M. Khan, Tandu Allah Yar, Sukkur, Khairpur, Naushero Feroze, Ghotki Lakki Marwat, Bannu, Abbottabad, Battagram, Mardan, Chitral, Karak, Kohat, Malakand, Mansehra, Swabi, Buner, Hangu, Haripur

KPK

1,156

1,198

200,799

3,800,000

Balochistan

48

102

75,261

1,300,000

11

Nasirabad, Jaffarabad

Neelum Other federating units Total 254 147 9,928 300,000

Sources: NDMA, PDMA (9 September 2010) & www.pakresponse.info, 7 September 2010 )

1,767

2,869

1,884,708

20,600,000

Sibi, Kachi, Killa Saifullah, Loralai, Mussakhail, Sherani, Hamai, Jhal Magsi, Kohlu, Barkhan Bagh, Bhimber, Kotli, Mirpur, Muzafarabad, Neelum, Rawlakot, Astor, Diamir, Ghanche, Ghizer, Gilgit, Hunza-Nagar, Skardu

The term federating unit is used in this document to refer to both provinces and regions. Breakdown of severely and moderately affected districts provided by the Government of Pakistan. 11 This figure is compsed of 700,000 affected people affected residing in Balochistan, and 600,000 IDPs from Sindh who have taken refuge in Balochistan as a result of the floods.
9 10

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

The forthcoming Damage and Needs Analysis that will be undertaken by the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank, with support from the United Nations, aims to provide more detailed analysis on baseline figures. Women and children are likely to be disproportionately affected by the disaster. Women have limited access to income-generating opportunities even at the best of times and are at greater risk of being dispossessed of property and assets. Domestic abuse and gender-based violence, common outcomes of disaster situations, and both priority concerns of the Government of Pakistan, may increase. Children are more vulnerable to infectious diseases and malnutrition, the effects of which are life-long. Factors including cramped living conditions during periods of temporary displacement, mean that children are also at heightened risk of exploitation and abuse. The following table shows number of people in need per cluster, people reached to date, and the planned beneficiaries per cluster. People in People reached Planned % of people in need of need of by the cluster beneficiaries assistance targeted by assistance to date (per cluster cluster Needs and gap analysis of clusters included in the initial Floods Emergency Response Plan (more detail available in each individual cluster response strategy) 12 13 14 Food 10.1 million 4.9 million 6.2 million 60% Shelter 13 million 2.1 million 13 million* 100% WASH 20.6 million 3.2 million 13.3 million 67% Health 11 million 4.5 million 11 million 100% 460,000 children under five, Nutrition 13.3 million 37,000 800,000 35% pregnant and lactating women Protection 10.1 million 500,000 5 million 58% Needs and gap analysis of clusters NOT included in the initial Floods Emergency Response Plan Agriculture 7 million* 150,000 people 7 million 100% Varies by subCommunity sector (average 20.6 million None* varies restoration of 55% of people in need) 23,475 children 1.3 million 9 million and 5,790 children, and Education 14% children adolescents and teachers and adults parents Cluster

*Calculated using an average household size of seven people (http://www.statpak.gov.pk/depts/pco/statistics/pop_sex_ratio_growth_rate/pop_sex_ratio_growth_rate.html)

Based on WFP Initial VAM. Figure is based on loss of assets. Households were included: 1) whose houses were completely destroyed by the floods; 2) whose houses were significantly damaged and rendered uninhabitable; and 3) who suffered extensive crop loss. 13 This includes in-kind assistance provided to date by the UN and major NGOs, but excludes cash transfers or assistance provided by the government (these data were not available). 14 Assumes that around 40% of the required food assistance will be provided by actors who are not part of the Floods Emergency Response Plan, including the civilian Government, the military and others.
12

25

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Funding requirements to meet the resulting relief and early recovery needs are: Early Recovery $956,550,640 Relief $928,579,763 Relief/Early Recovery $53,076,875 Total Requirements $1,938,207,278

For further details, see the summary and detailed financial tables in this document, or consult the Financial Tracking Services webpage for the response plan for the most up-to-date financial figures. Since the launch of the Pakistan Initial Floods Emergency Response Plan (PIFERP), the number of affected people has increased from 12 million to 20.6 million.

3.1

RELIEF NEEDS

Relief needs continue to centre on public health, immediate access to food, and emergency shelter solutions. The Government of Pakistan, through NDMA, has itself identified food, shelter/non-food items (NFI), health, and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) as its four priority sectors for the relief phase of the response, with the relief response being complemented by the nutrition sectors. An Initial 15 Vulnerability Assessment (VAM), carried out by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and partners in the four most affected provinces, has identified more than 10 million people as 16 extremely vulnerable and needing immediate relief assistance. Food 17 With regard to immediate foods needs, all households surveyed by MCRAM teams (families living in camps, collective centres, host families, spontaneous settlements, or at the site of damaged houses) reported unavailability of food stocks as a key concern. At least in the short term, the floods have limited access to food by restricting markets: around 30% of communities said that the nearest market was still closed. Only 25% of women and 50% of men said they had access to a functioning market. Households were reported resorting to a range of coping strategies that are known to have negative effects. These included debts, borrowing, reducing meal size, skipping meals and women eating less than men. A few weeks in to the disaster a small number of households already reported they will spend less on health care in order to purchase food and others reported they will withdraw children from school. Based on WFPs further analysis of the MCRAM data, around 55% of households surveyed at the household level said that they had no food stock or would run out within one week. For example, 8.4% of women and 9.1% of men reported going without food the day before they were interviewed, with much higher levels reported in Sindh (17.6% and 19.3% for women and men, 18 respectively). The impact of the floods on the nutritional situation of children and pregnant women could be significant: almost half of nursing mothers report at the household level that they have reduced breastfeeding and around 15% have stopped breastfeeding since the floods. Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) among children 6-59 months was at 9% based on globally used thresholds for midupper arm circumference (MUAC). In spite of ongoing efforts to deliver food in affected areas, the delivery and distribution of food will continue to be a major challenge. Moreover, because many areas affected by the disaster have already experienced high levels of poverty and food insecurity, and the most severely affected people were chiefly small farmers and agricultural labourers, it is expected that

15 Initial Vulnerability Assessments have been carried out by WFPs Vulnerability Analysis and Mapping Unit in August and September 2010 in Balochistan, KP, Sindh and Punjab. 16 Extremely vulnerable people are defined in this context as households who lost everything in their houses and need immediate relief (including those whose houses are fully destroyed, severely damaged or otherwise uninhabitable). 17 A MCRAM took place in four flood affected provinces from August 24-31. 18 See Pakistan Flood Impact Assessment (WFP, forthcoming).

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

many households will remain highly or moderately food-insecure until their homes, agricultural lands and jobs have been restored. Shelter Across the flood-affected areas of Pakistan, thousands of makeshift camps have been erected to facilitate aid to the needy, and thousands of schools, colleges and other government and private facilities are being used as provide temporary shelter. According to the Education Cluster, for example, some 5,633 schools/colleges are currently being utilized as temporary shelters by more than 1.3 million people. In addition, there are currently well in excess of half a million people in spontaneous settlements. Preliminary figures on camp populations are as follows: Population Locations (households) 170 schools and other Balochistan 50,000 open-air sites 800 temporary KPK 87,500 sites/public facilities Punjab 691,000 2,073 sites Sindh 1,000,000 3,100 temporary sites Totals 1,828,500

Source PDMA/Education Cluster Education Cluster PDMA

As the school year commences and public buildings return to their intended use, it is expected that people will seek out other sites where authorities are establishing new camps, necessitating support from Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) cluster members in site planning, training and other staffing and planning. Government authorities have dispatched line departments to prepare temporary facilities and make-shift encampments. However, despite these efforts, shelter, sanitation, water and other facilities are frequently inadequate. Latest assessments carried out by Provincial Disaster Management Authorities and humanitarian agencies such as the WFP indicate that the floods have damaged or destroyed 1.8 million homes across the flood-affected federating units. The overwhelming scale of need and constantly evolving situation mean that full coverage of all affected households cannot be realistically achieved within a short time frame. In line with the decision of the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) to extend the appeal period to one year, the Shelter and NFI Cluster has revised its strategy to provide emergency relief and early recovery assistance to the population affected by the floods in Pakistan. The following table shows the current distribution and pipeline coverage for emergency shelter:
Federating Unit Balochistan FATA KPK Punjab Sindh Other federating units Unknown TOTAL Shelter Need 76,136 4,557 228,483 466,969 1,072,632 10,856 1,859,633 Emergency Shelter Served / HH 11,535 419 159,502 87,890 39,573 6,372 305,290 Emergency Shelter Pipeline 2,450 57,696 31,625 16,930 201,813 310,514 Remaining Need / HH 62,151 4,138 11285 347,454 1,016,129 4,484 1,445,641

Displaced populations are already beginning to return to their places of origin as the water recedes. The humanitarian community will support the Governments efforts to support returnees immediately to prevent further and/or prolonged displacement and encourage sustainable returns. Through the MCRAM and other assessment tools, the humanitarian community has been able to categorize the current living situation of the affected populations as follows: 9% host family, 13% in collective centres, 19% in planned camps, 10% in spontaneous settlements, 40% returned to or remained on site of house, and 9% who cannot return for six months.
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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Households surveyed for the MCRAM reported significant shelter needs, with 42% reporting that their house has been completely destroyed by the floods and 27% expressing fear that they may have lost the land that their house was built on. Households highlighted the following as their top three concerns regarding the current shelter and housing situation: Lack of financial means to rebuild Inability to return to their usual place of residence Absence of house/shelter When asked about their immediate priorities for shelter support, families indicated that they needed materials to rebuild and repair, tents, temporary shelter or cash. The overall approach within the Shelter Cluster will be in line with the two-pronged strategy of relief and recovery. Within the relief phase, the shelter/NFI cluster will ensure that those whose homes have been seriously damaged or destroyed in the floods have access to emergency shelter and NFIs that provide basic protection from the rain and sun, as well as providing privacy and dignity. The early recovery phase will focus on providing a safe and durable shelter solution, leading towards resumption of flood-affected peoples normal lives. The focus will be on assisting those whose homes have been destroyed or heavily damaged by providing appropriate means and structural materials for repair and rehabilitation, primarily based upon the use of traditional building materials enhanced with appropriate technical assistance and support for revitalizing the supply chain of key materials. Environmentallyfriendly approaches will be adopted, and local materials will be used as far as possible. Traditional patterns of housing will be fully respected. Local procurement will be encouraged to ensure needs are met as quickly as possible. Health Of the 20 million people affected by the floods, over eight million are in urgent need of health care, among a general population which, even prior to the crisis, had limited access to social services. Prior to the current crisis, approximately 80% of the total health expenditure was from direct out of pocket payment and there was no functional social security system (two thirds of consultations take place in 19 private facilities (mainly in urban area). Humanitarian access is plummeting rapidly with people either exposed to or already facing serious negative health consequences and insufficient access to health services. As of 1 September, assessments from four flood-affected provinces showed that of 2,957 health facilities in the affected districts, at least 236 health facilities had been damaged and 200 destroyed. Most of these were the primary providers of basic health services, mainly in rural areas, although several referral hospitals have also been damaged or destroyed. Management capacity of the local health systems in the flood-affected districts has virtually collapsed, with District health authorities are overstretched and unable to cope with the service demand. The health workforce is also affected. It is estimated that at least 35,000 lady health workers (LHW) are displaced. Skilled workers need to be deployed, both in temporary health facilities established for the camps and in health facilities still functional but serving the increased patient load. Public health risks are exacerbated by inadequate sanitation, compromised safe water supply, potential food shortages, malnutrition and low levels of immunity. With the high rate of chronic malnutrition among children (30-35% of children are stunted), in a context of possible food insecurity there is fear of increasing acute malnutrition. Reports from epidemic-prone diseases surveillance from affected areas show an increasing number of cases of water-borne diseases contracted through direct contact with polluted waters and vectors and increased numbers of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) (reported via the health clusters disease early warning system [DEWS], which is operational in all provinces). Other critical health concerns in affected areas include dysantary, hepatitis A and B and malaria.

19

WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean (WHO EMRO) Health system observatory. 28

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

WASH Evidence gathered in four of the worst-affected provinces through the MCRAM provides a detailed qualitative picture of the needs identified by affected communities themselves. With regard to the public health situation, the MCRAM shows a marked increase in the reliance on unimproved water sources (especially in Punjab and Gilgit Baltistan), with numbers of people accessing protected water 20 sources dropping from 71% to 46%. Only 28% of households reported having appropriate, safe water storage. Less than 20% of households living in the affected areas covered by the assessment reported that they had access to toilets that they found clean and functioning, leading to a marked increase in open defecation. The non-availability of safe drinking water and damage to sanitation infrastructure is causing skin problems and infections, especially among women and children, as well as acute diarrhoea and other water-borne disease. Stagnant water where people live remains in all federating units, causing a potential public health threat. Southern Sindh and eastern Balochistan have been particularly badly affected in this regard. Protection In terms of protection concerns, households in all provinces reported the loss of documents such as national ID cards, property documents and birth or death certificates. Various assessments, including the MCRAM, identify the lack of privacy for affected women and girls as a serious issue. The floods have washed away not only household items but also clothing. The loss of chadars (cloth wraps) can create significant anxiety for women and girls. Families are sleeping in open spaces and purdah is violated as female members are exposed to unfamiliar surroundings. Experience shows that understanding the specific needs of particular groups in disaster-struck communities is a crucial element for effective relief and the finer nuances of gender-based disaster response cannot be overlooked in this response plan. Womens perceptions of having sufficient privacy For using the latrines Less than 40% report sufficient privacy For bathing Less than 40% report sufficient privacy To breast feed children Less than 30% report sufficient privacy
Source: MCRAM

Gender analysis and collection of sex- and age-disaggregated data will be a pre-requisite in the response. Application of these will facilitate reporting on results allowing who in the population has been reached and whether men and women are benefiting equally from services and support. A roster of gender workers (experts and social mobiliser) for field missions has been developed, so that female presence (which is a pre-requisite for carrying out interviews with women and girls) can be assured. A preliminary rapid gender assessment of Pakistans flood crisis has also been undertaken by the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM), mapping gender concerns from the onset of the floods to current relief camps, flagging issues for upcoming stages of early recovery. The single reporting format that will be rolled out will ensure that the needs of vulnerable groups are properly captured, including through appropriate disaggregation of data. The cluster will coordinate its efforts closely with those of the Government of Pakistan.

3.2

EARLY RECOVERY NEEDS

Relevant data and information collected by humanitarian organizations and government officials have identified significant early recovery needs particularly in terms of agriculture and livelihoods, community infrastructure, shelter, education and health. The Government of Pakistan, through NDMA, has identified the following six sectors as priorities for the early recovery response: on/off-farm livelihoods, community infrastructure restoration, education, health, shelter (see the needs analysis presented above) and governance restoration.

The Pakistan Social and Living Standards Measurement Survey (2008) reports that overall 92.8% of households have access to an improved drinking water source.
20

29

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Agriculture By all accounts, agricultural losses are dramatic: in three out of four areas surveyed by the MCRAM (Gilgit Baltistan, Punjab and Sindh), the majority of households interviewed in the worst-affected districts reported losing 90%-100% of cropland. Farming and landowning was reported to be the main source of income for nearly half of the households surveyed in the sample (and actual numbers may be much higher, as unskilled and skilled labour and retail can also be predominantly agriculture21 dependent in rural areas). An earlier preliminary damage assessment carried out by the Agriculture Cluster reported that approximately 80% of the population in the flood-affected areas depend on agriculture inclusive of crops, livestock, fisheries and forestry for their livelihood. A broad variety of key standing crops such as rice, maize, vegetables, and sugar cane have been lost just before the current harvest and crop land has been damaged just prior to subsequent rabi wheat planting season beginning in September/October.
Field Crops (damage in hectares)
Federating Unit Punjab Sindh KPK Balochistan Other federating units Total Cotton Sugarcane Rice Maize Pulses Fodder Crops 110,565 3,934 0 4,932 0 119,431 Summer vegetables 5,005 6,044 8,137 35,722 1,296 56,204 Others Other Orchard s 25,686 3,150 4,745 0 177 33,758 Total

315,769 99,930 206 0 0 415,905

64,467 20,072 41,986 0 0 126,525

72,086 217,074 36,542 41,455 113 367,270

2,782 0 92,206 15 9,474 104,477

50,865 0 6,807 0 0 57,672

14,411 7,284 391 10,245 182 32,513

636,637 357,488 191,020 92,369 11,242 1,313,755

Livestock losses (head of livestock)


Died in Floods 62,765 54,064 105,042 51,740 723 274,334 Indirectly Affected 4,361,000 7,376,115 739,429 1,621,144 228,000 14,325,688 Sold at Low Prices 9,800 NK NK NK 1,900 11,700 Animal Sheds Destroyed 10,700 33,000 NK NK 2,700 46,400 Poultry Farms/ Birds 459,000 NK NK NK NK 459,000 Govt. Veterinary 13 9 NK NK NK 22 Extension Dept. Field Offices 17 0 NK NK NK 17

Federating Unit

Fisheries

Punjab Sindh KP Balochistan Other federating units Total NK: Not Known

916 NK 23 NK NK 939

Damage to irrigation infrastructure (number of systems) Federating Unit Punjab Sindh KPK Balochistan Other federating units Total Primary 55 NK 14 NK 132 201 Secondary 64 NK 332 NK NK 396 Tertiary 5,166 433 2,601 NK NK 8,200 Tube Wells / Others 10,200 NK 437 NK NK 10,637 Total 15,485 433 3,384 NK 132 19,434

NK: Not Known Source for all tables: Agriculture Cluster Preliminary Damage Assessment, Sept. 2010. (http://www.pakresponse.info/assessments/AgricultureCluster_Preliminary%20Damage%20Assessment%20in%20the%20Agric ulture%20Sector_Sept2010.pdf.

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Agriculture Cluster. Preliminary Damage Assessment in the Agricultural Sector for Flood Affected Areas of Pakistan. 9-14 August 2010. 30

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Community Restoration In the wake of the floods, there have been significant changes in peoples livelihoods. According to the MCRAM, the percentage of households describing themselves as without a main source of livelihood has increased from 10% before the floods to almost 60% now. Meanwhile, farming has dropped from being the main form of livelihood for around 50% of households to less than 10%. Nonfarm livelihoods are also heavily affected by the floods more than half of households not engaged in agriculture said that their business/employment situation was totally affected, while only 19% of households reported that their non-agricultural livelihood had not been affected. When asked what they needed in order to reclaim their livelihoods, households cited land reclamation, finance, and inputs (such as tools) as their key priorities. A high degree of damage was reported in relation to community infrastructure, and people expressed concern about their future ability to access mosques, schools, health centres and other social services. Most people surveyed did not yet know the status of government buildings in their place of origin. Shelter Latest assessments carried out by PDMA and humanitarian agencies such as WFP indicate that the floods have damaged or destroyed 1.8 million homes across the flood-affected federating units. As indicated in the table on affected populations and damages by federating unit (above), Sindh is by far the worst affected province with over 1 million houses destroyed or damaged, followed by Punjab with almost half a million and KPK with over 200,000. Apart from the numbers, there are significant regional differences in terms of needs and materials required for people to obtain adequate shelter. In northern districts where winter can be very cold, shelter solutions need to be implemented that provide families with warm accommodation, whereas in Sindh, Punjab and Balochistan there is less need for winterization. While materials or cash could be provided for repairs to households whose houses are partially damaged, the full reconstruction of destroyed houses would be too costly and time-consuming to be feasible during the humanitarian phase (the Damage and Needs Assessment will provide further analysis and possible solutions on this issue). On the other hand, providing transitional shelter risks this becoming permanent but ultimately substandard accommodation and a waste of resources if full housing reconstruction starts under the reconstruction and recovery phase. The best option is therefore to aim at providing affected households with means to reconstruct at least one room as the first stage in the full reconstruction of their houses, using materials commonly used in that particular part of the country and based on a floor plan of what will ultimately become a complete house. Provision of reconstruction materials will need to be closely coordinated with emergency shelter activities; experience from the 2005 earthquake suggests that prolonged provision of temporary shelter directly impacted upon the pace of housing reconstruction. Health There are as yet no complete data on the number of health facilities damaged or destroyed, but as indicated in the Relief section in the Needs Analysis (above) on health-related issues, out of 2,957 health facilities in the flood-affected districts in four provinces at least 236 health facilities have been damaged and 200 destroyed. This points to a significant but not insurmountable challenge in terms of restoring access to at least primary providers of basic health services, particularly if those facilities least damaged are restored first and priority is given to areas where the health care management system is least affected. Rehabilitation of health facilities and health infrastructure more generally will be critical. Mobile health facilities will be needed to cover areas where static facilities are limited. WASH There are as yet no full data on the number of water supply systems, protected water sources and toilets in the affected areas. As mentioned above in the Relief section of the Needs Analysis, based on MCRAM data only 46% of households interviewed reported having access to protected water sources and a mere 20% to toilets they considered clean and functioning. Only 28% reported having appropriate and safe water storage facilities. Detailed data from DCOs are being collected, not only
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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

on the numbers but also the agree to which water supply systems and other WASH facilities have been affected, allowing for a prioritization of repairing the least damaged systems and facilities first. This will enable a rapid phasing out of large scale water tankering and provision of purification tablets to a level that is more sustainable and would allow for the subsequent repair of more heavily damaged or destroyed systems and facilities. Education Education recovery needs will be significant. At the time of the MCRAM assessment, schools throughout affected areas were closed for vacation. However, the Government reports that more than 10,900 schools are damaged or destroyed and 5,633 school buildings are being used as collective centres. Past experience in Pakistan has shown that when public buildings such as schools are used as collective centres, they need to be rehabilitated before they can again be suitable for the resumption of education activities. Temporary structures are also required for totally damaged schools to ensure that education continues during the transition period. Environmental issues Relief and early recovery efforts might also be affected by environmental issues, such as mud or silt covering agricultural land and the possible pollution of mud/slit with pesticides from storage sites. Other key environmental issues include landslides, disaster waste management, and hydro-carbon spills from depots and a refinery as outlined in the United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination (UNDAC) Rapid Environmental Assessment from early September 2010. The environment will be integrated as a cross-cutting issue in the humanitarian response. The Government has highlighted in particular the need for reusable material to be provided as shelter support where possible. For the most up-to-date list of all assessments conducted, see http://www.pakresponse.info.

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

The flooded village of Talli in the Sibi distribct in Balochistan. UNHCR/N. James

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

3.3

STRATEGIC PRIORITIES FOR RESPONSE

Based on the needs analysis presented in the previous section and taking into account the most likely scenario, the Humanitarian Country Team and the clusters have developed this humanitarian response plan, which represents a strategic framework to assist the flood affected population, in a manner fully consistent with the sovereignty of the Government of Pakistan and its primary responsibility to provide protection and assistance. The dual objectives are: Preventing excess morbidity and mortality Enabling flood-affected communities to return to their normal lives The international humanitarian community is one of only several actors responding to the needs of flood-affected families. In order to maximize its contribution, the Humanitarian Country Team has identified the following as areas in which the international humanitarian community can offer a distinct added value especially in terms of reaching the most vulnerable: Supporting the Government to ensure strategic coordination of assistance provided by all stakeholders Technical advice and capacity support Material and financial support Advocacy on humanitarian needs and the rights of flood-affected people The humanitarian community, working together with other actors, aims to leverage its comparative advantage in these areas by focusing on the following five strategic priorities and related indicators:
STRATEGIC PRIORITY Indicator Target Phase Main Clusters Ensuring adequate public health of the flood-affected population through an integrated approach combining WASH, health and nutrition. Public health surveillance will be used to identify priority areas for the restoration of basic WASH, health and nutrition facilities/services. Global acute malnutrition (GAM) rate of 1. No increase, by end RELIEF Health children under- five in flood-affected January WASH population, compared to pre-flood 2. No increase, by end Nutrition baseline. January Shelter/NFIs Incidence of severe communicable 3. Six million people, Food disease (including vector-borne and by October Education water-borne) among flood-affected 4. % of agencies Protection population, compared to pre-flood completing the baseline. monthly Single Number and proportion of displaced, Reporting Format. returning, and otherwise severely floodaffected people having access to basic essential services up to humanitarian standards (including emergency shelter and NFIs, emergency education, food and nutrition, health services, physical security, potable water, and sanitation). Full and continuously updated mapping of needs, coverage and gaps, by October 1. Providing food assistance and other social assistance measures to offer a basic safety net, especially to most vulnerable, until peoples livelihoods are restored. Proportion of food-insecure people who 5. 100% RELIEF Food receive all necessary food assistance. Shelter/NFIs CCCM Protection Community Restoration

1
1. 2.

3.

4.

5.

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Supporting sustainable solutions through the provision of shelter assistance, prioritizing interventions that can span emergency shelter, transitional shelter and core housing needs.

6. Number and proportion of displaced 6. 1.6 million, by EARLY Agriculture people returning to home communities October 7. Target RECOVERY Protection or finding other durable solutions (local pending for indicator 7 Community integration, resettlement). Restoration 7. Number and proportion of people with Shelter/NFIs destroyed or severely damaged homes receiving support to re-build homes; number and proportion effecting repairs that allow re-inhabitation. Restoring on and off-farm livelihoods, with a focus on agricultural activities, livestock, and protection and restoration of productive assets 8. Number of people requiring 8. No more than 50% EARLY Agriculture humanitarian relief (broken down by type of target RECOVERY Community of relief) at end January 2011, compared population, by 31 Restoration to September 2010 baseline. January. 9. Number of hectares planted with rabi 9. Target pending for and kharif crops among flood-affected indicator 9 farming households, compared to pre10. Target pending for floods baseline. indicator 10 10. Number of healthy livestock held by flood-affected households, compared to pre-flood baseline. Restoring basic community services and supporting the re-establishment of public administration, health, and education systems. 11. Number and proportion of people with 11. 80% of most EARLY Community impaired livelihoods receiving support vulnerable, based on RECOVERY Restoration sufficient to restore short-term selfneeds assessments, Protection reliance. by 31 July. Health 12. Number and proportion of public 12. 100% of public Education administration offices (e.g. revenue administration offices department) functional in the most severely 13. Number and proportion of functioning affected districts, by educational facilities and health services. 31 July. 13. 100% of facilities in most severely affected districts, by 31 July.

The common services of logistics, emergency telecommunications and coordination will support clusters in achieving these strategic priorities, in collaboration with government partners. Proactive efforts will be made to identify the most vulnerable groups and individuals in need of protection and assistance. The information systems adopted will be coordinated across all stakeholders, including government and humanitarian organisations, to achieve simplified, fast-tracked information on assistance and services.To ensure that international support supplements the efforts of the Government of Pakistan to address the differentiated impacts of the disaster on the affected population, data disaggregated, inter alia, by sex, age and location will be collected and analysed. Similarly, in order to fully understand who is accessing humanitarian support, all participating clusters will submit reports presenting disaggregated data. Next Steps This Response Plan is an ongoing framework to strategize and measure the response. Next steps include detailed mapping of project activities to district and sub-district (tehsil) level so as to ensure the maximum possible coverage of needs plus real-time reporting on results; prioritization among projects in the Response Plan, to guide donors to the most urgent unfunded projects; and monitoring, with continued adjustment of the project portfolio as needed (for example new projects for areas found to be under-served). The humanitarian community will continue to work closely with the Government at all levels to refine priorities and maximise the impact of its support.

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

4.
4.1

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY AND PRIORITIES FOR RESPONSE


KEY CHALLENGES

Meeting both the immediate relief and early recovery needs of flood-affected families is not a straightforward exercise, particularly in light of the sheer scale of the disaster. An analysis of the response to date suggests that the HCT must be prepared to design strategies for overcoming at least the following challenges: Scaling up capacity: a lack of human resources and skilled staff to carry out coordination and information management functions has hampered the response especially at sub-national levels. Capacity varies significantly across districts as well as provinces, with those areas that have previously coordinated humanitarian responses (such as Khyber Pakhtunkhwa) faring relatively better in terms of capacity when compared to areas that have not previously experienced disasters at such a large scale. Capacity to scale up: faced with immense need spread out across the whole country, humanitarian agencies have struggled to identify sufficient human resources, especially technical experts, to link up quickly and effectively with local capacities already on the ground. This particularly applies to provinces such as Punjab and Sindh (where the vast majority of humanitarian actors did not have a significant presence or established partnerships prior to the floods) and in Balochistan (where problems of access and security have made it difficult to scale up as rapidly as was required). While the humanitarian system has managed to scale up comparatively well with regard to logistics (and meet its targets in sectors that rely heavily on logistical capacity), there have been significant gaps in sectors that require a high degree of technical expertise. Pipeline and procurement: a lack of availability of certain relief items has significantly slowed down a number of sectors, including shelter, WASH and nutrition. A limited production capacity in national and local markets combined with global shortages of certain materials (related in part to the high demand for relief goods in Haiti) has led to significant delays in the sourcing of key relief items such as tents, tarps, water bladders, water purification tablets and nutritional supplements. In addition, access to certain areas and beneficiaries has been hampered due to logistical challenges such as damaged infrastructure. Delays in adopting emergency procurement procedures has also slowed down a few actors. Uneven fundingacross the response: while donors have given generously to the Response Plan, some sectors (including WASH and Health) only began to receive significant funds several weeks into the response. Especially for technical sectors, agencies have expressed concern that initial funding has focused too heavily on material goods and hardware as opposed to basic operational costs (including staff and start-up costs for establishing offices in new areas). It should also be noted that funding has been channelled primarily to the larger UN agencies rather than smaller technical agencies and frontline implementing agencies such as international or national non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and that greater efforts are required to ensure a diversity of funding channels and modalities. It has also been recognised that more is required to ensure that funding allows for even geographical coverage across the country. Gaps in information management and reporting: an initial lack of dedicated information management capacity in some clusters has led to missed opportunities for improving the efficiency, effectiveness and visibility of the humanitarian response. Data collection and analysis have been hampered by the lack of uniform and standardized reporting formats, especially at the local and provincial levels, and by a lack of clearly-defined roles and responsibilities relating to data reporting and sharing. Time-span of the crisis: the gradual evolution of the floods, which are still causing new devastation and swallowing up whole villages seven weeks into the response, has challenged the humanitarian community to respond simultaneously with rescue, relief and early recovery activities. It has also led to some areas such as Khyber Pakthunkhwa being comparatively better served than others, as humanitarian actors focused their initial attention on those areas
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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

that first emerged as severely affected. This type of approach requires strong capacities to assess, analyse, and flexibly respond to the differing needs across a diverse geographical area. Coordination: due to a large number of partners working together in many new operational areas, the response has been accompanied by a high risk of duplication and gaps.

4.2

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY:

OVERCOMING KEY CHALLENGES

In order to overcome the challenges outlined above, the HCT has agreed on a number of concrete actions and formulated the following plans: Scaling up capacity: drawing on the lessons learned from past humanitarian responses (especially in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and the Federally Administered Tribal Area), the HCT will expand its support to government to provide strategic and capacity support for coordination at district, provincial and federal levels to all stakeholders involved in the humanitarian response, including civilian and military authorities, civil society, the private sector and others. Specifically, humanitarian agencies will focus on identifying local and national civil society networks or organizations and strengthening their response capacity through technical support (including information management) and material or financial inputs. Initial experiences with the development of the Response Plan and the Pakistan Emergency Response Fund indicate a clear interest from local and national actors to strengthen linkages with international organizations and create closer partnerships through the cluster approach. A mapping of presence and capacities of national and local organisations across Pakistan will be completed to allow international actors increase their response capacity by working through national networks. This process will be carried out in close coordination with NDMA and other government entities. Responding to pipeline problems: in light of the clearly identified gaps in global and national supply chains, the clusters have already begun adapting their response strategies by developing innovative and situation-specific solutions for responding at scale (for example in the Shelter Sector, where agencies agreed very early on in the response to pare down household shelter kits to essential items to increase the overall beneficiary coverage). Similarly, all clusters will work closely with the Logistics Cluster to identify alternative supply sources and effective ways of sourcing materials either locally or from emerging markets such as China. It shall be ensured that the procurements are made in a transparent manner. Local procurement will remain the preferred option, to ensure that relief items can reach target beneficiaries as quickly as possible, and clusters will continue to reach out to local markets in this regard. Raising funds to support the response: all clusters and humanitarian organizations are regularly communicating with donors about humanitarian needs and related funding requirements, in bilateral conversations as well as group meetings such as the monthly donor breakfast and biweekly informal donor briefings. Proactive media strategies, supported by high-level visits (such as the UN Secretary-Generals visit) and celebrity work, have all contributed to raising the profile of the Pakistan floods internationally, in both traditional and non-traditional donor markets. The Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) and the Pakistan Emergency Response Fund have provided donors with a strategic funding mechanism in support of the response. The latter will require regular replenishment from donors to ensure predictable, needs-based funding especially for NGOs. Strengthening information management and reporting: initial weaknesses in information management capacity are now being addressed through the deployment of qualified field staff. More than 50 information management specialists have now been deployed in Islamabad and provincial coordination hubs by the twelve clusters and the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). Support to the information management capacity of the NDMA and PDMAs continues to be scaled up. Weekly meetings of the information management (IM) and Geographic Information System (GIS) Working Groups have resulted in the development of common standards, including the Single Reporting Format that will serve as the primary monitoring and reporting tool for the response articulated within this response plan. OCHA has been tasked with ensuring that project-level information is reported according to this format in a

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

timely manner. It will be necessary to provide additional support to district-level government partners to ensure that this system operates effectively.

