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WELCOME! Drum Secrets 2 iPhone and iPad App by Sam Brown VIDEO 1 SIXTEENTHS 101

WELCOME!

Drum Secrets 2

iPhone and iPad App

by Sam Brown

VIDEO 1

SIXTEENTHS 101

Or perhaps I should say “Welcome back” if we have already met in Drum Secrets ‘One’. Whichever way it is, I am delighted to be chatting to you here via these PDFs.

Thank you SO much for spending your hard-earned gig-money on my humble app. However, I humbly believe that if you work through some of the material within these videos, MP3s and PDFs your money will have been well spent. The app’s value for money is largely de- pendant upon the amount of time you invest in exploring the topics here-in. Feel free to just watch the videos and laugh uncontrollably at my bald-patch (for that alone is worth the tiny amount of money that you have spent). However, If you do invest some time working through the material I’m presenting to you, that tiny investment will become the equivalent of having bought some Apple shares twenty years ago! Yes, there is HUGE value here if you dive in with an open, enthusiastic mind and ambition in your heart.

The ‘language’ of 16th notes

Yes, I know it sounds a bit corny, but it really is true: music is a language. Language is a form of communication, and music certainly communicates a great deal - more than can be said with words sometimes. For our language of sixteenth-notes, the ‘alphabet’ would be the ba- sic sounds: bass drum, hi-hat, unaccented snare and accented snare. Our vocabulary is made up from the following combinations of four sixteenth notes:

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

of this vocabulary, in other words. Once you know what each one sounds like you’ll
of this vocabulary, in other words. Once you know what each one sounds like you’ll

of this vocabulary, in other words. Once you know what each one sounds like you’ll be reading rhythms that are way beyond Grade Eight standard.

As a general rule, the more rests you eliminate, the easier the music will be to read. Here is a mind-numbingly simple example:

will be to read. Here is a mind-numbingly simple example: The copyist/computer/whoever who wrote the example
will be to read. Here is a mind-numbingly simple example: The copyist/computer/whoever who wrote the example

The copyist/computer/whoever who wrote the example on the left presumed that the stems for the hi-hat and snare drum should go up, and that the bass drum notes’ stems should go down.This is understandable because they are probably used to writing music for piano, guitar, harp and other ‘polyphonic’ instruments. Sadly, this approach is not very helpful for the reading drummer. You’ll notice those horrible quarter-note rests on beats two and four. If the writer had understood that the tune we are playing here is the bass drum/snare drum pattern and that the hi-hat part is a much less important part of the musical pattern, he would be more likely to write it as per the example on the right.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

This becomes even more obvious when you consider our old friend the sixteenth-note groove. If

This becomes even more obvious when you consider our old friend the sixteenth-note groove. If I religiously follow the rule I have just told you about you’d get this:

follow the rule I have just told you about you’d get this: which looks horrible because

which looks horrible because of the 16th note rests. So why not write it like this:

of the 16th note rests. So why not write it like this: Answer: Because now we’ve

Answer: Because now we’ve got quarter-note rests on beats two and four and we cant ‘see the tune’ because it’s split between stems-up and stems-down. So we have to compromise and run the risk of upsetting some music theorists out there. I believe the easiest way to write this bar is like this:

I believe the easiest way to write this bar is like this: Now we can ‘see

Now we can ‘see the tune’ (because the melody notes are all stem-down) yet we also un- derstand that there is no hi-hat at the same time as the snare drum. The fact that the stem goes up and down for the snare notes is the compromise we make for the sake of being able to read this groove quickly and easily.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Another important way to eliminate rests was hinted at in the video: A long note

Another important way to eliminate rests was hinted at in the video: A long note on a drum is the same as short note followed by a bunch of rests. In other words these two ex- amples are to all intents and purposes the same:

two ex- amples are to all intents and purposes the same: As are these two: By

As are these two:

are to all intents and purposes the same: As are these two: By applying this rule,
are to all intents and purposes the same: As are these two: By applying this rule,
are to all intents and purposes the same: As are these two: By applying this rule,

By applying this rule, we can make certain phrases much easier to read.

Look at this horror:

certain phrases much easier to read. Look at this horror: Let’s apply the rule and see

Let’s apply the rule and see how much clearer it is:

Let’s apply the rule and see how much clearer it is: Yes, ditch the rests and

Yes, ditch the rests and the picture becomes a whole lot easier to read.

Sometimes I see really great drum tutor books rendered almost incomprehensible by the way the music is typeset or copied. Such a shame. Sometimes, if a student is struggling with a new piece they have picked up from the music shop, all I have to do is re-write it. I make sure to get the stems going in the most logical direction and eliminating as many rests as I can. Miraculously, the pupil gets up and running with the new piece in half the time.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Why Read? Well, two huge reasons: 1) Your Education 2) Your Drumming Career Firstly, when

Why Read?

