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BHAGWAN PARSHURAM INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

(PSP -4, Sector-17, (Opp. Sector-11), Rohini, Delhi-110085)

Minor Project Synopsis


Wireless Integrated Network Sensors (WINS) (Networking)

Project guide: Mr. C.M. Sharma

Submitted by: Happy, 121 Quamar Shamshad, 123 Gaurav Nayyar, 129

Minor Project synopsis

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Background
In early 1980 The University of California at Los Angeles, often working in collaboration with the Rockwell Science Centre, has had a Wireless Integrated Network Sensors (WINS) project since 1993. Wireless Integrated Network Sensors (WINS) combine sensing, signal processing, decision capability, and wireless networking capability in a compact, low power system. Compact geometry and low cost allows WINS to be embedded and distributed at a small fraction of the cost of conventional wire line sensor and actuator systems. On a local, wide-area scale, battlefield situational awareness will provide personnel health monitoring and enhance security and efficiency. Also, on a metropolitan scale, new traffic, security, emergency, and disaster recovery services will be enabled by WINS. On a local, enterprise scale, WINS will create a manufacturing information service for cost and quality control. The opportunities for WINS depend on the development of scalable, low cost, sensor network architecture. This requires that sensor information be conveyed to the user at low bit rate with low power transceivers. Continuous sensor signal processing must be provided to enable constant monitoring of events in an environment. Distributed signal processing and decision making enable events to be identified at the remote sensor .Thus, information in the form of decisions is conveyed in short message packets. Future applications of distributed embedded processors and sensors will require massive numbers of devices. In this paper we have concentrated in the most important application, Border Security

Aim/Objective
Wireless Integrated Network Sensors (WINS) combine sensing, signal processing, decision capability, and wireless networking capability in a compact, low power system. Wireless Integrated Network Sensors (WINS) provide a new monitoring and control capability for monitoring the borders of the country. WINS require a Microwatt of power and it is very cheaper when compared to other security systems such as RADAR and produce less amount of delay to detect the target. By using WINS we can monitor on the borders and detect the firing on the border and any other suspected moment and find the direction and what kind of weapon is used in firing after find the direction automatic weapons will be turn to that
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particular direction and firing on that particular direction and end the suspect easily by just single click. Our Team traversed through some couple of research papers and analyzed that on a local wide-area scale, battlefield situational awareness will provide personnel health monitoring and enhance security and efficiency. It provided to enable constant monitoring of events in an environment and decision making enable events to be identified at the remote sensor.

Proposed Model
Wireless Integrated Network Sensors (WINS) now provide a new monitoring and control capability for monitoring the borders of the country Also, on a metropolitan scale, new traffic, security, emergency, and disaster recovery services and on a national scale, transportation systems, and borders will be monitored for efficiency, safety, and security will be enabled by WINS. For implement the WINS we use these:1. WINS node 2. WINS micro sensors 3. Routing between nodes 4. Shortest distance algorithm 5. WINS digital signal processing 6. PSD comparison 7. WINS micro power embedded radio Some other benefits of WINS are following:1. Densely distributed sensor networks 2. Application specific networking architectures 3. The network is self-monitoring and secure 4. It can accommodate new devices at any time 5. Its flexible to go through physical partitions 6. It can be accessed through a centralized monitor

References:1) Wireless Integrated Network Sensors: Low Power Systems on a Chip G. Asada, M. Dong, T. S. Lin, F. Newberg, G. Pottie, W. J. Kaiser, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California kaiser@ee.ucla.edu and H. O. Marcy Rockwell Science Center, Thousand Oaks, California 2) Wireless sensor networks: a survey I.F. Akyildiz, W. Su*, Y. Sankarasubramaniam, E. Cayirci Broadband and Wireless Networking Laboratory, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA Received 12 December 2001; accepted 20 December 2001

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