4.3

TARGETING STRATEGY

Across all clusters, proactive efforts will be made to identify the most vulnerable groups and individuals in need of assistance. This requires a strong focus on cross-cutting issues. Government data on losses and damages by district and province, the list of severely-affected districts that are being prioritised by the Government, as well as initial vulnerability assessments provide a solid foundation for ensuring provincial equity by focusing the humanitarian communitys efforts on the most severely affected areas and communities. In addition, a recently developed inter-agency Survival Strategy will allow humanitarian organizations to draw up daily updated analysis from the field-based surveillance mechanism to identify high-risk communities and ensure that assistance delivery is evidence-based and distributions are appropriately targeted.

4.4

COORDINATION

Coordination mechanisms to support the humanitarian response have already been established at several levels. Further strengthening of of these mechanisms is imperative to ensure availability of accurate and timely information both for planning and monitoring of progress. At the federal level the overall leadership with regard to coordination of the humanitarian response rests with NDMA, acting in consultation with the Humanitarian Coordinator and the HCT. At provincial level the humanitarian community will work through the PDMAs, most of which have been reinforced through the creation of humanitarian coordination centres and provincial/area hubs (including in Hyderabad, Multan, Peshawar, Quetta, and Sukkur) and deployment of more than 50 cluster coordinators. Coordination at the district level is of critical importance given the close contact that District Coordination Officers (DCOs) maintain with both response operations and beneficiaries. District-level coordination structures have already been established in several key districts in KPK, where DCOs chair district coordination meetings which include government and humanitarian partners. Sectoral working groups, co-chaired by relevant Executive District Officers (EDOs), have also been established in these districts, functioning in many respects as district-level clusters. OCHA will continue to strenthen the coordination capacity of district authorities through the establishment of additionalsatellite offices in flood-affected areas, where a suite of coordination services will be provided, including contact lists, meeting schedules, maps and who what where products. Precise support needs will be established in close collaboration with the DCOs themselves. Efforts in this regard are already underway in several severely affected districts in Sindh, Balochistan, Punjab and KPK. These support structures are expected to be fully operational across worst-affected areas by the end of the relief phase. At all levels, coordination will be strengthened through the cluster approach, working through the following 12 clusters: Cluster Agriculture Community Restoration Food Health Primary Governmental Counterpart Ministry of Agriculture National Disaster Management Authority and Provincial Disaster Management Authorities National Disaster Management Authority and Provincial Disaster Management Authorities Ministry of Health
38

Cluster Lead Agency (for cluster partners, see cluster response plans) FAO UNDP WFP WHO

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Shelter & NFIs WASH Logistics, Emergency Telecommunications Coordination Nutrition Education Protection Camp management/ Camp Coordination

National Disaster Management Authority and Provincial Disaster Management Authorities Ministry of Environment, Provincial Public Health Engineering Departments National Disaster Management Authority and Provincial Disaster Management Authorities National Disaster Management Authority and Provincial Disaster Management Authorities Ministry of Health Ministry of Education Ministry of Social Welfare National Disaster Management Authority and Provincial Disaster Management Authorities

IOM UNICEF WFP OCHA UNICEF UNICEF/Save the Children UNHCR UNHCR

4.5

MONITORING AND EVALUATION

The impact and results of the humanitarian communitys contribution will be measured against a set of agreed key performance indicators at the strategic, cluster and project levels. Monitoring and reporting against these indicators will be based on the roll-out of a recently developed Single Reporting Format. This tool, which has been successfully piloted in two of the affected provinces, will allow partners to demonstrate their progress against the strategies presented in this document via a monthly online reporting format. Specifically, Single Reporting Formats will collect information on the following issues to track progress against objectives: Project budgets and expenditure Partners (including government agencies and implementing partners) Project locations (to tehsil level) Beneficiaries Activity types and outputs Key performance indicators An online reporting system to facilitate data entry has already been developed, and is now in its final testing phase. A series of training workshops to support humanitarian organizations (especially fieldbased staff) who will use the new reporting formats will be carried out by OCHA immediately after the launch of the response plan to pave the way for the first round of reporting. Government counterparts will be invited to participate also. OCHA will act as a focal point for collection of project-level information on the online system. A Federal Oversight Body for this response plan, chaired by Economic Affairs Division with representation from the relevant Ministries/Agencies, such as Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Finance and the NDMA, donors and the humanitarian community led by the UN Special Envoy for Assistance to Pakistan, supported by the Humanitarian Coordinator/OCHA, will be established to monitor the progress, ensure compliance with the reporting system and review the plan on a quarterly basis. The first review will be made by the end of January 2011. Relevant provincial authorities (including line agencies) will ensure that projects are in line with response plan objectives and contribute to the monitoring of projects though their participation in clusters and working groups.

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

5.
5.1

CLUSTER RESPONSE PLANS


OVERVIEW AND PROJECT SELECTION CRITERIA

The Cluster Response Plans presented in the following sub-sections outline the plans both to respond to remaining relief needs and to provide support to early recovery. Most of the remaining relief needs are addressed by the following clusters: CCCM: By providing emergency support to displaced people temporarily accommodated in camps, public buildings and makeshift sites. Food: By providing relief food assistance to those who remain unable to meet their immediate food needs. Health: By reducing the burden of avoidable death and illness through life-saving interventions among flood-affected populations of Pakistan. Logistics and Emergency Telecommunications: By ensuring continuous delivery of life-saving aid to populations inaccessible by surface means. Protection: By ensuring equal access to appropriate relief assistance for affected persons, with a focus on those with special needs, and ensuring that vulnerable people are protected from heightened risks of violence, abuse, exploitation and discrimination brought on by the floods. Shelter and NFIs: By distributing tents or tarpaulins and NFIs as emergency shelter solutions. WASH: By focusing on maintaining and upgrading water and sanitation facilities to temporary settlements, improving personal hygiene practices in families, and ensuring that minimum accessibility standards are promoted and used. The CCCM and Logistics and Emergency Communications Clusters will be focused exclusively on the relief effort. Early Recovery needs are addressed by the following clusters: Agriculture: By enabling vulnerable farming households to revive/resume productive agricultural activities, thereby contributing to livelihood recovery, food security and self-reliance. Community Restoration: By restoring access to basic community infrastructure and services, reviving non-farm livelihoods, restoring public administration and local governance capacities for recovery and addressing environmental hazards and increased disaster risks as a result of the floods. Education: By supporting the restoration of the education system in flood-affected areas, both formal and non-formal education. Food: By contributing to the restoration and rebuilding of livelihoods and economic security of targeted populations in the affected areas in close collaboration with technical government departments and other partners particularly from the Agriculture and Community Restoration Clusters. Health: By preserving and restoring access to basic health care, reducing financial barriers and ensure rehabilitation/ re-establishment of primary and secondary health services; and developing national and local health emergency management capacities: risk assessments, disaster risk reduction, emergency preparedness and safer hospitals. Nutrition: By providing nutritional support and treatment for malnourished under-five children and pregnant and lactating women; controlling and preventing micro-nutrient deficiencies; promoting appropriate infant and young child feeding practices; setting up nutrition surveillance systems; and strengthening capacities of implementing partners. Protection: By ensuring equal access to appropriate early recovery assistance for affected people, focusing on those with specific needs, and ensuring that vulnerable people are protected from heightened risks of violence, abuse, exploitation and discrimination brought on by the floods.. Shelter and NFIs: By providing support to people with heavily damaged or destroyed houses at their place of origin.

40

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

WASH: By focusing in the construction and rehabilitation of water and sanitation facilities in affected communities to at least pre-disaster levels, incorporating disaster risk reduction (DRR) based improvements wherever possible, as well as building capacities within communities and local government for water and sanitation management. The Agriculture, Community Restoration and Education Clusters will be focused exclusively on the early recovery effort. Coordination and Support Services will be required for both relief and early recovery operations. The HCT adopted the following criteria, based on the strategic objectives for humanitarian action, to guide the selection of the projects that support the cluster response plans. These criteria have also been applied to distinguish between relief and early recovery projects. Criteria for selection and prioritization of relief projects (maximum of six-month timeframe): 1. Projects that save lives and provide immediate alleviation of the suffering of affected populations. Projects that address the immediate needs of displaced persons, returnees, or those who never left their areas of origin, Criteria for selection and prioritization of early recovery projects (maximum of twelve-month timeframe): 1. Projects that support the restoration and improvement of basic conditions for affected populations to return and rebuild their lives, in particular access to basic services, transitional shelter and means to repair houses, and food security, with attention to increasing equality for the most marginalized population segments. 2. Projects that support spontaneous recovery initiatives by affected women and men. 3. Projects that aim to support, restore and improve livelihoods, access to services, local economy and coping mechanisms of affected populations. 4. Projects that address the protection of returnees and non-displaced affected persons. 5. Projects that reduce disaster risk through immediate, short-term disaster protection measures. 6. Projects that reduce reliance on relief assistance. There are also projects that can be categorized as both relief and early recovery. However, the HCT has recommended the clusters to keep these to a minimum as follows: 1. Projects that mainly provide relief support, but include elements of early recovery in order to ensure that relief support can be kept to a minimum are categorized as relief (for example onthe-job training of local health or nutrition workers to take over responsibilities from international organizations and NGOs). 2. Projects that mainly provide support for early recovery, but need to continue a minimum amount of relief support to create conditions for the early recovery support to take effect are categorized as early recovery (for example continuation of water trucking while the community water system is being repaired). 3. Projects that address the needs of displaced populations in the area of displacement are categorized as relief. 4. Projects that address the needs of returnees or non-displaced affected populations with both relief and early recovery support should be categorized as early recovery. The Gender Task Force (GTF) in Pakistan was very active in the revision of the Response Plan. The GTF participated actively in cluster coordination meetings, advised clusters on including important gender issues in cluster response plans and projects, and distributed a gender marker toolkit. The GTF then reviewed all cluster vetted projects and applied a gender score to each of these projects based on the following criteria: 1) reflection of sex, age and vulnerability disaggregated data; 2) connectivity between gender issues in needs, planned activities and anticipated outcomes; 3) greater participation of women in decision making.

41

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Score 2b 2a 1 0

Description Principle purpose of project is to advance gender equality Project is designed to contribute significantly to gender equality Project will likely make insignificant contributions gender equality Project does not address or contribute to gender equality

Number of projects* 96 99 219 65 479

% of total projects 20% 21% 46% 14% 100%

Total * Subject to slight modification in final report

Overall, 41% of all project proposals scored 2a or 2b which indicates that they aim to advance 22 or contribution significantly to gender equality . The percentage of projects in each cluster which falls under these two categories ranges from 25% (shelter and NFI) to 89% (nutrition). Food, WASH, and Education mainstream gender in less than 40% of their project proposals, while Community Restoration, Health, Protection, CCCM and Agriculture all mainstream gender in 40% to 60% of their project proposals.

Although good progress appears to have been made in mainstreaming gender equality into Response Plan projects, cluster partners still need to make gender relevant to clusters and the GTF must deepen its engagement with non-traditional clusters where more projects reflect no visible or limited potential to contribute to gender equality. By demonstrating the differential impact of assistance and support on people and the vulnerable, these objectives are possible.

Three generations of the Hafiz family, the youngest only three days old left their farm a month ago, having lost the harvest, their seeds for the next season and all their animals in the flood. They have found shelter in a school in Sukkur. FAO/Truls Brekke

22

Excludes coordination and logistics and emergency telecommunications. 42

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

5.2

AGRICULTURE
FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS (FAO) In close partnership with relevant local authorities and communities, enable vulnerable farming households (small land holders, landless and sharecroppers and women-headed households) displaced and affected by floods to: revive/resume productive agricultural activities contribute to livelihood recovery, ensure food security and self-reliance Approximately 1,000,000 rural households (small-holding farmers- average land holding of the particular area) affected by floods $170,552,906 See current cluster contact list: www.pakresponse.info

Cluster Lead Agency Cluster Objectives

Total Number of Beneficiaries Funds Requested Contact Information

NEEDS ANALYSIS The scale of losses to the Agriculture Sector caused by the Pakistan floods in 2010 is unprecedented and further unfolding. Approximately four out of five people in the flood-affected areas depend on agriculture (comprising crop production, livestock, forestry and fishery resources) for their livelihood. Initial cumulative estimates of the impact of the floods on the Agriculture Sector are as follows: 1.3 million hectares of standing crops have been damaged out of a total of 9.7 million hectares sown during this season according to the Ministry of Food and Agriculture/SUPARCO (Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission) Over two million hectares of cultivatable land damaged, including standing crops (e.g. rice, maize, cotton, sugar cane, orchards and vegetables) 0.5-0.6 million MTs of wheat stock for the upcoming planting season have been lost 23 1.2 million large and small animals, and six million poultry have been lost

23 Department

of Livestock. 43

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

The direct and future losses are likely to affect millions of people at household level, as well as impact national production of staple crops, such as wheat, maize and rice. One of the greatest challenges is helping farmers to recover and plant their land in time for the critical wheat season in September/October and to prevent further livestock losses. Women farmers (73% of women in rural areas are economically active) face some of the gravest threats, particularly in terms of their claims to land and water. Agriculture is the key to bridging the gap between relief and development by reducing dependencies on emergency relief and establishing the foundations for longer-term, large-scale reconstruction and recovery. If urgent support is not provided to ensure at least limited planting of staple, fodder and subsistence crops, household food security and household incomes will be reduced, future seed stocks will not be built up and livestock fodder next year will not be produced and stored (maize/sorghum stalks are a main source of winter fodder). If the humanitarian community is not able to provide this support for the upcoming Rabi wheat planting season which runs from September to November 2010, the bulk of affected people will have no significant opportunity to restore their livelihoods until the middle of 2011, when the next planting season (kharif) takes place. Similarly, if urgent support is not provided to keep surviving livestock alive bearing in mind that they are already severely stressed many livestock will die and distress-selling at increasingly low prices will become the norm. This will result in reduced income streams, reduced nutrition and the rapid depletion of household assets. Livestock assets are particularly important as a buffer against future crises their loss will therefore raise future vulnerability. If urgent support is not provided to recover the loss of forest and tree resources, the affected households will face serious problems with fuel wood and the croplands will continue to be affected by landslide and sedimentation processes. In close partnership with relevant local authorities and communities, the clusters objective is to enable vulnerable farming households (small land holders, landless and sharecroppers and women-headed households) displaced and affected by floods to revive/resume productive agricultural activities to contribute to livelihood recovery, ensure food security and self-reliance. Beneficiaries/targeting strategy (numbers and types) Approximately one million rural households (small holding farmers- average land holding of the particular area) affected by floods are in urgent need of agriculture assistance. Of these, the agriculture cluster aims to target: 700,000 households with crops inputs packages A partly overlapping 700,000 households with livestock inputs packages Teams making up 500 workers for 100 days in each of 700 union councils throughout the affected areas Damaged on-farm critical infrastructure and lands requiring rehabilitation/preparation in 700 union councils 500 fish farms 50,000 fisher households A total of 111 service structures requiring refurbishment and restoration of capacity to provide essential agricultural services OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES, OUTPUTS AND INDICATORS The Agriculture Cluster seeks to restore on and off-farm livelihoods (for men and women, young as well as old), with a focus on agricultural activities, livestock, and protection and restoration of 24 productive assets/resources and services though: 25 Crops: Provision of inputs (seeds, fertilizer and small tools ) for the Rabi (winter planting) 2010 and Kharif (spring planting 2011) seasons.

There should be consideration that assistance provided should reach to the maximum number of farmers while the value of different packages should remain more or less in the same range.
24

44

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Livestock: Provision of life-saving supplementary feed/fodder, transitional and emergency animal shelters, primary veterinary care for animals (including therapeutics, disinfectants, and instruments and supplies to treat injuries, control of external parasites, vector control, and calving problems), public awareness campaigns on hygienic methods to minimize zoonoses (such as heating milk, cooking food, and hygienic slaughter methods), animal handling facilities at camps if large numbers of livestock are present, and subsequent restocking of small ruminants and/or poultry. Agriculture lands and infrastructure: Repair of on-farm critical infrastructure (on-farm irrigation channels, water courses and water harvesting structures) and land 26 rehabilitation/preparation (cleaning, clearing, terracing, drainage, ploughing, and stabilization). Fisheries: Repairing, cleaning and restocking of private and government fish ponds, fish farms and hatcheries. Support to rehabilitation of sustainably managed freshwater fisheries and the provision of fishing livelihood inputs to existing fishers. Forestry: Distribution of fast growing tree seedlings to provide fodder, fuel and watershed protection, as well as fruit tree saplings. Establishment of small-scale and family run tree nurseries and analysis of feasibility of landslip stabilization programmes. Agricultural services: Restoration of the capacity (human, physical, financial, organizational, 2728 tools, and processes) to provide essential agriculture related services. The above interventions will help ensure long-term food security, restoration of lost income streams and reduced vulnerability. It will also give people the confidence that recovery is possible and is taking place a vital psycho-social boost after the trauma of recent weeks and months. ACTIVITIES In the initial response phase, the cluster will: refine situation analyses and response plans, with a gender perspective and a special focus on vulnerable groups such as orphans and the elderly. protect and restore livestock productivity of surviving animals through the provision of animal feed, medication and shelter. provide vegetable seeds, particularly focusing on women and female heads of households, to support immediate resumption of kitchen gardening activities in order to respond to immediate food security requirements. provide support for the clearance and de-silting of critical on farm irrigation infrastructures, where upstream irrigation structures are intact. distribute critical agricultural inputs for the Rabi 2010 planting season, including wheat seed, pulses, fodder seed, fertilizer, and small agricultural tools. These activities will be complemented in the short to medium term with the following activities: Rehabilitate on farm irrigation infrastructures (e.g. relining) and provision of water harvesting structures. Provide agriculture inputs for the 2011 kharif season. Support to natural resource management, including aquaculture and forestry-related interventions. Restocking of small ruminants and poultry, with associated provision of feed and shelter. Support to horticulture and farm forestry sectors. Build the capacity of all stakeholders.

Sets of agricultural tools foreseen should fit with proposals for inputs supply in terms of quantity required, and should be suitable for wheat planting, rice planting, orchards, or for livestock feeding. 26 It is important to let women and other vulnerable groups participate in decision-making and planning (i.e. rehabilitation of small-scale irrigation system, reconstruction of bridges in irrigation canals, pump provision for home gardens and household consumption, etc.). In Sindh province on 2006 about 70% of available water was utilized only for irrigation and the rest mainly by the industry. As a result there was very limited water at household level. 27 Special efforts should be made for strengthening womens and youth groups since they often do not participate in farmers organizations and other local institutions. 28 Including public and private veterinary institutions.
25

45

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Indicators Flood-affected farming households (especially women headed households) will able to return to their normal way of life and the vulnerability ofsmall land holders, landless and sharecroppers, and women headed households is reduced. Number and % of households who return to normal way of life ex-ante. Number and % of households provided with productive assets. Number of women, and youth and elderly provided with productive assets. Number and % of men and women enrolled/engaged in cash-for-work (CFW) activities. 30 Number of vulnerable people, including women, benefited through CFW and the creation of temporary employment opportunities as % of total vulnerable population. Acres of farm lands cleared of standing water, rubble, mud and debris as % of total affected farm land. Acreage of affected areas reseeded to restore crops. Acreage of affected areas replanted and stabilized with trees. Number of community-based organizations and % of population (including women) they cover reactivated; number of womens organizations as part of total. Number of community restoration initiatives through partnerships between local authorities, community organizations and private sector entities and % catering to the needs of women and girls. Number of direct beneficiaries provided (disaggregated by sex) with access to services / facilities as % of total affected population. Number of spot checks done to assess peoples access to services. Number of planning, coordination, information and other meetings conducted with participation of local authorities, community organizations and private sector entities. Number of women and men beneficiaries attending planning meetings. CLUSTER MONITORING PLAN An organizational development capacity approach will be adopted for restoring/developing strong partnerships between the affected communities, community based organizations (CBOs)/NGOs, private sector and government institutions in all aspects of farm household 31 restoration. An action-oriented integrated participatory approach will be adopted for the restoration of agricultural lands and infrastructure, the repair of fish farms and hatcheries and reviving on-farm and fisher livelihoods, and the restoration of forestlands and stabilization of landslide prone areas. To the extent possible, interventions will take place simultaneously in order to exploit linkages and ensure an integrated and holistic response to livelihoods restoration. Experience has shown that gender analysis can help planners and policy makers improve the performance of their endeavours.

29

To the extent possible and where relevant, all data for the listed indicators will be disaggregated by sex, age groups and people with special needs. 30 Vulnerable: Susceptible to being physically or emotionally wounded or hurt. Vulnerability: A combination of already existing factors that determine or predispose the degree of loss to which someone's life and livelihood is exposed by a discrete and identifiable event in nature or society. The detailing of distinct vulnerability types is indispensable. Lavell, A., 2000. Guidelines for Inter-Agency programming for disaster reduction. 31 Gender roles in agriculture should be analysed properly at the project formulation stage. There are activities, for example poultry and rearing of small to large ruminants, which are the responsibility of women and majority of women farmers, can benefit especially the landless and those whose major source of livelihoods are livestock. Similarly during the provision of tools/machinery, roles of women should be assessed. For example in some parts of the country women are involved in sowing, harvest and post-harvest management, while in some areas their roles are limited to post harvest only. Women should therefore be equipped according to their needs.
29

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Agriculture Cluster Members with Projects in the Response Plan Aga Khan Rural Support Programme (AKRSP), Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development (ACTED), Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Church World Service (CWS), Civil Society Human and Institutional Development Programme (CHIP), Concern Worldwide, Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Helping Hand for Relief & Development (HHRD), Human Appeal International (HAI), Initiative for Development and Empowerment Axis (IDEA), International Organization for Migration (IOM), International Relief and Development (IRD), Islamic Relief Pakistan (IR-P), OXFAM GB, PAIMAN Alumni Trust, Participatory Rural Development Society (PRDS), Realistic Approach to Nature and Nation Awareness (RANNA), Relief International (RI), Rural Development Project (RDP), Rural Health & Development Foundation (RHD), Save the Children (SC), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

47

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

5.3

CAMP COORDINATION AND CAMP MANAGEMENT (CCCM)


UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR REFUGEES (UNHCR) 1. Ensure support and capacity-building of authorities at district, provincial and national level to facilitate coordinated and effective, gender-sensitive service delivery in temporary shelters and makeshift encampments. 2. Enhance capacity of authorities in IM and collect and manage information, including sex/age disaggregated data. 3. Facilitate mass-information coordinate with objectives of authorities. 4. In close coordination with the Government, to ensure identification of feasible sites and facilitate site planning and when necessary plan and erect temporary camps including access routes, water, drainage, electricity pylons, storage facilities, etc. Approximately 1,821,000 people reported as of 1 September by PDMAs and the Education Cluster to be residing in makeshift sites and collective facilities like schools including 376,000 women 355,000 males 1,090,000 children (of which 320,000 are under five years of age). Of this number, an estimated 1 million people will not have returned by end October and 500,000 by end 2010 $12,829,817 See current cluster contact list: www.pakresponse.info

Cluster Lead Agency Cluster Objectives

Total Number of Beneficiaries

Funds Requested Contact Information

NEEDS ANALYSIS Initial UNHCR field assessments in affected areas of Balochistan, KPK and Punjab, as well as reports from PDMAs indicate that the need for temporary camps and camp management support will be fairly brief. Returns are taking place in all provinces. While returns are underway in Sindh, many Pakistanis are finding that areas remain affected or there is a lack of rehabilitation assistance or available humanitarian aid in their home areas. However, due to on-going flooding expected to ensure through late September in Sindh, collective facilities and make-shift sites in these areas will endure for a longer period. Site planning expertise is an urgent requirement and will remain so for the initial period after which the focus should turn to training and capacity-building via aid agencies working at provincial and district level outposts established in these sites so agency camp monitors ensure regular monitoring. For smaller encampments, mobile teams will monitor groups of camps. In relation to sites in schools, provincial authorities are identifying alternative public buildings and open areas that can be used as temporary camps upon the resumption of the school year. Authorities will need support in site planning and self-reliance/community mobilization which will be channelled via District Coordination Officers (DCOs), PDMAs and NDMA as well as charities and benevolent groups overseeing sites which will be offered training. While it is expected that many of the 1.8 million people residing in encampments and collective shelters will be in a position to return home in the next eight weeks, based on experience from the 2007 Pakistan floods which left many areas inundated for up to a year, the relief stage will endure particularly in Sindh Province. Final closing/decommissioning of encampments and collective sites may last into 2011. OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES, OUTPUTS AND INDICATORS In light of these needs, the CCCM cluster aims to: 1. Support and ensure coordination with government/PDMAs, strengthening links between camp management and authorities. 2. Facilitate and strengthen coordinated service delivery of all sector partners. 3. Ensure gender sensitive and other cross-cutting service provision amongst all partners. 4. Support the planning and establishment of camps in close coordination with the Government as required, including access, drainage, water, electricity, site preparation according to standards 5. Information collection/management, including sex/age disaggregated data using a uniform format. Promote effective information sharing amongst national, provincial and local authorities and humanitarian service providers and training in IM.
48

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

6. 7. 8.

9. 10. 11.

Facilitate mass-information outreach ensuring coordination with authorities to promote return. Work closely with the other relevant Clusters to help flood-affected people benefit from solutions. Advise District Coordination Officers, PDMAs and NDMA as well as local charities and benevolent groups on the closing/decommissioning of collective facilities and encampments sites Strengthen capacity of NGOs, charities and government actors involved in camp coordination and management. Ensure identification of feasible sites and appropriate site planning where necessary As provider of last resort, at request of District Coordination Officers and in close coordination with PDMAs plan and erect temporary camps including access routes, water, drainage, electricity pylons, storage facilities, etc.

ACTIVITIES Supplement the efforts of the Government in site planning, assisting when necessary as provider of last resort, to identify and set up new temporary sites according to international standards. Facilitate organic links with DCOs, PDMAs, gender and child cell, NDMA, other authorities and all other clusters including Shelter, WASH, Protection, Food, Medicine and Education. Regularly monitor camp indicators and promote effective referral mechanisms amongst all actors to address needs in service delivery and management. Support the Governments efforts to ensure that special measures are taken to provide separate accommodation for unaccompanied children and young women away from adult males so that adequate privacy and female-friendly spaces are available. Ensure that vulnerable groups can access aid distribution systems. Ensure consultations with women and girls on the location of facilities to ensure that pathways are safe, well lit and offer privacy and accessible by people with disabilities or special needs. Collect data and manage information on the temporary sites, with particular attention to collection and use of sex and age disaggregated data. Provide training for staff and volunteers in dos and donts/code of conduct. Advise and support authorities in proper closure/decommissioning of collective facilities, schools, colleges and makeshift camp sites. Facilitate an information service for the flood-affected Pakistanis using also pictographic messaging, radio, etc., to ensure they are informed of return/local integration/ resettlement and rehabilitation initiatives, land tenure matters and options for transitional shelter and issues faced by women and girls and people with special needs. Establish and maintain community and sectoral committees to help empower and inform all residents, in particular women, providing useful livelihood skills they may utilize upon return/ local integration/resettlement. Facilitate a vulnerability assessment structure that can be utilized by PDMAs to site so as to help identify people with specific needs for possible referral to relevant longer term social service or other assistance. Ensure, as provider of last resort, adequate and effective service delivery and provision of basic infrastructure including water, sanitation and gender responsive assistance to thwart the menace of sexual and gender-based violence (SBGV) in communal settings and encampments. Ensure as provider of last resort that adequate temporary camps are planned and erected including necessary access roads, water, drainage, electricity pylons, storage and other necessary infrastructure. Develop and coordinate, in close cooperation with PDMA, the CCCM operational structure at provincial level, identifying and supporting partners who are involved in or are carrying out camp management, also ensuring proper link at district level with the government District Coordination Officers (DCO) who are responsible for mobilizing line ministries and resources Provide training and technical advice to the organizations involved in camp management. OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS Expected Outcomes
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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Flood-affected displaced people will have their basic needs met and be gradually assisted to return to their communities. Service delivery will be focused over six months as capacities are built up with temporary sites emptied within one year. Multi-sectoral camp coordination effort will identify and address gaps based on alert indicators to maximize effective use of resources. Capacities of government and other national and local partners will be enhanced so as to respond to needs in a vast number of both urban and rural settings, particularly in Sindh Province. Training in site planning and disaster preparedness will be conducted to strengthen response capacities. Data collected, in particular sex and age disaggregated information, will ensure improved relief response and assist relevant district and government partners as well as other cluster/relief/recovery partners to better address needs. Flood-affected Pakistanis are mobilized to meet their own needs and local donors and benefactors are encouraged to support temporary camps according to international standards. Activities are conducted according to relevant dos and donts / code of conduct and beneficiaries have access to complaint mechanisms to raise concerns. Temporary encampments and collective sites are closed and decommissioned in accordance with agreed procedures. People with specific needs, including women, children, older people, and people with disabilities are assessed and have their requirements addressed accordingly. As provider of last resort, UNHCR will as necessary at request of authorities, plan, erect and initially manage temporary sites constructed according to international standards and in consultation with beneficiaries themselves. Indicators Sites are mapped and proper needs assessment takes place including gender/age disaggregated data whenever possible Inter-sectoral gaps are identified (number of shelter, wash, health, food intervention required) Number of returnee kits delivered Number of assessments for transitional shelter kits required by vulnerable groups Number of sectoral committees established for women and men and number of committee meetings Number of training and sensitization sessions completed Reports of difficulties faced by people in regard to accessing shelter, NFIs, health, protection, and proper sanitation Reports of difficulties faced by people in accessing community services and other protection assistance Reports of discrimination against minority residents, elderly, children and other people residing the temporary sites Number of collective facilities and temporary encampments decommissioned Number of CCCM reports issued by local authorities with support of the cluster CLUSTER MONITORING PLAN Working with host communities and provincial/national authorities, agencies will monitor needs and implement projects and alter impact accordingly to meet basic needs. Working organically with the Emergency Shelter/NFI, Protection, WASH, Food and Health Clusters at field locations and national level, cluster partners will provide a structure through which issues can be jointly addressed to ease service delivery in collective centres and encampments. The Cluster will facilitate a monitoring capacity through field staff, specialist personnel and partner agencies, convoking cluster meetings on a regular basis. The Cluster will also review the reports of the partners and conduct collective monitoring of the temporary sites and progress in decommissioning and restoring the temporary encampments.