Well, two huge reasons:

1) Your Education

2) Your Drumming Career

Firstly, when you can read, you are able to learn a ton of stuff that you would be very hard pushed to learn without reading. I think the following videos and pages in this app will con- vince you of this. You might, for example, go through all possible combinations of sixteenth

notes whilst playing a displaced paradiddle between your left hand and left foot without using

the reading material here they say.

but I doubt it! This is a way of ‘leaving no stone unturned’, as

There may have already been times when you have wanted to play one rhythmic pattern in one limb whilst playing another pattern somewhere else on the kit, but the mental agility required would be somewhat super-human. Writing a musical challenge like that down is write it too which is extremely useful as you’ll see in the next paragraph.

Secondly, whilst it is totally possible to enjoy a glittering career as a drummer without be- ing able to read, I believe that this inability is in inverse proportion to how lucky you are. In other words, instead of relying on luck to get your career off the ground, stack the odds in sight-reading my way through a gig at London’s famous 100 Club with a fabulous band called Blue Harlem featuring the wonderful singer Imelda May. I had been called as a last-minute dep but suitably impressed the guys and was asked to join the band permanently shortly afterwards. I would never have got that gig without being a good reader. From the connec- tions I have made through that band, I have gone around the world and played for Royalty and Film Stars. It is worth being able to read.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

What Next? In this app I have only got time to present one area of

What Next? In this app I have only got time to present one area of reading to you - ie sixteenth notes. You’ll need to know all about things like compound time-signatures, second endings, codas,

triplets, clefs, articulations

app that learning to read music is not unlike learning a language and is, in many respects,

easier.

Yes

there’s more stuff to learn, but I hope to show you in this

- ing tracks work rather like a teacher, in that you get immediate feedback when you play something ‘wrong’. To expand your reading skills to include other styles and formats you’ll Secrets 3, of course) but at least you can become blisteringly brilliant at reading sixteenth notes with a little help from me.

I should also mention that there is a really useful ‘reading’ section in my ‘Musicians Hypno- sis’ iPhone app.The fact that you can read these words means that your brain already has

a mechanism to turn squiggles of ink on paper into sounds in your mind’s ear. This is the

same way we read music - it’s just different squiggles.The hypnosis helps to strengthen this

link and it also helps to undo the very unhelpful belief that you might have learnt through

a few bitter experiences that “I am crap at reading music”. Once you ditch the belief that really quickly.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Drum Secrets 2 iPhone and iPad App by Sam Brown VIDEO 2 BASS DRUM FUN!

Drum Secrets 2

iPhone and iPad App

by Sam Brown

VIDEO 2

BASS DRUM FUN!

READING IS EASY - I PROMISE!

In this video I show you how you can discover the sound of each of the ‘words in our vocabulary’ by putting them on the bass drum within a sixteenth note groove. I also introduce you to the concept of the ‘Release Bar’ - something I hope you will use forever- more with everything you learn. Possibly you have already been practising this way anyway, which is brilliant.

Some lucky people stumble upon excellent learning strategies and become brilliant almost to continue where the ‘talented’ drummers reached an ‘impasse’. More on this in my podcasts and forthcoming iBook

will help you to mentally divide up a bar into four ‘chunks’ (provided the music is in 4/4 four chunks of four sixteenths is much easier to de-code than one huge chunk of sixteen sixteenth-notes.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Youcanprobablyread thissentenceeventhough therearenospaces betweenthewords gaps after every four words which is the

Youcanprobablyread thissentenceeventhough therearenospaces betweenthewords

gaps after every four words which is the equivalent of the bar lines in a line of music. Your You can do the same with music (once you can recognise the words).

If for any reason you cant recognise the words, you’re in trouble:

Yes, it’s a challenge in Czech (unless you speak Czech, of course). In that example it is little more than guesswork as to where each word begins and ends. With a line of music your brain has to do the same thing ie recognise the ‘chunks’. My humble method in this app will help your brain to do this quite elegantly while you have some musical fun at the same time.

elegantly while you have some musical fun at the same time. ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

) You may remember that this could have been written as a sixteenth followed by

) You may remember that this could have been written as a sixteenth followed by a dotted eighth. It’s quite common to see it this way, which is why I included it in the test.) careful with those two).

and doing something on autopilot (see the ‘Four Levels Of Learning’ bit in Drum Secrets to understand more about this. ) What we need is instant recognition, and the way to speed that up is to take a page of sixteenth-notey music and talk it through.