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Camp Coordination and Camp Management Cluster Members with Projects in the Response Plan International Organization for Migration (IOM) and United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)

Men digging up the remains of what is left of their home in the Azakhel refugee camp, near Peshawar/UNHCR/W. Schellenberg/August 2010

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

5.4

COMMUNITY RESTORATION
UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME (UNDP) Restore access to essential services (health, education, employment, markets) through employment-intensive rehabilitation of basic/critical infrastructure of flood-affected communities and households at risk. Reduce environmental hazards and disaster risk exacerbated by or resulting from the floods in ways that facilitates the safe and resilient recovery of livelihoods of the affected population. 32 Revive non-farm livelihoods of flood-affected communities through access to income generation and decent employment opportunities. Ensure community ownership and lay the foundations for sustainable recovery by restoring public administration capacities and functions, reactivating participation of women in community-based organizations and promoting partnerships between local authorities, communities and private sector entities. Strengthen social cohesion and reduce vulnerabilities through reactivating dispute resolution mechanisms. In recognition of the highly differential impacts throughout the country, and the need for tailoring the response to the resulting needs, the target beneficiaries are the relevant most-affected percentages of the approximately 18 million in the affected provinces and regions. $167,073,420 See current cluster contact list: www.pakresponse.info

Cluster Lead Agency Cluster Objectives

Total Number of Beneficiaries

Funds Requested Contact Information

NEEDS ANALYSIS The Community Restoration Cluster conducted a rapid assessment mid-August and an additional assessment in parallel with the MCRAM to complement and qualitatively expand on MCRAM survey statistics. The needs analysis provided in the main sections of this document, based on the various assessments undertaken, reveal that the livelihoods of many millions of people have been destroyed and that their villages have been devastated, touching upon every aspect of individual and community life (78% of MCRAM households surveyed reported complete or large impacts to business and employment). Local administrations were placed under enormous strain due to the unprecedented scale of the floods and Government records have been lost; community infrastructure has been destroyed, including access roads, bridges, flood protection structures, health, education and water facilities; agricultural lands are covered with silt while livestock, equipment and storage facilities have been lost; micro, small and home-based businesses have been destroyed; many people have lost their documentation and may face problems reclaiming what is left of their properties, potentially triggering conflicts; environmental conditions have worsened and disaster risk has increased. Women and children are among the most affected and therefore most vulnerable, as are disabled and minority groups. However, the impact of the floods is not uniform across the country, and different regions find themselves at different stages of relief and recovery. For example, while over 70% of the communities (MCRAM survey) in GB reported problems of debris removal and loss or damages to trees, and 42% reported problems with stagnant water, in downstream Punjab and Sindh, 34-43% of communities reported problems with debris removal and loss of trees, while stagnant water was seen as a problem in 63-74% of the communities. Consequently, a one size fits all approach for all provinces and districts would be ineffective and there is a need to develop tailor-made approaches for each, based on the actual impact of the floods in each location. In addition, as livelihoods, community infrastructure and services, social cohesion, shelter, public administration capacities, the environment and disaster risk are all closely inter-linked, focusing on just one of these sectors may have limited effect in terms of helping communities to recover.

32

For on-farm livelihoods support, see activities under the Agriculture Cluster. 52

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

The Community Restoration Cluster therefore proposes an area-based, multi-sector and integrated approach in the affected districts towards restoring capacities of local authorities, civil society and the private sector to lead the recovery process of communities by building on the relief efforts, thereby laying the foundations for longer-term reconstruction and recovery. In doing so, the interventions under the Community Restoration Cluster will focus on the core areas for which it is mandated (basic community infrastructure, local governance and administration, non-farm livelihoods, social cohesion and environment). At the same time, the Cluster will closely coordinate at all levels with other clusters, particularly Food, Agriculture, WASH and Protection, in order to promote full alignment of activities under these Clusters with those of the Community Restoration Cluster to ensure a comprehensive area-based approach to community recovery. In recognition of the highly differential impacts throughout the country, and the need for tailoring the response to the resulting needs, the target beneficiaries are the relevant most-affected percentages of the approximately 18 million in the affected provinces and regions. For example, in the case of debris removal the targets would be 71% of GB, 58% of KPK, 43% of Punjab, and 34% of Sindh. For restoration of community infrastructure, these same numbers may make good approximations, but detailed assessments will be required to guide programme implementation. The target beneficiaries include flood-affected people and communities, with specific focus on the most vulnerable, including women, children/youth, the elderly, people with special needs, lowest income-earning families, large and poor families, and vulnerable workers. OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES, OUTPUTS AND INDICATORS The Community Restoration Cluster aims to work in close partnership with disaster management authorities at national, provincial and district levels, local governance institutions and communities to restore access, reduce risk, support income generation and facilitate resumption of public services with a focus on the following key priorities: Restore access to essential services through employment-intensive rehabilitation of basic/critical infrastructure of flood-affected communities and households at risk. Reduce environmental hazards and disaster risk exacerbated by or resulting from the floods in ways that facilitates the safe and resilient recovery of livelihoods of the affected population. Revive non-farm livelihoods of flood-affected communities through access to income-generation and decent employment opportunities. Ensure community ownership and lay the foundations for sustainable recovery by restoring public administration capacities and functions, reactivating participation of women in CBOs and promoting partnerships between local authorities, communities and private sector entities. Strengthen social cohesion and reduce vulnerabilities through supporting the reactivation of dispute resolution mechanisms. The cluster will pursue a community-based, participatory approach by restoring/developing strong partnerships between the affected communities, CBOs/NGOs, private sector, government institutions and other humanitarian clusters in all aspects of community restoration. To the extent possible, interventions in the sub-sectors will take place simultaneously in target areas/communities in order to exploit linkages between the sub-sectors and ensure an integrated and holistic response to community restoration, focusing particularly on the needs of the most vulnerable. Building on relief efforts, the early recovery and restoration of communities aims at reducing dependencies on emergency relief and establishing the foundations for longer-term, large-scale reconstruction and recovery. The cluster will apply a gender mainstreaming approach by promoting collection of information and data disaggregated by sex in relation to community restoration activities. Priority activities of the cluster are as follows: 1. Community Infrastructure Repairing access / link roads (number and kilometres) Restoring community water facilities (number)
53

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Restoring drains (number and metres) Repairing / functionalizing village streets / meadows (number and sq ft) Repairing/establishing protection walls, dikes, check dams Restoring community centres (mosques, hujras, funeral places, washing pads for women, etc.) Applying CFW / food-for-work (FFW) modalities to the above 2. Environment Undertaking rapid community hazard mapping Cash for Work activities to remove rubble, mud and debris Procurement of / arrangement for machinery / other tools and equipments for rubble removal and pumping out standing water Purchasing seeds / seedlings for reseeding, plantation and reforestation Creating awareness and capacities with regards to environmental issues and promotion of alternate energy Non-farm Livelihoods Provision/replacement of productive tools and assets Provision of short-term employment opportunities through CFW Provision of vocational training for new/improved sources of livelihood Support to restoring micro- and small-sized enterprises, including home-based livelihoods activities through cash grants Support to micro-finance loan restructuring/repayment Undertake value-chain analyses to identify and support new livelihood opportunities Governance Repair of public administration premises and provision of essential equipment, including restoration of damaged early warning systems Recovery of damaged/lost records Support establishment of mechanisms to solve HLP issues Reactivating community-based organizations, in particular womens organizations Strengthen capacities of disaster management institutional mechanism (NDMA, PDMA and District Disaster Management Authorities [DDMAs]), local governments and community-based organizations for coordinating, assessing, planning (including hazard mapping), implementing and monitoring relief and recovery activities Mobilize private sector entities and volunteers for partnering with joint initiatives of local authorities and communities Social Cohesion: Support reactivation and maintanence of dispute resolution mechanisms

3.

4.

5.

Outcomes The cluster will support flood-affected communities to return to a safe and enabling environment which facilitates access to public services and the revival livelihoods opportunities by achieving the following outcomes: Basic/critical community infrastructure is repaired and functional in flood-affected communities and contributes to the quick return of flood-affected populations, short-term employment opportunities and disaster risk reduction. Conducive (cleaner and safer) environment restored in flood-affected communities resulting in reduced disaster risk. Livelihoods of flood-affected communities especially women revived through increased access to non-farm income generation and decent employment opportunities. Enabling environment for safer and sustainable recovery created through restored public administration capacities, reactivated CBOs, in particular womens organizations, and strong partnerships between local authorities, communities and private sector entities.

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Sense of normalcy restored, social cohesion strengthened and vulnerabilities reduced through reactivating dispute resolution mechanisms. Indicators 1. Community Infrastructure Number of infrastructure schemes identified by local communities as critical and % of these identified by women. Number of direct beneficiaries provided with access to services / facilities through repair of roads as % of total population. Number and % of households benefiting from restoring drains, the repair / restoration of streets and meadows, restored community centres (mosques, hujras, funeral places, washing pads etc). Number of protection walls, dikes, check dams restored as % of total needs. Number of vulnerable people that benefited from CFW and the creation of temporary employment opportunities as % of total vulnerable population. 2. Environment Number and % of households, especially vulnerable groups, that benefited from the removal of rubble, mud and debris through temporary employment / CFW activities. Amount (cubic meter) and % of rubble, mud, debris and other hazardous material removed and safely disposed of. Number and % of villages, settlements, public offices / places, markets cleared of standing water, rubble, mud and debris. Number and % of families using alternate energy. Non-farm Livelihoods Number and % of household/ families provided with productive tools/ assets. Number and % of household/families received vocational skills for new / improved source of livelihoods. Number and % of people/households enrolled/engaged in CFW activities. Number and % of small business restored. Number and % of people that benefited from cash grants or micro-credit. Number and % of beneficiaries supported to manage their micro-finance loan repayments. Total amount of cash injection into local communities/economy for livelihoods support. Governance Number and % of public administration offices repaired, re-equipped and operational. Number and % of essential early warning systems restored. Number and % of public administration offices provided with hazard maps and capable of using them to support disaster resilient community recovery. Number of CBOs and % of population (including women) they cover reactivated and participating in community restoration initiatives through partnerships between local authorities, community organizations and private sector entities. Amount of contributions (in cash or kind) to community restoration initiatives from local authorities, community organizations and private sector entities. Social Cohesion Number of disputes over land, houses, assets and other resources reported and successfully resolved.
33

3.

4.

5.

To the extent possible and where relevant, all data for the listed indicators will be disaggregated by sex, age groups and people with special needs.
33

55

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

CLUSTER MONITORING PLAN The community restoration cluster aims to work in close partnership with disaster management authorities at national, provincial and district levels, local governance institutions and communities to restore access, reduce risk, support income generation and facilitate resumption of public services. Community Restoration Cluster Members with Projects in the Response Plan AAGAHI, ACTED, AIMS Organization, AJK Rural Support Programme (AJKRSP), Al-Mehran Rural Development Organization (AMRDO), AMAR Foundation, Association for Behavior and Knowledge Transformation (ABKT), Balochistan Rural Support Programme (BRSP), CARE International, Children First, Community Motivation and Development Organization (CMDO), Concern Worldwide, Durawa Development Organization (DDO), Foundation for Rural Development (FRD), Hammda Foundation (HF), Help In Need (HIN), Human Resource Development Network (HRDN), Initiative for Change (IFC), IDEA, Institute for Peace & Human Development (IPHD), Integrated Development Support Program (IDSP), International Labour Organization (ILO), IOM, International Rescue Committee (IRC), Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V., Just Peace International (JPI), Kher Khegara Tanzeem(KKT), KWES, Malakand Community Development Organization (MCDO), Mamoona Development Foundation (MDF), Mercy Corps, MOJAZ Foundation, National Integrated Development Agency (NIDA), OXFAM GB, PAIMAN Alumni Trust, Pakistan Education Society (PES), Pakistan Rural Workers Social Welfare Organization (PRWSWO), Participatory Integrated Development Society (PIDS), PRDS, Qatar Charity, Response International (RI), SC, Sindh Youth Welfare Organization (SYWO), Society for Education Promotion and Rural Support (SEPRS), Society of Collective Interests Orientation (SOCIO), Step Towards Empowerment of Pupil (STEP), Support Agency for Rural & Human Association's Development (SARHAD), Takhleeq Foundation, The NGO World, Trocaire, UFAQ Development Organization (UDO), United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM), UNDP, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), UNHCR, United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT), United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS), Rahim Yar Khan (Public Welfare Organization & Human Development Organization), Pakistani Hoslamand Khawateen Network (PHKNP), Balochistan Rural Development Society (BRDS), Amar Foundation, Empowerment and Livelihood (for CAMP)

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

5.5

COORDINATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES


OFFICE FOR THE COORDINATION OF HUMANITARIAN AFFAIRS (OCHA) Throughout both the relief and the early recovery period the following coordination and support services will be provided: Ensure strong, inclusive humanitarian coordination in the emergency phase at the federal, provincial and district levels in support of the overall coordination responsibility of the NDMA. Ensure improved coordination, enhanced inter-cluster coordination, enhanced national coordination capacity, accountable planning, and information management to strengthen coordination structures that support coherent, efficient and effective response to immediate and medium-term humanitarian needs and early recovery with minimal duplication across clusters. Ensure the establishment of a common reporting system through the implementation of the Single Report format, providing training to humanitarian partners on use of the tool as required. Ensure dissemination of timely information products that support implementation of the humanitarian response plan by highlighting priority needs, gaps and duplications through the use of key performance indicators. Ensure and refine strategic inter-agency planning and advocacy to promote principled action, equitable distribution of support/services and a seamless transition from humanitarian response to early recovery Strengthen inter-agency needs assessments. Ensure timely and accurate communication of cluster programme activities to the affected communities through the Mass Communications Programme Promote the use and the analysis for sex disaggregated date for emergency response programming Enhance safety and security of humanitarian workers Humanitarian agencies and workers in flood-affected provinces and regions of Pakistan. $18,895,517 See current cluster contact list: www.pakresponse.info

Cluster Lead Agency Cluster Objectives

Total Number of Beneficiaries Funds Requested Contact Information

NEEDS ANALYSIS The humanitarian consequences of the Pakistan floods that struck the country end of July 2010 are significant and the massive scale of the disaster continued to grow in August and September as floodwaters continued to rise in parts of Sindh province. Almost 18 million people are reported as having been directly affected in a disaster that stretches from Gilgit in the north to Sindh in the south. Unless aid activities are rapidly scaled up to reach those who remain displaced and without immediate access to food and clean drinking water, additional loss of human lives and further suffering will occur. In response to the floods, OCHA identified a need to solidify and strengthen coordination, especially at the district level; to ensure complementarities with humanitarian activities that are carried out by other actors; improve accountability and transparency of humanitarian activities; and improve mainstreaming of cross-cutting issues in all sectors of response, and to strengthen holistic multi-sector responses. Strengthened information flow among hundreds of cluster partners is critical, as is improved gap analysis and support for improved planning and more effective monitoring of humanitarian activities. A further goal is to improve decision-making at both the policy and operational levels, to address the remaining access concerns and to keep abreast of developments by constantly analyze the context in close support and cooperation with the United Nations Department of Safety and Security. Humanitarian Hubs have been established in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab, and Sindh and humanitarian coordination structures have been established in Baluchistan and Gilgit Baltistan. The cluster approach has been rolled-out and dedicated cluster coordinators and information management staff are being deployed by lead agencies. District coordination mechanisms are being developed in the districts identified by the Government and the humanitarian community as most severely floodaffected within these provinces. An assessment working group has been established and an initial
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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

rapid multi-cluster assessment has been conducted in Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab, Sindh, and Gilgit Baltistan to provide information on needs and gaps in humanitarian assistance. The work of the Gender Task Force has been enhanced to increase awareness about the different needs of people, in humanitarian emergency. The Mass Communications programme has worked with clusters to provide information to affected communities on issues such as hygiene promotion. OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES, OUTPUTS AND INDICATORS Scaling up humanitarian response to Pakistan flood crisis requires support to OCHA in the form of additional humanitarian staff dedicated to enhance and strengthen field coordination in the floodaffected provinces. The expansion of humanitarian clusters to additional provinces requires strong inter-cluster coordination, strengthened relationships between OCHA and government partners at all levels, inter-agency needs assessments and strategic planning, information management, advocacy on humanitarian needs, monitoring and evaluation of emergency activities. Support will be provided to enhance current coordination capacities of national counterparts/stakeholders. Gender equality will not be treated as a sector on its own and is integral to every issue and area of work in the flood related operations so not a stand-alone matter. Accurate and timely needs assessments will be required to ensure that assistance is targeted at the most vulnerable of the affected population. The Multi-Cluster Rapid Assessment Mechanism, which has already been used extensively in Pakistan, will be used to carry out needs assessment in all affected provinces to enhance and ensure a higher level of understanding of the critical needs of the affected population and to identify gaps in assistance. Mass communications campaigns will be deployed to keep affected communities informed of assistance activities and pass on other important information on staying safe and healthy. Common safety and security services will be established to support humanitarian workers as well as beneficiaries. The presence of the inter-agency gender advisor housed in OCHA and a Gender Task Force (GTF) (supported and co-led by UNFPA and UNIFEM) support all coordination mechanisms by increasing awareness about the different needs of people, in humanitarian emergency responses. Inclusive and on-site cluster coordination, at federal, provincial and district level to determine cluster strategy, key objectives and priorities, identify response gaps and eliminate overlaps. Building coordination and information management capacity of government authorities at federal, provincial and district level. Monitoring and analysis of reporting (using sex disaggregated data) on project implementation Provision of information management services, such as the use of common analysis tools, maintenance of the web portal, contact lists, meeting schedules, and the Single Reporting Format. Development and revisions of the humanitarian response plan and follow up with clusters on gender action plan of HCT Pakistan. Provision of support to humanitarian resource mobilization and financial tracking. Provision of substantive support to current inter-agency and cluster coordination mechanisms at the federal, provincial and district levels Provision of timely multi-cluster needs assessments Provision of additional safety and security services for humanitarian actors Communication of cluster programme activities to affected populations Gender assessments and needs analysis to inform relief programming Expected Outcomes Strong, inclusive humanitarian coordination in the relief and early recovery phase and sufficient capacity at the federal, provincial and district levels. Improved coordination, enhanced inter-cluster coordination, enhanced national coordination capacity, accountable planning, and information management to strengthen coordination structures that support coherent, efficient and effective response to immediate and mediumterm humanitarian needs and early recovery

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Establishment of a common reporting system through the implementation of the Single Report Format. Dissemination of timely information products that support implementation of the humanitarian response plan by highlighting priority needs, gaps and duplications through the use of key performance indicators. Strategic inter-agency planning and advocacy to promote principled action, equitable distribution of support/services and a seamless transition from humanitarian response to early recovery Regular updates to the Government on progress. Strengthen joint needs assessments for needs and gaps and monitoring of key performance indicators. Strengthen common safety and security of humanitarian operations. Timely and accurate communication of cluster programme activities to the affected communities through the Mass Communications Programme The use and analysis of sex disaggregated data for emergency response programming Indicators % of severely affected districts with functioning district coordination mechanisms (DCMs and working groups) % of severely affected districts with information management capacity Number of clusters supported by information management services and mapping products Number of HCT and Inter-Cluster Coordination meetings held Number of clusters providing sex-disaggregated data in reporting Number of inter-agency needs assessment conducted % of targeted audience aware of the availability of humanitarian services Number of humanitarian missions supported by up-to-date security assessment/advice CLUSTER MONITORING PLAN OCHA will monitor indicators 1-5. The Monitoring of progress towards indicator 1-5 will be a continuous process throughout the year. OCHA will also, as the lead of an inter-agency access project, work with cluster partners to monitor indicators 6-8. OCHA will provide a structure through which feedback can be shared to enhance the collective monitoring of coordination structures and services, thereby ensuring improved transparency and accountability.

Coordination and Support Services Cluster Members with Projects in the Response Plan IOM, Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), United Nations Dept of Safety and Security (UNDSS), UNIFEM, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

5.6

EDUCATION
UNITED NATIONS CHILDRENS FUND (UNICEF) and SAVE THE CHILDREN (SC) Ensure that all children, adolescents and young people affected by the floods have access to safe learning opportunities. Provide opportunities for teachers and other education personnel to gain skills to address emergency issues and support quality teaching and learning. Identify and provide life-skills for learners to cope with the crises and DRR skills that are provided through protective and learner-centred methodologies. Ensure that the Education Cluster coordinates all strategies and activities effectively with other clusters, including early recovery, in close collaboration with the Government of Pakistan. Provide Parent Teacher Association/School Management Committee (PTA/SMC) and education authorities with skills to support teaching and learning for teachers and children in emergency and recovery situations. Strengthen policy framework for education in emergencies, including DRR strategies at national, provincial and district levels. 1.3 million children $83,402,534 See current cluster contact list: www.pakresponse.info

Cluster Lead Agencies Cluster Objectives

Total Number of Beneficiaries Funds Requested Contact Information

NEEDS ANALYSIS Of the approximately nine million children across all affected areas who have been affected by the flooding, an estimated 1.8 million children, who were previously enrolled in schools that have been damaged or are being used as internally displaced peoples (IDPs) shelters are in need of immediate educational support. 8,618 schools are either partially or fully damaged, and 5,633 schools are occupied by displaced flood-affected populations. Most of the affected children will be assisted by the respective provincial governments. Education Cluster will provide support in filling gaps in the most vulnerable areas by providing direct support to approximately 70% of the affected caseload or 1.3 million children. There is an additional need to provide educational opportunities to previously out-ofschool children, in particular girls. Several cross-cutting and guiding principles, as captured in the Inter-Agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE) Minimum Standards for Education in Emergencies, will underpin the education early recovery strategy and the specific objectives. These include: gender mainstreaming, sustainability, capacity-building initiatives, community-based approaches, and monitoring and evaluation. OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES, OUTPUTS AND INDICATORS The education strategy aims to support the restoration of the education system in flood-affected areas, both formal and non-formal education. This will strengthen education systems to enable all children, adolescents and young people to access quality learning opportunities in a protective and learnercentred environment. Most of the affected children will be assisted by the respective provincial governments, with the Education Cluster providing support in filling gaps in the most vulnerable areas. In line with that overall approach, the specific objectives of this strategy aim to: ensure that all children, adolescents and young people affected by the floods have access to safe and well equipped learning opportunities. provide opportunities for teachers and other education personnel to gain skills to address emergency issues and support quality teaching and learning. identify and provide life-skills for learners to cope with the crises and DRR skills that are provided through protective and learner-centred methodologies. ensure that the Education Cluster coordinates all strategies and activities effectively with other clusters, including early recovery in close collaboration with the Government of Pakistan. provide PTA/SMC and education authorities with skills to support teaching and learning for teachers and children in emergency and recovery situations.
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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

strengthen policy framework for education in emergencies, including DRR strategies at national, provincial and district levels. Activities The time-line and planned interventions will vary according to the specific situation in different provinces and districts. Assistance will target three types of populations: Displaced children who remain in temporary learning centres because they are not yet able to return to their areas of origin. Host community children whose schools are inaccessible due to structures being used as temporary shelters. Previously displaced populations who have returned to areas of origin. Based on the specific objectives, the Education Cluster will focus on the following interventions: Manage assessment information and highlight gaps identified in the completed MCRAM and education rapid assessments and develop strategies to address needs. Establish safe and child-friendly temporary learning centres, taking into consideration gender 34 and safety concerns. Rehabilitate schools affected by the floods or those being used as shelters. Provide transitional school structures for partially or completely damaged schools to ensure continuation of education during the transition period from tents/shelters to permanent 35 buildings. 36 Provide safe drinking water and gender sensitive sanitation facilities for functioning schools in close coordination with the WASH Cluster. In conjunction with the Protection Cluster train teachers in: (i) supporting the psycho-social recovery and well-being of affected children, adolescents and young people; (ii) protective and safety measures for children (49 years) and adolescents (1012 years), and adults; (iii) multigrade teaching and classroom management; and (iv) dissemination of health, hygiene, education, protection and disaster prevention and risk reduction messages. Provide adequate and contextual gender sensitive teaching and learning supplies to support quality teaching and learning, including school-in-a-box, recreation and early childhood development kits. Provide learning opportunities for vulnerable groups, particularly, previously out-of-school children, girls and other groups. Provide basic literacy and numeracy skills, life skills (including coping skills), emergency preparedness and DRR skills, using participatory, gender and learner-centred methodology. Reactivate and strengthen PTA/SMC and train them in disaster management with a focus on: (i) increased enrolment and retention of learners; (ii) post-emergency education and health needs; (iii) monitoring of educational activities; and, (iv) safety and maintenance of school structures. Advocate with education authorities for inclusion of education in emergencies in official education sector plans, with components of contingency and DRR planning and standards, and with an explicit budget allocation. Provide psycho-social support for teachers as needed. Work with Food Cluster to support school feeding programmes. Outcomes School-age children/adolescents and young people have access to safe, protective, gendersensitive and quality learning environments that enable them to cope with the emergency, and to gain skills in emergency preparedness and DRR. Teachers and other education personnel gain skills to address emergency issues and to support quality teaching and learning.

Learning opportunities will be provided to children, either mixed or segregated (especially for adolescents/youth). To promote access for girls, boundary walls will be included in structures, where appropriate. 36 This includes separate latrines for children.
34 35

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Rehabilitation of partially damaged schools is undertaken and where school structures are completely damaged, transitional school structures are in place to allow teaching and learning to continue. PTC/SMC and education authorities acquire skills to support teaching and learning for teachers and children in emergency and recovery situations. Advocacy to support the policy framework and budget support for education in emergencies, including DRR strategies is undertaken at national, provincial and district levels. Indicators 1.26 million children (4-17 yr age group) benefitting from the provision of educational supplies including transitional school structures in official camps and affected communities. 1.26 million children (4-17 yr age group) benefiting from psychosocial, health and hygiene education and nutrition interventions. 150,000 children including 68,000 girls (age group 5-9 yrs) benefitting from the construction of transitional school structures. 5,000 older girls mainstreamed into formal education or continue their studies. 25,000 women benefitting from literacy skills and trainings on health and hygiene, mother and child care, rights and responsibilities, conflict management and income generation skills. 15,000 outof-school girls and women enrolled in basic education. 15,000 young children of age 3-5 benefit from learning and playing opportunities. 30,000 young children and girls of age 10 receive education about health and hygiene, peace education, and other life skills. 5,633 temporarily-occupied and 8,151 damaged schools rehabilitated. 5,445 teachers (female, male) trained and using emergency education kits. 1,000 functional literacy centres for women operational. 500 nonformal basic education schools established. 500 communitybased non-formal early childhood education (ECE) centres in operation CLUSTER MONITORING PLAN Most of the projects proposed by the Education Cluster will be implemented through NGOs and, more importantly, through the relevant district education departments. The Cluster will ensure accurate reporting on outcomes, outputs and activities through a 3 tier monitoring and Information management mechanism. At the 1st and 2nd tiers, cluster members will support the relevant education departments at the district and provincial levels to improve monitoring outreach and reporting capacity through technical and financial assistance as well as development of common monitoring plans. At the 3rd tier, cluster lead agencies, UNICEF and Save the Children, will ensure the presence of Information Management Officers (IMO) in all provincial and field offices. The Cluster has already hired and deployed IMOs in Punjab, Sindh, KP and Balochistan. The IMOs will ensure the provision of accurate and updated information to the relevant line departments and PDMAs Mid-year review meetings on progress of the ongoing projects will involve: Relevant PDMA representatives Relevant Education Department at the district or provincial levels Donor representatives Partners and implementing agencies Cluster lead agencies

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Education Cluster Members with Projects in the Response Plan Awammi Development Organization (ADO), CRS, Children's Global Network (CGN), Pakistan (Guarantee) Limited, Dosti Development Foundation (DDF), HIN, IFC, IDEA, IPHD, IRC, Muslim Aid, National Commission for Human Development (NCHD), Philanthrope, Roshni Development Organization (RDO), Rural Education and Development Foundation (READ Foundation), Rural Support Programmes Network (RSPN), Sarhad Rural Support Programme (SRSP), SC, Social Youth Council of Patriots (SYCOP), UNICEF, UNESCO, Women Association Struggle for Development (WASFD)

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5.7

FOOD
UNITED NATIONS WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME (WFP) The food cluster aims to save lives, avert hunger and improve livelihoods of 10.5 million flood-affected people by: (a) continuing to provide relief food assistance to those who remain unable to meet their immediate food needs; and, (b) initiating early recovery activities to enable these populations to rebuild their livelihoods. 10.1 million of the most vulnerable flood-affected individuals $573,284,476 See current cluster contact list: www.pakresponse.info

Cluster Lead Agency Cluster Objectives

Total Number of Beneficiaries Funds Requested Contact Information

Table: Disaggregated number of affected population and beneficiaries


Category Total General Food Distribution Food-for-Work/ Cash-for-Work School Feeding Supplementary Feeding Affected population Female Male Total 4,949,000 5,151,000 10,100,000 Female 4,279,972 3,005,494 1,349,448 980,000 1,157,896

Beneficiaries Male 4,454,664 3,123,007 1,404,527 1,020,000 372,504

Total 8,734,636 6,128,501* 2,753,975* 2,000,000* 1,530,400*

*NB: The total beneficiary figure when tallied by category includes targeted individual rations for children whose families may also receive a general food distribution ration (beneficiaries who have received food under more than one of the food assistance categories [i.e. school feeding and GFD]).

Needs Analysis Food assistance continues to be one of the main priorities, as many flood-affected families will not be able to restore their access to food in the near future due to the loss of their homes, productive assets and employment. While the cluster will seek to address the food needs of an verage of six million people up to the end of January 2011, within an overall requirement for immediate support for 10.1 million, the numbers to be assisted may be adjusted based on reassessments of the dynamic situation and/or should the other major players fall short of meeting the residual requirements. As the flood waters recede and the situation permits early recovery activities will commence reaching a peak of over 4 million people in Spring 2011.

Food Cluster Response


7,000,000 6,000,000

Beneficiary nr.

5,000,000 4,000,000 3,000,000 2,000,000 1,000,000 Relief Early Recovery

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES, OUTPUTS AND INDICATORS Relief Component Objectives The cluster aims to save lives and to avert hunger for vulnerable flood-affected populations. The cluster will provide in-kind food assistance consisting of a monthly food basket (fortified wheat flour, edible oil, pulses, sugar, salt and tea); or cash transfers to purchase food. To prevent increased malnutrition, blanket ready-to-use supplementary food will be provided for children between the ages of 6-24 months, and high-energy biscuits to those aged 2-12 years. The cluster has agreed to pursue the 2100kcal/p/p/d Sphere Standard for meeting relief food needs. Expected Outcomes The key expected outcome generated by the Food Cluster response will be: Stabilized and/or improved food consumption. nutritional declines forestalled amongst infants and young children through the supply of high energy biscuits and ready-to-use supplementary food. Indicators GAM prevalence (mid-upper-arm circumference / MUAC) below the emergency threshold (15%) in target populations Household food consumption score Number of people receiving food rations as % of planned figures Tonnage of food distributed, by type, as % of planned distribution

EARLY RECOVERY COMPONENT Objectives Initiate early recovery activities to enable affected populations to rebuild their lives and livelihoods. The Food Cluster will contribute to restoration and rebuilding of livelihoods and economic security of targeted populations in the affected areas. Specifically, the food cluster, in collaboration with technical government departments and other partners particularly from the Agriculture, Health, WASH, Education, Nutrition and Community Restoration Clusters will support small-scale land reclamation and rehabilitation of damaged community infrastructure such as agricultural terraces, link roads/paths, storage facilities, water harvesting structures, water channels, health clinics and damaged schools. As an incentive to promote the return of children to schools and encourage regular attendance, fortified High Energy Biscuits will be provided to children attending school once every school day. The programme will be put in place as school are repaired and education services resumed in flooddamaged pre-schools and primary schools. Targeted supplementary feeding of moderately malnourished children 6-59 months is being launched with implementing partners (NGOs) in collaboration with health centres as they are re-established and functional. Supplementary food rations will also be provided to pregnant and lactating women. Expected Outcomes The key expected outcome generated by the Food Cluster response will be: restoration and rebuilding of livelihoods and economic security return to and regular attendance of children at schools reduced acute malnutrition among targeted populations

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Indicators Enrolment and attendance of children return to pre-flood levels in 80% of WFP-assisted schools in flood-affected areas. Percentage of households with adequate food consumption scores returns to pre-crisis levels among targeted population. GAM prevalence (MUAC) below the emergency threshold (15%) in target populations Number of community assets created or restored by targeted communities and individuals. Number of women and men trained in livelihood-support thematic areas Tonnage of food distributed, by type, as % of planned distribution Number of beneficiaries receiving cash as % of planned number. Links with Agriculture Cluster De-silting and relining of farm irrigation infrastructure, where upstream irrigation structures are repaired. Supporting land rehabilitation/preparation (cleaning, clearing, terracing, drainage and stabilization). Provision of food to ensure that planting crop is not consumed and to provide a buffer for the lean period. Links with Nutrition Cluster During the relief phase, blanket supplementary feeding of children under 2 (RUSF) and 2 to twelve years old HEB. During recovery, targeted supplementary feeding for 6 to 59 months (supplementary plumpy) and for pregnant and lactating women WSB. Links with Education Cluster Encourage children to return to school through the provision of high energy biscuits. Repair damaged schools and rehabilitate those that are presently being used to shelter flood victims as well as to construct boundary walls in girls schools. Link with Community Restoration Cluster Skills training in areas such as kitchen gardening, livestock rearing, horticulture, reforestation and sewing. Food-for-work (FFW) or Cash-for-work (CFW) to rehabilitate damaged community infrastructure such as storage facilities, link roads, pathways and basic health units. Targeting Households will be targeted based on the assessment exercises which have already been completed in four provinces (KPK, Punjab, Sindh, and Balochistan), in close consultation with the provincial government. At the household level, vulnerable families qualifying for assistance will be identified on the basis of damaged and destroyed houses, lost food stocks, lost livelihood assets and continuing displacement by the floods. Vulnerable female-headed households, unaccompanied children and the elderly will be prioritized for assistance. The Food Cluster explicitly aims to facilitate the receipt of relief rations by women/widows and female-headed families (an estimated 10% of all those supported). Separate facilities will be established for women at distribution points, and female staff will be deployed. CAPACITY BUILDING The Cluster will facilitate enhanced national disaster risk management capacity building during the relief and recovery phase. This will include day to day support in relief food management and food security assessments and analysis.

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CLUSTER MONITORING PLAN The monitoring regime will be underpinned by close surveillance of food assistance deliveries, and local prices of basic food commodities, strong cluster teamwork using the clusters data base and maps, and close coordination with other clusters to enable pooling of common resources and synergies. VAM reviews will be conducted on a regular basis to gauge the level of improvement in the overall food security situation as well as to highlight hot spots of food insecurity. Process monitoring will be completed on a daily basis for the relief component of the interventions with information collected on beneficiaries reached and food distributed disaggregated by gender and age. Additional monitors have been deployed in all provinces to ensure that monitoring of food assistance is adequate and to conduct qualitative beneficiary contact monitoring on a regular basis.

Food Cluster Members with Projects in the Response Plan CWS, Focus Humanitarian Assistance (FHA), HIN, IRC, IR- Pakistan, OXFAM GB, PAIMAN Alumni Trust, SC, SEPRS, Strengthening Participatory Organization (SPO), Taraqee Foundation, Trocaire, WFP

Coverage for food security actions


10.00 9.00 8.00 7.00 6.00 5.00 4.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan Others - Relief WFP- FFW/CFW Relief - WFP

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5.8

HEALTH
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO) Relief: Reduce the burden of avoidable death and illness through lifesaving interventions among flood-affected populations of Pakistan, ensuring that women and men can access health services equally. Early recovery: address the factors that contribute to the main mortality risks - acute diarrhoea, acute respiratory infections, malaria, measles, malnutrition, and maternal and neo-natal mortality/morbidity - an integrated approach is essential Beneficiaries Of the 18 million affected flood-affected population, services will be targeted in areas with a total catchment of eight million potential beneficiaries for relief efforts of which: 300,000 children under-five 1,760,000 women of child-bearing age, of which 193,200 women will be pregnant in any given month and nearly 29,000 will require some type 37 of intervention at delivery. Early recovery interventions will target a total catchment of 11 million people. $199,044,064 See current cluster contact list: www.pakresponse.info

Cluster Lead Agency Cluster Objectives

Total Number of Beneficiaries

Funds Requested Contact Information

NEEDS ANALYSIS As of 1 September, assessments from four flood-affected provinces showed that of 2,957 health facilities in the affected districts, at least 236 health facilities had been damaged and 200 destroyed. Most of these were the primary providers of basic health services, mainly in rural areas, although several referral hospitals have also been damaged or destroyed. Management capacity of the local health systems in the flood-affected districts has virtually collapsed. The District health authorities are overstretched and unable to cope with the service demand. Prior to the current crisis, approximately 80% of the total health expenditure was from direct out of pocket payment and there was no functional social security system (two thirds of consultations take 38 place in private facilities (mainly in urban area). Financial barriers to access services must be removed for at least as long as the humanitarian phase lasts. The health workforce is also affected. It is estimated that at least 35,000 LHW are displaced. Skilled workers need to be deployed, both in temporary health facilities established for the camps and in health facilities still functional but serving the increased patient load. Reports from the clusters disease early warning system (DEWS) point towards increasing rates of water-borne disease and of acute respiratory infections. Significantly higher rates of suspected malaria are being reported from flood affected areas in Sindh and Balochistan. Other key disease concerns across flood-affected areas include Hepatatitis A and B. Communicable diseases threaten to be the leading causes of morbidity and mortality but are not the only threat to health. Among the 18 million flood-affected people, there will be an estimated 690,000 39 pregnancies in the coming year. Neonatal mortality is extremely high, accounting for 54/1,000 live births, while the overall infant mortality rate is 72/1,000. The very high neonatal mortality is clearly 40 linked to the extremely high maternal mortality ratio of 320 per 100,000 live births. Of the eight million people in need of immediate humanitarian assistance, 193,200 women are estimated to be pregnant in any given month and nearly 29,000 will require some types of intervention 41 at delivery. Without a safe environment to deliver and an adequate referral system, an even higher percentage of women will not have access to a skilled birth attendant nor to emergency obstetric care,

UNFPA: Inter-Agency Field Manual on RH Settings Humanitarian Settings- Pakistan Emergency Floods. WHO EMRO Health system observatory. 39 UNFPA: Inter-Agency Field Manual on RH Settings Humanitarian Settings- Pakistan Emergency Floods. 40 UNICEF report 2009 (2008 data). 41 UNFPA: Inter-Agency Field Manual on RH Settings Humanitarian Settings- Pakistan Emergency Floods.
37 38

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increasing the risk of maternal morbidity and mortality. With the high rate of chronic malnutrition in children population (30-35% child stunted), in a context of possible food insecurity there is fear of increasing acute malnutrition. Patients with chronic diseases, such as tuberculosis, HIV, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases will have treatment interrupted with associated health risks. One in three adults over the age of 45 years suffers from high blood pressure; 10% from diabetes and about 6% from neurotic conditions. In the current context, mental health problems are expected to increase. HIV/AIDS had emerged as a concentrated epidemic among intravenous drug users in Pakistan with a national HIV prevalence among them of almost 21%. Without efforts to maintain or even expand services for these groups and without ensuring that universal precautions are followed in health service delivery, there will be an increased risk of spread of HIV. Temporarily displaced populations reside in different sites such as local schools, structured or spontaneous camps, out in the open or hosted by kin/friends from unaffected areas. Displacement can result in food insecurity, poor quality of water and sanitation, overcrowding in temporary settlements, exposure to infectious agents and vectors for which people lack immunity. There is wide variation in the proportions of affected and/or displaced population across districts. Relief and development efforts need to be linked in the recovery period aiming for risk reduction. OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES, OUTPUTS AND INDICATORS Relief: Reduce the burden of avoidable death and illness through life-saving interventions among flood-affected populations of Pakistan, ensuring that women and men can access health services equally. Early recovery: address the factors that contribute to the main mortality risks - acute diarrhoea, acute respiratory infections, malaria, measles, malnutrition, and maternal and neo-natal mortality/morbidity an integrated approach is essential The Health Cluster will respond with an overall strategy and province specific strategies involving the community, government line departments, WASH and Nutrition clusters, I/NGOs and other stakeholders in immediate provision of health services and implementation of immediate and longterm health services provision strategies. Key Strategic Activities Members of the Health, Food, Nutrition and WASH Clusters came together to develop a joint InterCluster Survival Strategy, to ensure a more integrated, effective and timely survival response in priority flood-affected districts. The Inter-Cluster Survival Strategy outlines the cross-cutting essential lifesaving activities that will need to be implemented. It identifies principles for coordination and steps to be taken to strengthen common planning across these clusters. Health outposts and service delivery points, mobile medical teams, static health facilities, referral support at district headquarter hospitals (DHQ) are the proposed means and options for service delivery in order to implement the following activities: 1. Relief: preserve and restore access to basic health care, reducing financial barriers and ensure rehabilitation/ re-establishment of primary and secondary health services. Treatment of injuries, critical chronic treatments, mental health and psycho-social support, HIV/AIDS, acute malnutrition and referral systems of life-threatening conditions. Specific activities include: basic emergency rehabilitation of health facilities, including water supply and storage facilities and/or setting up of ad hoc temporary health facilities to allow immediate re-launching of essential primary health care services including minimum initial service package (MISP), the establishment of diarrhoea treatment units, tracing patients on chronic treatment and ensuring continuation of services.

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removing financial barriers to access services for at least as long as the humanitarian phase lasts. ensuring infection control measures are in place in health facilities including ensuring availability to health providers of materials for standard precautions for infection control and ensuring availability of safe blood supply and safe blood transfusion practice, including the provision of essential reproductive health kits (Relief). establishing mobile clinics for areas with no access to health facilities. supporting referral to secondary health services of patients suffering life-threatening conditions and for emergency obstetric and newborn care. providing resources for referral system. procuring and providing essential medicines and supplies including those needed for lifethreatening chronic diseases, and the supply of essential equipment and cold chain to health facilities, based on national standards. supporting for management of complicated SAM and contribution to nutritional assessments and surveillance. providing psycho-social and mental health support. preventing HIV transmission in health-care settings through adoption of standard precautions in all health-related activities and the availability of safe blood transfusions. identifying people receiving anti-retroviral therapy (ART) through existing health-care records or patient cards, if available, and ensuring that known injecting drug users have access to clean injecting equipment. ensuring harmonization of humanitarian actions to national standards and policies where possible or, temporarily, adapting these where necessary due to the changed circumstances. deploying displaced health workers, and establishing standardized incentives to national health workers to avoid distortions of salaries. applying or adapting the National Health Information System to request partners to report on essential health information required to monitor and evaluate progress and effectiveness of interventions. Seeking innovative solutions to encourage adequate reporting coverage from all health partners. supporting district level data management and analysis.

2. Early recovery: provide sexual and reproductive health services including: services for GBVrelated health problems according to MISP standard as part of basic public health care; provision of Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (MNCH) Programme in a safe environment and an adequate referral system to reduce related mortality rate. Specific activities include: ensuring safe access of women and girls to health care (not just for reproductive health). supporting appropriate activation of LHW cadre among the displaced population to reach women and children in their shelters. ensuring infection control measures are in place in health facilities including ensuring availability to health providers of materials for standard precautions for infection control and ensuring availability of safe blood supply and safe blood transfusion practice, including the provision of essential reproductive health kits. ensuring maternal and newborn care 24 hrs a day: (including skilled care during childbirth for clean & safe normal deliveries; basic emergency obstetric care BEmOC). developing strategies to ensure appropriated measures for comprehensive health services deliveries. ensuring adequate clinical management of rape (24 hr/day service). ensuring availability of prevention and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). 3. Relief: prevent, control and provide public health response to communicable disease outbreaks.

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Specific activities include: mass communication and social mobilization to prevent disease outbreaks including provision of adapted healthcare education messages targeting priority communicable diseases as well as sexual and reproductive healthcare or any other relevant diseases. ensuring provision of oral rehydration salts (ORS) and access to safe drinking water for the household during home based care and during transportation to a healthcare facility. epidemiological surveillance and disease control through the Disease Early Warning System (DEWS). strengthening case management. establishing or strengthening systems to enable monitoring and ensuring water quality and environmental health. supporting malaria prevention and vector control measures. supporting emergency mass vaccination campaigns (such as measles, polio). working closely together with, and building capacity of district and provincial health authorities in maintaining DEWS after the humanitarian phase. 4. Relief: Ensure water quality control, water-borne and vector disease control, sanitation and hygiene promotion, including messages for proper health seeking behaviour during consultations. Specific activities include: targeted water quality monitoring and control in all accessible affected areas to block the spread of water borne diseases. the provision of safe water supply in healthcare facilities and mobile clinics and adequate sanitation and healthcare waste management equipment in assessed healthcare facilities. crossmatch water-borne disease surveillance with water quality surveillance results and undertaking immediate response measures whenever needed (provision of chlorination tablets at community level, health promotion etc). environmental health assessment of all health care facilities in affected districts. regular water quality monitoring and control in all affected areas to block the spread of water borne diseases. capacity-building of the Governments water supply departments regarding water quality monitoring and treatment in collaboration with Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources. regularly attendance at WASH Cluster coordination meetings and sharing information especially to coordinate acute watery diarrhoea outbreaks response. vector control activities which should be started directly as soon as the flood waters recede. 5. Early Recovery: develop national and local health emergency management capacities: risk assessments, DRR, emergency preparedness and safer hospitals integrated in the early recovery and reconstruction process. Specific activities include: strengthening of national and local health emergency management systems focusing on risk assessment, disaster risk reduction and emergency preparedness, integrated into the recovery process. strengthening of national and local health emergency management systems focusing on risk assessment, DRR and emergency preparedness, integrated into the recovery process. providing technical and financial support for personnel/units in Ministries of Health (MoH) to enable them to coordinate health emergency management programme development and implementation. community health disaster risk management applying primary health care approaches, including risk communication and health promotion, strengthening role of LHWs, community nurses and other local health workers in high-risk areas. disseminating good practice and technical guidance translated into local languages. enhancing rapid skill and knowledge through in-country training courses and workshops.
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continuing assessment, restoration and retrofitting of damaged health facilities in accordance with building standards. assessing the safety, security, vulnerability and preparedness of existing health facilities for natural hazards and action taken to reduce vulnerabilities through retrofitting and emergency preparedness. reconstructing and constructing of new or replacement facilities which take account of local hazards and comply with up-to-date building standards for the design, construction and operations of health facilities. identifying information systems for new construction, repairs or improvements to existing health facilities. OVERALL EXPECTED OUTCOMES Relief

Appropriate links and dialogue maintained at national and local levels with State institutions, local civil society and other relevant actors (e.g. local, national and international military forces, peacekeeping forces and non-state actors) and related programmes. Access to essential primary health care and emergency services including basic and emergency obstetric care, restored in affected communities. Access to and utilization of essential drugs, supplies and equipment at all the health facilities/makeshift health outlets in the affected districts. Health needs assessed to establish a baseline for monitoring the humanitarian health response, with sex and age disaggregated data generated and utilized for making informed decisions. Trends of different diseases monitored weekly base or daily in case of epidemic (Weekly epidemiological reports will be produced). Early detection of and timely effective response to outbreaks of communicable diseases. Emergency mass vaccination campaigns conducted (measles, polio).

Early Recovery Coordinated response plan including collaboration with WASH, Food and Nutrition. Effective Health Custer contribution to identifying critical issues that require multi-sectoral responses, and planning the relevant synergistic interventions with the other clusters concerned. Affected populations have access to safe drinking water and proper sanitation. Early identification and exploitation of opportunities to promote recovery and appropriate rebuilding and risk reduction measures incorporated in Cluster strategies and plans. Adherence to standards and best practices by all cluster partners, allowing for local adaptation. Regular monitoring of health situation, health service delivery and the application of standards to enable identification of gaps, revision of cluster action plan and prioritized interventions and projects. Reports and monitoring of outcomes shared with stakeholders, including donors. A variety of advocacy products aimed at stakeholders: affected populations, communities, donors. Population vulnerabilities identified and monitored throughout the crisis period and appropriate health interventions triggered to prevent excess morbidity and mortality. A disaster resilient Health Sector at national, province and community levels with capacity to reduce health risks, respond and recover more effectively to emergencies, disasters and other crises. Safer health facilities which are resilient to and prepared for the risk of emergencies, disasters and other crises from natural, technological, environmental and societal hazards and epidemics.

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Health resources availability Health services coverage Risk factors Health Outcomes

Indicator Average population per functioning health facility (HF), by type of HF and by administrative unit Number of HF with BEmOC/ 500,000 population, by administrative unit Coverage of measles mass vaccination (six months - five years) Percentage of births assisted by a skilled attendant Number of cases or incidence rates for selected diseases relevant to the local context (cholera, measles, acute meningitis, others) Prevalence of GAM Prevalence of SAM

CLUSTER MONITORING PLAN Monitoring will be based on indicators, as well as qualitative feedback from service users, which is an essential element in assessing Cluster achievements and overall effectiveness. To ensure a continually relevant service, feedback from rapid service appraisal assessments will be incorporated regularly throughout the project. Monitoring tools include: Internal and external regular hub situation reports; Training, workshops and evaluation reports; Health cluster partner surveys; Project finalization reports; LSS supply and storage management system will be used to track drugs supply.; DEWS epidemiological surveillance data used to track diseases trend at district and provincial levels The Cluster to use monitoring templates and guideline to be used by all Cluster partners for their internal monitoring focusing on the above indicators and reporting findings to the Cluster at the various level (district, provincial and national) At provincial and district levels common inter-cluster monitoring mechanism will be established with the WASH, Health, Nutrition and Food Clusters in the framework of the survival strategy whose development is ongoing. Health Cluster Partners with Projects in the Response Plan AL-Nijat Welfare Society (AWS), American Refugee Committee (ARC), ABKT, BRSP, Bilal Foundation, Bright Future Organization (BFO), CAMP, CARE International, Catholic Organisation for Relief and Development Aid (CORDAID), CWS, CMDO, Doctors Worldwide, Friends Foundation (FF), Gambat Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS), Gender and Reproductive Health Organization (GRHO), HIN, HHRD, HAl, Integrated Community Development International (ICDI), Integrated Health Services (HIS), International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC), International Medical Corps (IMC), IOM, IRC, IR-Pakistan, Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V., Khyber Aid, Kohsar Welfare and Educational Society (KWES), Kurram Welfare Home (KWH), Malteser International, Marie Stopes International (MSI), Mdecins du Monde France (MDM-F), Medical Emergency Relief International (MERLIN), Mercy Corps, MOJAZ Foundation, Muslim Aid, NIDA, New World Hope Organization (NWHO), PAIMAN Alumni Trust, PRWSWO, PRDS, Potohar Organization for development Advocacy (PODA), Rl, Rl, RSPN, SC, Shirkat Gah, SYCOP, Society for Appraisal and Women Empowerment in Rural Areas (SAWERA), SCIO, SARHAD, UNICEF, UNHCR, United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), UNFPA, World Health Organization (WHO), World Vision Pakistan (WV-P), Yar Muhammad Samejo Educational Society and Development Organization (YMSESDO)

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5.9

LOGISTICS AND EMERGENCY TELECOMMUNICATIONS


UNITED NATIONS WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME (WFP) Ensure continuous delivery of life-saving aid to populations inaccessible by surface means Enable the humanitarian community to respond and operate effectively in flood-affected areas Not applicable $50,476,269 See current cluster contact list: www.pakresponse.info

Cluster Lead Agency Cluster Objectives

Total Number of Beneficiaries Funds Requested Contact Information

NEEDS ANALYSIS The Government of Pakistan and the humanitarian community have requested continued and expanded logistics and emergency telecommunications services for six months to ensure that lifesaving aid reaches the most affected population groups. Air access, temporary storage, communications and efficient logistics coordination remain critical for the humanitarian community to deliver assistance effectively and safely in the rapidly changing operational environment. OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES, OUTPUTS AND INDICATORS The Logistics and Emergency Telecommunications Cluster will reinforce the emergency response capacity of the Government of Pakistan and will provide a logistics service of last resort for the Humanitarian Community in order to provide a coordinated, predictable, timely and efficient emergency logistics and telecommunications response under the cluster approach. This will focus on: ensuring continuous delivery of lifesaving aid to populations inaccessible by surface means enabling the humanitarian community to respond and operate effectively in flood-affected areas To achieve these objectives, the Logistics Cluster will undertake the following activities: Air transport: The provision of a common air transport service is a life-saving priority due to persistent flooding, the destruction of roads and bridges, and continued population movements. WFP will provide aviation services to the humanitarian community through the coordinated use of available air assets in country, as well as the deployment of ten heavy-lift helicopters by the United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS). WFP aviation assets and services will be based out of strategic locations in KPK, Sindh and Punjab provinces and will be expanded to other areas as required. WFP aviation staff with the necessary technical background will be deployed. Air coordination: A joint Air Coordination Cell, chaired by NDMA, has been established to task all available air assets in coordination with all stakeholders. Cargo movement requests from the humanitarian community are received and processed centrally through the Logistics Cluster. Cargo prioritization: The priorities set by NDMA and the HCT will guide the management of all cargo handled and stored by the Logistics Cluster. Logistics coordination and information management: As of early August, WFP has reinforced the Logistics Cluster Coordination Cell in Islamabad and has established Logistics Cluster Coordination Cells in Sukkur, Peshawar and Multan. Coordination will be reinforced through new Logistics Cluster offices in Hyderabad and Gilgit. The Logistics Cluster is providing common storage facilities for the humanitarian community in Multan, Punjab, Ghazi, Kwazaklela, Bisham, Hydrabad and Sukkur, and has expanded the staging/storage capacity in Peshawar. Identification of gaps/bottlenecks: The Logistics Cluster will continue to work closely with NDMA to identify logistics unaddressed gaps/bottlenecks, and to address these through the coordinated use of available logistics assets and the provision of necessary logistics common services. Shelter items/NDMA in-kind donations: In coordination with the Logistics Cluster IOM will facilitate the delivery of Shelter Cluster items, as well as items from the other clusters if needed, providing forward delivery by road, pre-positioning, and delivery at distribution points in line with identified needs and priorities. IOM will also support NDMA to transport in-kind donations by road to various destinations in Punjab, Sindh, Balochistan, KPK and GB.

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Road services: WFP will establish forward bases along the Indus River Valley to maximize the number of helicopter rotations per day. A dedicated fleet of small trucks will be used for shunting cargo between the forward bases and the Logistics Cluster transit hubs. Additional Activities Life-saving goods unavailable in Pakistan, such as specialized supplementary foods, will be airlifted directly to Pakistan using contracted commercial air carriers. As requested by the Humanitarian Coordinator, a humanitarian base camp will be mobilized by WFP (through the International Humanitarian Partnership) to provide safe and secure accommodation and meeting facilities for humanitarian workers in Sukkur, Sindh Province. Space allocation per organization will be decided by the HCT. National humanitarian logistics hubs will be established by WFP in partnership with the National and PDMAs, in the strategic locations of Islamabad (Chakala air base), Multan (in Punjab Province), Sukkur (in Sindh province) to provide 24-hour emergency response capacity in case the situation significantly worsens. To achieve these objectives, the Emergency Telecommunications (ETC) will, based on the latest security and communications capacity assessment: strengthen and establish HF and VHF radio communications for the humanitarian community in all common operational areas across Pakistan. ensure a reliable Minimum Operating Security Standards (MOSS) compliant very high frequency/high frequency (VHF/HF) radio network independent from the public infrastructure in all the affected areas. deploy data communications services to the humanitarian community in five new locations in the affected areas. coordinate with the Government of Pakistan to upgrade the existing Pakistan security telecommunications system in seven common operational areas across the country. establish communications centres (COMCENs) in seven new locations impacted by the most recent floods. train humanitarian staff on the efficient and appropriate use of telecommunications equipment and services. deploy a dedicated ETC coordinator to ensure that the needs of the humanitarian community are addressed. EXPECTED OUTCOMES Uninterrupted supply of life-saving relief items to the affected population for all humanitarian actors. Coordinated, predictable, timely and efficient emergency logistics and telecommunications response under the cluster approach. Logistics and emergency telecommunications and information-related tools, services and platforms available to the humanitarian community. Logistics and telecommunications gaps and bottlenecks identified and addressed. Relief items are efficiently received and dispatched to disaster-affected areas in a timely manner. Availability of an upgraded, MOSS-compliant and sustainable security telecommunications system in all common operational areas. Indicators for this result Total storage space made available since the onset of the emergency No. of logistics hubs established No. of agencies and organizations using storage facilities No. of agencies and organizations utilizing Logistics coordination services No. of bulletins, maps and other logistics information produced, shared and improved 3 Volume (m ) of cargo moved through logistics common services Percentage of requests for storage services fulfilled
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Percentage utilization of the contracted hours of aircraft Percentage of requests for air transportation (cargo) fulfilled No. of agencies and organizations using aviation air services Number of passengers and amount of cargo transported with WFP-UNHAS managed helicopters Percentage of requests for medical and security evacuations fulfilled Percentage of UN agencies and NGOs in the operational area provided with telecommunications services No. of operational areas provided with data communications services Information management facilities established to serve the ETC community and linked to the single reporting system No. of UN agency and NGO staff trained on the use of the ETC services since the launch of the operation CLUSTER MONITORING PLAN Monitoring will be based on quantitative indicators, as well as qualitative feedback from service users, which is an essential element in assessing cluster achievements and overall effectiveness. To ensure a continually relevant service, Logistics Cluster participants feedback will be incorporated regularly throughout the project. Monitoring tools include: internal and external regular situation reports training databases and evaluation reports Pakistan emergency response lessons learnt Logistics Cluster and humanitarian actors partners surveys Logistics Cluster web portal traffic project evaluation inter-agency cargo movement and storage tracking, a recently developed cargo tracking system will be used to ensure comprehensive data collection, analysis and reporting through the Logistics Cluster for passenger and cargo bookings made through the WFP/UNHAS setups, a dedicated communication system is in place to monitor the location and flight progress of the WFP/UNHAS operated aircraft The Flight Management Application (FMA) system is in place. The system enables monitoring of usage the service by the various agencies, load factors, flight routing and provides operational data for management overview WFP Air Safety Unit will monitor the safety level of the operators in line with UN Aviation Standards

Logistics and Emergency Communications Cluster Members with Projects in the Response Plan IOM, UNDSS, UNHCR, WFP

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5.10 NUTRITION
Cluster Lead Agency Cluster Objectives UNITED NATIONS CHILDRENS FUND (UNICEF) To provide coordinated nutrition services that contributes to saving the lives of infant and young children and women through a package of interventions at different levels and throughout the life cycle (from pregnancy to less than five years). Specifically: 1) In the immediate relief phase, the primary objective is to scale up the management of acute malnutrition, while at the same time integrating infant feeding in emergency. 2) In the recovery phase, the life-saving objective will be complemented by the prevention of under-nutrition and the strengthening of the national awareness and capacity. 1.3 million of which 500,000 children under-five and 800,000 pregnant and lactating women (PLW) $44,605,727 See current cluster contact list: www.pakresponse.info Targeted Beneficiaries Male 105000 37,800 7,000

Total Number of Beneficiaries Funds Requested Contact Information Category

Moderately malnourished children Severely acutely malnourished children Blanket SF for children under-five Blanket SF for PLW Micro-nutrients for PLW Caregivers Department of Health staff

Female 105,000 37,800 800,000 123,200 10,500

Total 210,000 75,600 500,000 800,000 123,200 75,600 17,500

NEEDS ANALYSIS Child malnutrition rates in Pakistan remain persistently high, with an overall national GAM rate of 13% 42 and a SAM rate of 3%. The high rise in food prices since 2008 and the on-going emergency situations in Pakistan (floods, conflict situation) have had a serious impact on the nutritional status of children under-five, and pregnant and lactating women. Currently, a large number of displaced families limited access to food and the loss of household properties, food stocks and damage to standing crops will further increase food insecurity at the household level. Given the current hygiene and sanitation situation, the risk of water-borne diseases has increased, with serious implications on the already compromised nutritional status of children, and PLW. If immediate nutrition interventions are not implemented, this will lead to increased morbidity and mortality among infants and young children. OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES, OUTPUTS AND INDICATORS The Clusters specific objectives for the relief phase of the response are: to provide nutritional support and treatment for malnourished under-five children, and pregnant and lactating women through community and facility based programmes as well as blanket feeding to control diarrhoeal cases through appropriate infant feeding practices with focus on exclusive breastfeeding to strengthen coordination of nutrition interventions for timely and effective implementation and transition to recovery The specific early recovery objectives include: strengthening community capacity to manage and prevent acute malnutrition through facility and community based management of acute malnutrition strategy preventing and controling and preventing micronutrient deficiencies among children aged 6-24 months and pregnant and lactating women

Although Pakistan lacks recent nutrition data at a national level, the most recent Demographic and Health Survey in 2002 reported a GAM rate of 14% and SAM of 3%, signifying an emergency situation. More recent data gathered from localized surveys reveal a varied picture. The recently approved a national nutrition survey has been postponed due to the floods. The Nutrition Cluster acknowledges varying rates among provinces and regions, yet even where the prevalence was lower before the floods, it is likely to rise.
42

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promoting appropriate infant and young child feeding practices at community and facility setting up nutrition surveillance system and strengthen existing nutrition information system strengthening capacity of implementing partners, including government and NGOs The overall strategy for the Nutrition Cluster is to provide well coordinated nutritional support in 33 districts from the flood-affected areas. In addition, the Cluster will focus on setting information management system, and ensure delivery of quality services in the affected areas through a well coordinated mechanism in collaboration of other clusters, e.g. Health, WASH, Food and Child Protection. Activities Relief

Blanket distribution of supplementary food to all children aged 6-35 months, PLW for a period of one month and to all children aged 6-24 months led by WFP as part of the general food distribution (refer to section 3.2.6 Food for details) Treatment/care of severely malnourished children under-five through community and facilitybased management of acute malnutrition Provide targeted supplementary food for moderate malnourished children and PLW at risk Undertake accelerated campaign to promote appropriate infant feeding practice (breastfeeding) to control diarrhoea among infants Procurement and delivery of emergency nutrition supplies

Recovery Implement the community based management of acute malnutrition Training of health care providers, community workers on infant feeding practices and management of acute malnutrition Social mobilization and advocacy on appropriate infant feeding practices through community workers, religious leaders, media, and civil society organizations, and monitoring of donation of breast milk substitutes Procure emergency nutrition supplies, including therapeutic foods, medicines required for severely malnourished children, multiple micro-nutrient tablets and powder (sprinkles), and ensure timely distribution Rapid needs assessment Setting Nutrition Information Management system and surveillance system EXPECTED OUTCOMES Relief Phase 180,000 children aged 6-35 months and 123,200 PLW received supplementary food (blanket feeding) for a month. 857,000 children 6-24 months (blanket feeding) receive a ready-to-use supplementary food (RUSF) for the duration of the relief phase through the general food distribution (refer to section 3.2.6 Food) 9,000 severely malnourished children aged 6-59 months treated 160,000 pregnant and lactating women reached with key messages on appropriate infant and young child feeding practices, and hygiene 30,000 moderately malnourished children aged 6-59 months, and 21,000 pregnant and lactating women at risk received supplementary food Recovery Phase 160,000 pregnant and lactating women at risk and 120,000 children aged 6-24 months received multiple micro-nutrient supplementation 160,000 PLW reached with key messages on basic health and nutrition package including appropriate infant and young child feeding practices, hygiene/sanitation, and health seeking practice
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More than 3,000 health care providers trained on emergency nutrition services, including infant feeding in emergency & community management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) About 66,000 severely malnourished children are treated through community based management of acute malnutrition approach INDICATORS Relief Phase Number of children (6-35 months) and pregnant mothers reached through blanket supplementation. Number of severely malnourished children with medical complication treated at the stabilisation/ therapeutic units Percentage of moderately malnourished children treated Percentage of mothers/caretakers reached with appropriate infant feeding messages Recovery Phase Number of malnourished children reached through community based acute malnutrition management strategy Number of health care providers, community workers trained on infant feeding practice and acute management of acute malnutrition Percentage of mothers/caretakers reached with appropriate infant feeding messages The number of mothers and caretakers reached with basic social mobilisation/ sensitization package to promote appropriate infant feeding (counselling, educating on infant feeding, health seeking behaviour and hygiene promotion) CLUSTER MONITORING PLAN A common monitoring plan for the relief and recovery phases will be used to monitor implementation The therapeutic and supplementary feeding programme performance indicators will be monitoring and compared with the Sphere Standards (recovery, defaulter and death at the very least) Regular information sharing will be ensured at the Cluster level to review performance and analyse the response gap At provincial and district levels common inter-cluster monitoring mechanisms will be established with the Health, Nutrition and Food Clusters in the framework of the survival strategy whose development is ongoing Supervision and facilitation of trained health and nutrition care providers will be ensured to enhance programme delivery and quality

Nutrition Cluster Members with Projects in the Response Plan Abaseen Foundation, AJKRSP, BFO, Community Development Organization (CDO), Frontier Primary Health Care (FPHC), GRHO, Global Peace Pioneers (GPP), an Irish NGO (GOAL), IHS, Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V., MERLIN, National Rural Support Programme (NRSP), Peace and Development Organization (PDO), Philanthrope, Rl, Research & Awareness for Human Development Benefits and Rights (RAHBAR), SC, SYWO, SCIO, UNICEF, WHO, WV-Pakistan

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5.11 PROTECTION
Cluster Lead Agency Sub-Cluster Lead Agencies Cluster Objectives UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR REFUGEES (UNHCR) Child Protection (UNICEF), GBV (UNICEF and UNFPA) Ensure equal access to appropriate relief and early recovery assistance for flood-affected persons, with a focus on those with specific needs. Support the efforts of the Government to ensure that vulnerable persons are protected from violence, abuse, exploitation and discrimination. Ensure free and informed return, reintegration and/or other viable solutions in safety and dignity for flood-displaced persons. Advocate for the rights of flood-affected persons, with specific emphasis on vulnerable groups. Ensure coordinated and effective delivery of protection assistance under the Protection Cluster in close collaboration with the Government of Pakistan. Five million vulnerable people, of which the majority are women and children. $ 52,932,153 See current cluster contact list: www.pakresponse.info