When you do a ‘talk-through’ of a line of music this is how you would describe what you of the bar. ie:

“The second sixteenth note of beat four” or “The third sixteenth note of beat one”

page or two before playing anything. It makes progress faster and more fun in the long run.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

1) Sixteenth-note one of beat three 2) Sixteenth-note one of beat four 3) Sixteenth-note four

1) Sixteenth-note one of beat three 2) Sixteenth-note one of beat four 3) Sixteenth-note four

1) Sixteenth-note one of beat three 2) Sixteenth-note one of beat four 3) Sixteenth-note four of beat four 4) Sixteenth-note three of beat two 5) Sixteenth-note two of beat one 6) Sixteenth-note four of beat one 7) Sixteenth-note two of beat three 8) Sixteenth-note four of beat three 9) Sixteenth-note one of beat two 10) Sixteenth-note two of beat two

given time.

rules and trust your eyes more than your mind’s ear.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

-------RELEASE--------
-------RELEASE--------

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Drum Secrets 2 iPhone and iPad App by Sam Brown VIDEO 3 THE BACKBEATS OF

Drum Secrets 2

iPhone and iPad App

by Sam Brown

VIDEO 3

THE BACKBEATS OF DOOM!

THE FUN PATH TO AWESOMENESS:

In this video we discover how many combinations of sixteenth-notes we can have on beat two. If we are playing a groove with a ‘backbeat’, there will be a snare walloping away on

The six variations look like this:

a snare walloping away on The six variations look like this: ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Now we have the complete picture: all possible positions for the bass drum within a

Now we have the complete picture: all possible positions for the bass drum within a position of beat two because that’s where the snare ‘backbeat’ is. I am not saying that you NEVER put a bass drum down at the same time as the snare backbeat, but for the purposes of this learning method we’ll leave it out.

I was fortunate enough to be able to study at the prestigious Berklee College of Music and whilst there I worked through the ‘Patterns’ books by Gary Chaffee.The Backbeats of Doom page is my ‘take’ on what I learned from Gary. I strongly recommend checking his books out.

When I worked on this material when I was a student the only accompaniment I used was

a metronome. I was living and breathing drums so I just knuckled down and did the work

because that’s what you did at music college. I returned home to the UK with my degree and started teaching what I had learnt back in the USA. However, I was teaching students who were not in a music college environment and the motivation to practice was very different. I tried teaching them what I had learnt, but they didn’t really get their teeth into it.

It was too dry.

Dullsville. Yawn.

Bor-ing!

That’s when I started developing the backing tracks and the whole method was transformed. Hey, even I started working on the page again because it was so much FUN! My students thought so too and they improved dramatically. I can quote my erstwhile pupil Leo Crabtree, now drummer for The Prodigy, as saying that if it weren’t for the backing tracks he would never have gone the distance with the backbeats page.

It is, I believe, a fantastically powerful combination:The Backbeats of Doom and the MP3 backing tracks and I’ve been using my copy for about twenty years! I have printed the page supply shop or stationers will be able to do this for you too.

So here it is. Just for you:

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP
FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Sometimes jumping straight in with the Backbeats Of Doom page is a little over-ambitious. I’ve

Sometimes jumping straight in with the Backbeats Of Doom page is a little over-ambitious. I’ve given you some guidance on how to nurse yourself into a new ride pattern or sticking

up’ before diving into the page:

ride pattern or sticking up’ before diving into the page: That approach works particularly well when

That approach works particularly well when practising the left-hand-lead routine coming up.

one line (ie all twelve bars - don’t forget that the page is a six-by-twelve table.) Then you have experienced all the coordination that you’ll need. From then on it’s just combinations and you can have fun making it groove with the backing tracks.

there should be a nice bland release bar! Hey, we are all human and it is tempting to ‘rock out’ with this and get carried away. My only caveat here is this: if you aren’t 100% perfect than good. Avoid the temptation to over-play unless you can guarantee perfection.

So what follows now is a short selection of approaches that you can try out with the Backbeats Of Doom.This should get you started, but I really hope that you use your That way you’ll become an original player with a distinctive sound - something you’ll need in order to stand out amongst the millions of brilliant drummers out there!

Ambition, imagination and bravery are three very good qualities to nurture. Go for it!

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Below are some suggested ways to use the Backbeats Of Doom.With the sticking-pattern examples, see

Below are some suggested ways to use the Backbeats Of Doom.With the sticking-pattern examples, see if you can adapt them by reversing the sticking. With the Ride Pattern approach, work on them left-handed too. This might mean changing your kit setup a little - I be a lot better at demonstrating your grooves to a left-handed pupil.

better at demonstrating your grooves to a left-handed pupil. ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter:

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

TO PUSH, OR NOT TO PUSH When you have the last sixteenth-note (ie the fourth

TO PUSH, OR NOT TO PUSH

When you have the last sixteenth-note (ie the fourth one) followed by a rest, it gives you that funky ‘pushed’ feeling:

The scat syllables: “Scoo-by-do-WAH” describe what I mean, in a roughly phonetical way.