Total Number of Beneficiaries Funds Requested Contact Information

NEEDS ANALYSIS The torrential rains and floods have caused widespread displacement throughout Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab, Balochistan and Sindh provinces, resulting in critical protection needs among vulnerable people. The overarching protection objective is to ensure equal access and nondiscrimination in the distribution of relief and early recovery assistance for flood-affected persons, particularly those with specific needs. Other key protection concerns include resolving issues of potential prolonged displacement and lack of alternatives for return or lasting solutions for vulnerable persons due to massive loss of assets (land documents, livelihoods, non food items and other belongings as well as social support networks). According to the MCRAM carried out in four flood-affected provinces, a prominent fear of displaced people is to not be able to return to their places of origin or get assistance to rebuild their homes. . Additional protection issues include reduced physical security due to the impact of the floods, unaccompanied and separated children, the increased risk of protection incidents involving children and women and the need for enhanced access to legal redress mechanims and legal assistance. For the population to better understand humanitarian relief assistance programmes, as well as programmes assisting return/local integration/resettlement, there is an urgent need for provision of objective, reliable and accessible information targeting the affected populations, at all levels. OBJECTIVES FOR THE RELIEF PHASE Ensure equal access to appropriate humanitarian assistance for flood-affected persons. Ensure that vulnerable people are protected from violence, abuse, exploitation and discrimination, in collaboration with the authorities. Ensure free and informed return, reintegration and/or other viable solutions in safety and dignity for flood-displaced persons. Ensure coordinated and effective delivery of protection assistance under the Protection Cluster in close collaboration with the Government of Pakistan. Ensure the use of and capacity building of local and national capacities and expertise in the protection response. Ensure full coherence, consistency and complementarity with the protection policies and activities of the Government of Pakistan at all levels. OBJECTIVES FOR THE EARLY RECOVERY PHASE Ensure equal access to appropriate early recovery assistance for flood-affected people. Ensure free and informed return, reintegration and/or other viable solutions in safety and dignity for flood-displaced persons. Ensure coordinated and effective delivery of protection assistance under the Protection Cluster in close collaboration with the Government of Pakistan. Ensure mainstreaming of key protection concerns into cluster strategies.
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Ensure the use of and capacity building of local and national capacities and expertise in the protection response. Ensure full coherence, consistency and complementarity with the protection policies and interventions of the Government of Pakistan at all levels. ACTIVITIES The Protection Cluster intends to respond in all affected provinces using province-specific strategies to involve the community, government line departments, UN agencies, NGOs and other stakeholders so that those identified in need of protection are assisted in finding lasting solutions. The Clusters strategy has been designed to ensure that its interventions are consistent with and supportive of the protection policies and response of the Government of Pakistan. Taking into consideration the regional variations that affect responding agencies and partners ability to implement, and the challenging environment for collecting and responding to information on sensitive protection issues, this will involve the following activities: Humanitarian assistance, early recovery assistance and capacity-building Continue assessments in coordination with the Government of Pakistan to identify protection concerns for vulnerable children and adults, to be used as baseline data, with sex and age disaggregation, for humanitarian assistance, protection activities and facilitation of return, local integration and/or resettlement. Strengthen and establish monitoring and referral mechanisms, legal aid, information and counseling services to address vulnerable peoples access to assistance and services, reliable information about their options, resolution of land and property disputes and document recovery. Formation of child protection committees under the leadership of UNICEF to monitor the situation of the identified vulnerable children and linking them with referral services, such as foster care, shelter, psycho-social support, child friendly spaces, family tracing and reunification. Formation of GBV working groups under the co-leadership of UNICEF and UNFPA to coordinate interventions that protect women and children from GBV and provide services and referral information to GBV survivors and their communities. Strengthening the capacity of key government actors at the federal, provincial and district levels. Establishment/strengthening of women- and adolescent girl-friendly spaces by providing trained female staff and supplies to ensure vocational skills psycho-social support, life skills-based education and awareness on RH/GBV issues through focus group discussion are provided to flood-affected women and girls. Provision of psycho-social support (in collaboration with the Health Cluster partners) to vulnerable children. Training of local partners on protection issues. Information Establish and support individual/household-level social mobilisers, community elders and other community information mechanisms as well as mass communication mechanisms to reach affected populations with reliable and relevant information, ensuring all mechanisms are accessible to the entire population (i.e. Illiterate people, people with hearing impairments). Presence and Advocacy Monitor vulnerable groups access to services and assistance and advocate with key stakeholders and duty bearers to secure commitments to address critical gaps and respond to their specific needs. Coordination Ensure effective coordination of the implementation of the Protection Clusters projects and activities, develop strategies and workplans. Ensure application of sex and age disaggregated data where possible, and work with other clusters, humanitarian and early recovery actors to ensure application of IASC guidelines and other relevant standards.

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Support the Government of Pakistan to implement sustainable return strategies for displaced populations across the affected provinces. OUTCOMES Relief Phase Separated, unaccompanied and missing children are traced and reunified with their families. Documents such as national identity cards (PoR cards for Afghan refugees), land deeds and other public documentation have been recovered through legal assistance or other referral mechanisms (working in close coordination with relevant government partners and the Community Restoration cluster). Vulnerable groups are able to return to their places of origin or identify sustainable solutions durable solutions. Protective environments and physical safe spaces have been created for vulnerable women and children with mitigation of traumatic experience. Vulnerable people have equal access to humanitarian assistance without discrimination. The survivors of GBV have access to government support mechanisms, health facilities, legal assistance and psycho-social support and better coping mechanisms The rights of vulnerable groups are respected Relevant and reliable information is accessible and disseminated in a culturally appropriate way to affected populations, including those who are illiterate or who have disabilities limiting their access to information. Affected communities are better trained and equipped to prevent trafficking of people. Appropriate messaging to the affected population at mass media, community and household level is enabling vulnerable people to strengthen their own coping mechanisms. Provincial level sustainable return strategies are developed and implemented in support of the Government provincial and district level early recovery plans to find appropriate solutions for temporarily displaced people. Recovery Phase Referrals for and implementation of family reunification is an activity largely taken over by district authorities and national NGOs with the necessary support of the Cluster. Documents such as national identity cards (PoR cards for Afghan refugees), land deeds and other public documentation have been recovered through legal assistance or other referral mechanisms. Vulnerable groups are able to return to their origins or find durable solutions. Vulnerable women and children are protected through assistance in return areas and in places of displacement for those who have not yet returned. Vulnerable people have equal access to return and early recovery assistance without discrimination. The survivors of GBV have access to government support structures, health facilities, legal assistance and psycho-social support and better coping mechanisms. The rights of vulnerable groups are respected. Relevant and reliable information about return and recovery assistance is accessible and disseminated in a culturally appropriate way to affected populations, including those who are illiterate or who have disabilities limiting their access to information. Affected communities are better equipped to prevent trafficking of people. Appropriate messaging to the affected population at mass media, community and household level is enabling vulnerable people to strengthen their own coping mechanisms. Provincial level sustainable return strategies are implemented in support of the Government provincial and district level early recovery plans to find sustainable solutions for displaced persons. Indicators Sex, age and vulnerability are disaggregated in data collection and analysis. Number of beneficiaries accessing humanitarian assistance, early recovery assistance and return facilitation through legal cases resolved (formally and informally) and referral mechanisms used, such as resolution of land and property disputes, access to return assistance, access to compensation or reconstruction assistance. Number of beneficiaries with official documentation recovered or issued through established mechanisms.
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Number of children with access to Child Friendly Spaces, psycho-social support and other services. Number of referrals made and followed-up through Social Welfare Centres and other mechanisms. Number of survivors of GBV referred and followed-up through health facilities, legal assistance and psycho-social support. Number of vulnerable people identified, registered and profiled. Geographic coverage of priority areas with access to adequate protection monitoring and services. Number of communities, aid workers, vulnerable people, groups and partners such as relevant authorities receiving training and capacity-building. Coverage of key messages through mass media such as radio and community level messaging. BENEFICIARIES/TARGETING STRATEGY The Protection Cluster has identified the target beneficiaries as the most vulnerable. Under this appeal document, the Protection Cluster plans to target 5 million vulnerable people in the relief and early return phase (25% of the total affected population), and of these 2,5 million vulnerable people who will continue to need protection assistance throughout the return and early recovery phase (12,5 % of the total affected population). The majority of these beneficiaries will be women and children. CLUSTER MONITORING PLAN The impact and results against activities this response plan will be measured against agreed performance indicators at several levels: by individual agencies and organizations internal monitoring and evaluation mechanisms related to their project implementation ongoing monitoring by the cluster lead on the overall objectives and outcomes for the cluster response plan reporting and coordination through the Ministry of Social Welfare, which retains primary responsibility for the protection of flood-affected persons. inter-cluster monitoring mechanisms facilitated by OCHA. The Cluster indicators are: number of persons of concern accessing humanitarian assistance number of persons of concern accessing return and early recovery assistance number of persons of concern provided with cash transfers number of beneficiaries with official documentation, including birth registration, recovered or issued through established mechanisms number of unaccompanied and separated older persons or persons with disability identified and number of unaccompanied and separated older persons and persons with disability who have been reunified with family number of children with access to Child Friendly Spaces number of children with access to psycho-social support and other services number of older persons with access to psycho-social support number of persons with disability with access to psycho-social support number of persons of concern supported through legal advice and counselling number of persons of concern supported through Social Welfare Centres number of survivors of GBV survivors who were provided with support through medical, legal and psycho-social assistance number of stakeholders receiving training and capacity-building number of persons of concern in [broadcast area] where key messages are communicated through mass media and community level messaging number of unaccompanied and separated children identified, reported, and reunified with family number of Help Line Services provided sensitization of communities, authorities and service providers on GBV prevention and response number of health facilities equipped to respond to GBV survivors number of women and girls with access to safe spaces and psycho-social support

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Monitoring and reporting against indicators will be based on the roll-out of a Single Reporting Format. This tool will allow the cluster to demonstrate its progress against the strategies presented within this response plan on the basis of a monthly online reporting format. This reporting will allow tracking of progress through information on project budgets and expenditure, partners, project locations, beneficiaries, activity type and outputs and performance indicators. Protection Cluster Members with Projects in the Response Plan Bedari, Cavish Development Foundation (CDF), Children First, CWS, DDO, FRD, Hl, Hayat Foundation, Insan Foundation Trust (IFT), IMC, IOM, IRC, Internews, INTERSOS, KWES, MDF, NGOs Coalition on Child Rights (CCR), Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC), Pakistan Rural Development Program (PRDP), PRDS, PDO, Plan International (PI), PODA, Relief Pakistan, RDO, READ Foundation, SC, Sewa Development Trust Sindh (SDTS), Society for Empowering Human Resource (SEHER), Society for Sustainable Development (SSD), UNICEF, UNIFEM, UNDP, UNESCO, UNHCR, United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT), UNFPA, WASFD, WWOP, World Vision International (WVI), Youth Parliament of Pakistan (YPP)

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5.12 SHELTER/NON-FOOD ITEMS


Cluster Lead Agency Cluster Objectives INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR MIGRATION (IOM) The objective of the relief phase is to provide life-saving emergency shelter solutions including distribution of tents or tarpaulins and NFIs, to address the rapidly increasing need. Currently, the humanitarian community needs to redirect its focus toward underserved provinces in the country. Provincial breakdown of damaged/destroyed housing units as follows: 1,060,680: Sindh 500,000: Punjab 191,215: Khyber Paktunkhwa 75,261: Balochistan 4,614: Federally Administered Tribal Area 9,138: Other federating units The early recovery phase will focus on providing a safe and sustainable shelter solution, minimising further displacement and encouraging return of populations in a dignified and sustainable manner. The vast majority are expected to rapidly return to their place or origin and the shelter cluster will support the creation of core shelter, prioritizing the use of local material Of the 1.8million houses damaged and destroyed, the Shelter & NFIs Cluster will target1.44 million households (apx 8.8 million people)* in the relief phase The number of targeted beneficiaries for the early recovery phase will be established by assessments as the situation evolves Funds Requested Contact Information *assumes family size of 7 people $321,089,320 See current cluster contact list: www.pakresponse.info

Total Number of Beneficiaries

NEEDS ANALYSIS Within the relief phase, the Shelter/NFI Cluster will ensure that those whose homes have been seriously damaged or destroyed in the floods have access to emergency shelter and NFIs that provide basic protection from the rain and sun, as well as providing privacy and dignity. The early recovery phase will focus on providing a safe and durable shelter solution, minimizing further displacement and encouraging return of populations in a dignified and sustainable manner.

# of HHs served (https://sites.google.com/site/shelterpak2010/im)

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The focus will be on assisting those whose homes have been destroyed or heavily damaged to support themselves by providing appropriate means and structural materials for repair and rehabilitation, primarily based upon the use of traditional building materials enhanced with appropriate technical assistance and support for revitalizing the supply chain of key materials. Different parts of the country are currently going through different phases of the response. Early recovery support will need to start immediately in places where return is occurring. The response will be graduated and appropriate, based upon regularly assessed need as the flooding recedes, access improves, and return is possible. OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES, OUTPUTS AND INDICATORS 1. Relief Phase The objective of the relief phase is to provide life-saving emergency shelter solutions including distribution of tents or tarpaulins and NFIs, to address the rapidly increasing need. Currently, the humanitarian community needs to redirect its focus toward underserved provinces in the country. Gap filling and topping up of emergency relief, particularly for areas in need of winterization, is also 43 required. Alternative solutions such as corrugated galvanized iron (CGI) sheeting and chattai may be appropriate in some parts of the country and should be encouraged. Tool kits and clean up kits can support improvement of shelter and repair/clean up of partially damaged houses. Key Shelter and NFIs have been identified as including blankets, bedding and kitchen sets. The Shelter Cluster has advocated for the importation of at least 600,000 shelter grade plastic sheets into the country which will complement the emergency shelter being produced by the strong Pakistan tent manufacturing and plastic sheeting industries. Non-food items to complement the plastic sheeting can be procured nationally as well On site Displaced Partially Spontaneous Destroyed Host Collective Location type damaged camps (such houses families centres houses as roadsides) Tents or Tents or Tarpaulins Tents or Tarpaulins tarpaulins tarpaulins Types of and fixings, tarpaulins and and fixings, and fixings, and fixings, Emergency tool kits, fixings, tool kits, tool kits, tool kits, Support household tool kits, household household household kits household kits kits kits kits

Planned camps* Tents tarpaulins and fixings, tool kits, tousehold kits

The following should be noted with regard to distributions of shelter and NFIs: Cash and vouchers should be considered options where markets can support demand. Emergency shelter and NFI distribution mechanisms must be accessible to all vulnerable groups (people with disabilities, older people, etc.). Distributing shelter material that can be re-used in the early recovery phase should be encouraged. Distribution of clean-up kits will facilitate return and speed up the repair and rehabilitation process. Distribution in location and support to host families will prevent further migration. Specific gender considerations must be made in both the selection and targeting of beneficiaries and the distribution and follow up of shelter support. Additional emergency shelter support may be required for overly congested collective centres. Organizations will need to follow displacement to ensure coverage of the maximum number of families. Extended relief may be required for those who cannot return to their land.

43

Local woven mats. 86

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Coordination with CCCM Cluster will be necessary for provision of shelter to planned camps. Coordination with WASH and Health Clusters indicates that the Shelter Cluster will not cover hygiene kits, jerry cans, buckets and mosquito nets. Public information campaigns using formal and informal communication methods will explain policies to flood-affected populations. Communication channels should be accessible to all and facilitate feedbacks. Expected Outcomes Families will have shelter that provides a secure, habitable living environment, privacy and dignity for those within it during the relief phase. Shelter is provided in coordination with other sectors, throughout the response. Indicator Number of families provided with emergency shelter Number of families provided with key household NFIs Number of families provided with toolkits

2. Early Recovery Phase The early recovery phase has begun in parts of Pakistan. It starts as soon as families begin to return to their place of origin and/or are able to find land on which to rebuild. The objective of the early recovery phase is to provide support to people with heavily damaged or destroyed houses at their place of origin. Within this group, areas in need of winterization should be targeted first due to the high altitude, accessibility issues, and the fact that floods have largely receded in these areas in comparison to other parts of Pakistan. Different areas of Pakistan will require different shelter solutions based upon cultural, topographical, material availability and climatic distinctions. Unique technical solutions are being developed on the provincial level within the Shelter Cluster. Returnees should be encouraged to move back with all belongings distributed during the relief phase. Early Recovery support in the Shelter Sector may include: 1. technical, financial and material support for housing rehabilitation and, when necessary, transitional shelter, prioritising in-location support and those living in areas in need of winterization. a. Shelter support for those with destroyed or non-repairable houses to create one habitable room using traditional building materials. b. Partial shelter support and clean up packages for those whose houses can be made habitable with minor support. 44 c. Construction of transitional shelters or core houses for the most vulnerable whose houses have been completely destroyed or are beyond repair. 2. debris removal and management support. 3. encouraging and providing technical support for construction-related livelihood programmes. The following should be noted with regard to early recovery support: CFW and cash grant approaches should be considered where possible. Flood mitigation and DRR components and education should be included, as well as seismic safety in relevant areas. 45 Utilize universal access design and government accessibility standards to address needs of people with disabilities and other specific needs. Mobilize community participation for rehabilitation and clean up. Encourage reusing salvageable and indigenous material.

44 45

Core house = one room that can then be extended later at their own pace when they have money or time. designs that are accessible by all i.e. including elderly and disabled people. 87

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Distinction between support to urban and rural communities should be considered, including ongoing support for host families. Activities to be carried out in engagement with and support to local authorities. Include public information on safe construction and planning practices. Coordination with Protection (Land rights), Community Restoration (Debris removal/management, settlement planning and livelihood support), and WASH (latrines/sanitation) Clusters. Cluster members should follow guidelines as indicated by these clusters. Expected Outcomes Improve and stabilize return of families to their place of origin during early recovery phase. Shelter is provided in coordination with other sectors, throughout the response. Indicators Number of families provided with repair support Number of families with core/transitional shelters support Number of families provided with clean-up kits CLUSTER MONITORING PLAN The Shelter Cluster has a reporting and monitoring system in place to provide relevant and timely information to Government, donors and cluster partners. Through reporting templates provided, each implementing organization is responsible for reporting distribution activities, pipeline and results achieved. Reports on overall distribution and pipeline information is regularly compiled by the cluster and shared with NDMA and posted on www.shelterpakistan.com. At the provincial and district level, the cluster focal persons in the field hubs will liaise closely with provincial governments and participate in inter-cluster coordination meetings. Regular verification of distribution reports in the provincial hubs minimises double reporting and notify agencies of area of greatest need. These efforts will be fully aligned with the inter-cluster Single Reporting Format.

Shelter and Non-Food Items Cluster Members with Projects in the Response Plan AAGAHI, AKDN, ACTED, AJK Rural Support Programme, ARC, BRSP, BFO, CARE International, CRS, CDF, Concern Worldwide, Dehi Samaji Taraqiati Council (DSTC), DDO, Farmers Development Organization (FDO), FHA, Food for the Hungry (FH), FRD, HF, Hl, HIN, HAl, IMC, IOM, IRC, INTERSOS, IR-Pakistan, Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V., JPl, KWES, MOJAZ Foundation, Muslim Aid (MA), Muslim Hands International (MHI), NRSP, NWHO, NRC, Oriental Women Organization (OWO), OXFAM GB, PAIMAN Alumni Trust, PRDP, PRWSWO, PRDS, PAI, Pattan Development Organization (Pattan), Qatar Charity, Rl, SC, SDTS, Shelter Cluster Consortium, SSD, Society for the Advancement, Community, health, Education and Training (SACHET), SPO, Taraqee Foundation, UNDP, UNHCR, UN-HABITAT, United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS), WVI

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

5.13 WASH
Cluster Lead Agency Cluster Objectives UNITED NATIONS CHILDRENS FUND (UNICEF) Contribute to a measurable improvement in WASH-related morbidity and mortality among the affected population through the efficient, effective, and timely implementation of WASH emergency and early recovery programmes, targeted at flood-affected women, men, children, and other vulnerable categories (the elderly, the disabled, etc). 13.3 million people currently in urgent need of safe drinking water and basic sanitary assistance $244,021,075 See current cluster contact list: www.pakresponse.info

Total Number of Beneficiaries Funds Requested Contact Information

NEEDS ANALYSIS Needs and Objectives It is estimated that approximately 14 million people are currently in urgent need of safe drinking water and basic sanitary assistance. The needs of the affected communities differ significantly due to geographical and vulnerability factors. In some areas (KPK in particular where has water receded) people are returning, while in others (Southern Sindh where the floods are still escalating) people are leaving their houses and villages. Among those who have fled, some have made their way to relatives in non-affected areas, others are sheltered in public building or in tented camps, and in spontaneous settlements. Some settings place the displaced people at higher risk of disease than others. Regardless of location or context, women, children, the elderly and disabled are at greatest risk. The clusters objective is to contribute to a measurable improvement in WASH-related morbidity and mortality among the affected population through the efficient, effective, and timely implementation of WASH emergency and early recovery programmes, targeted at flood-affected women, men, children, and other vulnerable categories (the elderly, the disabled, etc). Relevant cross-cutting concerns (gender, the elderly, the disabled, environment, and protection) will underpin both the emergency and early recovery phase interventions. Within the relief period, WASH Cluster partners will ensure immediate WASH interventions are implemented in the most affected areas to meet basic/survival needs of the populations. These interventions will assist people cut-off by flood waters (accessing them through a joint efforts with Logistic Cluster) and displaced people in spontaneous settlements, in tented camps or are sheltered in existing public buildings with no or insufficient WASH facilities and services. Within the early recovery period, WASH Cluster partners will focus on supporting people in areas where flood waters have receded and return has taken place to return to a normal life. OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES, OUTPUTS AND INDICATORS During the relief phase, the cluster will focus on maintaining and upgrading water and sanitation facilities to temporary settlements, improving personal hygiene practices in families, and ensuring that minimum accessibility standards are promoted and used through: distribution of household water containers and means to treat water at household level provision of chlorine for storage tanks disinfection water supply to temporary settlements through the temporary deployment of mobile water treatment plants, water trucking and water storage water quality testing including bacteriological, residual chlorine and chemical construction of emergency latrines with hand washing facilities, taking into consideration gender, age and disabilities construction of open trenches for defecation excavated with machinery or by affected population (through contracting or CFW) taking into consideration gender, age and disabilities construction of washing/bathing facilities with women friendly, suitably private areas for washing and drying of menstrual cloths cleaning campaigns for solid waste and open defection supported by distribution of tools (picks, shovels), and payments/incentives
89

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

hygiene promotion and messaging especially on hand washing with soap, use of latrines and keeping WASH facilities clean, including hand washing points identification and training of community focal points for organizing/mobilizing priority activities, campaigns including leaflets, radio campaigns, mosques, etc hygiene kit distribution: soap, menstrual cloth for women and girls distribution of household water transport and storage containers as part of an integrated survival strategy support a rapid response team to respond to AWD outbreaks support the establishment of a joint coordination unit in hot-spot districts with the Health, Nutrition and Food Clusters During the early recovery phase, the cluster will focus on the construction and rehabilitation of water and sanitation facilities in affected communities to at least pre-disaster levels, incorporating DRRbased improvements wherever possible, as well as building capacities within communities and local government for water and sanitation management through: provision of equipment and material for the repair of water and sanitation systems. repairs/maintenance/upgrade of broken systems (water supply network, tube wells equipped with hand/motorized pumps) taking DRM into account. cleaning contaminated open wells by the removal of debris, chlorination and protection. support the returning affected population by distribution of tools (picks, shovels) and payments/incentives in clearing mud/debris from their houses and surroundings in collaboration with Shelter and Community Restoration Clusters. CFW activities to support recovery at village level e.g. clearing drainage ditches, communal areas coordinated with Community Restoration Cluster. either cash or material support for toilet construction/rehabilitation in coordination with the Shelter Cluster. Both the relief and early recovery needs are massive and services need to be provided quickly to minimizing WASH-related disease risks. The WASH Cluster has identified the following options for scaling up to meet the needs: Working through local partners (NGOs) and local government (e.g. Public Health Engineering Department [PHEDs], Town Municipal Administrations [TMAs]) who have the local knowledge and ability to recruit local staff and volunteers quickly. Increased use of existing national structures and resources in close coordination with the respective sectoral clusters e.g. LHWs and community volunteers for hygiene promotion. Advocacy with major INGOs who are not operational or have limited projects to scale up. Implementing partners to pursue multiple options for sourcing materials so as not to rely on a limited number of major suppliers. Local procurement should still be utilized to the extent possible. If necessary, technical agreements through WASH Cluster TWGs on best practice (latrine design etc.) to support smaller WASH actors and minimize duplication of efforts and facilitate simpler monitoring. Improved forward planning, material stockpiling of WASH needs for the recovery phase and for AWD outbreaks to ensure that the WASH Cluster is able to be responsive, effective and proactive. Encourage relevant local authorities to improve information available to displaced people relating to camp locations. Collaborate with Shelter, Logistics and Food Cluster to speed up delivery of some basic materials by conducting joint distribution. While the government has demonstrated leadership and readiness to respond, resources are not sufficient to adequately cover and coordinate all the WASH response therefore it is important to establish a baseline of the WASH sector for early recover phase. As a result, the WASH Cluster will work together with all mandated bodies at all levels to ensure a complementary and effective coordination and sorting out options for additional resources.
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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

OUTCOMES Relief

Targeted people in flood-affected locations have access to, and make optimal use of, WASH facilities, taking action to protect themselves against threats to health. People in flood-affected areas have access to and use adequate quantities/quality water for drinking and basic household needs. Targeted people in flood-affected locations adopt safe hygiene practices/behaviours - such as effective hand washing at key times- as result of positive communication, interaction, dialogue and provision of the means required to practice these improved behaviour. Optimal use, care and maintenance is made of the provided water and sanitation facilities by targeted populations. The Do no harm principle will be fully applied and quality of WASH interventions enhanced paying particular attention to specific vulnerabilities within the affected population (gender, age, disabilities, protection etc), as well as environmental issues such as ground water pollution. There are no major outbreaks of WASH-related communicable disease in targeted areas.

Early Recovery Targeted people in flood-affected locations have access to, and make optimal use of, WASH facilities, taking action to protect themselves against threats to health. People in flood-affected areas have access to and use adequate quantities/quality water for drinking and basic household needs Targeted populations live in an environment free of silt, debris, other rubble, and the corpses of animals. Such a result can be achieved in part through waste management, drainage and cleanup activities. This outcome will be achieved jointly with the community restoration cluster. Targeted people in flood-affected locations adopt safe hygiene practices/behaviours - such as effective hand washing at key times- as result of positive communication, interaction, dialogue and provision of the means required to practice these improved behaviour. Optimal use, care and maintenance is made of the provided water and sanitation facilities by targeted populations. The Do no harm principle will be fully applied and quality of WASH interventions enhanced paying particular attention to specific vulnerabilities within the affected population (gender, age, disabilities, protection etc), as well as environmental issues such as ground water pollution. Flood victims are aware of/empowered to minimize the impact of future floods when they happen, particularly the risk of outbreak of WASH-related disease-community empowerment/awareness about overall issues on flooding. Indicators The indicators below will be used for both relief and early recovery efforts, but measured separately where possible and appropriate. Hygiene practices Percentage of households where safe water is available and used for drinking and cooking Percentage of households washing their hands with water and soap or any other deterrent material e.g ash after contact with faeces and before contact with food WASH NFIs Percentage of households possessing soap and other basic material of hygiene kit (towel, water bucket etc.) Percentage of households/families possessing appropriate sanitary protection materials to use during menstruation by women Percentage of households possessing at least one clean narrow-necked or covered water container for drinking-water

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Water Supply Percentage of households with access to a safer/safe drinking-water source Quantity of water used/available per person per day for drinking, cooking, hygiene and laundry (minimum 15 litres per person per day) Distance to the nearest water collection point is less than 500 meters Queuing time at water collection point is no more than 15 minutes Water point/tap should not take more than 3 minutes to fill a container of 20 litres Sanitation Percentage of men and women with access to (appropriate) bathing and laundry facilities Percentage of households/families with access to latrines (distance not more than 50 meters) Presence of latrines convenient for children and differently able people to use (separate public latrines for women) Percentage of toilets that are used and clean functioning and convenient hand washing facilities Exist and operational a solid-waste management system Exist and operational waste water disposal system/facilities on and around the site Representation, Equity, and Participation The WASH response includes effective mechanisms for representative and participatory input from all users at all phases All groups within the affected population have equitable access to WASH facilities and services The affected population takes responsibility for the management and maintenance of facilities as appropriate, and all groups contribute equitably Coordination Standard information management tools established to support effective coordination and communication existing and utilized Standard technical guidelines to support quality response available and utilized Cluster response monitoring and analysis undertaken Cluster capacity mapping and analysis conducted on a regular basis Cluster concerns identified, addressed and reported on as part of sector response monitoring report Cross-Sector/Cluster linkages to support an effective multi-sectoral response with the Health, Nutrition and Food Clusters in hot spot districts as part of an integrated survival strategy established CLUSTER MONITORING PLAN A core function of the cluster lead agencys and cluster coordinators terms of reference is related to monitoring. In the current response, the WASH Cluster will adopt the following approach to monitoring: Relief Phase The WASH Cluster will develop monitoring templates and guidelines in consultation with NDMA to be used by all WASH Cluster partners for their internal monitoring focusing on the above indicators and reporting findings to the WASH Cluster and National, Provincial and District Disaster Management Authority (NDMA, PDMA and DDMA) at the various levels (district, provincial and national). At provincial and district levels joint inter-cluster monitoring mechanism will be established with the Health, Nutrition and Food Clusters in the framework of the survival strategy whose development is ongoing. An additional resource and mechanism the WASH Cluster intends to use is the MCRAM team from OCHA. Development of the monitoring questionnaire will be done jointly with the WASH Cluster, while the data gathering, processing, analysis and reporting will be undertaken by the MCRAM team. Early Recovery Phase
92

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

In the early recovery phase, when the risk of disease outbreaks is less, the WASH Cluster approach to monitoring will be mostly agency-based. Individual WASH Cluster partners will be encouraged to undertake comprehensive monitoring using the standardized tools (for both monitoring and reporting) developed by the WASH Cluster. The contribution of the Government and donors to bring both their technical perspective and their authority for achieving this exercise will be sought. Notwithstanding the above, the WASH Cluster will explore additional possibilities/opportunities for monitoring, such as: a. Identifying agencies at provincial level to take on this role on the behalf of the WASH Cluster, using their own resources or the lead agency ones b. Hiring national consultants to carry this exercise in the affected areas on a regular basis c. Coordination with DDMAs, PDMAs and NDMA to ensure that the support provided to the flood affected people is inline with the stated objectives of government and donor for Early Recovery Phase. Data shall be reported according to the Single Reporting Format. Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Cluster Members with Projects in the Response Plan Action Contre la Faim (ACF), AKDN, AKRSP, AJKRSP, ARC, BRSP, BFO, CARE International, CWS, Community Social Welfare Council (CSWC), Concern Worldwide, FF, Ghazi Barotha Taraqiati Idara (GBTI), Hl, HHRD, HAl, IRD, IRC, IR-Pakistan, Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V., JPl, Khushal Awareness and Development Organization (KADO), Muslim Aid, NRSP, OXFAM GB, OXFAM Netherlands (NOVIB), PAIMAN Alumni Trust, PRDP, PDO (Pakistan), Pl, Punjab Rural Support Organization (PRSO), Qatar Charity, Salik Development Foundation (SDF), Save the Children, Sindh Graduate Association (SGA), Sindh Rural Support Organization (SRSO), SSD, SPO, Sungi, UNICEF, UN-HABITAT, WHO

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

ANNEX I.

LIST OF PROJECTS AND FUNDING TABLES


Table III. List of Response Plan Projects (grouped by cluster), with funding status of each
Pakistan Floods Relief and Early Recovery Response Plan 2010 as of 31 October 2010
http://fts.unocha.org
Compiled by OCHA on the basis of information provided by donors and appealing organizations.