WAH ” describe what I mean, in a roughly phonetical way. However, that ‘push’ feeling disappears

However, that ‘push’ feeling disappears as soon as you place a note directly after it:

disappears as soon as you place a note directly after it: That’s more of a:“Du- DUM

That’s more of a:“Du-DUM” kind of sound

if you see what I mean.

I only mention this because the two types of ‘sixteenth-note number 4’ feel very different. One is funky and ‘syncopated’, the other has a much more solid and grounded ‘down-beaty’ feel.After working on the material in this app you’ll recognise the 2 different situations and read accordingly.

Watch out for bar-lines and particularly those instances where the ‘Du-DUM’ is split between two lines.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

When working through the Backbeats Of Doom page, you could choose a release bar which

When working through the Backbeats Of Doom page, you could choose a release bar which has a bass drum on the downbeat:

choose a release bar which has a bass drum on the downbeat: Or you could choose

Or you could choose a release bar with a rest on the downbeat:

you could choose a release bar with a rest on the downbeat: The two ways of

The two ways of playing a release will give a different feel to the groove. Just so as you know

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Drum Secrets 2 iPhone and iPad App by Sam Brown VIDEO 4 THE NIGHTMARE BAR!

Drum Secrets 2

iPhone and iPad App

by Sam Brown

VIDEO 4

THE NIGHTMARE BAR!

THE BITTER PILL WORTH SWALLOWING:

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

“Get those bass-drum/left-hand unisons really together and squeeky-clean” not nearly enough will ©Sam Brown Music

“Get those bass-drum/left-hand unisons really together and squeeky-clean” not nearly enough

will

together and squeeky-clean” not nearly enough will ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter:

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Drum Secrets 2 iPhone and iPad App by Sam Brown VIDEO 5 THE DRUM-GODS JUST

Drum Secrets 2

iPhone and iPad App

by Sam Brown

VIDEO 5

THE DRUM-GODS JUST MADE ME FUNKY!

SOME GROOVY SUGGESTIONS:

Below are some suggested ways to use the Backbeats Of Doom.With the ‘sticking-pattern’ examples, see if you can adapt them by reversing the sticking. With the ‘Ride Pattern’ approach, work on them left-handed too. This might mean changing your kit setup a little - I be a lot better at demonstrating your grooves to a left-handed pupil.

With all of these examples, for the sake of clarity, I have not written in the left foot part. More on that later

I have not written in the left foot part. More on that later ©Sam Brown Music

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

his funky guitar to my backing tracks. Rather than bury his credit in the small-print
his funky guitar to my backing tracks. Rather than bury his credit in the small-print

his funky guitar to my backing tracks. Rather than bury his credit in the small-print at the made such a difference and has added life to what would otherwise be a very sterile bit of

THE LEFT FOOT

When you move your right hand up to the ride cymbal (or cow-bell, x-hat, wood-block etc for you to try out.

see how the feet interact with each other. Once those three limbs are secure, then add the

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

The obvious choices are quarter-notes in the left foot, eighth-notes in the left foot and

The obvious choices are quarter-notes in the left foot, eighth-notes in the left foot and the ‘up beats’ in the left foot.

in the left foot and the ‘up beats’ in the left foot. When you get really

When you get really ambitious it is possible to play much more elaborate rhythms such as to play cow bells and even cabassas with the left foot - that opens up a whole world of

DYNAMICS MAKE YOU FUNKY

Towards the end of the video I talk about the issue of dynamics. I cannot over-emphasise the importance of getting as wide a range of dynamics as possible within the groove. The unaccented snare notes of a sticking pattern need to be whisper-quiet and the backbeat needs to be a full-in-the-face rimshot accent. By learning to control your drumming to the extreme ends of the scale, you’ll then have the control to play anywhere within that spectrum of sound. It is vital to know, and be able to play, where the ends of the scale are.

Here is a game you can play which teaches you a great deal of dynamic control. Play quarter- note unisons between two limbs - let’s take right hand and right foot as an example. Play

- let’s take right hand and right foot as an example. Play It is quite tricky

It is quite tricky to keep the unisons really tight, and is especially challenging when you use However, it is a very powerful learning tool as well as being a good test of your dynamic control abilities.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Drum Secrets 2 iPhone and iPad App by Sam Brown VIDEO 6 LINEAR DRUMMING MADE

Drum Secrets 2

iPhone and iPad App

by Sam Brown

VIDEO 6

LINEAR DRUMMING MADE EASY

AN INTRO TO LINEAR DRUMMING

I seem to be using the phrase “Linear drumming is the funkiest thing you can do with a bar of sixteenth-notes” rather too much in this app. However, I do believe that to be the case.

Using the ‘John Bonham Triplet’ routine as the opening wedge into this technique is a great introduction to both Linear Drumming and indeed to Polyrhythms.The idea of playing groups of three, but phrasing them in groups of four scrambles the listener’s brain and creates a very pleasant state of mild musical confusion.This state of confusion creates tension, and we resolve the tension by bringing out the backbeat as demonstrated.The result? Funkiness.

As with previous examples, dynamics are key here. Go for extremes: very quiet and very loud. It’s that contrast in volumes that makes this work so well. Here’s what the lick looks like:

makes this work so well. Here’s what the lick looks like: the bass drum notes and

the bass drum notes and the snare backbeat combine which creates the ‘tune’. More on this ‘tune’ thing in the next video.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

That lick is only the start of a huge topic. It is almost overwhelming when

That lick is only the start of a huge topic. It is almost overwhelming when by linking it in with the Backbeats of Doom backing tracks.

As I mentioned on the video, I have created the Linear Backbeats Of Doom page for you. Print it out, laminate it in plastic if you like, and it will be your friend for many many years. However, although the framework of bass drum notes and the backbeat are exactly the

You could, if you wanted to, write out your own version of this page by choosing your own wanted to get creative and produce your own page:

own wanted to get creative and produce your own page: You’ll notice that the bass drum

You’ll notice that the bass drum and the accented snare backbeat are the same for all four

Now at this point I have a confession to make. When I do the demonstration of the Linear

Backbeats Of Doom I merrily say how easy it is to play a paradiddle as your release bar. I then proceed to play something different! It seems that the release bar that I was putting in

was, more often than not, this: R L R R

L L R L.

Now in a way I am glad I made that mistake because it proves that when I was playing beats 3 and 4 I was truly relaxing my brain and playing on autopilot. This is exactly what you are supposed to do in a release bar, so in a way I have proved my point. Anyway, I wasn’t going

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Drum Secrets 2 iPhone and iPad App by Sam Brown VIDEO 7 LINEAR DRUMMING GOES

Drum Secrets 2

iPhone and iPad App

by Sam Brown

VIDEO 7

LINEAR DRUMMING GOES BONKERS!

FOUR HUNDRED MILLION GROOVES! (nearly)

Yes, its true.Take four sixteenth-notes, distribute them between bass drum, hi-hat, accented snare and unaccented snare and you’ll get about a hundred and forty usable chunks of music. (The un-usable ones are the ones with three-in-a-row or more so I disregarded them). Multiply 140 by 140 four times and you get 3,841,6000.That’s a lot of grooves!

Please excuse my blatant advertising for my Drum Linear iPhone App in this video, but I think you would have some fun with it and also learn some hot grooves in the process. The secret to linear drumming is to do lots and lots of grooves, not just learn a dozen or so patterns and end there.The idea is that you should be able to weave any pattern you wish around the kit and in order to do that you need to have a large database of linear experience under your belt. The Drum Linear app helps you to build that linear repertoire in a fun and musical way.

As explained, you have to extract the ‘tune’ that is hidden in that bar of sixteenths. After a while you’ll get pretty adept at doing this and you’ll be milking the music from the bars in no time. When I recorded the demo of me playing with no dynamics and then playing the same pattern with dynamics, I was amazed at the difference. I have demonstrated that routine to my students in their lessons, but never actually heard myself doing it! It is a very powerful demonstration of the importance of dynamics.

Here’s the bar that the Drum Linear App came up with for me:

the bar that the Drum Linear App came up with for me: ©Sam Brown Music 2012

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

LINEAR LEARNING STRATEGIES: Here I go a little deeper into the subject of ‘release bars’.

LINEAR LEARNING STRATEGIES:

Here I go a little deeper into the subject of ‘release bars’. If they enable you to loop an exercise and play a continuous stream of music then you’ll probably be enjoying your practice session much more. There is nothing worse than trying to play something with supreme effort and failing! It is much better to play with little effort and to SUCCEED!

‘Scuse me whilst I tweet those last two sentences

There. Done!

The law of reversed effort sometimes works wonders. Yes, there are times when you really have to stretch yourself, but I think the 80-20 principle applies here. In other words: use ‘stealth learning’ for 80% of your practice time and really ‘burn’ for the remaining 20%. With ‘stealth learning’ you are making the task as easy as possible by taking very small steps forward. There should be no sweat when you are practising this way. Using release bars is a great example of stealth learning, and so is playing an exercise really, really slowly.

In the video I demonstrate a good practice routine using the release-bar method.The graphic on the screen tells you what my brain is doing as I play. I’ve compressed the practice-session into about 90 seconds for the video - you should take considerably longer when you use this routine.