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) AGRICULTURE PKA-FL-10/A/34053/R/13054 PKA-FL-10/A/34069/R/5146 PKA-FL-10/A/34071/R/5861

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($)

Revised requirements ($)

Funding ($)

Unmet requirements ($)

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($)

Priority

PKA-FL-10/A/34080/R/123

PKA-FL-10/A/34123/R/14125

PKA-FL-10/A/34626/R/12947

PKA-FL-10/A/34770/R/12992 PKA-FL-10/A/34850/R/298 PKA-FL-10/A/34855/R/13101 PKA-FL-10/A/34895/R/13953 PKA-FL-10/A/34921/R/6079

Post Floods Emergency Agriculture, veterinary health and livestock Support in flood affected area of D I Khan and Tank Districts Agricultural Recovery and Livestock Support for FloodAffected Communities in Sindh, Balochistan and KPK Emergency Livestock Management Support for Flood Affectees in D.I Khan and Tank Districts, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Early recovery of agriculture based livelihoods and food security of vulnerable households through provision of critical agricultural and livestock inputs and rehabilitation of irrigation infrastructure in KPK, Punjab, Balochistan and Sindh Emergency assistance for increased food security through livestock management in the flood affected areas of districts Shangla and Kohistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa recovery of on farm livelihoods in flood affected areas of Khyber Pukhtunkhwa through a community based approach. ( Union Council Mohib Bandah Nowshehra, Mirza Dher, Aagrah and Nissatta Charsadah and Nahqi of Peshawar KPK)da Provision of agriculture inputs/technical assistance to the affected farmers of Most affected Districts Swat and Nowshera in KPK Support to Agriculture and Livelihoods Activities in Flood Affected Districts of KP, Punjab and Sindh through Distribution of Tool Kits Restore livelihood through provision of livestock and agri support in Rajanpur District Restore the livelihood of the flood affectees throgh Cash for Work Protection and Recovery of Households Food Security and Livelihoods for Flood Affected Families in KPK, Punjab, Sindh and Balochistan.

PRDS CRS IRD

385,000 6,020,714 587,298

385,000 6,020,714 587,298

0% 0% 0%

EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY

FAO

81,000,000

51,380,852

29,619,148

63%

RANNA

234,000

234,000

0%

RDP

2,248,975

249,399

1,999,576

11%

IDEA IOM PAIMAN RHD SC

560,000 2,000,000 1,173,000 162,052 8,219,630

6,730,086

560,000 2,000,000 1,173,000 162,052 1,489,544

0% 0% 0% 0% 82%

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/A/35038/R/5120 PKA-FL-10/A/35057/R/5090

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 3,782,353 546,161

Funding ($) -

Unmet requirements ($) 3,782,353 546,161

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

PKA-FL-10/A/35079/R/6971 PKA-FL-10/A/35097/R/776 PKA-FL-10/A/35174/R/12839 PKA-FL-10/A/35309/R/13160 PKA-FL-10/A/35371/R/5357 PKA-FL-10/A/35416/R/123 PKA-FL-10/A/35575/R/123 PKA-FL-10/A/35606/R/8498 PKA-FL-10/A/35643/R/12966 PKA-FL-10/A/35658/R/14320 PKA-FL-10/A/35746/R/6458 Sub total for AGRICULTURE

Support to agricultural livelihoods in the flood-affected provinces of KPK and Sindh Restoration of Agriculture and Livestock production, and Livelihood support to the flood affected vulnerable men and women farmers and the landless, in district Rahim Yar Khan Punjab Post flood Rapid Livelihoods Rebuilding through Supporting Recovery of Livestock Systems in Nowshera District, KPK Reviving Agriculture and Livelihoods Restoration in Flood Affected Areas (RALRIFA) Livestock assistance to flood victims Early Recovery of Agriculture in Muzaffargarh Punjab Thatta Food Security Project for Flood Affected Small Scale Farming Families Cluster-based coordination of immediate and early recovery agricultural assistance Livelihood rehabilitation and mitigation of adverse impact of monsoon floods through early recovery interventions in forestry and fishery sectors in flood affected districts Restoration of agriculture-based livelihoods in the floodaffected districts of Punjab, Sind and Baluchistan, Pakistan Ensuring Food For Vulnerable Food Insecure Women and Men Farmers Through Provision of Green Houses for Agri activities In Harsh Winter of Baltistan Agriculture Food Security Revitalization for women headed households of Gilgit Baltistan Provision of agricultural assets and ability to flood affected population in Pakistan

OXFAM GB HAI

0% 0%

EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY

RI UNDP HHRD IR Pakistan CWS FAO FAO CW CHIP AKRSP ACTED

180,067 20,000,000 1,483,985 536,259 142,618 998,074 25,000,000 3,580,338 118,236 7,510,000 4,084,146 170,552,906

408,163 3,443,456 62,211,956

180,067 20,000,000 1,483,985 536,259 142,618 998,074 25,000,000 3,172,175 118,236 7,510,000 640,690 108,340,950

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 11% 0% 0% 84% 36%

CAMP COORDINATION AND CAMP MANAGEMENT PKA-FL-10/CSS/34819/R/298 PKA-FL-10/CSS/35670/R/120 Enhancing Humanitarian Support and Information to Camp and Settlement-based Populations through the Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) Camp Coordination and Camp Management: support and implementation IOM UNHCR 1,773,450 11,056,367 12,829,817 4,323,596 4,323,596 1,773,450 6,732,771 8,506,221 0% 39% 34% RELIEF RELIEF

Sub total for CAMP COORDINATION AND CAMP MANAGEMENT COMMUNITY RESTORATION PKA-FL-10/ER/34353/R/13008 Non farm Livelihoods Children First

141,713

141,713

0%

EARLY RECOVERY

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/ER/34368/R/8227 PKA-FL-10/ER/34388/R/5103 PKA-FL-10/ER/34483/R/13029 PKA-FL-10/ER/34516/R/14135 PKA-FL-10/ER/34532/R/5645 PKA-FL-10/ER/34565/R/14205 PKA-FL-10/ER/34601/R/14216 PKA-FL-10/ER/34627/R/12692 PKA-FL-10/ER/34651/R/12963 PKA-FL-10/ER/34660/R/8766 PKA-FL-10/ER/34689/R/14237 PKA-FL-10/ER/34722/R/12968 PKA-FL-10/ER/34733/R/12968 PKA-FL-10/ER/34736/R/8498 PKA-FL-10/ER/34757/R/13101 PKA-FL-10/ER/34759/R/13101 PKA-FL-10/ER/34797/R/14129

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 984,967 478,000 89,900 516,526 2,602,300 944,247 115,293 2,654,745 206,500 122,000 126,500 192,100 194,300 4,835,459 816,000 877,000 275,170

Funding ($) 832,733 27,473 -

Unmet requirements ($) 984,967 478,000 89,900 516,526 1,769,567 944,247 115,293 2,627,272 206,500 122,000 126,500 192,100 194,300 4,835,459 816,000 877,000 275,170

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

Improved Non-Farm Livelihoods and Social cohesion among flood affected communities in Jaffarabad and Naseerabad districts of Balochistan. Promoting Cultural Industries for Livelihood Recovery in Flood Affected Areas Supporting Livelihoods Recovery in severely flood affected areas of upper swat, KPK Improvement of Governance and Basic Community Infrastructure in District Jaffar Abad. Balochistan Abad, Balochistan. Development-Oriented Emergency and Transitional Aid for the Flood affected Population of Khyber Pakhtoonkwa and Sindh Post Disaster livelihood restoration and rehabilitation Community livelihood rehabilitation project in District Neelum (3 UC, 1. Neelum, 2.. Barrian 3.Dudnyal ) & Other affected areas of District Neelum Restoration of Lives and Livelihoods in Flood Affected Districts of DG Khan, Rajan Pur and Muzaffar Garh Support Livelihoods through Cash for Work Programme in District DIKhan- KP Immediate restoration of damaged and destroyed Community Infrastructure in the flood affected areas for stabilization and start up of routine life. Restoration & recovery of Community based infrastructure in Tehsil sharda district Neelum To address the needs of local communities related to access affected by Floods in District DI Khan and Charsadda of KPK Province. To address the needs of local communities related to access affected by Floods in Bajour and Mohmand Agencies of FATA. Restoration of non-farm livelihoods & community infrastructure in the flood affected districts of KPK, Punjab, Sindh and Baluchistan, Pakistan. Reducing environment degradation through participatory approaches in Thatta Community Restoration of Small Bridges, Pathways, Culverts and Water Channels in District Thatta Livelihood support and prevention of Environmental hazards through community restoration initiatives in District Kohistan (Tehsils Pattan, Palas ,Dassu) Livelihood Support to 8,000 Vulnerable Flood Affected Women Home Based Workers/Entrepreneurs by provision of Raw Material and Tools Lost in the recent Floods in 50 UCs of Dera Ghazi Khan, Rajan Pur, Rahim Yar Khan, Jhang & Mian Wali Districts.

BRSP UNESCO JPI PIDS CARE International AJKRSP KWES QC CMDO NIDA DDO SARHAD SARHAD CW PAIMAN PAIMAN MCDO

0% 0% 0% 0% 32% 0% 0% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY

PKA-FL-10/ER/34800/R/14212

AAGAHI

1,479,064

1,479,064

0%

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/ER/34801/R/14181 PKA-FL-10/ER/34815/R/13101 PKA-FL-10/ER/34826/R/298 PKA-FL-10/ER/34829/R/5492 PKA-FL-10/ER/34830/R/298

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 373,797 642,000 10,369,552 289,226 15,227,913

Funding ($) 2,098,471

Unmet requirements ($) 373,797 642,000 10,369,552 289,226 13,129,442

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

PKA-FL-10/ER/34832/R/298

PKA-FL-10/ER/34836/R/13054 PKA-FL-10/ER/34875/R/6458 PKA-FL-10/ER/34884/R/13101 PKA-FL-10/ER/34889/R/12955 PKA-FL-10/ER/34903/R/7039 PKA-FL-10/ER/34905/R/14235 PKA-FL-10/ER/34929/R/6079

PKA-FL-10/ER/34931/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/ER/34952/R/13101

PKA-FL-10/ER/34965/R/14251

PKA-FL-10/ER/34975/R/776

Restoration of basic physical Infrastructure and non-farm livelihoods in Taluka Majhand District Jamshoro in Sindh Restore Community Infrastructure for Flood affected people of DI Khan Enabling returns through debris removal thereby improving access to homes Early Recovery of Livelihoods in Flood Affected Areas of UC Nahqi, District Peshawar and UC Aagra, District Charsada, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Repairing community infrastructure and revitalizing critical livelihoods in 60 peri-urban villages across flood affected areas Human Resources and Rapid Procurement Support to the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) for the Flood Affected Vulnerable Population in Pakistan During the Early Recovery Post Floods emergency Convalescence of Essential Community structures, livelihoods and Environment in Charsadda KPK Community facilities rehabilitation and livelihoods intervention for highly vulnerable flood affected households in Pakistan Promoting Livelihood opportunities in flood affected Tehsil Land Kotal of Khyber Agency FATA Restoration of Non Farm Livelihood of the most vulnerable population in flood affected districts Integrated Settlement Restoration in the Least Served Flood Affected Union Councils in 21 Districts Relief & Restoration of Flood Victims for Sustainable Livelihood Emergency Utilities Assistance Grants and Cash for Work opportunities to extremely vulnerable Flood Affected Women and Women Headed Households in KPK, Punjab, Sindh and Baluchistan Economic relief and livelihood support for the extremely vulnerable flood affected families, focusing women and women headed households in KPK, Punjab, Sindh and Baluchistan Restoration of Integrated Non Farm Livelihoods in Dist. Layyah, Punjab Support 1500 workers (70% female workers, 30% male workers) for Livelihood by providing productive tools & assets, and to build their capacity on Business Development Services & Disaster Risk Management to uplift their socio-economic & psychosocial conditions, at 2 UCs of District Muzaffargarh Area-Based and Integrated Community Restoration in Flood-Affected Areas

AMRDO PAIMAN IOM Trocaire IOM

0% 0% 0% 0% 14%

EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF

IOM

4,000,000

1,666,667

2,333,333

42%

PRDS ACTED PAIMAN HIN UN-HABITAT MOJAZ Foundation SC

274,495 3,540,222 246,000 534,499 9,444,884 332,448 5,667,191

274,495 3,540,222 246,000 534,499 9,444,884 332,448 5,667,191

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

SC PAIMAN

18,762,924 993,800

18,762,924 993,800

0% 0%

EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY

IFC

313,648

313,648

0%

UNDP

44,932,333

250,000

44,682,333

1%

97

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/ER/34987/R/14279 PKA-FL-10/ER/35011/R/13955 PKA-FL-10/ER/35058/R/5120 PKA-FL-10/ER/35068/R/13072 PKA-FL-10/ER/35102/R/14295 PKA-FL-10/ER/35138/R/14194 PKA-FL-10/ER/35143/R/12989 PKA-FL-10/ER/35256/R/5767 PKA-FL-10/ER/35259/R/14171 PKA-FL-10/ER/35322/R/13029 PKA-FL-10/ER/35338/R/13054 PKA-FL-10/ER/35378/R/12970 PKA-FL-10/ER/35414/R/13101 PKA-FL-10/ER/35429/R/12992

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 133,000 1,238,666 2,253,981 166,000 357,986 264,000 213,145 3,584,109 503,000 197,400 274,495 199,448 522,000 130,000

Funding ($) -

Unmet requirements ($) 133,000 1,238,666 2,253,981 166,000 357,986 264,000 213,145 3,584,109 503,000 197,400 274,495 199,448 522,000 130,000

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

PKA-FL-10/ER/35499/R/14251

PKA-FL-10/ER/35503/R/14251 PKA-FL-10/ER/35512/R/14302

Environment Protection in flood affected Areas through Sensitization & Demonstration of alternative energy sources Improvement in social cohesion and restoration of normal life in flood affected population of Punjab. Early livelihoods recovery in the flood-affected provinces of KP and Sindh Restoration of livelihoods and community infrastructure in 8 selected UCs of district Tank Restoring flood affected communities through Initiating income generating activities for home based women workers in 11 Tehsils of South Punjab Provision of Reconstruction Oriented Skills Training (ROST) to the crisis affected population of Naseerabad and Jafarabad Districts. Stabilization to Life through Rehabilitation of Essential Infrastructure & Provision & support to Livelihood in Upper Dir District Immediate rehabilitation of basic community infrastructures in Pakistan Restore basic community infrastructure and environment degradation through participatory approaches in Jaffarabad. Supporting Livelihoods Recovery in severely flood affected areas of Tehsil Jamrud and Bara, Khyber Agency FATA Post Floods emergency Convalescence of Essential Community structures, livelihoods and Environment in D I Khan District KPK Restoration and rehabilitation of non-form livelihood and community infrastructure schemes in flood affected Dir Upper Reducing environment degradation through participatory approaches in Rajanpur Restoration of flood affected small enterprises for sustainable livelihood through cash grant in Bara Tehsil of Khyber agency FATA Support 4500 workers (70% female workers, 30% male workers) for Livelihood by providing productive tools & assets, and to build their capacity on Business Development Services & Disaster Risk Management to uplift their socio-economic & psychosocial conditions at 6 UCs of District Layyah Cash-for-work programme to remove rubble, mud and debris from Union Council Baseera of District Muzaffargarh Repairing community link roads Khan Garh Doma, Sultanpur, and Langarwah, Tehsil Alipur, District Muzaffargarh

IDSP FRD OXFAM GB PES AIMS Organization SOCIO STEP UNOPS SEPRS JPI PRDS ABKT PAIMAN IDEA

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY

IFC

940,944

940,944

0%

EARLY RECOVERY

IFC IPHD

340,743 155,519

340,743 155,519

0% 0%

EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY

98

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/ER/35522/R/12959

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 496,300

Funding ($) -

Unmet requirements ($) 496,300

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

PKA-FL-10/ER/35536/R/14181 PKA-FL-10/ER/35542/R/14312 PKA-FL-10/ER/35563/R/14151 PKA-FL-10/ER/35599/R/1024 PKA-FL-10/ER/35700/R/14268 PKA-FL-10/ER/35736/R/776 PKA-FL-10/ER/35761/R/120

Community restoration through rehabilitation of basic infrastructure and support to non farm livelihoods in flood affected areas in District Thatta, Sindh and DI Khan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.. Restoration of basic physical Infrastructure and non-farm livelihood in Taluka Thulh and Jackabad of District Jackabad Sindh Coomunity restoration through infrastructure improvement & livelihood support in District Shikarpur, Sindh Paksitan Restoration and Rehabilitation of livelihood in District Sukkur, Shikarpur& Kashmore, Sindh Restoring livelihood options for flood affected population in Punjab, Sindh, and Balochistan Provinces Community Basic Infrastructure Response to Flood Affected District Sibi Restoration of communitys energy needs through provision of subsidised and alternate energy in selected flood affected areas. Infrastructure interventions in Afghan refugee villages and surrounding communities

HRDN

0%

EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF

AMRDO Takhleeq Foundation SYWO Sukkur Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V. BRDS UNDP UNHCR

374,069 344,767 240,000 2,801,717 91,528 9,250,000 8,403,887 167,073,420

3,286,343 8,161,687

374,069 344,767 240,000 2,801,717 91,528 9,250,000 5,117,544 158,911,733

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 39% 5%

Sub total for COMMUNITY RESTORATION COORDINATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES PKA-FL-10/CSS/33954/R/298 PKA-FL-10/CSS/33972/R/119 PKA-FL-10/CSS/34492/R/5139 PKA-FL-10/CSS/34844/R/298 Mass Communications for Flood Affected Populations Humanitarian Coordination and Advocacy for Pakistan Floods Response Safety and Security of Humanitarians and Flood-Affected IDPs: Establishment of 8 Field Offices Security Awareness Induction Training IOM OCHA UNDSS IOM

3,000,000 10,900,000 3,495,517 1,500,000 18,895,517

2,167,231 4,304,937 1,001,604 7,473,772

832,769 6,595,063 2,493,913 1,500,000 11,421,745

72% 39% 29% 0% 40%

2,651,842 2,651,842

RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY

Sub total for COORDINATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES EDUCATION PKA-FL-10/E/34526/R/5103 Reactivation and Early Recovery of the Education System in Flood Affected Areas: Support to Non-formal Basic and Secondary Education and Capacity Building of Education Department for Disaster Management Provision of educational facilities by establishment of alternative spaces, rehabilitation , PTC/SMC capacity building and teachers identification of fully/partially 600 damaged govt schools Reviving and Strengthening Education Systems in the Flood Affected Areas of KPK UNESCO

5,700,000

5,700,000

0%

EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY

PKA-FL-10/E/34723/R/12955 PKA-FL-10/E/34741/R/8765

HIN SRSP

600,000 3,135,913

600,000 3,135,913

0% 0%

99

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/E/34749/R/12992 PKA-FL-10/E/34768/R/14291 PKA-FL-10/E/34825/R/14251 PKA-FL-10/E/34859/R/5179 PKA-FL-10/E/34891/R/5146 PKA-FL-10/E/34954/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/E/35107/R/12972 PKA-FL-10/E/35146/R/13952 PKA-FL-10/E/35183/R/14230 PKA-FL-10/E/35221/R/124 PKA-FL-10/E/35235/R/13956 PKA-FL-10/E/35255/R/14302 PKA-FL-10/E/35262/R/14221 PKA-FL-10/E/35384/R/14145 PKA-FL-10/E/35424/R/14257 PKA-FL-10/E/35453/R/12951 PKA-FL-10/E/35544/R/5370 PKA-FL-10/E/35569/R/124 PKA-FL-10/E/35668/R/7524 Sub total for EDUCATION

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 169,060 1,985,000 224,412 671,000 124,774 13,060,911 7,329,479 713,085 96,080 35,695,000 80,273 148,340 347,197 50,847 946,473 161,255 1,745,000 700,000 9,718,435 83,402,534

Funding ($) 7,497,024 7,497,024

Unmet requirements ($) 169,060 1,985,000 224,412 671,000 124,774 13,060,911 7,329,479 713,085 96,080 28,197,976 80,273 148,340 347,197 50,847 946,473 161,255 1,745,000 700,000 9,718,435 75,905,510

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

Provide assistance for access to quality education, Imparting DDR, Provision of hygiene education and psychosocial support at schools affected by flood in the Upper of District Swat (Tehsil Matta and Madayan) Welcome to School Campaign in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) and FATA Training of 500 male & 500 female school teachers to support the psychosocial recovery and well-being of 50,000 flood affected children, District Muzaffargarh Rehabilitation of Education Facilities in Khyber Pukhtunkhwa Supporting Quality Teaching and Learning in Jaffarabad and Nasirabad Provide access to and quality of education to flood affected children to resume their education in flood hit areas Education through Alternate means for flood affected children in IDP camps and damaged schools Rehabilitation and Strengthening of Government Primary Education System Educational And Psychological Social Support Project Ensuring Equitable Access to Quality and Safe Education for all Children in the Flood Affected Provinces. Government Schools Renovations & Partial Reconstruction in District Charsadda Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Temporary Learning Centers Back to School/Emergency Education: Mitigating the Impact of Floods on 8,000 schoolchildren at Rahim Yar Khan district, Punjab Learning Environment in Government Schools

IDEA Philanthrope IFC IRC CRS SC NCHD DDF SYCOP UNICEF WASFD IPHD READ Foundation ADO

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 21% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 9%

EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY

Creating Child Friendly Learning and Recreational Spaces CGN-P for Children and Adults Support flood affected community to lead prosperous life through Functional literacy numeracy of district Muzafar RDO Garh. Restoration of educational system and services affected Muslim Aid by flood Education Cluster Coordination Provision of Basic Education Services for all children in Community Schools Destroyed in Flood Affected Area in Pakistan UNICEF RSPN

100

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) FOOD SECURITY PKA-FL-10/F/33892/R/5826 PKA-FL-10/F/33914/R/561 PKA-FL-10/F/34213/R/13101 PKA-FL-10/F/34619/R/5492 PKA-FL-10/F/34778/R/12955 Food Security

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($)

Revised requirements ($)

Funding ($)

Unmet requirements ($)

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($)

Priority

PKA-FL-10/F/34969/R/561 PKA-FL-10/F/35046/R/5120 PKA-FL-10/F/35139/R/5179 PKA-FL-10/F/35219/R/14141 PKA-FL-10/F/35311/R/14171 PKA-FL-10/F/35358/R/5357 PKA-FL-10/F/35810/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/F/36019/R/8223 PKA-FL-10/F/36023/R/8222 Sub total for FOOD SECURITY HEALTH PKA-FL-10/H/33893/5826

Emergency Food Assistance to Families Affected by Monsoon Floods (EMOP 200177) Provision of food assistance to the flood affectees in district Thatta Sindh Emergency Food Assistance to Victims of the Pakistan Floods in KPK and Sindh. Provision of Food and Food & Cash for Work for ensuring food security and revitalizing livelihood activities among the flood affected communities Enable flood-affected communities to revive their livelihoods and local rural economies to ensure early recovery and food security (5.25-month portion of 10.5month EMOP 200177) Food security and early recovery in the flood-affected provinces of KPK and Sindh Emergency livelihoods support to vulnerable flood affected households Food Distribution Project Gilgit-Baltistan and Chitral Food Assistance to Host Communities in Balochistan. Food for Work and Cash for Work for food security for flood affected communities of Shangla and Kohistan, KPK Save the Children Food Assistance for Floods Rehabilitation Relief Operation for Flood Affected Population - Food Aid (ERF funded project) Provision of relief to 1,100 most affected families in flash flood affected areas of Baluchistan Province - Food Aid (ERF funded project)

UN Agencies and NGOs (details not yet provided) WFP PAIMAN Trocaire HIN

156,250,000 -

417,228,257 1,960,000 707,000 5,238,658

215,659,794 109,850 327,473 -

201,568,463 1,850,150 379,527 5,238,658

0% 52% 6% 46% 0%

1,125,000 -

NOT SPECIFIED RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF

WFP OXFAM GB IRC Focus Humanitarian Assistance SEPRS CWS SC SPO Taraqee Foundation

156,250,000

89,533,636 19,806,647 3,892,257 2,155,000 966,210 2,310,494 28,985,192 251,125 250,000 573,284,476

3,384,865 4,781,944 348,763 13,199,970 249,547 250,000 238,312,206

89,533,636 16,421,782 - 889,687 2,155,000 966,210 1,961,731 15,785,222 1,578 334,972,270

0% 17% 123% 0% 0% 15% 46% 99% 100% 42%

1,125,000

Health

UN Agencies and NGOs (details not yet provided)

56,200,000

0%

NOT SPECIFIED

101

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/H/33926/122 PKA-FL-10/H/33983/R/5325 PKA-FL-10/H/34028/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/H/34044/R/5370 PKA-FL-10/H/34045/R/13937 PKA-FL-10/H/34056/R/13054 PKA-FL-10/H/34091/R/12835 PKA-FL-10/H/34092/R/298

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 30,028,157 2,000,000 353,100 120,000 199,750 879,264 618,859

Funding ($) 11,646,894 3,557,030 -

Unmet requirements ($) 18,381,263 - 1,557,030 353,100 120,000 199,750 879,264 618,859

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) 1,000,000 -

Priority

Provision of Essential emergency Package of Healthcare including MNCH/RH/FP, psychosocial support and HIV treatment and care for the population living in flood affected districts Health needs of affected population Integrated Emergency Health Assistance for Children and Families Affected by Monsoon Floods in Punjab, Sindh and KPK Provision of emergency health facilities in Flood affected areas Provision of psychosocial support & medical camps for the flood affectees in district swat ( UCs Madyan,Kalam,Bahrain) Post Floods Health Convalescence through Comprehensive Primary Health Care Project in 12 UCs of Nowshehra District KPK Emergency health assistance for flood affected population in Sindh Provision of Emergency Health Care Services through Strengthening Referral Mechanisms to Flood Affected IDPs and Host Communities in Dera Ghazi Khan Division of South Punjab, Pakistan Provision of Primary and Reproductive Health Services to flood affected populations in four BHUs and two RHCs of Districts Naseerabad and Sibi, Baluchistan Emergency Health Relief and Awareness for Healthy Survival in Sindh Provision of Primary and Reproductive Health Services to flood affected populations in six BHUs and two RHCs of District Sukkur and Jacobabad in Sindh and six BHUs and two RHCs in District Jaffarabad in Balochistan Ensure provision of Comprehensive Essential Primary Health Care services for floods affected population of Nowshera, Charsada, DG Khan, Muzaffargarh and Mianwali Provision of life saving and emergency health services to the flood affected population through and support to integrated primary health services in the targeted districts of Punjab Mobile Health Units in Rahim Yar Khan, Punjab Malaria control among flood affected population Provision of Health Services to the Flood Affected areas Emergency Assistance to Flood Affected Mothers, Newborns and Children in Pakistan

WHO NGOs SC Muslim Aid BFO PRDS WVP IOM

39% 0% 178% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

RELIEF NOT SPECIFIED RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY

PKA-FL-10/H/34094/R/5586 PKA-FL-10/H/34095/R/5645 PKA-FL-10/H/34096/R/5586

ARC CARE International ARC

357,374 1,119,045 485,900

1,598,810 -

357,374 - 479,765 485,900

0% 143% 0%

100,000 -

PKA-FL-10/H/34097/R/8766

NIDA

246,000

246,000

0%

PKA-FL-10/H/34099/R/5195 PKA-FL-10/H/34101/R/6971 PKA-FL-10/H/34103/R/5195 PKA-FL-10/H/34105/R/12841 PKA-FL-10/H/34108/R/124

MERLIN RI MERLIN CAMP UNICEF

859,211 150,821 1,925,000 103,289 30,557,719

930,249 7,571,529

859,211 150,821 994,751 103,289 22,986,190

0% 0% 48% 0% 25%

RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF

102

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/H/34109/R/13937

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 162,000

Funding ($) -

Unmet requirements ($) 162,000

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

PKA-FL-10/H/34112/R/12970 PKA-FL-10/H/34114/R/12839 PKA-FL-10/H/34115/R/1024 PKA-FL-10/H/34116/R/5162 PKA-FL-10/H/34118/R/12986

PKA-FL-10/H/34120/R/5375 PKA-FL-10/H/34137/R/1171 PKA-FL-10/H/34138/R/7560 PKA-FL-10/H/34144/R/122 PKA-FL-10/H/34146/R/122 PKA-FL-10/H/34179/R/13999 PKA-FL-10/H/34293/R/12968 PKA-FL-10/H/34345/R/14153 PKA-FL-10/H/34476/R/13937 PKA-FL-10/H/34649/R/12963 PKA-FL-10/H/34683/R/14153

Emergency Health support & services to Flood affected population of Charsadda ( 1 Manzoray Camp & UCs Dawalat Pura & Hisara Yaseenzai) To ensure the provision of primary health and MNCH services for survival of flood affected population through restoration and strengthening of affected/closed health facilities and services in KPK Dir Upper Extension and Expansion of PHC Services in flood affected areas in KPK To ensure the provision of essential PHC services to the flood affected population in Sindh, Balochistan, Punjab and Khyber Paktunkwa. Mobile Medical Units for Flood Affected Populations in Sindh and Balochistan provinces Emergency Comprehensive PHC Project for Flood Affectees of KPK & Punjab with special focus on psycho social support & gender as cross cutting themes Emergency Provision of Primary Health care services to flood affected population at the North (Shangla, Kohistan) and South (Kohat, surroundings of Peshawar) of KP province Provision of life saving reproductive health services to populations affected by floods Health care services and life-sustaining early recovery action for flood- affected vulnerable populations in four Union Councils of Raheem Yar Khan Districts, Punjab Province Health cluster coordination and expansion of cluster system to Punjab, Sindh,Balochistan and KPK Surveillance and response to epidemics and other public health events of national concern; prevention, control and treatment of vaccine preventable and endemic diseases in the flood affected areas of Pakistan Medical Camps and medicinal support for flood affectees of UC Agra District Charsadda, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Provision of Health Services to Flood Affected Populations at Charsadda District of KPK Establishment of 10 mobile health units (MHUs) 5 each in Thatta and Jamshoro districts in Sindh Risks Reduction of malaria outbreak through emergency diagnosis and community awareness in flood affected areas of Lower Orakzai Agency Emergency Primary Health Care in Tehsil Pabbi Nowshehra District KPK Establishment of "Health Homes for Elderly & Disabled" besides provision of onsite healthcare and support to both the most vulnerable groups in 4 flood affected districts of Punjab

BFO

0%

RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF

ABKT HHRD Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V. Mercy Corps FF

50,000 270,000 800,000 202,500 75,000

96,402 -

50,000 270,000 703,598 202,500 75,000

0% 0% 12% 0% 0%

CORDAID UNFPA Malteser International WHO WHO KWH SARHAD IHS BFO CMDO IHS

800,000 9,594,469 1,011,000 4,706,067 22,182,923 91,855 120,640 197,090 133,131 60,000 275,882

8,515,325 400,000 212,124 15,038,551 -

800,000 1,079,144 611,000 4,493,943 7,144,372 91,855 120,640 197,090 133,131 60,000 275,882

0% 89% 40% 5% 68% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF

103

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/H/34691/R/14153

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 111,113

Funding ($) -

Unmet requirements ($) 111,113

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

PKA-FL-10/H/34730/R/14284 PKA-FL-10/H/34781/R/13101 PKA-FL-10/H/34792/R/12955 PKA-FL-10/H/34798/R/1171 PKA-FL-10/H/34837/R/14144 PKA-FL-10/H/34892/R/8227 PKA-FL-10/H/34893/R/14235 PKA-FL-10/H/34916/R/5179 PKA-FL-10/H/34917/R/14140 PKA-FL-10/H/34918/R/12835 PKA-FL-10/H/34920/R/298 PKA-FL-10/H/34927/R/12835 PKA-FL-10/H/34945/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/H/34992/R/12839 PKA-FL-10/H/34998/R/5179 PKA-FL-10/H/35047/R/6971 PKA-FL-10/H/35060/R/6971 PKA-FL-10/H/35062/R/6971 PKA-FL-10/H/35082/R/14266