The main thing is to notice how calm you can remain when you work this way. If your degree of calmness is in proportion to the speed at which you are playing, see how much calmer you feel when you slow down. Often I’ll ask a student this question: “How relaxed will you feel when you can play this brilliantly?” Then I’ll go on to ask them to ‘pretend to be that relaxed NOW’ and see how much better they play. (Also, for those of you with any knowledge of NLP, you’ll notice the embedded command there:“you can play this brilliantly”. Haha! Sneaky stuff!)

Anyway, getting to the top by climbing the cliff face is almost impossible - go ‘round the back and walk gently up the slope. Metaphors - don’t you just love ‘em.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

MORE LINEAR FUN: Here’s an idea which I simply didn’t have time to put on

MORE LINEAR FUN:

Here’s an idea which I simply didn’t have time to put on the video. It’s seriously cool! You’ll love it.

The idea is to choose a linear groove which doesn’t contain too many double strokes and to but with the embellishments:

The dynamics still apply though, so keep the 32nd note doubles really quiet.

apply though, so keep the 32nd note doubles really quiet. pretend they are eighth-note triplets! Ignore

pretend they are eighth-note triplets! Ignore the last four notes (the greyed out ones in the example below). Now you have some cool jazz patterns. OMG, I have just opened up a can

of very wriggly worms with that idea

I feel another app design coming on!

worms with that idea I feel another app design coming on! ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Drum Secrets 2 iPhone and iPad App by Sam Brown VIDEO 8 DISPLACED STICKINGS WHEN

Drum Secrets 2

iPhone and iPad App

by Sam Brown

VIDEO 8

DISPLACED STICKINGS

WHEN IS A PARADIDDLE NOT A PARADIDDLE?

The answer is, of course ‘when it is not a paradiddle’. In other words, even if we move the sticking around, it is still that cherished pattern of RLRR LRLL. However, this video should show you that there’s lots to explore in that hallowed rudiment and some hidden gems to be found too.

This video is all about displacing a sticking pattern and, for familiarity’s sake, I’ve chosen the paradiddle as our starting point. The routine I do at the beginning is something like this:

The routine I do at the beginning is something like this: Actually, the very last displacement

Actually, the very last displacement is slightly different from what I describe in the video. I actually start the paradiddle on the second sixteenth-note of the bar. This way it makes for a nice little four bar routine that’s worth learning.

I remember seeing a drum clinic on TV (ahh, those were the days when they put interesting stuff on the telly) featuring the great Billy Cobham and I remember him doing a similar

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

routine. “Very clever” I thought. I tried doing it and soon discovered that it was

routine. “Very clever” I thought. I tried doing it and soon discovered that it was more fun to

However, many many years later, after playing with paradiddles in a far less ‘exercise-y’ and much more musical way, I discovered that I could (pretty much) do the routine that Billy had

What had happened? Well, I think I learned that I learnt best when I was having fun. As journey, I had managed to frame learning paradiddle stickings as being fun. I hope to take that concept and show you how to make things fun for you too.

So now we dive into the application of some displaced stickings. This will lift them from the bottom of the ‘stuff I should do but cant be arsed’ list, to the top of the ‘lemme at it! I HAVE to learn to do that’

Here’s some of the fun that I demonstrate on the video. Firstly, one bar of plain vanilla- note is hi-hat and bass-drum together in unison. However, the hi-hat in that example can be left out leaving just the bass drum playing on the very last note. It is a little more comfortable, I think.Try both ways of playing it.

more comfortable, I think.Try both ways of playing it. ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter:

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

The next thing to do is to condense the two bar phrase into one bar:

The next thing to do is to condense the two bar phrase into one bar: half a bar of plain paradiddle followed by half a bar displaced:

a bar of plain paradiddle followed by half a bar displaced: ONLY THE BEGINNING Well, we

ONLY THE BEGINNING

Well, we have certainly given the humble paradiddle a bit of a shake-up, but do remember that it’s the principle of displacing stickings that you are learning here - not just a party-trick with a paradiddle. I hope you’ll start exploring paradiddle-diddles and double paradiddles the

If you have seen Drum Secrets 1 , you’ll know that sticking patterns exist for a musical reason and are simply combinations of single and double strokes. Invent your own stickings and then have fun displacing them and see what you get. I certainly didn’t discover the cool grooves you have heard in this app until I got pencil and paper out and started moving the notes about. Engage imagination, and off you go

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Drum Secrets 2 iPhone and iPad App by Sam Brown VIDEO 9 LETS GO HORIZONTAL!

Drum Secrets 2

iPhone and iPad App

by Sam Brown

VIDEO 9

LETS GO HORIZONTAL!

SPEAKING THE LANGUAGE

Yes, by now you’ll have grasped the ‘big picture’ that I’m painting with this app. Some extremely complex music grows from the roots of some essentially simple things: our without reference to a grid of hi-hat notes is a slightly different process for our brains to comes relatively easily.