School Health Forums - Children as Ambassadors of Health & Hygiene and Messengers of Change in 5 districts (Bhakkar, Layyah, Muzafargarh, Rajanpur & D G Khan) Malaria Control Project in Flood Affected Area of Jaffarabad and Naseerabad districts of Balochistan (MCP) Provision of Primary Health Care Services and make BHUs functional for flood affected UCs of District Rajanpur, Province Punjab Primary health care services to flood affected communities at Kot Adu, Muzaffargarh(Punjab) Restoration and rehabilitation of basic and comprehensive reproductive health services for flood affected populations Immediate Medical Assistance & Medical Supplies to Flood Affected in Thatta Emergency health response in flood affected areas of Balochistan Relief & Restoration of Flood Victims for Sustainable Livelihood Emergency Primary Health Care Response for Flood Affected Communities in Punjab, Sindh and KP An initiative to prevent children by the harmful affects of Diarrhea in flood affected communities Emergency health assistance for flood affected population in KPK (Lower Dir, Nowshera, Charsada and Peshawar) IOM Pakistan Primary Health Care Revitalization Program for flood affected communities in Southern Punjab and Southern Sindh Emergency health assistance for flood affected population in Punjab Integrated Emergency Health Assistance for Children and Families Affected flood hit districts in Punjab, Sindh and KPK provinces, To provide immediate and sustainable health services including basic MNCH services in 7 flood affected districts,in KPK,Punjab and Sindh Malaria prevention and response in flood affected districts of Pakistan Emergency Health Units for Flood Affectees in Kachi, Balochistan Emergency Health Units for Flood Affected population in Swat and Lower Dir, KPK Mobile Health Unit in Kashmore, Sindh AL-Nijat Mobile Unit and Psycho Social Support Flood Relief Services

IHS

0%

EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY

GRHO PAIMAN HIN UNFPA NWHO BRSP MOJAZ Foundation IRC PRWSWO WVP IOM WVP SC HHRD IRC RI RI RI AWS

184,362 1,013,700 143,200 15,434,322 44,919 144,771 161,650 720,000 76,184 534,944 1,524,300 775,264 2,499,840 450,000 903,679 60,000 120,000 150,821 100,000

669,214 5,451,884 -

184,362 1,013,700 143,200 15,434,322 44,919 144,771 161,650 720,000 76,184 534,944 855,086 775,264 - 2,952,044 450,000 903,679 60,000 120,000 150,821 100,000

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 44% 0% 218% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

104

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/H/35122/R/14194 PKA-FL-10/H/35147/R/14153

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 171,000 170,033

Funding ($) -

Unmet requirements ($) 171,000 170,033

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

PKA-FL-10/H/35152/R/12982

Ensure provision of Emergency Comprehensive Essential Primary Health Care in District Naseerabad and Jafarabad. Establishing 10 MOBILE HEALTH UNITS (MHUs) in the 2 worst flood affected districts of Punjab: Muzafargarh and Layyah Strengthening and supporting integrated essential PHC/MNCH services at facility level to ensure availability to and access of Flood affected community to these services in most far plunge and remote areas of Muzaffargarh, where basic health services and facilities are not sufficient. Muzafargarh Health Reform Project Capacity building for the Provision of Comprehensive Health Care (CHC) Services to Improve the Physical and Psychosocial Health of Women and Children in 3 UCs of District Swat Provision of Comprehensive Primary Healthcare Services in Six Health Facilities of district Swat and Kohistan Khyber Pukhtunkhwa Revitalization of health services in six health facilities of District Swat and Kohistan in Khyber Pukhtunkhwa Emergency Health Relief and Awareness for Healthy Survival in 4 UC of District Neelum & other needy Union Council of District Neelum Provision of specialized care of physical and mental health/psychiatric illnesses at Tertiary Level care Health Facilities in Nowshera, Charsadda, Muzaffargarh and Thatta Emergency Comprehensive Healthcare and Mental Health Services for the Flood Affected Population in KPK Provision of Quality Health Care Services & Distribution Hygiene Kits Among Flood Affectees of Jaffarabad through Mobile Health Units. Provision of emergency Reproductive Health care services especially focusing on maternal newborn and child health care services in flood affected area in UC Mirza Dher of Tehsil tangi of District Charsada Essential Health Care Programme for the Flood Affected Population in Pakistan Maintaining and Expanding the Prevention of Parent to Child Transmission Continuum of Care in Flood Affected Districts of Punjab, Sindh and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa PHC Medicines for Afghan refugees

SOCIO IHS

0% 0%

RELIEF RELIEF

PODA

168,000

168,000

0%

RELIEF

PKA-FL-10/H/35180/R/14230 PKA-FL-10/H/35245/R/12960

SYCOP ICDI

68,190 96,752

68,190 96,752

0% 0%

RELIEF RELIEF

PKA-FL-10/H/35246/R/14213 PKA-FL-10/H/35250/R/14213 PKA-FL-10/H/35266/R/14216

Khyber Aid Khyber Aid KWES

180,000 100,000 100,117

180,000 100,000 100,117

0% 0% 0%

RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF

PKA-FL-10/H/35278/R/12836 PKA-FL-10/H/35315/R/5160 PKA-FL-10/H/35328/R/14170

BF IMC YMSESDO

152,400 720,000 130,272

187,950 -

152,400 532,050 130,272

0% 26% 0%

RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY

PKA-FL-10/H/35333/R/14258 PKA-FL-10/H/35366/R/7524 PKA-FL-10/H/35398/R/124 PKA-FL-10/H/35402/R/120 PKA-FL-10/H/35493/R/5160

SAWERA RSPN UNICEF UNHCR

80,000 1,798,000 866,700 535,000 830,700

535,000 -

80,000 1,798,000 866,700 830,700

0% 0% 0% 100% 0%

Emergency Comprehensive Healthcare and Mental Health IMC Services for the Flood Affected Population in Punjab

105

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/H/35497/R/5160 PKA-FL-10/H/35502/R/124 PKA-FL-10/H/35581/R/5090 PKA-FL-10/H/35597/R/5586 PKA-FL-10/H/35609/R/7560 PKA-FL-10/H/35611/R/5357 PKA-FL-10/H/35613/R/5357 PKA-FL-10/H/35621/R/7560 PKA-FL-10/H/35623/R/7560

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 800,000 19,401,681 180,000 443,314 1,331,851 332,569 305,000 646,000 323,000

Funding ($) 1,192,136 -

Unmet requirements ($) 800,000 19,401,681 180,000 443,314 139,715 332,569 305,000 646,000 323,000

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

PKA-FL-10/H/35626/R/8595

PKA-FL-10/H/35638/R/5109 PKA-FL-10/H/35669/R/5370 PKA-FL-10/H/35749/R/122

PKA-FL-10/H/35834/R/5195

PKA-FL-10/H/35835/R/5195 PKA-FL-10/H/35836/R/5195 Sub total for HEALTH

Emergency Comprehensive Healthcare and Mental Health Services for the Flood Affected Population in Sindh Assistance to Flood Affected Mothers, Newborns and Children in Pakistan (Early Recovery) Provision of health services to the flood affectees in Distt. Rahim Yar Khan -Punjab Provision of Primary and Reproductive Health Services to flood affected populations in one civil hospital, two BHUs and three civil dispensary in Kalam in District Swat in KPK Health care services and life-sustaining early recovery action for flood- affected vulnerable populations in eight Union Councils of Swat and Kohistan Districts Provision of Mobile Health Clinics for flood affected people in Kohistan and Shangla Emergency Health Assistance to the Most Vulnerable Flood Affected Families in Khyber Pakhtunkha, Pakistan Life-saving health care services for flood affected vulnerable populations in eight Union Councils of Swat and Kohistan Districts Life-saving health care services for flood affected vulnerable populations in four Union Councils of Raheem Yar Khan District Efficiently Delivering Essential Reproductive Health Services and Products and Essential Primary Health Care to Flood Affected Populations in 15 Districts in All Four Provinces of Pakistan. Ensuring continuity in HIV prevention, treatment, care and support to vulnerable populations affected by the floods in Pakistan: Joint UN Team on AIDS Restoration of Health Facilities in flood affected areas of KPK, Punjab and Sindh Restoration of Healthcare service delivery in the flood affected districts flood hit districts in Punjab, Sindh, Balochistan and KPK provinces, To support the support the return of basic health services and normal life to the flood affected populations in Muzaffargarh District, Punjab Province, through restoration of integrated primary health care services. Provision of life saving and emergency health services to the flood affected populations in Swat, Buner, Charsadda, Nowshera and Shangla the targeted districts of KPK Restoration of initial package of essential healthcare services for flood affected populations in Nowshera, Charsadda, Swat, and Shangla districts of KPK

IMC UNICEF HAI ARC Malteser International CWS CWS Malteser International Malteser International MSI

0% 0% 0% 0% 90% 0% 0% 0% 0%

EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY

250,000

250,000

0%

UNAIDS Muslim Aid WHO

561,000 700,300 29,159,439

561,000 700,300 29,159,439

0% 0% 0%

MERLIN

973,631

973,631

100%

MERLIN MERLIN

56,200,000

780,000 800,000 199,044,064

652,798 59,229,527

127,202 800,000 139,814,537

84% 0% 30%

1,100,000

LOGISTICS AND EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS

106

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/CSS/33894/R/6459 PKA-FL-10/CSS/33965/R/561 PKA-FL-10/CSS/34035/R/561 PKA-FL-10/CSS/34042/R/120 PKA-FL-10/CSS/34839/R/298 PKA-FL-10/CSS/34841/R/298 PKA-FL-10/CSS/35602/R/5139

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) 15,624,000 15,624,000

Revised requirements ($) 46,103,514 508,292 400,589 1,500,000 1,500,000 463,874 50,476,269

Funding ($) 31,358,041 156,650 1,986,739 2,466,666 35,968,096

Unmet requirements ($) 14,745,473 508,292 243,939 - 486,739 - 966,666 463,874 14,508,173

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

Logistics, Emergency Telecommunications and Coordination Logistics Augmentation, Aviation Services and Coordination in Support of the Humanitarian Community's Response to the Monsoon Floods (SO 200181) Provision of Data Communications and Emergency Telecommunications Cluster coordination to the Humanitarian Community (SO 200181) Security Telecommunications services for flood affected areas Transport and Distribution of In Kind Contributions Logistics Support to NDMA Safety and Security of Humanitarians and Flood-Affected IDPs: Establishment of 4 Radio Rooms

UN Agencies WFP WFP UNHCR IOM IOM UNDSS

0% 68% 0% 39% 132% 164% 0% 71%

NOT SPECIFIED RELIEF RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY

Sub total for LOGISTICS AND EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS NUTRITION PKA-FL-10/H/33895/R/5826 PKA-FL-10/H/33940/R/124 PKA-FL-10/H/34029/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/H/34074/R/1024 PKA-FL-10/H/34075/R/6971 PKA-FL-10/H/34076/R/13034 Nutrition Early Recovery Nutrition Interventions in Flood Affected Districts in Pakistan Integrated Emergency Nutrition Assistance for Children and Families Affected by Monsoon Floods in Pakistan Emergency Nutritional Services to the flood affected populations in Sibi, Naseerabad and Jafferabad districts of Balochistan province Reduce malnutrition in children ,pregnant women and lactating mothers in the flood affected communities in Jaffarabad and Naseerabad in Balochistan Emergency Nutrition Services (Community Management of Acute Malnutrition CMAM) in flood Affected Area's in 8 UC's of District Nowshera KPK Prevention of excess mortality through Emergency Nutrition Services based on CMAM approach for the flood affected vulnerable population living in food insecure areas in KPK and Punjab Emergency Nutritional Services to the flood affected populations in District Peshawar, Khyber Pukhtoonkhwa province Provision of Emergency Nutrition Services for the Flood Affected Communities in Muzaffarghar and Layyah districts of Punjab with a special focus on pregnant and lactating women and children under 5 years of age UN Agencies and NGOs (details not yet provided) UNICEF SC Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V. RI CDO

14,150,847 -

16,866,901 1,128,000 530,670 588,765 154,364

18,941,080 1,453,488 -

- 2,074,179 - 325,488 530,670 588,765 154,364

0% 112% 129% 0% 0% 0%

NOT SPECIFIED EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF

PKA-FL-10/H/34078/R/5195

MERLIN Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V. GPP

2,676,176

2,362,330

313,846

88%

PKA-FL-10/H/34081/R/1024

305,170

305,170

0%

PKA-FL-10/H/34083/R/14113

261,500

261,500

0%

RELIEF

107

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/H/34085/R/8226 PKA-FL-10/H/34125/R/13937 PKA-FL-10/H/34334/R/12977 PKA-FL-10/H/34688/R/12835 PKA-FL-10/H/34735/R/14284 PKA-FL-10/H/34979/R/12944 PKA-FL-10/H/34995/R/14205 PKA-FL-10/H/35123/R/14194 PKA-FL-10/H/35170/R/1024 PKA-FL-10/H/35206/R/14291 PKA-FL-10/H/35408/R/12952 PKA-FL-10/H/35460/R/122 PKA-FL-10/H/35465/R/13134 PKA-FL-10/H/35530/R/124 PKA-FL-10/H/35537/R/14151 PKA-FL-10/H/35558/R/12977 PKA-FL-10/H/35656/R/14265 Sub total for NUTRITION PROTECTION

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) 14,150,847

Revised requirements ($) 1,217,654 144,000 257,721 453,060 236,279 95,000 1,987,518 615,000 628,704 1,170,000 726,667 3,187,624 140,736 10,688,847 122,000 257,721 165,650 44,605,727

Funding ($) 22,756,898

Unmet requirements ($) 1,217,654 144,000 257,721 453,060 236,279 95,000 1,987,518 615,000 628,704 1,170,000 726,667 3,187,624 140,736 10,688,847 122,000 257,721 165,650 21,848,829

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

Proposal for Emergency Nutrition Support for flood affected areas in Punjab Emergency Nutritional Services to the flood affected population of six UCs District Peshawar Community Based Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) Program in 10 selected flood affected areas of Nowshera district of KPK Province - Pakistan Emergency nutrition assistance for children under 5 and pregnant and lactating women in flood affected population in Sindh and Punjab Nutrition Intervention Project (NIP) for the flood affected woman and children of Jaffaraabad, Naseerabad and Sibi districts of Balochistan. Provision of Emergency Nutrition Assistance for Floods Affected Children and Families in District Swat. To provide nutritional support for malnourished children women Provision of Emergency Nutrition services for the Flood affected In Naseerabad and Jafarabad. Emergency Nutritional Services to the flood affected population in Districts Thatta, Dadu and Naushahro Feroz, Sindh province Community based management of acute Mal-nutrition CMAM and MCH activities in KP & FATA Provision of Nutrition services to Flood affected People of District Shangla & Swat Emergency and critical Health and nutrition interventions in flood affected districts of Sindh, Baluchistan, GB and Punjab. Community Management of Acute Malnutrition to under five children, pregnant and lactating women in selected 10 union councils of district charsada Emergency Relief Nutrition Assessment and Rapid response Emergency Nutrition Assistance for flood affected Children and Women in Two districts of Sindh; Sukkur and Shikarpur Community Based Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) Program in 10 selected flood affected areas of Charsadda district of KPK Province - Pakistan Supporting Pakistani women affected by recent floods in accessing nutritional basic needs and medical help

NRSP BFO FPHC WVP GRHO PADO AJKRSP SOCIO Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V. Philanthrope RAHBAR WHO AF UNICEF SYWO Sukkur FPHC Shirkat Gah

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 51%

EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF

108

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/33896/R/5826 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/33969/R/120 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34059/R/13054 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34070/R/5179 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34106/R/124 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34117/R/5105 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34165/R/1171 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34165/R/5105 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34413/R/14167 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34489/R/12982 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34490/R/14216 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34550/R/12944 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34753/R/14292 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34793/R/14260 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34849/R/298 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34868/R/13008 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34960/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34962/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34993/R/14139 Protection Protection for all

Title

Appealing agency UN Agencies and NGOs (details not yet provided) UNHCR

Original requirements ($) 2,000,000 -

Revised requirements ($) 10,004,920 505,000 1,980,000 713,700 1,680,000 710,400 113,290 250,000 136,424 140,000 274,250 172,865 1,000,000 115,000 1,646,440 3,409,764 172,000

Funding ($) 3,912,427 -

Unmet requirements ($) 6,092,493 505,000 1,980,000 713,700 1,680,000 710,400 113,290 250,000 136,424 140,000 274,250 172,865 1,000,000 115,000 1,646,440 3,409,764 172,000

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

0% 39% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

NOT SPECIFIED RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY

Emergency Child and Women Protection Initiative in Flood PRDS Affected Areas of D I KHAN AND TANK DISTRICTS Emergency Protection Support for Flood Victims in Khyber IRC Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh (Early Recovery) Multi-Cluster Rapid Assessment Mechanism (McRAM) Gender Based Violence (GBV) Prevention and Response by addressing protection needs of flood affected women and girls in Pakistan (withdrawn) Preventing gender-based violence (GBV) and responding to the needs of survivors Preventing gender-based violence (GBV) and responding to the needs of survivors Protection, Intervention and Prvention of children in the flood affected camps of Sukkur and Ghotki districts Sindh Protecting Children from all kinds of abuse, exploitation and neglect in Flood affected communities by providing children rights awareness, psychosocial and social support through recreational activities. Child protection and psychosocial support for children in flood effected area of District Shikarpure Sindh Pakistan Integrated Women Protection Initiative through capacity building and enhancement of livelihood opportunities in District Swat Child protection and empowerment of adolescents in Kot Adu, Tonsa, D G Khan, Jhang and Mianwali Support for Child Protection in District Layya and District Nowshera Preventing Trafficking in Persons amongst the flood affected population throughout Pakistan Rehabilitating flood affected children in the three union councils (Hinjrai, Bait Qaim Wala and DD Panah) Tehsil Kot Adu, District Muzaffargarh, South Punjab. Protecting Children, Women and Elderly in Emergencies through Psychosocial Support Strengthening the protective environment of women, children and elderly in flood-affected areas. Community Child Protection Action in Jaffarabad and Naseerabad Districts-Balochistan UNICEF UNIFEM UNFPA UNIFEM SDTS PODA KWES PADO YPP WWOP IOM Children First SC SC IFT

109

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details)

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 232,848 125,759

Funding ($) -

Unmet requirements ($) 232,848 125,759

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

Making humanitarian action accountable to flood affected communities including vulnerable groups/individuals and PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/34997/R/5357 bridging the communication gap between aid receivers and aid givers. Protecting children in post flood time in Charsadda, PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35136/R/13955 D.I.Khan and Tank Districts of Khyber Pukhtoonkhwa. Providing rights based information for IDPs protections, assisting with access to legal identity documents (CNIC) PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35144/R/12982 for relief claims, facilitating referrals for legal aid assistance and counseling for flood affected people particularly for rural women. Providing awareness about and facilitating protection from PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35173/R/12982 Gender Based Violence for women and girls in IDP camps and host families in 4 flood affected Districts. Living Protection: CFS as protection enhancement in flood PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35194/R/5660 affected communities PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35200/R/8502 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35204/R/5349 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35207/R/124 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35208/R/1171 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35208/R/5105 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35227/R/14316 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35229/R/13956 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35238/R/12944 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35247/R/14221 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35252/R/124 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35303/R/14325 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35317/R/5160 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35423/R/5834 Child Protection Programming in Punjap & Sindh Emergency intervention to ensure the protection of the most vulnerable flood-affected persons in Pakistan Recovery programmes and interventions to protect vulnerable children and women affected by the floods and ensure access to appropriate social benefits and services Facilitating a coordinated and effective response to gender-based violence among populations who return to or resettle in flood affected areas Facilitating a coordinated and effective response to gender-based violence among populations who return to or resettle in flood affected areas Reducing economic vulnerability of women created as result of floods Emergency Child Protection interventions to protect vulnerable children affected by the flood in selected Union Councils of Kohistan District of Khyber Pukhtukhwa Emergency interventions to protect vulnerable children affected by the flood in District Shangala. Child protection: Mitigating the Impact of Floods on 20,000 children of District DG khan, Punjab, Pakistan Relief interventions to provide immediate relief to children and women rendered vulnerable by the floods and ensure prevention from aggravated risks of secondary separation, exploitation, and abuse. Child Protection Service for Vulnerable flood affected Children In Nowshera Capacity Building of the Relief Workers on Identification and Response to Gender Based Violence (GBV) Information Counseling and Legal Assistance (ICLA) in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP)

CWS FRD

0% 0%

RELIEF RELIEF

PODA

200,000

200,000

0%

RELIEF

PODA INTERSOS WVI HI UNICEF UNFPA UNIFEM SSD WASFD PADO READ Foundation UNICEF PakRDP IMC NRC

250,000 402,320 634,420 1,033,314 8,800,000 2,430,000 2,000,000 51,857 200,000 115,000 321,003 3,000,000 180,559 600,000 501,857

4,293,633 1,937,980 -

250,000 402,320 634,420 1,033,314 4,506,367 2,430,000 2,000,000 51,857 200,000 115,000 321,003 1,062,020 180,559 600,000 501,857

0% 0% 0% 0% 49% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 65% 0% 0% 0%

RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY

110

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35444/R/12951

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 166,291 149,526 145,000 2,000,000 4,000,000 201,921

Funding ($) 633,121

Unmet requirements ($) 166,291 149,526 145,000 2,000,000 4,000,000 - 431,200

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

Support flood affected children through friendly environment in District Shakar Pur (Sindh). Rehabilitation of truamatized children in flood affected PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35461/R/14315 areas of district shikarpur Protective Services for flood affected children in three PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35482/R/14237 most affected districts (Neelum, Hattaian, Haveli ) PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35616/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35624/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35684/R/5524 Extending Protection Services for Flood-affected Children District Level Community-based Child Protection Systems Provision of psychosocial first aid and strengthening child protection through establishment of Child Friendly Spaces (CFS) Emergency Response to Flood Affectees with Child Protection from exploitation, abuse and violence 3 Districts of Sindh(Larkana, Jacobabad and Shikarpur) that will covered 15 Tehsils of the said Districts. STOP for Child Protection (S Space, structure, T Trust, time, talking ,O Opportunity to play, organized play, P Play, and partnership with parents) STOP for Child Protection (S Space, structure, T Trust, time, talking ,O Opportunity to play, organized play, P Play, and partnership with parents) Protection and Support centers in Flood effected Districts Kashmore and Shikarpur Protection Coordination

RDO MDF DDO SC SC Plan

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 314%

EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF

PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35692/R/14290

Hayat

124,410

124,410

0%

RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY

PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35699/R/14316 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35699/R/14329 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/35740/R/14288 PKA-FL-10/P-HR-RL/37118/R/120 Sub total for PROTECTION SHELTER & NON-FOOD ITEMS PKA-FL-10/S-NF/33897/5826 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/33929/R/120 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/33930/R/7039 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/33931/R/14130 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34026/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34065/R/5179

SSD NCCR Bedari UNHCR

2,000,000

141,476 134,965 1,765,574 52,932,153

690,429 11,467,590

141,476 134,965 1,075,145 41,464,563

0% 0% 0% 39% 22%

Shelter/NFI Emergency shelter and basic domestic items support to flood affected populations in Pakistan Adaptive Shelter and Shelter for Extremely Vulnerable Households in the least served Union Councils of 21 Flood Affected Districts (WITHDRAWN) Provision of Emergency Shelter and NFIs For Flood Affected Populations (Shelter Cluster Consortium) Provision of Emergency Shelter and NFI to 40,000 families in Punjab and Sindh Emergency Shelter and NFI Support in Qambar, Shadadkot and Khairpur districts in Sindh, Leiah and Bhakkar districts in southern Punjab

UN Agencies and NGOs (details not yet provided) UNHCR UN-HABITAT Shelter Cluster Consortium SC IRC

105,000,000 -

102,421,117 20,666,408 10,000,000 3,590,975

59,007,525 1,805,721 451,671 -

43,413,592 18,860,687 9,548,329 3,590,975

0% 58% 9% 0% 5% 0%

NOT SPECIFIED RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY NOT SPECIFIED RELIEF RELIEF

111

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34325/R/5660 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34386/R/12950 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34420/R/14167 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34561/R/14216 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34597/R/14205 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34621/R/13054 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34631/R/14144 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34633/R/13054 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34665/R/12692 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34692/R/14237 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34784/R/5349 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34786/R/8498 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34796/R/5349 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34809/R/298 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34824/R/5146 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34834/R/298 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34847/R/298 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34854/R/6971 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34860/R/8227 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34861/R/12955

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 245,030 249,618 117,038 75,565 1,676,506 2,050,000 93,112 2,050,000 2,120,000 460,000 1,794,377 4,361,674 1,250,030 25,777,141 1,990,170 42,347,359 2,000,000 768,160 584,113 626,258

Funding ($) 604,396 131,062 5,011,570 255,805 674,068 17,094,629 826,413 -

Unmet requirements ($) 245,030 249,618 117,038 75,565 1,676,506 2,050,000 93,112 2,050,000 1,515,604 460,000 1,663,315 - 649,896 1,250,030 25,521,336 1,316,102 25,252,730 1,173,587 768,160 584,113 626,258

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

Emergency sheltering contribution to the flood affected population of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Provinc Provision of 335 safe and durable transitional shelters to sustain returns of most vulnerable displaced communities affected by the floods in Daira Den Panah, Tehsil Kot Adu, District Muzaffargarh over a period of six months. Rapid Shelter and NFI provision to flood affected families in Khairpur districts of Sindh. Provision of Core shelter and NFIs for 84 Flood affected families To provide Shelter/NFI support to Flood Affecttes of District Neelum, District Muzaffarabad, District Hattian, District Bagh, District Haveli and District Bhimber Provision of 3000 Transitional Shelters in flood affected areas of Nowshehra District KPK Emergency Assistance to Flood Affected Populations Shelter and Plastic Sheets Early Recovery Initiative through Provision of 3000 Transitional Shelters in flood affected areas of Dera Ghazi Khan District, Punjab, Pakistan Humanitarian Response in flood affected Districts of Rajanpur, DG Khan and Muzaffargarh Construction of transitional shelter for flood affectees Provision of Appropriate Transitional Shelter solutions to flood-affected populations in Sindh Province Transitional shelter assistance to Flood Affected Families in Punjab, Sindh and Balochistan, Pakistan. Emergency Provision of Shelter and NFIs to 15,000 households within flood-affected populations in Thatta District of Sindh Province Shelter Support for Flood-Affected Populations

INTERSOS MHI SDTS KWES AJKRSP PRDS NWHO PRDS QC DDO HI CW HI IOM

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 29% 0% 7% 115% 0% 1% 34% 40% 41% 0% 0% 0%

RELIEF RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY

Safe, Dignified, Durable, Transitional Shelters for FloodCRS Affected Families in Sindh and Balochistan Residual Emergency Shelter and Non-Food Items Support IOM to the Monsoon Flood-Affected Population in Pakistan Coordination Support to Shelter Cluster Response to IOM Flood Affected Population Emergency Shelter to flood affected population in Punjab Provision of Transitional Shelters support in Balochistan Provision of 800 Transitional Shelter to most vulnerable flood affected families in KPK RI BRSP HIN

112

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34881/R/6458 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34886/R/6458 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34890/R/13101 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34897/R/5160 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34898/R/14212 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34901/R/14235 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34940/R/14211 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34951/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/34968/R/5370 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35059/R/5090 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35061/R/5120 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35063/R/14141 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35072/R/776 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35236/R/13029 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35249/R/5767 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35254/R/5834 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35270/R/8226 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35276/R/14154 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35279/R/5834

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 2,301,780 6,004,352 393,000 6,250,041 614,623 243,207 250,000 8,000,000 6,250,041 1,616,317 2,348,530 490,562 8,000,000 588,437 10,725,115 2,140,014 1,386,287 498,404 3,745,024

Funding ($) 6,353,240 50,000 500,000 411,822 473,982 1,344,614

Unmet requirements ($) 2,301,780 - 348,888 393,000 6,200,041 614,623 243,207 250,000 7,500,000 6,250,041 1,616,317 2,348,530 78,740 8,000,000 588,437 10,725,115 1,666,032 1,386,287 498,404 2,400,410

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

Provision of emergency shelters and NFI kits for flood affected population in Pakistan, Punjab and KPK provinces Provision of transitional shelters for flood affected population in Pakistan, Punjab and KPK provinces Provision of Transitional shelters during early recovery period for extremely marginalized flood affected communities of Thatta (Sindh) Provision of Emergency Shelter and NFIs to the Flood Affected Population in Punjab, Sindh and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) Support to Flood Affected Communities by providing Indigenous Muddy Shelters & NFIs in 4 UCs of Dera Ghazi Khan District Relief & Restoration of Flood Victims for Sustainable Livelihood Providing NFI Kits for Flood Affected in Muzafargarh and Rahim yar khan and Installation of shelter and temporary toilets for most vulnerable Provision of Transitional Shelter and NFI to 10,000 families in Punjab, Sindh & KPK. Provision of Shelter in Flood affected areas in Punjab and Sindh Emergency Shelters & NFIs provision to 5000 worst floodaffected families in Tehsil Liaqat Pur- Distt. Rahim Yar Khan Punjab Distribution of emergency shelter items in KPK and Sindh provinces Emergency Shelter and NFI Project Gilgit-Baltistan and Chitral (GBC) Low cost winterized shelter units in Selected Districts Affected by the Floods Humanitarian Response to flood Affected Population through provision of NFIs to bring the situation toward normality in four districts (Swat, Shangla, Kohistan & D.I.Khan) of KPK Transitional shelters for vulnerable returnees and nondisplaced communities affected by the floods in Pakistan Providing winterized shelter and NFIs to flood affected families in KPK Province Provision of shelter and emergency non-food items to displaced persons in flood affected areas of Sindh To provide adequate shelter material in local environs to flood affected families Facilitation of house repairs to secure core shelter for flood affected families in KPK.