I often explain to a pupil that when you read vertically you are relating each note to that

- the ‘important information’ our mind’s ear!

read it you can also write it! Now, I can hear you protesting that you have no ambition to write music, but consider the following scenario:

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

than the guys in the band! I can say with cast-iron certainty that “It is

than the guys in the band! I can say with cast-iron certainty that “It is a double chorus after the sax solo, then the bridge, then the third verse”.

What I suggest is that you do is err on the side of caution and get your reading and theory ‘chops’ together - just to be on the safe side. My own career took a dramatic turn thanks to one pivotal gig. I was called for a last-minute ‘dep’ job with a great swing/blues band called Blue Harlem featuring the wonderful singer Imelda May at London’s famous 100 Club in Oxford Street. With no rehearsal I went in and sight-read my way through two sets of charts. I did a band. I’m still with them now. Had it not been for that evening’s sight-reading challenge the past ten years would have turned out very differently. That band has taken me around the world and to some amazing places, Buckingham Palace was a particular highlight, and I have got to play with some fantastic musicians too.

My point is that although you’ll probably not need to read on every gig, occasionally it can come in very useful career-wise! There’s a plethora of good

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

teachers, study aids, iPhone apps and more out there which make learning this stuff easy

teachers, study aids, iPhone apps and more out there which make learning this stuff easy and fun. Go for it - ‘doors’ open if you are a good reader.

If you can read these words then there is a neural network already in your brain which can convert squiggles of ink on paper (or screen) into sounds in your head. You ‘say’ the words in your mind’s ear as you read. Reading music is exactly the same mental process only using a different set of squiggles. It is also different in that you don’t use your vocal chords to produce the sounds unless you are a singer. No, you’ll be blowing, scraping, or thumping to get the sounds out instead.

Anyway, if you were a bit ‘iffy’ about reading then I hope that has encouraged you to

HORIZONTAL READING FOR DRUMMIES

vocabulary. You can choose to read the ‘melody’ with any limb, but the way I demonstrate which ultimately you’ll be able to play on auto-pilot and I’ll suggest some melody/ostinato

play on auto-pilot and I’ll suggest some melody/ostinato ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter:

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

HORIZONTAL READING FOR DRUMMIES FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP ©Sam Brown Music

HORIZONTAL READING

FOR DRUMMIES

FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP

FOR DRUMMIES FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter:

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

HORIZONTAL READING FOR DRUMMIES P2 FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP
HORIZONTAL READING
FOR
DRUMMIES P2
FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Drum Secrets 2 iPhone and iPad App by Sam Brown VIDEO 10 SAM GOES BONKERS!

Drum Secrets 2

iPhone and iPad App

by Sam Brown

VIDEO 10

SAM GOES BONKERS!

JUST THE BEGINNING

Yes, you’ve probably got the idea now that this app is just the beginning for you. Using the tools I’ve shared with you, you’ll be able to forge your own path and develop your own style and identity as a musician.

to think. “What would it be like if I played such-and-such left handed” or “I like this bar - how can I develop it into something really special?”

I can also introduce you to another page of melodies in this lesson: the ‘Horizontal Reading From Hell’ page. Here I have included some polyrhythmic reading which is way beyond Grade Eight reading, yet if you work through the Backbeats of Doom and the Horizontal Reading For Drummies you’ll be reading this stuff with ease.

When you set up a new ostinato for use with either of the two Horizontal Reading pages, it’s a good idea to work on the ‘required skills’ list which I mention in the video. Depending upon the kind of exercise you have designed for yourself, the list will be slightly different. For instance in the video I leave the feet doing a really strange pattern: the bass drum is on sixteenth-notes 2 and 4. Therefore both hands are free so my ‘required skills’ list would be a bunch of ‘two-limbed’ patterns. For instance:

Singles, Doubles, Displaced Doubles, Paradiddles, Polyrhythms.

Here’s what they look like:

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Then the fun really starts. Yes, it’s time for some Polyrhythms! We have met a
Then the fun really starts. Yes, it’s time for some Polyrhythms! We have met a

Then the fun really starts. Yes, it’s time for some Polyrhythms!

We have met a polyrhythm already in video number six. We started our exploration of linear drumming by playing little chunks of three notes, even though the music was blatantly constructed in groups of four. The poor listener’s brain doesn’t know which way to think:

“Do I latch onto the ‘3’ phrase or the ‘4’ phrase?” and it’s this confusion which makes it sound so interesting (read: ‘funky’) to us.

The way I approached the ‘3’ polyrhythm in this example is to play a simple R L L sticking and loop it around. Unfortunately, because the sticking is totally out of phase with the sixteenth notes in the bar, we have to do THREE WHOLE BARS of this polyrhythm before we wind up with R L L at the beginning of the bar again. Sorry, that’s just the way it works. resolve etc etc. Here’s the ‘3’ polyrhythm written out so you can see what’s going on:

polyrhythm written out so you can see what’s going on: ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter:

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

It is also very common to phrase the ‘3’ polyrhythm R R L. I didn’t

It is also very common to phrase the ‘3’ polyrhythm R R L. I didn’t include this in the demo on the video, but you should try it out anyway:

in the demo on the video, but you should try it out anyway: Next we meet

Next we meet the ‘5’ polyrhythm.Yummy, this is really useful - well worth learning! This

mind’s ear to know where you are in the bar. Very helpful.) A Polyrhythm like this creates

a lot of tension in the music so don’t feel that you have

The audience loves polyrhythms, but only when you RESOLVE THE TENSION with a big, fat, friendly downbeat at the end.The release of musical tension FEELS GREAT!

at the end.The release of musical tension FEELS GREAT! The next polyrhythm is the group of

The next polyrhythm is the group of seven.The sticking I’m using in the demo is:

R L R L R L L and it resolves after seven bars. Useful for confusing the dancers on the dance

If you can play these polyrhythms whilst playing the ostinato at the same time then I reckon

you are pretty comfortable with the coordination. I took the liberty of doing a little solo for

you on the video here. I’m not fond of self-indulgent chop-fests when I teach, but I thought you should at least see where this approach has led me. Now you can have some fun and lot easier having been through the preliminary exercises from the list. You can read with imagination to create your own approach. After working this way for a while you’ll have great fun next time you read a Tower Of Power drum chart or need to play a blistering solo. It’s a great skill to have.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

choose an ostinato which leaves only one limb free, then your required skills list would

choose an ostinato which leaves only one limb free, then your required skills list would be a little different. We touched on this way of learning in Drum Secrets 1 when we explored the Samba groove as part of our bass drum doubles lesson. We had two basic skills to master: melody notes on the down-beats and melody notes on the up-beats.

If you understand the metaphor of the guy restoring bike engines by making sure each component was in perfect condition, you’ll approach the Horizontal Reading pages in the you need. In the example on the video there were two fundamental skills: 1 ) melody notes in unison with the right hand and 2) melody notes in unison with the bass drum. Therefore, before trying to read anything at all, I made sure those skills were comfortable. Here’s what those exercises look like:

were comfortable. Here’s what those exercises look like: ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter:

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

Finally we need to get to grips with the Polyrhythms. These guys are very simple

Finally we need to get to grips with the Polyrhythms. These guys are very simple patterns really, its just a shame that they look so terrifying when they are written down! Sorry about that. I hope that when you start playing them you’ll hear the repetitiveness of the phrase and play them by ear to start with.

of the phrase and play them by ear to start with. So here are the Horizontal

of the phrase and play them by ear to start with. So here are the Horizontal

So here are the Horizontal Reading From Hell reading pages. Sometimes I have used ‘ties’ to join notes together even though we have no way of sustaining the sound of a single hit on a percussion instrument. Although it is usually helpful to eliminate rests when writing a groove (see lesson 1) when reading horizontally it is good to have the same note values as the rest of the band (or in this case the brass section). When writing drum parts, common sense should prevail at all times.

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic
FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP

FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic
FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP

FOR USE WITH DRUM SECRETS 2 IPHONE/IPAD APP ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic

A FINAL GOODBYE AND SOME CREDITS WHERE DUE: Time to wrap it up now. Ahhh.

A FINAL GOODBYE AND SOME CREDITS WHERE DUE:

Time to wrap it up now. Ahhh.

Thank you for purchasing this humble collection of drummy material. I hope you have found things that will take your drumming forward in whatever direction you wish. Thank you for baring with me on the slightly heavy reading material - I had to cover all the theory so that stuff towards the end of the app. I hope you’ll forgive me if some of the material was stuff you already knew.

Thank you too for allowing me to be ever so slightly cheeky in asking for you to review the app in the app store. I’m a struggling musician too and the apps help keep my head above where they count :-)

Big thanks to Jerry Crozier-Cole for his wonderful guitar work on the backing tracks - it has ‘App-land’ and to Ted Nash of Venevi.com for his expert support and guidance in the early session, well done gal!

Special thanks to Lynne for supporting me and my creative urges. It’ll all be worthwhile, I promise!

Please follow me on Twitter @sambrownmusic and Facebook: samthedrums.

Happy drumming!

@sambrownmusic and Facebook: samthedrums. Happy drumming! ©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter:

©Sam Brown Music 2012 www.drumsecrets.com Twitter: @sambrownmusic