ACTED ACTED PAIMAN IMC AAGAHI MOJAZ Foundation OWO SC Muslim Aid HAI OXFAM GB Focus Humanitarian Assistance UNDP JPI UNOPS NRC NRSP Pattan NRC

0% 106% 0% 1% 0% 0% 0% 6% 0% 0% 0% 84% 0% 0% 0% 22% 0% 0% 36%

RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF

113

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35287/R/14259 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35351/R/14140 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35381/R/14148 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35385/R/14148 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35396/R/14261 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35399/R/14131 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35425/R/13937 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35443/R/1024 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35498/R/14298 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35540/R/7039 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35622/R/13955 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35677/R/7608 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35783/R/8226 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35788/R/14316 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35791/R/5975 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35792/R/5586 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35793/R/5586 PKA-FL-10/S-NF/35795/R/14333

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) 105,000,000

Revised requirements ($) 81,822 182,385 855,000 572,450 335,745 500,000 2,586,013 3,252,290 880,000 11,137,416 1,345,517 1,121,884 3,613,713 1,039,500 1,990,200 401,000 409,000 1,625,000 321,089,320

Funding ($) 229,863 95,226,381

Unmet requirements ($) 81,822 182,385 855,000 572,450 335,745 500,000 2,356,150 3,252,290 880,000 11,137,416 1,345,517 1,121,884 3,613,713 1,039,500 1,990,200 401,000 409,000 1,625,000 225,862,939

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

Shelter homes for Flood affectees in the areas surrounding of District Hattian 1. salmia 2.chakama 3. Leepa Emergency Assistance to Flood Affected Population of District Rahimyarkhan, Punjab Province Protection of Most Vulnerable families in Sindh through provision of Transitional shelter Protection of flood affected families through provision of emergency shelter & basic domestic items in Sindh. Transitional Shelter Provision in Rajanpur Emergency NFIs and Shelter Assistance to Flood affectees of Kohistan, KPK (ENSAF) Assistance of Winterized NFIs kits to the flood affectees in District Kohistan & Batagram KPK and District Jamshooro & Khair Pur Sindh Ensuring the provision of Transitional Shelters to flood affected population of Punjab and Sindh provinces. Provision of Shelter and NFIs to Flood Victims in Punjab District Level Technical Assistance and Policy Support for Shelter and Recovery Provision of transitional Shelter and daily Use NFIs to flood affected Population in Khyber Pukhtoonkhwa and Punjab, KPK Shelter Flood Assistance Charsadda District

SACHET PRWSWO CDF CDF FDO PRDP BFO Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V. HF UN-HABITAT FRD PAI

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 9% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 30%

EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF

Provision of shelter and emergency non-food items to NRSP displaced persons in flood affected areas of Punjab. Transitional Shelter and NFIs Support to the flood-affected SSD households in Sindh AKPBS - Shelter Project Gilgit-Baltistan and Chitral (GBC) AKDN Emergency Shelter and NFIs provision to most vulnerable flood affected households in district Sukkur and Jacobabad in Sindh. Emergency Shelter and NFIs provision to most vulnerable flood affected households in district Sibi, Naseerabad and Jaffarabad in Baluchistan Emergency needs regarding shelter and NFI in flood affected areas (district of Rajanpur) ARC ARC DSTC

Sub total for SHELTER & NON-FOOD ITEMS WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE

114

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/WS/33898/R/5826 PKA-FL-10/WS/33921/R/124 PKA-FL-10/WS/33933/R/7039 PKA-FL-10/WS/34027/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/WS/34068/R/5179 PKA-FL-10/WS/34119/R/5861 PKA-FL-10/WS/34127/R/5370 PKA-FL-10/WS/34130/R/5120 PKA-FL-10/WS/34131/R/122 PKA-FL-10/WS/34133/R/5889 PKA-FL-10/WS/34134/R/5975 PKA-FL-10/WS/34135/R/8227 PKA-FL-10/WS/34152/R/8226 PKA-FL-10/WS/34162/R/124 PKA-FL-10/WS/34340/R/13029 PKA-FL-10/WS/34537/R/5645 PKA-FL-10/WS/34578/R/14205 PKA-FL-10/WS/34623/R/12692 PKA-FL-10/WS/34629/R/12692 WASH

Title

Appealing agency UN Agencies and NGOs (details not yet provided) UNICEF UN-HABITAT SC IRC IRD Muslim Aid OXFAM GB WHO ARC AKDN BRSP NRSP UNICEF JPI CARE International AJKRSP QC QC

Original requirements ($) 110,500,000 -

Revised requirements ($) 50,000,000 10,999,172 2,200,000 6,000,000 1,488,600 2,300,000 6,516,406 7,630,812 735,750 500,000 4,037,053 3,000,000 4,037,290 187,503 1,000,000 1,417,171 4,040,000 2,860,500

Funding ($) 37,704,978 1,113,087 800,000 387,597 624,322 -

Unmet requirements ($) 12,295,022 10,999,172 1,086,913 5,200,000 1,488,600 2,300,000 6,128,809 7,630,812 735,750 500,000 4,037,053 3,000,000 4,037,290 187,503 375,678 1,417,171 4,040,000 2,860,500

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

0% 75% 0% 51% 13% 0% 0% 6% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 62% 0% 0% 0%

NOT SPECIFIED RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF/EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF

Relief WASH Interventions for the flood-affected populations Integrated WASH Assistance in the Least Served Union Councils of 20 Flood Affected Districts Immediate emergency WASH response for flood affected communities in Punjab, KPK and Sindh Province (3 months) Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Support for Flood-Affected IDPs in Swat, D.I. Khan, Tank districts in KP, Sindh and Punjab provinces Relief WASH Interventions for the flood-affected populations in Punjab, Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa (KPK), and Sindh WASH support to flood affectees in Sindh, Punjab and KPK Flood Emergency WASH Response in KPK and Sindh Provinces (early recovery) Water Quality Monitoring and Improving Healthcare facilities WASH services (Early recovery) Provision of emergency WASH services (Drinking water, sanitation facilities and health & hygiene) to the flood affectees in selected union councils of KPK and Sindh Rehabilitation of Flood affected Drinking Water Supply Schemes and Hygiene Promotion in Flood Affected Areas of Gilgit Baltistan Provision of Safe Drinking Water and Hygiene Promotion Activities in Flood Affected Areas of Districts of Naserabad and Jaffar Abad, Jhal Magsi, Provision of WASH facilities in flood affected areas and hygiene promotion through distribution of hygiene kits and dissemination of messages on safe hygiene practices. Water, Sanitation & Hygiene Cluster Coordination Emergency Relief Water Supply, Sanitation Facilities & Hygiene Education Project for two union councils of district District Nowshehra, KPK. Providing access to Water Sanitation and Hygiene for healthy survival in flood affecteddistricts of Nowshera, Charsadd and Swat in KPK Early Recovery Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Interventions for the flood affected communities Pakistan Flood Emergency WASH Response in KPK and Punjab Province WASH Humanitarian Response in District of Rajanpur, DG Khan and Muzaffargarh

115

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/WS/35016/R/5120 PKA-FL-10/WS/35080/R/6079 PKA-FL-10/WS/35153/R/13029 PKA-FL-10/WS/35202/R/12839 PKA-FL-10/WS/35248/R/124 PKA-FL-10/WS/35625/R/14131 PKA-FL-10/WS/35661/R/13160 PKA-FL-10/WS/35673/R/12978 PKA-FL-10/WS/35674/R/122 PKA-FL-10/WS/35689/R/5186 PKA-FL-10/WS/35691/R/14205 PKA-FL-10/WS/35695/R/8227 PKA-FL-10/WS/35698/R/5186 PKA-FL-10/WS/35702/R/13160 PKA-FL-10/WS/35703/R/5861 PKA-FL-10/WS/35711/R/5357 PKA-FL-10/WS/35717/R/1024 PKA-FL-10/WS/35720/R/1024 PKA-FL-10/WS/35748/R/14365 PKA-FL-10/WS/35752/R/14366

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 13,032,812 5,000,000 196,605 141,145 65,000,000 460,000 1,082,506 269,530 7,736,100 953,500 468,152 3,188,487 1,956,000 821,954 2,299,800 281,700 1,228,598 2,452,970 261,813 3,312,631

Funding ($) 6,245,148 4,658,385 242,775 922,063 500,000 219,097 -

Unmet requirements ($) 6,787,664 341,615 196,605 141,145 65,000,000 460,000 839,731 269,530 6,814,037 953,500 468,152 3,188,487 1,456,000 821,954 2,299,800 281,700 1,228,598 2,233,873 261,813 3,312,631

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

Flood Emergency WASH Response in KPK and Sindh Provinces (relief) Immediate emergency WASH response for flood affected communities in Punjab, KPK, and Sindh Provinces Emergency WASH Interventions for flood affectees in Districts Dadu and Shahdadkot, Sindh,Pakistan Ensuring availability of safe drinking water to the flood affected population of Sanawa, Tehsil Kot Adu, Muzafargarh Early Recovery WASH Interventions for Flood-affected Populations Emergency WASH Assistance to Flood affectees of Kohistan, KPK WASH intervention for most vulnerable flood affected communities (living at camps/higher ground/roads/public buildings) in Punjab, Sindh, KPK and Balochistan WASH Emergency Response Project Water Quality Monitoring and Improving Healthcare facilities WASH services (Relief ) Emergency WASH assistance to flood affected populations Relief Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Interventions for the flood Affected population Early recovery WASH Interventions for flood affected population in Districts Jaffar abad, Naseer Abad,JhalMagsi (Balochistan) Emergency WASH relief to flood affected populations in KPK and Sindh Provinces WASH intervention for flood affected communities those are returning home from their emergency shelter in Punjab, Sindh, KPK and Balochistan Early Recovery WASH Interventions for the flood-affected populations in Punjab, Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa (KPK), and Sindh Provision of Safe Water, Latrines and Hygiene Promotion, in Flood Affected Villages of Khairpur District in Sindh Province. Relief WASH interventions for the flood affected population in Balochistan and Sindh. Early Recovery WASH interventions for the flood affected population in Balochistan and Sindh. Early Recovery WASH Interventions for Flood-affected Populations in in Jafferabad Balochistan Provision of Safe Drinking Water and Hygiene Promotion Activities in Flood Affected Areas of Districts Larkana, Shikarpur, Shahdadkot, Kashmore, Ghotki, Jacobabad, Sukkur, Khairpur and Naushero Feroz (Sindh)

OXFAM GB SC JPI HHRD UNICEF PRDP IR Pakistan SDF WHO ACF AJKRSP BRSP ACF IR Pakistan IRD CWS Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V. Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V. Sungi SRSO

48% 93% 0% 0% 0% 0% 22% 0% 12% 0% 0% 0% 26% 0% 0% 0% 0% 9% 0% 0%

RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF

116

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/WS/35756/R/14320

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) 1,073,466

Funding ($) -

Unmet requirements ($) 1,073,466

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Priority

PKA-FL-10/WS/35757/R/14318

PKA-FL-10/WS/35759/R/124

PKA-FL-10/WS/35763/R/14318

PKA-FL-10/WS/35766/R/14366 PKA-FL-10/WS/35806/R/7039 PKA-FL-10/WS/35817/R/14373 PKA-FL-10/WS/36005/R/5090 PKA-FL-10/WS/36007/R/13101 PKA-FL-10/WS/36009/R/5362 PKA-FL-10/WS/36010/R/5524 PKA-FL-10/WS/36015/R/5524 PKA-FL-10/WS/36021/R/8223

Restoration and rehabilitation of Water Supply & Sanitation Schemes and Hygiene Promotion for the flood affected population in Gilgit-Baltistan and district Chitral KPK. Relief - Provision of Safe Drinking Water and Relief Services in Flood Affected Areas of Districts Mazaffargarh, Mianwali, Bhakkar, Rahim Yar Khan and Layyah (Punjab) Early Recovery WASH Interventions. Provision of Safe Drinking Water and Hygiene Promotion Activities in Flood Affected Areas in Muzaffargarh, Layyah, Rajanpur & DG Khan districts (Punjab). Recovery Provision of Improved Sanitation Facilities & Safe Drinking Water in Flood Affected Areas of Districts Mazaffargarh, Mianwali, Bhakkar, Rahim Yar Khan and Layyah (Punjab) Provision of Safe Drinking Water and Hygiene Promotion Activities in Flood Affected Areas of Districts Larkana, Shikarpur, Shahdadkot, Kashmore, Ghotaki, Jacobabad, Sukkur, Khairpur and Naushero Feroz (Sindh) Immediate WASH assistance in the least served Union Councils of 21 Flood Affected Districts in Pakistan Provision of Safe Drinking Water and Hygiene Promotion Activities in Flood Affected Areas in Muzaffargarh, Layyah, Rajanpur & DG Khan districts (Punjab) Early Recovery & Rehabilitation. WASH facilities for flood affected in district Rahim Yar Khan (ERF funded project) Provision of hygiene kits and drinking water to 4,500 flood affected families of District Rajanpur (ERF funded project) Flood Emergency Response 2010 (ERF funded project)

AKRSP

0%

EARLY RECOVERY

CSWC

1,133,536

1,133,536

0%

RELIEF

UNICEF

4,779,933

2,000,000

2,779,933

42%

EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF EARLY RECOVERY RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF RELIEF

CSWC

3,400,608

3,400,608

0%

SRSO UN-HABITAT PRSP HAI PAIMAN OXFAM Netherlands (NOVIB)

110,500,000

5,750,531 3,519,211 4,027,614 215,946 182,569 244,969 250,000 250,000 98,132 244,021,075

1,201,904 215,946 182,569 244,969 250,000 250,000 95,045 57,857,885

5,750,531 2,317,307 4,027,614 3,087 186,163,190

0% 34% 0% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 97% 24%

Plan Pakistan: Provision of WASH in Sindh Province (ERF Plan funded project) Plan Pakistan: Provision of WASH in Punjab Province Plan (ERF funded project) Emergency Relief Operation for Flood Affected People in SPO Baluchistan - WASH (ERF funded project)

Sub total for WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE CLUSTER NOT YET SPECIFIED PKA-FL-10/SNYS/33899/5826 PKA-FL-10/SNYS/33900/R/8487 To be allocated to specific project/cluster Emergency Response Fund (ERF) UN Agencies and NGOs (details not yet provided) ERF (OCHA)

1,999,956 26,572,338

n/a n/a

n/a n/a

1,755,153 65,531

NOT SPECIFIED RELIEF

117

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Project code (click on hyperlinked project code to open full project details) PKA-FL-10/SNYS/33901/6459 PKA-FL-10/SNYS/33915/6459 PKA-FL-10/SNYS/33916/124 PKA-FL-10/SNYS/33918/120 PKA-FL-10/SNYS/35586/R/298 CERF grant

Title

Appealing agency

Original requirements ($) -

Revised requirements ($) -

Funding ($) 6,998,431 96,741,096 11,612,407 997,807 5,299,139 150,221,174

Unmet requirements ($) n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a

% Covered

Uncommitted pledges ($) 1,000,000 2,820,684

Priority

UN Agencies UN Agencies UNICEF UNHCR IOM

n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a

To be allocated to specific project/cluster To be allocated to specific project/cluster To be allocated to specific project/cluster Awaiting allocation to specific project/sector

NOT SPECIFIED NOT SPECIFIED NOT SPECIFIED NOT SPECIFIED NOT SPECIFIED

Sub total for CLUSTER NOT YET SPECIFIED

Grand Total NOTE: Pledge: Commitment: Contribution: "Funding" means Contributions + Commitments

459,724,847

1,938,207,278

760,707,792

1,177,499,486

39%

7,697,526

a non-binding announcement of an intended contribution or allocation by the donor. ("Uncommitted pledge" on these tables indicates the balance of original pledges not yet committed.) creation of a legal, contractual obligation between the donor and recipient entity, specifying the amount to be contributed. the actual payment of funds or transfer of in-kind goods from the donor to the recipient entity.

The list of projects and the figures for their funding requirements in this document are a snapshot as of 31 October 2010. For continuously updated information on projects, funding requirements, and contributions to date, visit the Financial Tracking Service (http://fts.unocha.org/).

118

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Table IV.

Total Funding per Donor (to projects listed in the response plan)
Pakistan Floods Relief and Early Recovery Response Plan 2010 as of 31 October 2010 http://fts.unocha.org

Compiled by OCHA on the basis of information provided by donors and appealing organizations.

Donor

Funding

% of Grand Total 35 % 13 % 8% 7% 6% 6% 4% 4% 3% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 1% 100 %

Uncommitted pledges ($) 100,000 1,755,153 5,842,373 7,697,526

($) United States Saudi Arabia United Kingdom European Commission Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) Private (individuals & organisations) Australia Canada India Germany Japan Sweden Norway Netherlands Denmark Spain Finland Allocations of unearmarked funds by UN agencies Belgium Luxembourg New Zealand Italy Ireland Azerbaijan France Others Grand Total
NOTE: Pledge: Commitment: Contribution: "Funding" means Contributions + Commitments

265,035,167 100,000,000 60,145,653 56,036,775 44,378,875 43,526,747 33,095,918 30,899,647 25,000,000 15,554,165 13,349,680 12,169,308 10,212,792 9,089,392 8,127,681 6,961,300 4,091,883 2,867,600 2,818,112 2,808,864 2,182,680 2,120,333 2,036,618 1,999,956 1,377,988 4,820,658 760,707,792

a non-binding announcement of an intended contribution or allocation by the donor. ("Uncommitted pledge" on these tables indicates the balance of original pledges not yet committed.) creation of a legal, contractual obligation between the donor and recipient entity, specifying the amount to be contributed. the actual payment of funds or transfer of in-kind goods from the donor to the recipient entity.

The list of projects and the figures for their funding requirements in this document are a snapshot as of 31 October 2010. For continuously updated information on projects, funding requirements, and contributions to date, visit the Financial Tracking Service (http://fts.unocha.org).

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Table V.

Summary of Humanitarian Funding for the Pakistan floods outside the Response Plan
as of 31 October 2010
http://fts.unocha.org

Compiled by OCHA on the basis of information provided by donors and appealing organizations.

Recipient

Funding ($)

% of Grand Total 33% 14% 10% 6% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

Uncommitted pledges ($) 147,336,217 5,567,000 149,127,269 -

Bilateral (to affected government) NGOs DEC (UK) Various ICRC Swiss Solidarity IFRC SHO (NL) IRW IOM UN Agencies and NGOs (details not yet provided) NRC AKF IRC OXFAM GB NGOs; Red Cross ACF - Spain DEMA UAE Embassy in Pakistan Germany RC MSB Denmark RC Canada RC DWHH Pakistan RC Turkey RC CARE-UK Danchurchaid Mobilink Foundation CBHA ACTED Solidarits Action Aid

304,339,726 128,270,026 91,614,907 57,271,696 37,739,457 36,062,378 35,181,732 34,254,740 25,668,381 13,750,311 10,309,051 7,721,552 6,300,000 5,495,870 5,119,883 5,000,000 4,919,340 4,633,455 4,276,567 4,257,291 4,017,351 3,940,392 3,822,646 3,546,003 3,455,692 3,249,272 3,181,996 3,175,263 2,776,470 2,771,891 2,712,444 2,318,932 2,300,000
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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Recipient

Funding ($)

% of Grand Total 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

Uncommitted pledges ($) 5,292,284 1,461,988 -

IRD NCA Development and Peace United Arab Emirates RC No channel specified Norway RC CW American RC SDC/SHA MERLIN Americares Netherlands RC Iran RC Care Germany HELP IHP GOAL OXFAM Canada Trocaire RI WVI SC - Denmark WFP Mercy Corps Diakonie Emergency Aid UN Agencies Caritas Germany (DCV) Sweden RC Latter-Day Saint Charities OCHA Kindernothilfe e.V. HI CARITAS CANADEM Finnchurchaid HOPE'87 Global Medic RIRF

2,269,670 2,232,142 1,949,318 1,882,225 1,724,830 1,648,261 1,544,671 1,510,000 1,488,952 1,456,271 1,315,000 1,310,616 1,300,000 1,290,632 1,272,515 1,164,596 1,092,041 1,065,891 917,431 898,565 869,349 853,150 832,600 831,000 808,700 798,999 705,156 693,674 677,216 659,304 658,660 637,258 572,675 560,304 524,246 524,246 510,488 494,478

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Recipient

Funding ($)

% of Grand Total 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

Uncommitted pledges ($) -

Switzerland RC OXFAM Australia Al-Khidmat Foundation Bundesanstalt Technisches Hilfswerk Plan Ireland USAID World Vision Australia World Bank OXFAM International Church of Sweden SPO Response Int'l SSD ICMC Friendship AN Nehemia Christenhilfsdienst e.V. Humedica DRC SC France RC Secours Islamique SPF Pakistan Association in Dubai UNDAC LandsAid e.V. CHF International Kuwait RC MR CARE International Lions Clubs International Foundation InfoAsAid ARO MDM France BBC World Service Trust DRI Life for Relief and Development DMC

480,307 451,671 407,318 396,582 393,184 350,566 316,170 291,367 277,954 268,258 249,997 248,926 244,080 229,060 209,313 207,915 203,304 176,933 175,923 175,000 131,062 131,062 131,062 130,192 123,145 107,104 100,000 100,000 100,000 98,296 89,700 78,247 76,016 65,531 63,532 53,000 50,000 43,980

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Recipient

Funding ($)

% of Grand Total 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100%

Uncommitted pledges ($) 167,090,068 3,000,000 100,000 6,000 -* 478,980,826

Luxembourg RC ADRA AHD UN Agencies, NGOs and Red Cross Eid Charity Qatar RC TSF PMC NCHD Operation USA ICDO IFRC DREF IMC Syrian RC Grand Total
NOTE: Pledge: Commitment: Contribution: *

39,318 34,720 31,766 30,000 27,473 27,473 25,000 23,611 20,000 4,000 -* 912,688,963

"Funding" means Contributions + Commitments a non-binding announcement of an intended contribution or allocation by the donor. ("Uncommitted pledge" on these tables indicates the balance of original pledges not yet committed.) creation of a legal, contractual obligation between the donor and recipient entity, specifying the amount to be contributed. the actual payment of funds or transfer of in-kind goods from the donor to the recipient entity.

In-kind support for which no monetary value was provided

The list of projects and the figures for their funding requirements in this document are a snapshot as of 31 October 2010. For continuously updated information on projects, funding requirements, and contributions to date, visit the Financial Tracking Service (www.reliefweb.int/fts).

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Table VI: Total international humanitarian funding per donor to the Pakistan floods
as of 31 October 2010
http://fts.unocha.org
Compiled by OCHA on the basis of information provided by donors and appealing organizations.

Donor

Funding

% of Grand Total 29 % 17 % 14 % 6% 5% 4% 3% 3% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

Uncommitted pledges ($) 54,043,300 112,008,740 108,843,537 2,906,977 14,461,633 45,440,051 29,498,525 1,000,000 1,461,988 1,651,842 5,292,284 3,811,944 -

($) United States Private (individuals & organisations) Saudi Arabia United Kingdom European Commission Australia Canada Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) Germany India Denmark Norway Japan Sweden China Turkey Netherlands Allocation of funds from Red Cross / Red Crescent Kuwait Switzerland Austria United Arab Emirates Spain Finland Oman Allocations of unearmarked funds by UN agencies Italy Ireland Luxembourg France Indonesia Belgium Bahrain 488,071,721 291,100,260 242,198,994 100,622,174 91,657,980 67,437,497 48,348,216 44,378,875 30,882,999 25,000,000 22,163,106 20,253,200 20,196,998 18,158,402 18,137,829 14,649,272 13,021,240 10,662,918 9,000,000 8,501,440 8,285,180 7,694,993 7,125,127 5,795,683 5,000,000 4,323,428 4,287,766 4,270,077 4,219,416 4,179,711 3,000,000 2,818,112 2,659,574

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PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Donor

Funding

% of Grand Total 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

Uncommitted pledges ($) 6,000,000 100,000,000 192,000 65,531 - **

($) New Zealand Korea, Republic of Bangladesh Egypt Morocco Azerbaijan Russian Federation Qatar Iran (Islamic Republic of) World Bank Brazil Afghanistan Algeria Malaysia Mauritius Uzbekistan Czech Republic Poland Slovakia Cyprus Greece Nepal Monaco Botswana Georgia Singapore Estonia Thailand Hungary Andorra Guyana Sri Lanka Lithuania Malta Slovenia Iceland Montenegro Argentina
125

2,540,136 2,202,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 1,999,956 1,609,712 1,565,934 1,530,000 1,300,000 1,200,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 300,000 300,000 209,699 196,592 170,380 131,062 131,062 130,000 127,065 103,040 100,000 100,000 83,752 75,000 50,000 38,119 30,000 26,667 18,979 12,706 12,706 -**

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN

Donor

Funding

% of Grand Total -** -** -** -** -** -** 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100 %

Uncommitted pledges ($) - ** - ** - ** - ** - ** - ** 486,678,352

($) Jordan Kenya North Atlantic Treaty Organization Sudan Syrian Arab Republic Yemen Grand Total
NOTE: Pledge: Commitment: Contribution: * ** "Funding" means Contributions + Commitments

1,673,396,755

a non-binding announcement of an intended contribution or allocation by the donor. ("Uncommitted pledge" on these tables indicates the balance of original pledges not yet committed.) creation of a legal, contractual obligation between the donor and recipient entity, specifying the amount to be contributed. the actual payment of funds or transfer of in-kind goods from the donor to the recipient entity.

Includes contributions to the Consolidated Appeal and additional contributions outside of the Consolidated Appeal Process (bilateral, Red Cross, etc.) In-kind support for which no monetary value was provided

The list of projects and the figures for their funding requirements in this document are a snapshot as of 31 October 2010. For continuously updated information on projects, funding requirements, and contributions to date, visit the Financial Tracking Service (http://fts.unocha.org).

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ANNEX II.
AAGAHI ABKT ACF ACS ACTED ADAM ADF ADO AF AIMS Organization AJKRSP AKDN AKRSP AMAR Foundation AMRDO ARC ARI ART Aware Girls AWD AWS BDRO Bedari BEmOC BFO BRAC BRDS BRSP CAMP CBO CCCM CCR CDF CDF CDO CERF CERIT CESVI CFS CFW CGI CGN-P Children First CHIP CMAM CMDO COMCENS CONCERN CORDAID CPI CRS CSWC CWS DAC DCO DDF DDMA DDO DEWS DHQ DIN DLG DNA

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS


AAGAHI Association for Behavior and Knowledge Transformation Action Contre la Faim Al-Mumtaz Cooperative Society Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development Association of Development Awareness and Motivation Alfalah Development Foundation Awammi Development Organization Abaseen Foundation AIMS Organization AJK Rural Support Programme Aga Khan Development Network Aga Khan Rural Support Programme non-sectarian neutral organisation providing humanitarian aid to disadvantaged communities Al-Mehran Rural Development Organization American Refugee Committee acute respiratory infection anti-retroviral therapy Aware Girls acute watery diarrhoea Al-Nijat Welfare Society Badin Development and Research Organization Bedari basic emergency obstetric care Bright Future Organization Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee Balochistan Rural Development Society Balochistan Rural Support Programme Camp community-based organizations Camp Coordination and Camp Management Coalition on Child Rights Cavish Development Foundation Community Development Foundation Community Development Organization Central Emergency Response Fund Center of Education, Research, Innovation and Training Cooperazione E Sviluppo child friendly space cash-for-work corrugated galvanized iron Children's Global Network, Pakistan (Guarantee) Limited Children First Civil Society Human and Institutional Development Programme community management of acute malnutrition Community Motivation and Development Organization communication centres Concern Worldwide Catholic Organization for Relief and Development Aid community physical infrastructure Catholic Relief Services Community Social Welfare Council Church World Service Development Assistance Committee District Coordination Officer Dosti Development Foundation District Disaster Management Authorities Durawa Development Organization Disease Early Warning System district headquarters Development Institutions' Network De Laas Gul Damage and Needs Assessment 127

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN DRM DRR DSTC ECE ECHO EMRO ERF ETC FAO FDO FF FFW FH FHA FMA FPHC FRD GAM GB GBTI GBV GHI GIMS GIS GOAL GPP GRHO GTF HAI Hayat HBWWCA HC HCT HDR HF HF HF HHRD HI HIN HIV/AIDS HKCA / KEPS HPO HRDN IASC IBT ICDI ICMC IDEA IDP(s) IDSP IDU IFC IFPRI IFT IHS I-LAP ILO IM IMC INEE INGOs INTERSOS IOM Disaster Risk Management Disaster Risk Reduction Dehi Samaji Taraqiati Council early childhood education European Commission Directorate-General for Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean Emergency Response Fund emergency telecommunications Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Farmers Development Organization Friends Foundation food-for-work Food for the Hungry Focus Humanitarian Assistance Flight Management Application Frontier Primary Health Care Foundation for Rural Development global acute malnutrition Gilgit Baltistan Ghazi Barotha Taraqiati Idara gender-based violence Global Hunger Index Gambat Institute of Medical Sciences geographic information system an Irish NGO Global Peace Pioneers Gender and Reproductive Health Organization Gender Task Force Human Appeal International Hayat Foundation Home Based Women Workers Center Association Humanitarian Coordinator Humanitarian Country Team Human Development Report Hammda Foundation health facility high frequency Helping Hand for Relief & Development Handicap International Help in Need human immuno-deficiency virus/acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome Hindu Kush Conservation Association, UK. Houbara Protection Organization Human Resource Development Network Inter-Agency Standing Committee Idara Baraye Taleem-o-Taraqi i.e., Center for Education and Development Integrated Community Development International International Catholic Migration Commission Initiative for Development and Empowerment Axis internally displaced person (people) Integrated Development Support Programme intravenous drug users Initiative for Change International Food Policy Research Institute Insan Foundation Trust Integrated Health Services Interfaith League Against Poverty International Labour Organization information management International Medical Corps Inter-agency Network for Education in Emergencies international non-governmental organizations Intersos International Organization for Migration 128

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN IPHD IR Pakistan IRC IRD IRDO Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V. JPI KADO Khyber Aid KKT KPK KWES KWH LAAS LHW MA MCDO McRAM MDF MDG MDM-F Mercy Corps MERLIN MHI MISP MNCH MoE MoH MOJAZ Foundation MOSS MRC MRE MSI Muslim Aid MWO NCCR NCHD NDMA NFIs NGO NIDA NRC NRSP NTUF NWHO OCHA OECD OHA OWO OXFAM GB PAI PAIMAN PakRDP Pattan PCRWR PDMA PDO PES PHED Philanthrope PHKNP PI Institute for Peace & Human Development Islamic Relief Pakistan International Rescue Committee International Relief and Development Indus Rural Development Organization Johanniter Unfallhilfe e.V. Just Peace International Khushal Awareness and Development Organization Kalash Environmental Protection Society Khyber Aid Kher Khegara Tanzeem Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (formerly known as the North-West Frontier Province) Kohsar Welfare and Educational Society Kurram Welfare Home Legion Against Adversities of Society lady health workers Muslim Aid Malakand Community Development Organization Multi-cluster Rapid Assessment Mechanism Mamoona Development Foundation Millennium Development Goal Mdecins du Monde-France Mercy Corps Medical Emergency Relief International Muslim Hands International minimum initial service package Maternal and Newborn Child Health Programme Ministry of Education Ministry of Health MOJAZ Foundation Minimum Operating Security Standards Makran Resource Center Mine Risk Education Marie Stopes International Muslim Aid Mohib e Watan Welfare Organization NGOs Coalition on Child Rights National Commission for Human Development National Disaster Management Authority non-food items non-governmental organization National Integrated Development Agency Norwegian Refugee Council National Rural Support Programme National Trade Union Federation New World Hope Organization Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development Organization for Humanitarian Assistance Oriental Women Organization OXFAM GB Partner Aid International PAIMAN Alumni Trust Pakistan Rural Development Programme Pattan Development Organization Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources Provincial Disaster Management Authority Peace and Development Organization (Pakistan) Pakistan Education Society Public Health Engineering Department Philanthrope Pakistani Hoslamand Khawateen Network Plan International 129

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN PIDS PIFERP PIPHRO PLW PNAC PODA PoR PRDP PRDS PRSO PRWSWO PTA PTC RAHBAR RANNA RDO RDP READ Foundation Relief Pakistan RH RHD RI RI RSPN RVO SACHET SARHAD SAWERA SC SCOPE SDF SDO SDTS SDWA SEHER SEPRS SGA SGBV SHARED Shelter Cluster Consortium Shirkat Gah SMC SOCIO SPO SRSO SRSP SSD STEP STI Sungi SUPARCO SYCOP SYWO Sukkur Takhleeq Foundation Taraqee Foundation The NGO World TMA TRDO Trocaire TVO TWG UDO UN UNAIDS UNDAC UNDP Participatory Integrated Development Society Pakistan Initial Floods Emergency Response Plan Pakistan International Peace and Human Rights Organization pregnant and lactating women Pakistan National AIDS Consortium Potohar Organization for development Advocacy Proof of Registration cards Pakistan Rural Development Programme Participatory Rural Development Society Punjab Rural Support Organization Pakistan Rural Workers Social Welfare Organization Parent Teachers Association Parent Teacher Committee Research & Awareness for Human Development Benefits and Rights Realistic Approach to Nature and Nation Awareness Roshni Development Organization Rural Development Project Rural Education and Development Foundation Relief Pakistan reproductive health Rural Health & Development Foundation Relief International Response International Rural Support Programmes Network Reach Vulnerable Society for the Advancement, Community, health, Education and Training Support Agency for Rural & Human Association's Development Society for Appraisal and Women Empowerment in Rural Areas Save the Children Society for Conservation and Protection of Environment Salik Development Foundation State Development Organization Sewa Development Trust Sindh Sahkar Dost Welfare Association Society for Empowering Human Resource Society for Education Promotion and Rural Support Sindh Graduate Association sexual and gender-based violence Society for Humanitarian Assistance Research Empowerment and Development Shelter Cluster Consortium Shirkat Gah School Management Committee Society of Collective Interests Orientation Strengthening Participatory Organization Sindh Rural Support Organization Sarhad Rural Support Programme Society for Sustainable Development Step Towards Empowerment of Pupil sexually transmitted infection Sungi Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission Social Youth Council of Patriots Sindh Youth Welfare Organization Takhleeq Foundation Taraqee Foundation The NGO World Town Municipal Administration Tribal Reforms and Development Organization Trocaire Trust for Voluntary Organizations Technical Working Group UFAQ Development Organization United Nations United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination United Nations Development Programme 130

PAKISTAN REVISED FLOODS RELIEF AND EARLY RECOVERY RESPONSE PLAN UNDSS UNEP UNESCO UNFPA UN-HABITAT UNHAS UNHCR UNICEF UNIFEM UNOPS UXO VHF WASEB WASFD WASH WES WFP WHO WSO WVI WV-P WWOP YMSESDO YPP Zindgi United Nations Department of Safety and Security United Nations Environment Programme United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization United Nations Population Fund United Nations Human Settlements Programme United Nations Humanitarian Air Service United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees United Nations Childrens Fund United Nations Development Fund for Women United Nations Office for Project Services unexploded ordnance very high frequency Welfare Agency for Socio Economic Betterment Women Association Struggle for Development water, sanitation and hygiene water and environmental sanitation United Nations World Food Programme World Health Organization Women Social Organization World Vision International World Vision-Pakistan Women Welfare Organization Poonch Yar Muhammad Samejo Educational Society and Development Organization Youth Parliament of Pakistan Zindgi Welfare Society

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O FFI CE FO R THE C O O RDI N ATI O N O F HUM ANI T ARI AN AF F AI RS (OCHA) UNITED NATIONS NEW YORK, N.Y. 10017 USA PALAIS DES NATIONS 1211 GENEVA 10 SWITZERLAND